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Apple iBook 2001

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5 Reviews

This iBook weighs 4.9 pounds — almost 2 pounds lighter than before. You’ll also note that this iBook is smaller: just 11.2 inches wide, 9.1 inches deep and 1.35 inches thick. With iMovie, iTunes and iTools, the new iBook is designed to work with your digital tools and toys.
Turbocharged with a 500MHz PowerPC G3 processor and 256K on-chip cache running at full processor speed, the new iBook packs a punch. And it ships with the ATI RAGE Mobility 128 graphics accelerator with 8MB of SDRAM and AGP 2X support.

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      26.07.2003 05:58
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      Apple Ibook-2003 model . At present the Apple ibook comes in two main configurations namely : 1) 900 mhz G3 processor 14.1? TXT XGA LCD DVD / CR-rw Combo drive 40 gig Ultra ATA Hard drive 256 meg RAM ( price £1000.00 incl. VAT ) 2) 800 mhz G3 processor 12.1? TXT XGALCD CD drive 30 gig Ultra ATA Hard drive 128 meg RAM ( price £800.00 incl. VAT ) Both variations share the following charcteristics : ATA Mobility Radeon 7500 graphics card with 32 mb VRAM / 56k internal modem / 2 * USB (12 Mbps )/ 10/100 Base-T Ethernet / 4000bps ( 5eee 1394 ) Firewire / Video Out / Audio out ports . 512 L2 cache / built-in battery level indicator / Kensington security slot . Weight approx. 4.9lb ( 2.2 kg ) . Ram can be upgraded to 640 meg , and an AirPort can be added for infra-red wireless networking . ~ Looks ~ A white polycarbonate case , internally fortified with magnesium for strength , this laptop oozes charm . The lid has the Apple logo which is illuminated when the beast is turned on . Underneath is the battery level indicator , which illuminates when a small button is pressed . The left hand edge holds the main connectivity ports , when the right hand side provides the drive bay and power socket . The front edge provides the lid release and also hidden lcd , which pulses if the machine is left on and the lid closed - nice touch that . Open the lid , and the translucent keyboard is most striking , and a joy to use . Above the keyboard you find the power-on button and two speakers . ~ Software ~ The main operating OS is OS X , which is a unix based operating system . However in keeping with previous OS releases , much of the tradition OS views are there to be found . As OS X is unix based and therefore totally non compatible with previous OS releases , Apply also include OS 9.2 , which automatically load
      s should non compatible software be loaded . This runs in its own enviroment , and in practice has been found to be very stable , as is OS X . Also supplied is the latest release of Appleworkks ( v 6.2.5 ) , which is similar in function to Microsoft works , only much more user friendly and powerful . Then you have the iLife suite , comprising of iT unes , iMovie and iPhoto , that make editing of images / movies and music a thing of simplicity . Then you have iCal ( calendar ) , iChat ( real time online chat using AIM ) and Sherlock , which just has to be one of the best search engines available today . Next you have Internet Explorer 5.2 for Mac , Outlook Express and Mail ( Apples Outlook Express replacement ) . NOTE : Microsoft have recently announced that they are no longer to support the Macintosh format , and so the current versions of IE and OE will be the last . While doing this ,however , they will still continue to update MS Office for Mac ( ! ) . This should not be of concern though , as Mail is preferred over OE and there is always Netscape Navigator and Apple?s own forray into the web surfing , namely Safari . Furthernore you also get three games ( GNU chess , Deimos Rising and Otto Matic ) , and Worldbook . ~ In Use ~ The display is crisp and superbly clear . Brightness is controlled via F1 and F2 keys . Sound is crisp and clear albeit a little quiet . Again control is via key use , name F3,F4 and F5 keys . When using these control keys , the relevant icon appears in ghost format above current application , and disappears just as quick . When using OS X , you also see on screen the ?Dock? which is fully animated and works in a similar manner to Windows Start Menu , as well as the usual Application menu , synomimous with the Apple GUI . The supplied software is easy to use , even without previous experience , a thing that Apple have always prided themselves on . Should you encounter a
      ny problems the Help menu is a comprhensive and useful . Nice features on the desktop include battery level supplied in icon and % formats , speker volume level and modem icon , that when in use provides spent on-line time . I particularly like iTunes which makes copying your CD collection onto hard disk simplicity , so you always have your musical likes to hand . As I said before , the speaker volume is not too high , but this is usual with most laptops . However using external speakers or headphones really brings out the quality of playback . ~ Processor speed ~ Prospective buyers should not be put off by the low speed rating of these computers , especially compared to PC models who often have speed ratings in excess of 2ghtz , as Apple computers use the range of power processors manufactered / designed by Apple / IBM / Motorola , which use a totally different archtecture to Intel / AMD