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Polaroid i-Zone

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9 Reviews
  • easy to ruin first picture.
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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    9 Reviews
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      12.06.2011 11:39
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      Sadly laying at the bottom of my junk drawer

      Goodness me, I got this camera when I was about 15 so it is around 11 years ago now! Surprisingly it still works but you can't get hold of the film anymore and Polaroid stopped making it in 2006! However, on seeing as documentary on the history of Polaroid the izone was mentioned and the possibility of it being adapted to start making exposures again using APS film.

      I googled it and stumbled across the following link:

      http:// www. instructables. com/id/ Bring-Your-Polaroid-I-Zone-Camera-Back-From-the-De /#step1
      (Ignore the spaces)

      I am very intrigued by this and thought I would write a review of the izone. It was the first camera I ever owned and the thought that it could be resurrected to work again intrigues me, although I'm not sure if I will ever find the time or patience to sit down and do it!

      *Price and availability*

      Cheekily the izone is still available as new through Amazon. If you get hold of a new one there is some film thrown in with the pack and you can pick one up for around £19.99. Second hand on EBay or Amazon Market place they cost around 3.99. This seems a lot for a camera that has been made redundant, unless you want to buy one to have a tinker with, like in the steps above.

      *Description*

      The camera is around 15cm x 5cm x 4cm. It comes in a variety of colours which certainly appealed to the teenage market. I had a blue one and my best friend had a silver one. As their main audience was young people, it was important to make the camera user friendly and robust. The cameras are really sturdy and robust, I dropped mine many times and it was always fine when I picked it up!

      The camera has a view finder and a flash. The flash automatically comes on for every exposure and is controlled by a sensor next to the lens. You decide what sort of flash you need by switching the camera on to certain modes using a dial on the top. They are: Outside Sunny (f 34.5), Outside Cloudy (f 12.5), and Inside (f 10.) The straight forward no nonsense dials meant you could literally pick it up and shoot, you didn't need to bother reading the instructions.

      There is no red eye reduction or face recognition; this is point and press photography. The camera is so easy to use and this was one of the advantages that led to its success.
      Once you make your selection the camera is ready for the shot and you need to hit a large button that sticks out the top to take the photograph.

      The shutter speed is 1/125 sec and the focus is fixed at 2-6 feet. I wasted a few photographs by ignoring this and making the subject too close so the picture came out all blurry, but once I got my head around this and had a bit of distance between the camera and the subject, the quality was much better. So long as the subject stayed still as the shutter speed is quite long.

      Once you take the photograph, the camera switches off. This is great for young people who would forget to turn it off and come back to find their camera's battery had died.
      The camera runs on 2 x AA batteries.

      So once the exposure is taken, a few seconds later the image comes out from a little slit with rollers on the side of the camera, gently pull on the film and the image comes out. After 30 seconds of letting it dry the image is ready to do whatever you want with it. Some of the Polaroid film was sticky on the back so you could annoy your mum and stick them all over your bedroom.
      The images produced measured 24mm×36mm which is the same size as a 35mm film negative. The film cost around £4.00 for packs of twelve. You could get plain backed or sticky backed images. All the films came with a funky coloured border around your photographs with gave it that extra teenage appeal.

      *My experiences*

      I had a lot of fun with my izone and have some good little images that I still have today. I remember for one Christmas getting a little izone photo album key ring which was perfect sized for the mini photos.
      The quality of the photographs was okay to say how small the images were. They all seemed to have a blue green hue around them but it didn't really seem to matter. Out of a roll of 6, about 4-5 were successful; there was always one that was blotchy and white. I could never work out why this happened.
      It is a shame that they don't make film anymore as I would love to give it another go for old time's sake. To say the camera is so old and still in working order means they are good quality machines!

      *Overall*

      I've just seen a couple of unhappy customers who have bought the izone as new for £19.99 with 6 exposures and then being shocked to realize the film is now obsolete. So just to clarify, you can't get hold of the film anymore! Unless you keep an eye on EBay and someone has an abundance of stock left over to sell, I would not advise you to buy this camera.

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        25.01.2007 23:59

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        a little bit of fun for the party animal in you

        I always wanted a poloroid camera as a youth! When i saw this camera i was so excited - its cheap and easy to use and also great fun! I bought it whilst at university and it was the cause of so much fun! SNapping all my housemates and having instant ( if small) reminders of our fun and frolics! The pictures have a peel off back which reveals a sticker pad - so you can display your art work where ever you like!
        So much fun!
        They are also wallet sized and I still - 5 years on carry these small pictures in my wallet!
        So much fun to have with this little camera

