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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

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      12.01.2001 03:45
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      The Canon IX-7 is one of a fairly rare breed, that is to say, it’s a single-lens reflex (SLR) camera whilst also being an APS camera, with all the usual abilities such as three picture sizes that this film format possesses. Minolta and Nikon are also in the same market, and if you are starting from scratch, you may want to check these out as well., for the simple reason that they have a range of dedicated, and daintier interchangeable lenses. The Canon, however, uses the same EOS fitting lenses as its 35mm counterparts, which makes them somewhat bulkier, when used on an APS camera. EOS-type lenses are more freely available, made both by Canon, and independent lens manufacturers, giving an impressive range, so if flexibility is paramount, and you MUST have a 500mm mirror lens AND an APS camera in your arsenal, then the Canon IX-7 is for you. In my case, being the owner of a Canon EOS 500n as well, this makes particular sense. In fact I bought both together from Jessops for £400 the pair. My only regret is that the IX-7 does not have a “body-only” option, so I ended up with two short zooms, one shorter than the other. In fact, when I put the “standard” 22-55mm lens from the IX-7 on the 500n, it is so wide angle, that I can see my belly in the viewfinder! Coming back to the IX-7, it is extremely easy to use in its “idiot-proof” modes, but has plenty of others to grow into, as the fancy takes you. The exposure-mode control dial is almost identical to that on the 35mm job, so it has been a very easy task to get the hang of both of them at the same time. Exposure modes are grouped into two specific ranges – “technical”, designed for those who know their “aperture priorities” from their “shutter priorities”, and “artistic” for those who know a close-up from a landscape, and can tell a moving object from a still one! Then there is fu
      lly-programmed mode for those who don’t know nuffink ‘cept they’ll get killed if these photos don’t come out. They can all relax, the results are super, and there is very little, if any, quality difference detectable between APS and 35mm results. Bearing in mind that most cameras, even silver ones are plastic these days, build quality is fine, and styling is OK-ish, if that matters on a functional piece of kit like this. Full marks for initial ease of use, whilst leaving you with plenty to learn (if you want to). Full marks for picture quality from such a small negative. One year down the line and the camera is still perfect in every respect. I noticed in Dixons in Falmouth last week (27/02/01) that it was shown as an end of line bargain (what a surprise!). If this leads to its price reduction, then the value for money will even better.

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      12.10.2000 21:10
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      This camera combines the best of both worlds - an SLR camera with the advantage of APS film, and the pictures it takes are stunning. It comes as standard with a EF22-55mm lens, and also has a 55-200mm lens available, although any Canon EF lens will fit it. The camera has an several automatic modes for varying situations such as portrait, sporting and lanscape modes, as well as all the manual functions you expect on an SLR camera.

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