processors , but are on a par with there counterparts . ~ Battery Life ~ The iBook comes with a Li-Ion battery , which when used conservatively and in conjunction the usual enrgy saving features eg, screen dimming after x.x minutes inactivity , can supposidly last for up to five hours . In practice I have achieved in excess of 3.5 hours continuous usage without the need to recharge , which isn?t bad . Re-charging from empty takes approx 1 hour. Additional batteries can be purchased at a cost of around £90.00 . ~ Built-in fan ~ All computers have built-in cooling fans . In use it has to be said that your lap will get quite warm , yet in four weeks of use , only once has the fan come into operation , and that was approaching the 3.5 hours of use mark . While the noise of the fan was noticable , it was not overly loud , but was powerful enough to feel the cooling air from the rear air vents . ~ Disappointments ~ I have the lower spec. 800 mhz / cd version . What would have been nice is th
      e inclusion of a CD-r as standard . Similarly , the higher spec. model could also have included a DVD-R/ CD-r combo drive as standard. Such drives are becomming commonplace in the PC laptop market , and could influence future buyers , given the similar costs of Apple / PC laptops . The cost between the two detailed models ( £200.00 ) , seems a little steep , when you only get an extra 10 gig hard disk space , 100 mghz processor increase and upgrade to DVD / CD-rw Okay , you can buy external devices , but it the additional cost may be off putting ( probably dearer than buying the higher spec. model ) , and having built-in burning software and no way of making use of it is a huge disappointment . ~ Preferences ~ Having used both Apple and PC laptops , I do prefer the Apple in use . The software tends to be of better quality and easier to use , and build quality is superb . The downside in use however is the amount of software available , however all the big names are available eg. Photoshop , MS Office , etc. etc. , and file sharing isn?t a major problem . additionally most high profile games do get ported to the Apple platform , although it does take a while for it to arrive . Not being a huge game player , nor needing high PC compatibilty , I find the Apple all that I need . Well worth a look , but if you can afford the additional cost , go for the higher spec model . Thanks for the read.

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        06.02.2003 06:47
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        My iBook has been my constant companion for the last 3 months, couldn't function without it now. As well as my work desk, it's my calendar, my photo album, my cinema and my juke box. I don't think it has the visual impact of some other Apple products, but it's neater and tidier-looking than most laptops and the screen is just big enough for most purposes. It's virtually silent too. Working in a Windows environment isn't a problem - files transfer easily by ethernet (MS Office is essential for this) and although the games selection is small they run smoothly enough. Best of all are OSX and the iApps - each is a cinch to use, stylish and totally reliable - and free! They also integrate beautifully. The operating system is comparitively stable but unlike some users I have experienced the odd crash, perhaps because I'm easily tempted by non-Apple applications & demos.

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          05.03.2002 22:28
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          Okay lets get a few things straight. I bought this computer as I was told it was the best laptop for editing films. This was very useful for my university degree. It is great for that type of thing. With my video camera plugged in (The cable i had to buy seperately costing £20) You have a very good drag and drop editing system, therefore you can make beautifully edited films. I was however not aware that Macintosh machines can't play PC games,they can only play Macintosh's own games which meant all my old PC games did not work, maybe this is a good thing because now i can work instead of playing games all day! There is no windows, as well as many other faults. This causes a lot of problems. I'm not denying that Mac OS is not good but when one can't open simple .doc or .exe files, i don't consider that great. No Microsoft office. I have Apple works I can't even open normal .doc files and i don't even have a floppy disk drive (Thats another £50). The only way i can get information from one computer to another is by copying and pasting it onto an email. This i find very frustrating. I have a problem with certain websites as not all the websites are macintosh compatible such as MSN chat for example. I have had to download a fair amount of prgrams which would come complete with a windows computer. Therefore it takes up a lot of hard drive space. As far as the specs of the computer go, well, its average speed reasonably reliable and looks fantastic. I guess its just not the computer for me. One might say its good that Macintosh have not given into the Microsoft conglomerate, but since nearly everything computer based has something to do with Microsoft it makes things very awkward and frustrating. I really would not recommend to anyone who just wants a plain computer. You can get computers which are as capable, if not better for less money.