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        15.03.2003 22:47
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        When I was little I remember we had a Polaroid camera, which my dad always got out on Special Occasions. It was a massive black box and it took several hours to set up (although that could have been just because my dad was doing it!) I grew up thinking Polaroids were a bit naff and so did a large proportion of the population. Polaroid gained an image that was a bit sleazy. It was the camera you used to take the sort of photos that you didnt exactly want the staff at Boots looking at when you got them developed. That was until it gave itself a dramatic makeover in line with the 'naughty Noughties' and suddenly Instant Cameras were cool! 'i-zone' instant pocket cameras were Polaroids bid to regain domination of market where other camera manufacturers had suddenly tried to grab a piece of the action. They were marketed with 'fun' in mind. Serious shots not allowed! The gimmick is that the mini pictures these cameras produce are actually stickers! Cool, eh? I have the basic blue edition, but there is a range of colours and styles, including silver, metallic shades, transparent and even Tweety Pie and one with a built in FM Radio. Although the product itself is not new on the market, new variations regularly appear. The camera is fairly compact although only pocket sized if you have big pockets. It is long and thin rather than the traditional box shape of Polaroid cameras. On the top is a bright yellow button to turn it on and alter the setting for indoors and outdoors which is the same button you press to take a photo. That's about as complicated as it gets!! The actual photos work in the same way as normal Polaroid ones -you take the picture, pull it out of the camera, and within a few moments it develops. It can take some getting used to, especially when photographing people, they need to be really close up, otherwise they just look pale and not very interesting, but after a
        few pract ice shots, its easy. Don't expect top quality images, they just don't happen, but I would hope that people looking for excellent photo quality wouldn't be interested in bright blue and yellow plastic cameras in the first place! The photographs really are mini. They are 3.6 cm x 2.4 cm. Each one is numbered, so you know how many shots are left. When the photo is developed, you just cut it out, peel off the backing paper and stick it on whatever takes your fancy. You can also buy the film as just mini photos without the sticky bit, but where's the fun in that? Also available is 'fortune film', where when the photo pops out it displays a message like a fortune cookie, which fades as the picture develops. I can't really see the point of this, but it apparently sells by the bucket load, so obviously someone does!! I have had a couple of faulty films, where the pictures never develop or don?t come out clearly even if the lighting was correct. Polaroid are very good at dealing with customer queries, and I?ve always had mine swapped with no quibble if I?ve had a problem. The I-Zone makes a great gift for difficult to buy for teenagers. I bought one for my niece and she loved it. Apparently they are 'well cool.' It's easy to use and robust so it makes an ideal first camera as well. The film is simple to load - you just lay it in and away you go. It would also make a great present for people who regularly get very drunk indeed (in my experience, we are talking students here!) as they would no doubt find it hilarious and it has the added benefit of providing lots of little stickers of documentary evidence of 'the night before.' The camera itself retails at around £19.99. This usually includes one pack of film containing 6 shots and the 2 AA batteries required to work it, although keep an eye out for offers in places like Toys R Us where I've see
        n it retail as low as £9.99. Films come in twin packs (2 x 12 shots), which retail at £8.99. I usually buy mine from Boots, but photographic shops and supermarkets also sell them. As mobiles develop and more have the capacity to take photographs, I'm sure the popularity of instant cameras will diminish, but for now, they certainly are a great little fun camera and ideal to take anywhere.

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          24.02.2002 04:53
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          My oldest son, who is eight years old, received a Harry Potter photo album for his Christmas. Showing a remarkable degree of cunning, he waited until I had consumed just enough food and drink to be semi-comatose before he demanded his very own camera. Needless to say, for the sake of a quiet life, I agreed – as long as he would share it with his little brother (4). So off we went, a couple of days later, to the sales to look for a suitable camera. As we have a drawer full of undeveloped films, and also so that the kids would see the fruits of their labours instantly, we decided that a Polaroid would be the best option. We looked at the standard Polaroids on offer and opted for the Polaroid i – zone. This camera is one of those little flat ones - about 7 inches long and silver. It has a single purple button which is used to take the photos. The only other control is a switch which can be set for taking photographs indoors, outdoors in sunny conditions or outdoors in cloudy conditions. It also has its own flash, which works off two AA batteries (these come supplied). The main feature of this camera is that it takes small, passport sized photographs – about one and a half inches by one inch in dimension. These take a couple of minutes to develop and have an adhesive backing so they can be mounted directly into a photo album or stuck on a wall or a door if the subject matter is likely to have general appeal. The photos produced are of surprisingly high quality, but because they are small you need to be quite near to the subject matter when using the camera. Over the last couple of days, my son has built up his photo album with pictures of his cousins, uncles, aunts etc. Each picture is accompanied by a witty caption – “my stinky cousin”, “my cheeky wee brother” – which he finds highly amusing. He also gives some of the photos away and I suspect it will be a matter of time
          until blackmail and extortion commence. I would imagine that this camera could be quite good fun on a drunken night out but I haven’t tried this yet. The camera cost £19.99 and came complete with a 6 exposure film and 2 AA batteries for the flash. Safeway were recently selling a Barbie version (the same camera with a pink plastic cover and the word Barbie emblazoned across it) for £9.99.They also had ones with Tweety-Pie and Bugs Bunny on them for the same price. You can get a pack of three 12 exposure films for £12 – not too bad when you consider that you have no development costs. The film is very easy to load. All in all, I think this camera is a lot of fun and it should appeal to children and drunks – so quite a wide target audience then.

