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2 Reviews

Auto focus. Flash. Backprinting facility. Programmed auto exposure.

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    2 Reviews
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      28.01.2003 14:45
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      Absolutely brilliant camera, light, compact, durable (trust me, it has taken a fall or two!) and yet still produces a great picture when needed. Multiple picture dimensions mean any snap can now be achieved. Taken it now to all places I have travelled and it has endured most conditions (not sure if it was meant to). Price was very good as well. It timer facility and date stamps are extremely useful as each picture has time and date when it was taken so no excuses to forget the best moments that the camera has captured.

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        04.11.2002 14:07
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        'All good things must come to an end' as the saying goes. But, as true as it is, it doesn't really make the loss of the good thing any easier to bare does it? Of course, if to you your camera is merely a thing, and not used as an extension of your imaginative mind, the loss of your good thing will be bareable. However, if like me, that small well used silver box that has captured images of you, your friends, your loved ones and sunsets from all over the globe, is a treasured possession that has captured and even holds memories itself, well, you feel the loss when it gives up the ghost, and goes to the big camera cloud in the sky. Sniff. Sniff. All tears and crying aside .... If the losing bit is made better by almost immediately replacing the lost thing with something equally, and, dare I say it whilst the loss is still raw and hard to swallow, better, the all good things and coming to an end thing is rather bareable isn't it? A month or so back, my old Kodak Advantix died on me. Or rather, it started to misbehave. Naughty thing! On enquiring about repairs being done on, to my faithful travelling companion, I was told, 'Yes Miss idodoyou, it can be fixed, but it'll cost you'. Cue more sniff sniff. As the repairs were going to cost me as much as a new camera, I stiffled back a tear and fled the shop clutching a now useless small well used silver box. Up until a couple of months or so back, I'd amassed about a £100.00 on my Boots advantage card, and surprisingly for me, it wasn't earmarked to be spent. I hadn't even considered buying a camera from Boots [ignoring the fact that it was where I had bought the now defunct one from!] until, on chatting to somebody about points and their spenditure they informed me that they too were going points shopping for a new camera. Something clicked, and a lightbulb lit up above the sometimes vacant mind of idodoyou. All thought
        s of 'Where the hell am I going to find the money for a new camera now' disappeared quicker than Tim's ginger roots as soon as he left the BB house and I made my way Bootsward. I was buying me a new camera! With a whole myriad of little silver snappers all sitting pretty along the shelving all waiting to be bought. Or even more embarrassing, sitting there waiting to emit an eardrum piercing alarm that informs the whole city that you have just picked a camera up, and that you might, just might be considering on not paying for it. I was spoilt for choice. However, and due to a splitting headache after picking up the 5th camera for inspection I opted for the CANON IXUS L-1. Its small. 89.5x59.8x23.5mm small to be precise, and it weighs only 125g without the battery. If you want the exact weight with the battery, let me know, and I'll weigh it for you!! I'll be swearing and calling you names whilst doing the weighing, but still I will .... The size, I'll admit was the main thing that attracted me. I like small y'see [well, only in electrical objects that it ;)]. The second thing that attracted me was the look of the thing. And, it looks good. The casing is brushed silver, with various lens and LEDs for all manner of information. Of course, having an APS camera for a while now, there was no way that the new 'mugshot maker' was going to be anything but, and so, as with all APS [Advanced Photo System] cameras its a simple case of pop the film in, switch it on, and say cheese. So simple, a fool could take pictures I tell you. A fool ...... The IXUS L-1 takes 1 CR2 lithium battery, which when it comes to batteries are a tad on the dear side at about 6-7 squids each, and should, according to the very helpful handbook [in 6 languages no less] that accompanied the camera and a pretty naff fake leather case in the box, be good for around 18 lots of 25exps. This, for me rem
        ains to be seen, for although I like snapping, even I can not snap away 450 times in a month!! The lens/shutter type is IX240. The image size is 16.7 x 30.2mm. The lens is a Canon 26mm f/2.8. And shooting distance is 0.45m to infinity. I guess, because I was first attracted to the looks and size of the thing [why, it was just like picking a guy!!] I did the total girlie thing. And I'll admit, when I bought it, I didn't really know what it did. However, when in these cases, when things can go horribly wrong, things worked out just fine, and the IXUS L-1 can do a myriad of mugshots making marvels. Lets talk about flashing. Ok, ok, put your raincoats away, I mean camera flashing. Tsk .... funny lot of people get about now a days .... Quite 'niftily', there are 5 flash modes. 1. Auto Flash without Red-eye Reduction. Select this mode if you are taking piccies of scenery and the like. I mean, unless your mountains have eyes, why would you want to reduce the chance of your subjects having alien eyes? 2. Auto Flash with Red-eye Reduction. Quite obviously, this mode is to be used when you have people in the picture and that the light conditions are low. I've had people in my pictures. And not one of them have looked like an extra out of Men in Black. 3. Flash ON I tend to keep this mode on throughout my camera usage. I mean, the camera knows more about lighting than me and it saves me time and button twiddling. If I need extra light in the day time ..... the camera flashes. Who would not use this? 4. Flash OFF Pretty self explanotary is this mode. When you don't want flashing, set the camera to this and ..... you won't get flashing. Best used for night views, available light photography, or for those flash prohibited occasions. How your prints finish up on these night time shots will depend a lot on the developing. In several cases, if your nig