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            28.12.2001 19:32
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            I read the early reviews. I saw the adverts on TV. I researched on the internet for as long as I could every day for a month, hunting down the best deal and the best configuration for me. Then I managed to convince my dad to buy one for me. I'm still not exactly sure how that last part happened, and I'm equally unsure if he knows either, something about going to University next year and needing something more portable than my desktop. Anyway, I finally ordered my iBook from The Apple Store, www.apple.com/uk/thestore as I'm not luck enough to have a bricks-and-mortar Apple Store near my home town and it wasn't any cheaper anywhere else on the net. I also figured that buying it direct from Apple would give me the best quality of service and give me better technical support in the future. The Apple Store offers you to customise your purchase, such as adding larger hard drives (as I did) or more memory. If you just want a standard model and want it quickly then shop around. Third party dealers may now be able to offer lower prices that Apple Stores. The model which I ordered was the 600MHz, DVD-ROM, 128MB SDRAM, 20GB HD - £1,132.76 + VAT. I also ordered Microsoft Office and the Apple Pro Mouse, a groovy optical mouse with great features such as user-adjustable click tension and no buttons (not as we know them anyway). The body of the mouse pivots to act as a button, but that's another review. Back to the iBook. The ordering process was very simple and straight forward. When you send items to your shopping basket Apple gives you an estimated build time for each item. This feature is very useful as it you can see how long it is likely to take for your order to be built and arrive. The build time for my order was 25 working days, it would have been 7 days except Microsoft Office was in hot demand and was likely to take a while to be available. Very quickly after the order I was sent a confirmation of my order by email
            and I was also able to check the progress of my order online, from being reviewed to built and shipped. I would check the progress of my order online every day from placing the order. I was very surprised to see that Apple had kept to their goals, of shipping all products within 14 days of order where is reasonably possible. I had expected my order to take the full 25 working days, but when I checked after only 14 I was delighted. Being the Christmas season, the order did take 8 days to arrive after it was shipped, but it came within the 25 working days which I had been quoted. When the iBook arrived I was very pleased with its appearance, which was the first thing I noticed. It's small and beautifully designed body was simple, great for someone who loves minimalist design, and the white plastic made it stand out from the hordes of grey and black notebooks. The iBook had certainly changed from the previously colourful, clam-shaped style. The sleek new iBook looked like a younger brother to the titanium PowerBook G4. The iBook was thin, especially the screen, but did not seem fragile due to its excellent design and build. The hinge does not pivot in the same way as most notebooks. The pivot is lower down, moving the screen down and away as it is opened. This reveals a great keyboard, which is very comfortable to use, and the trackpad, which I have made little use of due to the very comfortable Pro Mouse but is still well balanced between speed and sensitivity. The two very compact speakers reside in the far corners. I was pleasantly surprised when I first started playing MP3s on the iBook. I was expecting tinny, low bass sounds but, although they do not match up to a set of Harman Kardon Soundsticks, performance is good enough not to warrant the extra £130, especially as you can select the small speakers option in the iTunes equaliser, which emphasises bass. The iBook comes with the basic software such as Internet Explorer, as well as
            QuickTime, iTunes, a great audio program (especially if you get an iPod MP3 player), iMovie 2, allowing you to edit movies from your DV video camera with some great effects, AppleWorks, make presentations, documents, spreadsheets and databases, and some fun games for those long journeys and boring lessons. Along the right-hand side of the iBook is the optical drive, choose from CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, CD-RW or CD-RW DVD-ROM combo (in ascending price order). Apple are very excited about their combo drive, giving you the ability to watch DVDs or burn CDs in your lap. However the choice is very personal, with cost playing a large part in the decision for some. I decided the best option would be to buy the DVD-ROM, allowing me to read CDs and watch DVDs, and I am