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            10.07.2001 07:55
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            • "easy to ruin first picture."

            Polaroid I-Zone Cameras cost around £18 from Boots. I bought mine a while ago when they were only available in red, blue or green, but since then the range of colours has widened. Some of the newer ones even come with changeable covers like mobile phones do. I-Zones are easy to load, but I nearly always spoil the first picture of each film. After you've taken your picture (adjust the flash setting and hit a button), you have to pull out a strip of paper. Your photograph is in the middle of it - after it's developed, you have to cut off the excess paper. Be careful to follow the marked lines though or you run the risk of leaking caustic paste. (Not good.) There are three flash settings - one for indoors, one for a sunny day and one for a cloudy day. These settings are depicted as little symbol pictures. On the bottom of the camera there are more pictures; these ones tell you how to use the camera. Once you've used up the film (comes in blocks of 12), the empty cartridge can be used as a box to store/give away pictures that you've taken. I suppose you could even stick a photo on top of it and use it for something else if you wanted. If you go to the I-Zone website (www.i-zone.com) then you can look through the ideas posted by other camera owners. Why not fix sticky pics of your friends into your address book? Create a dart board? Some mad person even suggested fixing a sticky pic and your address to a balloon and seeing if anyone responded. My own suggestion is that it you're moving, then why not take pictures of your friends, stick them into a book and get them to sign it? The film isn't that cheap, but you don't pay for processing and anyway, sticky pictures are just fun. I-Zone cameras are probably best suited for teenagers and the young at heart.

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              25.05.2001 16:23
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              This is a for fun gadget, in bright colours and entirely kiddy oriented. An ideal gift that provides hours of fun The label sized, self adhesive photos, become a decoration for excersize books, pecil cases etc., giving irefutable proof of ownership. The gadget (hard to call it a camera) is easy to use and gives instant gratification. The downside is the expense of the film/photos. That is true of all instant cameras. The camera is cheap, the film is expensive. With the advent of digital cameras the instant camera is losing it's usefulness. Assessors, previously the main users of instant cameras have gone digital. The guy at parties and other big doos who tempted you with instant mementos, finds it more economical to rush his film to the nearest mini-lab and tempt you with a higher quality product within the hour, so the logical outlet for the technology is kids. I think Polaroid has gauged the market correctly.

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                18.04.2001 18:28
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                Recently purchased the I-Zone Polaroid camera and I was really looking forward to taking some cool little shots with it. The camera came with 12 shot film in it already but I took the first two photos and pulled the tab quickly like the instructions indicate and nothing developed from the two. So basically it came with 10 roll film, and when I eventually did end up getting to take the photos I was very disappointed with how small and how out of focus and non-discript the shots were. Silly of me to pay £22 from my local Boots, for something that is useless to me, you can really only fit one person in the photo and even then you cant really see them that well. I kick myself for buying this and would definatly buy a proper Polaroid next time, yes they might be big and bulky but at least you can have a few people in the shot, so to pay a few extra pounds to get the bigger one I know it wont fit in your handbag but it will at least take a photo of it !!! Overall I would not recommend anyone buy this product for the money you pay for it.

