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9 Reviews

Manufacturer: Canon / manual and automatic focusing.

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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    9 Reviews
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      01.09.2001 02:11

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      Well, How did i end up with one of these??? Picture it in duty free, i needed a battery for my own cam... walked into dixons and came out with one of these. Have to say it cost me £300 and worth every penny. I was very lucky as i got the normal lens and a 80mm -300mm lens thrown in for free as well. Also a tripod etc as part of the kit. Having used it all over the place and seen the results i can thoroughly recommend this camera to anyone. Its perfect for anyone, from beginners to experts. The simplest mode makes it the same as any normal 35mm camera with a point and click ... it takes care of the zoom and focus for you. On the other end of the scale its got all the settings any techno-geek could want. The viewfinder is extremely clear and of a deent size - previous SLR's ive used have had miniscule viewfinders. The construction of the unit is nothing short of excellent. As you would expect from a professional unit it feels solid and robust. Its taken a few knocks etc and is still working perfectly The only request i would have made with the camera is for a more powerful flash. The onboard flash isn too bad for family parties etc, but like most SLR cameras the addition of an external light would make all the difference. Not sure if u can get these new anymore as i bought mine 18 months ago ... but even 2nd hand this will make an awesome purchase.

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      24.06.2001 15:13
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      I bought my Canon EOS 500n about 18 months ago. It was supplied with a 28-105mm zoom lens, which is a useful enough lens in its own right, making the framing of most non-specialised photos a doddle. Being a member, however lowly, of the Canon EOS stable, the 500n has a huge range of Canon (and other people's) lenses available to it. Although now an “outgoing” model, having been replaced by the EOS 300n, there are still some around, mainly sold as kits with a couple of lenses in places like Dixons. Styling is purposely “retro” with a half satin chrome* look, much beloved of cameras in the 60s and 70s before the all-black professional look took over. * yeah, yeah, I know it’s plastic really! Unless you are set on buying the latest model, the improvements embodied in the new 300 only seem to centre around the fact that its auto-focus now looks at 7 key points in the viewfinder, rather than the 500’s 3 points. Since I have not noticed any problems with the focussing of the 500, I’m not entirely sure that the extra money required to buy the 300 would be well spent. AUTOMATIC OPERATION Using any of the EOS range, the 500n included, centres around one large dial on the top-left of the camera. This selects all the exposure modes. By exposure, I mean the amount of light that is allowed to fall on to the film. This is regulated by the shutter speed, (i.e. the amount of time that the film is exposed) and the aperture (the size of “hole” through which the light passes). Most pocket cameras take the choosing of either of these away from the user. Quite apart from the two fully-programmed modes which make the camera a true point and shoot job, one of which even unlatches the built-in flash when required, there are two main sets of exposure modes: one, which Canon would call the “Creative” modes, and the other (rather grandly)
      “Programmed Image Control Zones”. The Creative Modes include :- Shutter priority – i.e. you choose the shutter speed and let the camera find the aperture setting to go with it. A thumb wheel over on the right by the shutter release enables you to “scroll” through all the shutter speeds from 30 seconds to 1/2000th second. Suggested uses for shutter priority include the ability to freeze action of moving objects by choosing a fast (short) shutter speed, and the ability to blur action, say to make a waterfall look ethereal, by choosing a slow (long) shutter speed. Aperture priority – the boot is now on the other foot, with the camera matching a shutter speed to the aperture chosen by you using the thumbwheel again. Possible uses for a small aperture would include obtaining sharp focus on a wide range of objects, some nearer to the camera than others. (The smaller the aperture, the less critical the need for focussing). By the same token, a large aperture makes focussing critical, and can throw a background into a blur, making close ups of flowers etc very effective. You also have a full manual mode where you can set both the aperture and shutter speed yourself, using the light metering in the camera to find the right reading, although you could of course ignore the camera’s “advice” completely. There is also what Canon call Depth-of-Field Auto Exposure. The way this operates is rather nifty. If the three separate focussing spots in the view finder detect major differences, i.e. the subject matter towards the centre of the picture is at varying distance from the camera, like a train at an angle for example, then it biases the exposure towards a smaller aperture to improve the apparent focussing accuracy over a wider range of distances. The Programmed Image Control Zones include, A sports mode – this takes care of all ex
      posure functions whilst giving a bias towards faster shutter speeds, making it more likely that moving objects will be captured correctly without blur. A landscape mode – this is yet another programmed mode, which gives a bias to towards smaller apertures (for sharper focussing) at the expense of fast shutter speeds. A close-up mode which sets the camera up to be better suited to the taking of close ups including activating the flash. A portrait mode, which is biased towards a large aperture where conditions allow, to throw backgrounds out of focus. If some of these are beginning to sound a bit “samey”, you’re not the first person to have thought so. Whilst I understand, or at least think I do, all the modes, I still tend to use the camera in its point-and-shoot mode the most, and it doesn’t come as any surprise that the full programmed modes fall either side of the “off” switch on the EOS’s dial. Whichever mode you pick, you get a very helpful LED display of exposure settings just below the main frame in the viewfinder. This also includes information on the success of the auto-focus and whether the flash is charged up yet. HANDLING This is no pocket camera and anyone considering a single lens reflex (SLR) had better bear this in mind. Having said that, it’s not heavy for its size – the upside of plastic construction. The right hand side of the body (the battery box) is shaped into a grip allowing a firm hold whilst grappling with all those exposure modes! The shutter release falls easily under the right index finger, as does that thumbwheel. Changing Canon lenses involves holding one button down whilst twisting the lens through about 70 degrees. OTHER FEATURES Motor driven wind on and rewind. (Only 1 frame per second when set to continuous.) “Bracketing”- the taking of three consecutive pictures, one
      being the correct exposure and the others being variations of under- and over-exposure “just in case”. Useful for those once-in-a-lifetime shots or for people with money to burn on film! Anti Red Eye – the camera throws out a bright white light beam just prior to the actually flash, to get the subjects pupils as small as possible in advance. Extra flash contacts for separate flash gun. A wired remote-control socket (control not supplied) Self-timer An LCD display on top of the camera body for exposure settings, chosen functions etc. Much of this is also repeated in the viewfinder. CONCLUSION I can’t see why anyone only interested in taking what used to be known as snaps would bother with an SLR on size grounds alone. However, if you already are interested in using more than one lens type, or think you could GET interested then a camera like this is the one for you. At around £200, it’s not too expensive for what you get, PROVIDING THAT YOU WANT WHAT IT’S GOT! Picture results are excellent – this camera wasn’t a “Best Buy” for nothing. 35mm is still the cheapest celluloid film format in which to operate, thanks to bargain-basement processing charges. This camera and others by reputable manufacturers like Nikon and Minolta have more features than you can shake a stick at, but at least you’re not going to “grow out” of them too quickly.