looking to buy an external CD-RW as I don't burn CDs very regularly. The left-hand side is where the ports are located. There is a modem connector (for use with the internal 56k modem), 10/100 Ethernet (for Broadband and networking), 6-pin FireWire (for DV cameras, external hard drives etc.), two USB ports (for external peripherals, mice etc.), RGB Video Out (allowing connection to an external monitor through the included cable) and AV connector (for composite connection to TV and for use with headphones). The iBook does not come with any PC card slots. Another missing element is a floppy drive. Apple seem to have omitted the floppy drive as it is becoming obsolete and this saves weight, size and battery life. For those of us who do not want to burn a CD or set up a network in order to transfer small files the only option is to buy an external USB floppy drive. I am currently purchasing a good model from VST which is powered through the USB port, so is easy to carry and connect when necessary and on-the-go. The new iBook is 'AirPort' ready. For those who do not know about this new technology it is a wireless internet and networking system. The AirPort hub allows up to 50
            Macs to be wirelessly networked up to 150 feet away from the hub at up to 11Mbps. The iBook requires an AirPort card to be inserted into the slot, located beneath the keyboard. I personally have not tried to do this as I do not have an AirPort card or hub, but other reviews suggest that the process is easy enough to complete, considering that the card rarely needs to be accessed once inserted. Apple initially chose to put 500MHz processors in all models, running at a mere 66MHz system bus and with 64MB of RAM and a 10GB hard drive as standard. They have now beefed up the iBook, putting the 600MHz (100MHz system bus) processor in all models except the CD-ROM, 15GB hard drive (expandable to 20GB) and 128MB of RAM as standard in all models. These changes were definitely for the best, especially when the iBook is running OS X, so that the iBook can keep up to speed. My iBook is perfectly capable of running multiple programs, and quickly too! But for those who wish to run multiple, large programs or do lots of PhotoShop work on their iBooks I would suggest more RAM (expandable to 640MB). The iBook is not designed to be a gaming machine, and the inclusion of the ATI RAGE Mobility 128 graphics accelerator with 8MB of SDRAM graphics memory illustrates this. The graphics card is chosen as a compromise between performance and battery consumption. The graphics are great for normal applications, but demanding games may suffer. Heavy gamers should look to a product which is aimed at, and designed for, their needs. The iBook is not. The screen is 12.1 inches (diagonal) TFT XGA which runs at 1024 x 768 resolution, but supports 800 x 600 and 640 x 480, all with millions of colours. Squishing the same resolution as a 14 inch screen into 12.1 inches was a worry for some people, the display may be small and difficult to read. However I find the display very easy to read, the resolution giving excellent sharp detail, and is very easy on the eye. The older us
            er may have problems, but there is always the option of switching to a lower resolution. I have heard that the plastic case is easy to scratch so I keep my iBook in a 'JamBags iBook Sleeve', wrapped up in a towel just to make sure. The plastic (polycarbonate for those in the know) is supposed to have excellent impact resistance and the hard drive is rubber mounted in the magnesium frame for extra protection. Although I have not yet tested these features I feel assured that the iBook has been designed to cope with the bumps and knocks of typical student life (aside from skydiving and rock-climbing of course). Battery life is quoted at 5 hours. I personally tend to get up to about 4 hours 25 mins, but with all the battery saving features in operation this should approach 5. The battery has a feature where four LEDs light up when a button on the battery is pressed to show battery life. This is a quirky feature which, although is not necessary for normal use, is great for checking charge on spare batteries. Charging the battery takes about 1 hour. The iBook has a built in security slot (at the rear left) which is compatible with a number of Kensington and Noble Security cables and locks so you can secure your iBook to a desk or table etc. The stability of UNIX means that the iBook's operating system is extremely reliable compared to Windows. My iBook has not yet crashed and I am not expecting it to. The DVD-ROM drive is great for playing DVDs wherever you are and you can use headphones if you are on the train or plane. It is also useful to connect the iBook to a TV through the AV port to play movies and DVDs on a larger screen. As for noise...what noise? The iBook is incredibly quiet. I have rarely heard my fan and the hard drive is barely noticable. When I use my PC now the fan seems like a jet engine in comparison. Prices start at £1099 for CD-ROM and go up to £1499+ for Combo drive. T