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                  03.04.2001 12:01
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                  The Polaroid I-Zone is an instant pocket camera that takes miniature sticker photos. -= The camera =- The camera comes in a range of colours, from bright green over transparent red to stylish silver. It measures about 17 x 5 x 5 cm, which makes it considerably smaller than a full-grown, bulky instant camera, but I still wouldn't consider it very handy (or maybe I'm just spoiled by my tiny Canon Ixus). Due to being completely made out of plastic it is very light-weight though. It requires two AA batteries, as far as I can tell they are only used to charge the flash though (the rest of the camera works completely mechanical), so on a sunny day you can use it without any batteries. Speaking of batteries - a warning: Be very careful if you carry the I-Zone around in a bag... it very easily gets switched on accidentally this way, which will result in charging the flash and completely discharging the batteries. -= Loading the film =- This couldn't be much easier - the film comes in a little black plastic box that just has to be inserted at the bottom of the camera. After you used up the film, you can use the box to store your pictures. -= Taking pictures =- The handling of the I-Zone is very straightforward - the camera is focus-free and the only setting you have to adjust before shooting is the flash, which you can set to either 1. sunny 2. cloudy or 3. indoors. Then wait a few seconds for the LED to light up (to signal that the flash is charged), target your victim through the viewfinder and press the shutter release. The targetting can be somewhat difficult to do as what you see through the viewfinder is not always what you get. To position something in the centre of the photo, I actually have to aim a little lower and more to the right. This is especially annoying since the pictures are so small that you at least want to capture your subject on it completely. A
                  frame that shows what you will see on the actual photo later would have been a helpful implementation here. After you have taken the picture, pull on the film tag firmly and evenly and you should hold a colourful strip of paper with a little glossy white rectangle on it in your hands. -= The results =- Over the next 60 seconds, your picture will begin to slowly fade in until the colours have fully developed, and it will hopefully show what you expected :) I was quite surprised at the good results, the colours are true to life and brilliant and the image is sharp. Occasionally there were small bright marks, sometimes looking like flames, on the developed images - I am not sure what caused this, it might be a problem with the lighting or irregularities in the film material. You can then proceed to cut out the picture from the strip, always cutting carefully along the marked lines - if you damage the film, it will leak acidic developer liquid, which spoils the picture and probably does not benefit your health either (also do not fold or bend the picture for this reason). The actual picture size is about 3.7 x 2.5 cm, with a slim black border added to the top and bottom and a slightly broader border to the left and right in the colour of the film strip (they come in various colours and patterns). The pictures are adhesive, so you can peel off the back and stick them to your refrigerator, monitor, letters, forehead, you name it. There is also a nonadhesive film available, however I don't see the point in buying it as it seems to cost the same. -= Purchasing the camera and film =- This is probably the weakest point of the I-Zone - the price! I bought mine in the USA for the discount price of about 10 pounds, but I am not sure if you can get it for that cheap in the UK - it might be worth looking around a bit. The average price in the UK is about 18 pounds for th
                  e camera, including batteries and a sticker film with 12 exposures. Film costs around 5 pounds for 12 exposures -that makes a whopping 40p per picture, which seems alot considering their size. You might be able to get a discount if you buy a few packs at once. -= Conclusion =- The Polaroid I-Zone is a fun little camera, and I would recommend it with some caution: Don't expect too much - this is a gadget, not a serious camera. It is perfect for parties and taking snapshots of your friends, pets, etc., but you won't be using this to capture family memories or pictures of the landscape. Try to look around a bit to find the lowest price possible - probably moreso for the film than for the camera itself - it can be quite addictive to take instant pictures of just about everything (and to then plaster your environment with the results), and the film is used up faster than you think. Have fun :)

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                    09.01.2001 14:27
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                    A snazzy little Polaroid camera, available in several trendy colours. Taking 2inch x 3inch instant photos, this camera is priced at around £18 in gift kit form, supplied with film and batteries.. Films cost £5.00 for 12 shots (stickers) This clever little number caught my eye late last year. With our own digital camera being too expensive for our children to use, we felt that this was a fairly basic and easy to use point and shoot camera for our 7 year old. With reservations as to the quality of the actual photographs, I was happy to see that she handled the camera well and with a little practice was actually quite good at taking pictures. The camera is about 6 inches long and has a rounded curved appearance. It resembles an old 110 camera The bottom of the unit is also the door to load the film, which is remarkably easy to do. There is nothing fancy about this camera; it is capable of taking quality distance photographs as well as arms length pictures. The camera is easy to use, and the on the top is the shutter button and a switch to indicate whether you use the flash, set it to bright sunny weather, or dull cloudy settings. Quite simply, you decide which brightness/ flash setting you want, press the button, wait a second, pull the flap of paper out firmly. And wait................. In about three minutes your photo just needs trimming and is ready The film develops quickly and is subject to extremes of temperature in which it fairs very poorly. We were unable to take any decent photos in the recent freezing weather, so this camera is really not suitable for the winter, although I can see her having a lot of fun with it later in the year. An added bonus of this camera, is the photographs are coated on the back with an easy to peel sticker, so you can place them anywhere you like. Polaroid have just introduced a numbering system which takes the guessing out of what remaining film you h
                    ave left When the film is finished it is very easily removed and replaced with a new one. To my amazement, my mum bought one for me too, so I have been keenly snapping away too. My house now has little pictures all over the place, however I was disappointed to discover that Polaroid did not have the forethought to market little photo albums for them. Ideally, this camera has the necessary features required by a compact camera with the added bonus of instant pictures, however, you have to squint a bit to see them properly. It seems to be durable and quite resilient, my daughter has dropped hers a few times and it still works well. Overall a great buy, shame that there is no tripod screw at the bottom though. Currently Boots are selling the I-zone film at the three for two deals, making them less than £3.35 each. I had the forethought to stock up a bit on them; I can see them getting plenty of use. Polaroid have a website specifically for the i-zone user , it can be seen at www.izone.polaroid.com This little camera is great, and ideal for kids too. Very highly recommended.

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