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        31.07.2000 06:04
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        This is my 8th camera and it is the first I have been really happy with. It is SO easy to load. though I must say that the fact that it loads all the film over to the opisite side of the "casette" and then feeds back into teh "casette" once the pictures are taken rather threw me the first time I was rewinding as it took like 2 seconds.. (something wrong I thought) But it really is a great feature as you should someone open the camera while film still in are less likely to loose already taken pictures. The camera itself is really easy to use. Both in manuel mode and in Automatic. It has a load of good and easy features (my fav being the portrait one <g>) It weighs a good amount in your hand (enough to make you feel that there is something there) but is not that heavy that you get fed up with having it in your hands or aroung your neck. The picture quality is wonderful I have yet to get a bad picture from it (nearly 2 years old now) changing of lens is easy and trouble free. My only niggle with it is the fact that if you forget to switch it off completely it eats the batteries like crazy. I would have liked for it to either switch off automatically if not in use after a certain while or at least not eat as much of the batteries when forgotten (2 batteries at £8 a time) this obviously was not for me made better by the fact that my pervious camera did not need to be switched off so I forgot a couple off times to begin with and needed to change batteries a lot in the early days. However it is now over 6 months since I last changed and I do use it a lot.. All in all a great camera that I would reccommend.

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          30.07.2000 16:27

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          I was bought this baby as my first 'proper' camera. I use it quite a bit as i like to just take photos and stuff. I would recommend to a first time buyer because although it's packed full of mind boggling features and really complicated settings it's still suprisingly easy for a begginner to get to grips with. You have the automatic modes like sport,close up,portrait and landscape which will work out all the settings for you! When you learn more about photography you will then be able to use the manual modes and be more creative! This is a brilliant camera and i've also heard that it's quite cheap now. Give it a try!