            he iBook is the notebook to be seen with this year, the great design and simple but fun adverts with the quirky "Would you like that to go?" message captured me as I'm sure they did many others. Overall the iBook is excellently designed and very well targeted at the student market and those who want an ultra-portable notebook. For the professional who demands a bit more the titanium PowerBook G4 is better (for Photoshop type applications). But for those of us who can't afford the extra £2000, don't want to carry around a large notebook and don't need the extra features, the iBook is a great cousin to the TiBook and doesn't come that far behind, and is more likely to turn heads. www.apple.com - Check It Out ***One tip, your iBook may come with the keyboard locking screw (located between the F5 and F6 keys) unlocked. This is the default position but may make the keyboard seem a bit squidgy. Turning this screw to the locked position relieves the problem by stiffening up the keyboard.***

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              15.08.2001 02:54
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              Right, I admit, I have not used this machine a lot. Come to think about it, I only used it for a 10 or 15 minutes in the shop. But I have also read a lot of reviews, research it a lot, and have been using the 9.1 OS that the iBook has on it. And that's better than nothing. It's the thing I am currently saving up to get, and you reading this review has just put me 5 pence closer to getting it. Thanks! The iBook 2001 is a mere 4.9 pounds, or 2.2Kg. This is exceptionally light in comparison to the PC laptops that I have had the misfortune to use at work, and the PowerBook G4. When you first see it, it looks really small. But, even though the screen may be exceptionally small, it does actually pack quite a punch in both the display and in terms of it's performance. The screen is 12.1". This may not sound much in comparison to say the PowerBook's 15", but you can do quite a lot on the screen. It is about the size of a piece of A4 paper (11.2" x 9.1"), and is only 1.35" (or 3cm-ish) thick. So, it's like one of those thick PC magazines, or 2 or 3 normal sized magazines piled on top of each other. This is damn small. Unfortunately, the shop staff didn't seem to want me to be able to sit down on a chair, and place this machine on my lap, and play with it for hours... shame! In terms of software, it comes pre-installed with Mac OS 9.1 (the 'Classic' OS that's continuing from what 8, 7, 6 etc.). 9.1 is the descendant of the first Mac OS that came on the first Macs. If you have used a Mac in the past, you've most likely been using a predecessor of 9.1, or even 9.1 itself. OS 9.1 is brilliant in terms of software. You get Sherlock 2, the powerful Internet search tool (with search engines like Google and Altavista pre-installed), which searches for shopping deals, websites, e-mail addresses, your hard drive, Mac technical support and whatever else you program it to... Y
              ou also get iMovie (which I haven't had the fun of using yet) but have heard only great things about it. it allows you to plug in a DV camcorder through the FireWire port, and edit digital video. You get the groundbreakingly-good iTunes software (which I use every waking moment...) which lets you make your own CD's, rip MP3's, make playlists and listen to Internet radio stations (It's been invaluable for helping add tracks to my latest project, the 24 Hour Jazz Cafe: see my profile!). You also get iTools, a set of tools to use on the internet, including the iDisk, a place to store files (up to 20Mb of storage is available on your iDisk, which can be upgraded to 400Mb). Unlike FTP sites and sites like the late i-drive.com, you can just drag and drop stuff on to your iDisk as if it was a hard drive. You also get KidSafe, an internet filtering system to stop underage users getting on to unallowed content. You can also get an @mac.com email address and put webpages up on to homepages.mac.com As well as the traditional OS 9.1, you get the new version of the Mac OS, X (pronounced 10). Now, based on what I have heard (I haven't used X yet...), the iBook's performance under X isn't great. But the new OS isn't really finished. You need to wait until 10.1 (coming this autumn) for the better performance to come in, and things like DVD performance, and a new picture organiser, and god knows what else... check out apple.com to see what else they are planning. Back to the iBook, the difference among the range is the type of optical media drive you use. The price ranges between £1,100 for the CD-ROM version, to about £1,800 for top-of-the-range DVD/CD-RW edition. You get 10GB as standard (or 20Gb if you upgrade via the Apple store). The iBook has two USB ports, a FireWire port and an AV port. With the AV port, you can either plug in headphones to hear the sounds that come out your machine, or if you purchase the £15 cable(
