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2 Reviews

The IXUS M-1 is the same size as a standard business card. It has five flash modes, 9 IX data functions, drop in loading, Print Aspect Ratio control and can record 5 captions in 6 languages for each frame.

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    2 Reviews
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      09.08.2001 01:39
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      I've always loved cameras but they never liked me much. Ever since I can remember I've been fascinated by those little boxes and by the fact that other people can create such beautiful pictures. But for me they were always blurred, dark, askew or just double-exposed. So when my sister bought me this for my 21st Birthday with the assurance that all of the above would change I didn't believe her... How wrong could I have been. For the photographically challenged this is 'the best thing since sliced bread' and for the more technically minded it still has loads to offer. For a start it is smart and stylish, compact and relatively light - a must for travelling. The carry-case has a useful way of attaching to your belt leaving your hands free, which is again ideal for sight-seeing. The most obvious advantage of a Camera such as this the Advanced Photo System which allows the film to be loaded astonishingly easily. All you have to do is slide the film in, shut the compartment and hey presto, all the work is done for you with no danger of damaging the film in the process. And once loaded it is easy to operate. Plus there's no possible way I could lose the lens cover as it's attached. The choice of three different types of photo (Classic, and Panoramic) help the beginner enormously with choosing how to take a particular shot and consequently each picture os of better quality. The shutter is easy to locate while peering through the view-finder, which I personally feel could be a little larger. Due to the fact that the entire camera is rather small, all the controls are also very little. This could have been a problem but Canon have found a way around it by providing a little plastic thing (I can't think of another way to describe it) that is attached to the Camera's wrist strap and which aids in the setting of the various functions. Of which there are many. Some of the most useful functions are the 'red-e
      ye reduction', which really works, and knowing that you can take pictures in semi-darkness and that they wil come out is quite liberating. It has a fun side too. It is possible to set the camera so that it prints a message such as 'Good Luck' or 'I Love You' in one of 6 languages on to the photograph. A great way to say 'Thank You' to a friend. I also found the fact that the camera automatically prints the date the photo was taken on the back to be most helpful. It eliminates all those dull Sunday afternoons spent trying to remember when a picture was taken! There are only two things that I can think of which could have been improved upon. The first is that the camera automatically uses the flash, unless you specifically turn it off at each useage. This could get annoying, especially if a flash is not allowed. The other area in which this camera could change for the better is the price. At over £70 it is quite expensive and so are the films and thier developing. These all wil, I dare say, reduce as time passes but nevertheless it is something that I believe the manufacturers should address. All in all I have found the Canon IXUS to be a wonderful camera. It has transformed the way I take photos and I'm not sure that I could go back to focussing and film loading manually. It does cost a lot but this camera will last for a long time (I hope) and the ease with which I can operate it means I use it so much more. All I need now is to figure out a way to get rid of the rogue men which have become a feature of my photography. I don't think a camera can help with that one. LOL!

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        21.03.2001 17:16
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        Before I get to the actually camera in this case, I shall briefly describe the APS (Advanced Photo System) because it is quite different to the “normal” 35mm film that we’re all familiar with. The film itself comes in a self-contained cartridge which enables quick reloading (if necessary). In order to load (or reload) the camera, you simply drop the cartridge into the slot, and close the cover. The APS films come in 3 sizes: 25 frames or 40 frames. The film enables three different size of pictures to be taken (classic, wide-angle or panorama), and no matter what film size you have in, you are able to take this amount of pictures (i.e. even though panorama is the largest, you can take 25 panorama shots on a 25 frame film) and it is possible to mix ‘n’ match pictures sizes on one film. When your film is developed, your actual film cartridge comes back to you (no more negatives!), and on the sleeve of your picture folder, are thumbnails (i.e. small pictures) of all the pictures you took on that film. The folder also has a reference number which matches up to the film cartridge, meaning that if your film and folder ever get separated, you still know which belongs to which. Each picture also has the reference number printed on the back of it for easy identification. The film cartridge also comes with an easy visual indicator to show whether the film is exposed, processed, partially exposed etc. One bad thing about APS is that, currently, the processing fees are more expensive than 35mm film. This should be taken into account when purchasing your camera – obviously if you plan on taking lots of photographs, you should consider a 35mm camera which will save you money in the long run, but for ease of use for the casual user, APS is a good investment. On to the camera. First impressions are that it’s quite small – in fact it’s barely larger than a credit card - 85 by 55 by 35
        millimetres to be exact. Setting it up for first use was a breeze thanks to the enclosed instruction manual. The instruction manual comes in 6 languages, which makes it a lot thicker than necessary. To be fair though, the English instructions (which take up about 47 pages) are clear and concise, even to those who have never used a camera before. So, with the date and time set, and the film and battery installed, I ventured forth with camera in one hand, instruction manual in the other, eager to try out my new toy. With a price that brings it close to the beginners’ end of the camera market, I found the camera to be excellent. As I said above, the instruction manual explains everything clearly, even some of the more advanced aspects. The features that the camera has are the standard ones you might expect from a normal camera these days – auto focus, red eye reduction, motorized wind and rewind (which is the norm for APS cameras). There is also time stamping (unlike 35mm cameras, APS time stamping is done on the back of the photograph), and a feature I haven’t seen on any other camera is imprinting of “titles” onto the photo. You can then name these for future reference, although you are restricted to the five default ones on the camera: “I love you”, “Thank You”, “Seasons Greetings”, “Happy Birthday” and “Congratulations”. The flash has a number of different modes – auto, auto with red eye reduction (RER), always on and slow-synchro with RER. This last one, while quite useful, will probably not be used a lot. It’s for nighttime outdoor shots where you would want a flash for the foreground, but a slow shutter speed for the background. All the information you need is displayed to you via an LCD on top of the camera, and this displays date, time, flash mode, current film frame number as well as battery and film statu
        s. It’s very light – much lighter than my last 35mm camera, which admittedly is about 5 years old now, and much bigger. But if this were in your pocket, you’d hardly notice it was there. The manual says that it’s only 115g (that’s 4.1 oz) without the battery installed. The battery is a small CR2 battery and so doesn’t add that much to the carrying weight. The camera (I bought the “photo-kit”) comes complete with a 25-frame film, battery and carrying case. In fact, everything you need to get it up and taking photos immediately. Another thing – having just taken possession of my first set of pictures, I have to say that I don’t think the image quality is as good as 35mm cameras. Now, that’s not to say that it’s poor because it isn’t (I was perhaps over critical when studying the photos and comparing them to older shots I had taken, and this was my first time using this camera), but I feel that my old 35mm Kodak compact (RIP) would have taken slightly better pictures, although it had nowhere near the amount of features that the Canon has. Speaking to a few photographer friends of mine, they assure me that this is to do with the APS film rather than the camera itself, and I have to say that as a casual user of cameras, the picture quality is good enough for my purposes. One final point – the build quality of the camera. I’ve already said that the camera is small, and light. This might make you think that it’s quite fragile, but it’s not (or at least, it doesn’t feel fragile – I have dropped it yet!). The few moving parts on it seem to be fairly well in place, and apart of the removability (not a real word, I know) of the battery cover (I would have preferred one with “hinges” instead of a removable trap door) everything should stay where it’s meant to stay. All in all, a good quality cam
        era at a price that can be afforded by all. Thoroughly recommended.

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