        ht time shots come back grainy, send them back and ask them to be darkened. Its amazing how cranking up the dark setting will change a picture for the best. [I used to work in a Photo Developing Lab and used to love improving the work that others had passed] They are your memories and they, you deserve to have the best. Do not except second best. Photo Labs cringe when they see me come in with my films! 5. Slow-synchro with Red-eye Reduction. I'll admit, I've never used this mode up to the time of writing, but if it delivers the pic as in the handbook .... I'm going to use this mode on a regular basis [I wonder .. is there a chance of the guy in the picture, in the handbook popping up when using this mode?] Apparently effective when taking pictures of people at night, with a lit up background. The flash and the slow shutter speed combine so that the person is lit up and the slow shutter speed lights up the distant background. How cool is that? One of the main advantages with the APS cameras is the ability to print the date, time and any other simple little message on the back, or front of your prints. Of course, even though your camera will do the printing of the aforementioned information, check with your developer that their machinery supports the data imprinting. The setting up of the time/date is simple, as too are the rest of the functions for this camera. You can change the format of the data shown, change the location of the data printing [front or back of developed photo] add a title ~ I Love You or Te Quiero or even Ti Amo [but only on the back of the photo] or change the language [5 options no less] Apart from the 'easybility' of the APS system [the drop in and shoot concept] the main, main draw to this no longer new way of taking pictures is the fact that you can choose your own picture size. And changing the size of your prints on the IXUS L-1 is easily done with a flick of a dial. <
        br>With all other APS cameras, the three print sizes are Classic ~ HDTV ~ Panoramic. One of the functions that I've, indeed anybody that has one, been issued with on this camera that I've not come across before is the Focus Lock function. Used to focus on the subject that is positioned close to the edge of the picture frame. To use this is simple, but effective. All instructions are easy to follow, and once you've used this function once or twice .... If you happen to be a 'Billy No Mates, or a 'Charlie Chumless', or just be on your own in a picture taking situation, never fear, for Self Timer Shooting is here. This can either be done with the timer in/on the camera, or you can purchase a nifty little remote control. As much as I'd like to add yet another little 'gadget' to my growing collection of electric but unused items, I've refrained from parting with my hard earned cash and buying the control. Although, to be honest, unless you find yourself in the situation that constantly requires the need to use it, I wouldn't bother. When still in the 'fiddling' stage I used the timer mode on two/three occasions, and its simple. Just press the relevant button [clearly marked], set the picture up [if need be] press the shutter button, strike your pose and wait about 10 seconds for the timer. While the timer is counting down, the flash .... flashes and so gives you an idea as to timing. There's nothing worse than standing there with a grin that could split your face in two until you get lock jaw because you daren't move just in case the camera goes off is there? The LCD panel is located on the top of this camera, and at all times will show various pieces of information whether the camera is off or on. Battery power available, whether or not a film is in place, time and date and the amount of frames that have been taken. I'm not sure I like this. I'
        ;m used to a camera that only shows LCD information when switched on, and so, while I'm getting used to it, I keep thinking I've left the blasted thing on and that battery power is being wasted. Doh idodoyou! Although, the fact that the battery meter is clear to see, and follow will only confuse the stupid amongst us! If at any time you have to change the battery, if you do so within 5 seconds, all date and time settings will be retained providing you do not touch any of the buttons. Apart from the naff case, a carrying strap comes with the camera. And, its not just any carrying strap. Oh no, it comes with a handy little device on the end, a Push button projection. Instead of hunting around for a small but blunt object to use during certain button pressing functions [the ones that you rarely need i.e setting the thing up] you can use your multifunctional carrying strap. So far, and through extensive 'fiddling' with my new toy, I can happily state that there's nothing wrong with this camera. I've had 2 films back and I've been happy with the results. No red eye. No missing heads [Focus Lock and some interesting little tips for photo taking in the handbook to thank there] There's been no blurred offerings, and amazingly so, no fingers [which is a speciality of mine]. Ok, so my picture taking skills will not win me awards. But then again, I'm only playing with an £80.00 camera and lets face it, on the scale of things in the world of cameras, £80.00 is cheap. But for me, and my limited photograph taking skills, the IXUS L-1 more than caters for my needs. I aim. I shoot. I take a passable [and at times, quite bloody good even if I do say so myself!] picture. I get them sent off for developing. And I get pictures back. Its all I want out of a camera.

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