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          13.07.2000 23:50
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          I was brought the Cannon EOS500N as my first 'real' camera and now i really cannot live without it... i take it everywhere (well, nearly). Before I had this camera, i was a photographer of the point and snap variety but now i like to think of myself as a potential professional... if i ever get round to advertising!!! The reason why is that the EOS is the ideal camera to learn on, it has settings from completely automatic to completely manual but once you have got to grips with the manual settings, you are unlikely to look back. The EOS has an easy automatic load (not quite as easy as the newer APS versions of cameras but a damn site better than tradtional SLR loading mechanisms). There is a manual or an automatic focus, a choice of auto-focus settings, multiple exposure, timer, red-eye reduction, a built in flash (not actually all that useful and so i bought an external flash unit). The auto settings include close-up, night-time, landscape and portrait but i tend to find it easier to do them myself these days. My tip for anyone who is buying this as a first SLR is to buy a tripod too. It needn't be that expensive but it helps because it gives you more leeway with shutter speed if you can eliminate camera shake.

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            13.07.2000 20:45
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            A super camera with two modes, programme mode and shutter priority mode. This camera is very good for an inexperienced photographer or as a first camera. You can set the camera on programme and it will do it all for you without you having to worry about anything. It takes a 35 mm film. This camera can be fitted with a motor drive taking up to 4 frames a second or a small motor drive that can take up to 2 frames a second. It is still obtainable from Jessops the camera shop which is found in most towns.

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            12.07.2000 04:30

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            This is a brilliant camera which you can still get second hand lenses for. It has 3 modes. Programme where it does it all for you, aperture priority where you choose the aperture and the camera sets the shutter speed and shutter priority where you set the shutter speed and the camera sets the aperture. It has a double exposure facility. This canon camera can be fitted with a motor drive that will take up to 5 frames a second. Pictures taken with this camera cannot be faulted.

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            10.07.2000 00:18

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            Eos 500N is the best seller -- quoted by Practical Photography magazine. I have one of my own since it was newly released. The feature that I like about this camera is that it is light. Some people argue that the havier it is, the better the camera is. However, I personally thinks that, if you are not used to handleing a heavy camera, this light-weight camera is better, especialy for those girls who have soft hands. Another feature that I like about it is that the auto-focus is fast and accurate. And it has 3 points focus which inteligently pick the right focusing points very quickly. The quality of the print out is also very good. I like the grip very much. It is cleverly design such that you can have a firm grip with one hand and do somthing else with your another hand. However, perhaps it is a bad news for the left-handed as the grip is designed pretty much for right-handed.

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            04.07.2000 19:14
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            Canon EOS500N was the best selling SLR camera until the new EOS300 was released to replace it. Though now an outdated model, it is still very good, especially at £199!!! I spot this at www.jessops.com. They are selling the EOS500N equipped with Tamron 28-80mm Lense for just £199. The EOS300 with Sigma 28-80mm Lense is going for £269.9. The savings is about £70. Although Tamron lens is usually not that good, but for a beginner (I presume you’re looking for a beginner SLR camera), this is ok. Want more option? How about Nikon F60 + Nikkor 28-80mm Lens for just £225 (with £25 cashback from Nikon, ends 31 July 2000). For £25 more, you get an up-to-date Nikon model with Nikon’s original lens. Found this at www.waltersphotovideo.co.uk. Good luck.

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        • Product Details

          The original Canon EOS (AKA Kiss) became a hit product due to its high-end features, easy operation, and affordable price. It was succeeded by the New EOS 500, which, while inheriting the main features of the original model such as lightweight and compact size, the New EOS 500 has a Multi-BASIS (|+|) AF sensor for 3 focusing points displayed in the viewfinder's image area. The focusing point can be selected manually by the user or automatically by the camera. Focusing the desired subject can be as quick as a more expensive camera. The following picture-taking modes can be set: Shutter speed-priority AE, aperture-priority AE, shiftable Intelligent program AE, Programmed Image Control modes, depth-of-field AE, program flash AE, and metered manual. The camera comes in silver or black.