              Apple Store again...), you can hook your iBook up to a telly. Perfect for iMovies. The case seems quite tough, and even without the rubber bumpers of the previous rainbow-coloured iBooks it still is quite strong. It's made out of impact-resistant polycarbonate plastic, and has an internal magnesium frame and a rubber-mounted ATA hard drive. So it's very resistant. Which is perfect, you can fling it in your backpack, or briefcase, and take the sexy laptop with you, wherever you go! It has a sort of rubbery feel to the case itself, and is comfortable whilst using (as in I could hold it, although the store staff weren't -TOO- happy about that...) (What will be) another major selling point for me is the fact that you can add an Airport card to the iBook with a simple lift of the keyboard. For those not in the know about Airport, it's a simple radio-waves based system for networking computers, and accessing the internet. I'll be able to purchase an Airport Base station and card, and put the card in my iBook, and the Base Station next to my phone port. The 802.11 network, as the boring gits at IEEE call it is an unsexy name for a very cool system. Imagine being able to sit on your couch, with a laptop in front of you. And your surfing the net. And networking with other Macs. With no cables. Your umbilical cord has been chopped and your left with a radio transmitter. If your friend's have an AirPort network (and they will get one out of jealousy soon enough...), you can just click on your Control Strip module and switch over to their network. And everything is secure, so nobody can go and pick up all the transmissions. As long as your within 150 feet of the AirPort base station, you can browse the net and share files with other Macintoshes in your home at 11Mbps. The screen is very easy to see, and although it runs at 1024 x 768, which seems quite a lot for a 12" screen, it is very easy to read, and I had no problem r
              eading a few pages in IE while previewing it in the shop. It seems to be extremely easy to read text off, and perfect as a bedside buddy for reading eBook's, and websites. Also, the speakers have been improved. The iBook also sports 2 speakers, rather than the original one. The ports are nicely designed, and don't have a flap to get to them, which makes them easy to access, and also that on most PC laptops, the port covers seem to be tacky and plasticy, and fall apart too easily. After researching this product, and my little instore demonstration and try-out, I think that the ideal solution for me (and possibly you and others) would be the DVD model, and then adding a USB or FireWire CD-RW. Personally, if I was out and about, I wouldn't burn CD's, but when I got back home I would. I could cart a CD-RW drive around, or have one on my desk at home and work, and just carry my laptop around. That is the ideal solution. Apple do charge a lot for the CD-RW and Combo editions. I have used Apple Technical Support, and they seem 'average'. In the past, when my mouse died on me (probably of overuse), I rang them up, and if like me you have an iMac, you have to read out the number located underneath your computer. Great serial number placement guys... But on the iBook, at it's very low weight, this sort of thing would be much easier. Also, after speaking to iBook users, the battery life is 5 hours. That would probably be right, if you turned it on and left it running. But, you could probably expect 3 - 4 hours out of the iBook if watching DVD's and listening to music / surfing the net etc. I'm sorry if this review seems a little half-hearted, but I am writing this of my experiences SO FAR of the product. I am writing this as a way of actually getting my hands on the product, and to prompt others to write iBook 2001 reviews, so I can get more ideas of whether or not I want this - it's
              quite a major purchase, remember). In conclusion, if and when I ever have £1300, I will be most happy to pop up to London and purchase the iBook. And if it's anything like my current Mac, I will definitely be pleased. ----UPDATE 17/10/2001---- The new iBook came out yesterday, and now features a 600Mhz processor (on the DVD and better models), and the minimum hard drive is now 15Gb rather than 10. Also, they upgraded the PowerBook G4 yesterday. For more info, see the Apple.com site. To confirm: I will be buying the DVD model, with 600Mhz and a 15Gb drive. Nice one... Thanks for reading, Tom

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