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Treasure Island Dizzy (Classic Game)

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3 Reviews

Manufacturer: Codemaster / Genre: Adventures & Role-playing

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    3 Reviews
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    • More +
      14.05.2009 11:10

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      classic game

      Treasure Island Dizzy is a classic adventure game. It is a game that was very popular in its time because of the games playability. This is still true today and you will still enjoy the game not matter what age you are.

      The game is about Dizzy. Dizzy is an egg with an egg family. Through the game you will meet with different characters related to Dizzy. Each will provide their own advice and sometimes necessary items to get through the game.

      You as Dizzy must uncover gold coins that are hidden through the game as well as pick up items and solve puzzles to progress. You have only one life and once you are killed you have to start the whole game again.

      You will jump through trees, explore the depths of the ocean and hidden treasure troves. You will explode rock and talk to dear friends to succeed.

      Its such an exciting simple game that keeps you coming back for more and more. The game although short is fun and not as easy as you might think.

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    • More +
      12.11.2008 15:34
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      A retro classic.

      Dizzy, our egg shaped hero has somehow managed to get stranded on a Desert island. His way of escape is to the right to the sea but he cannot swim. This leaves him with one option, left to find something on someone to help him of the island.

      "Treasure Island Dizzy" is the second in a long series of Dizzy games released on multiple gaming platforms during the 80's and early 90's by the legendary Oliver Twins. The roaming two-dimensional platformer was really established by the Dizzy franchise and even in this advanced gaming age "Treasure Island Dizzy" is very playable.

      As with all the Dizzy platforming adventures (ignoring the various bizarre offshoots), "Treasure Island Dizzy" involved standard puzzle solving at it's most basic level. Whether it was picking up a treasure chest to access a higher area or a snorkel so you can start to explore the sea this is very much a lesson in logic. However, some of the puzzles and item usages are incredibly bizarre as the game progresses and it is unfortunate that you have just the one life as you trial and error numerous items.

      Despite being able to carry three items they are cycled through by dropping the first one on display. This can be very frustrating and challenging especially in the water were you definitely need an item but risk dropping your snorkel and dying. With no restart points this game, like so many games of the 80's is a lesson in perseverance and reward. You do get satisfaction in getting that little bit further each time but you may also want to throw your gaming machine out the window!

      The simplistic keyboard controls of all the Dizzy games work just as well here with left right and jump being the games bread and butter. Controls in this game always seem to have a slight delay on them so you soon get the knack of jumping a second before you actually need to in order to avoid a trap, bad guy etc but collision detection is pretty atrocious. You could swear you did not touch those spikes only to find yourself dead and back at the starting point.

      Graphically, the Amiga version was certainly the most polished and I remember it being the most colourful of the Dizzy games. "Treasure Island Dizzy" is certainly the most appealing looking of the franchise and the maps are more pleasant to play on despite being comparatively small and requiring lots of backtracking and item juggling. Sound is a virtual non-existent in this title but it does not really suffer for it as the repetitive title music is pretty pointless.

      This is a game with some nice touches including the fact not all contact with bad guys i.e flying bugs kill you but can instead hamper you by reversing your controls. Clouds, a mainstay of all Dizzy games are once again central here to access many areas and the fact some are more solid than others lead to lots of "leaps of faith" to try and get to a new area.

      All in all "Treasure Island Dizzy" is one of the most challenging, annoying but enjoyable Dizzy titles I have played and one that will stay in my memory as a reminder of how good games used to be made. Of course, few of you will have an Amiga nowadays and if you do will be lucky to pick up this title from eBay. However, you are in luck as the creators Codemasters have released it for the PC for free. Why not download it for some retro gaming fun?

      http://www.codemasters.co.uk/downloads/details.php?id=17413

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      • More +
        06.09.2007 02:50
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        Produced by Codemasters (1987).

        The sequel to ‘Dizzy – The Ultimate Cartoon Adventure’ by talented geeks the Oliver Twins was one of the most popular in the series, despite still having a few of the bugs and frustrating features left over from its impossibly hard predecessor. A platform adventure game, the player controls Dizzy – a smiling egg with arms and legs – across a number of screens in the game world, coming across obstacles that can only be conquered by picking up and using the correct item, or skilfully jumping to avoid. As Dizzy cannot destroy the numerous enemies and traps that get in his way across land, sea and sky, the game requires a degree of skill and patience. As Dizzy only has one life, without even the health bar that would be added to all later sequels, the relatively small game will likely never be completed.

        The setting of ‘Treasure Island Dizzy’ can be deduced from its title: Dizzy starts the game on a beach by a deadly sea that requires a snorkel to enter, and the only other direction is left. Unfortunately, the jump up to the rock face is slightly too high, meaning Dizzy will have to pick up the empty treasure chest lying around in the sand, move it to the foot of the cliff, and use it as a step. This first, basic puzzle sets the game up nicely, but is perhaps too deceptively simple, as the numerous items that will be found thereafter are often perplexing even in the long-run. Dizzy can only carry three items at any one time, and without the easy inventory system of later games, whichever item he picked up first will be dropped before the others whenever the fire button is pressed. This adds an even greater degree of difficulty to a game that was already overflowing with danger, as carelessly picking up an object while underwater could potentially lead to dropping your invaluable snorkel and floating silently to game over.

        The Dizzy games were some of my favourites on the Amiga, and despite the added frustrations that came with this game, its unique layout and attractive setting make it one of the most memorable, particularly compared to the more fantasy- and castle-based games in the series, which became a little repetitive. The game map is a modest size compared to some of the later games, but an awful lot of retreading left and right is required, and it’s likely that most players will never see some of the later screens up in the clouds and over the other side of the ocean. Dizzy’s obstacles include wooden cages in the treehouse village that can fall and capture him – these merely need to be avoided by jumping across the landing area or finding a way over or under it – and huge flying insects that don’t hurt him like the underwater enemies, but instead have quite strange and interesting effects.

        As well as solving each of the puzzles as it comes by selecting the correct item to use, or (more likely) having to head back to wherever you left the seemingly pointless item to retrieve it, the player is also required to find every single golden coin scattered throughout the game in order to return home at the end. To make matters even worse, many of these are hidden behind bushes and doorways or in other locations, meaning that players will effectively have to press the joystick’s ‘fire’ button (or the ‘enter’ key as keyboard equivalent) on every suspicious piece of scenery they pass. With this mix of puzzle solving ingenuity and patience-testing, the game can be enjoyed by people of all ages, including young children, who will perhaps learn a thing or two from the solutions posed.

        Unusually for an early video game made in the late 80s, one of the best features of ‘Treasure Island Dizzy’ is its soundtrack. Lacking sound effects of any kind, the only noise is the synthesised main theme looping tirelessly, with one of my all-time favourite video game themes (alongside those from ‘Golden Axe,’ obviously). Unlike ‘Spellbound Dizzy,’ the theme doesn’t grate on my nerves over time as it’s based equally in the high and low ranges, and it would sound really excellent in a primitive electric guitar version. The graphics are less impressive, far flatter and less detailed than the later games in the series and lacking in the shading, causing Dizzy to basically resemble a white oval with a crude black outline dotted around him, his facial features also seeming quite crushed into the available space. The terrain is very repetitive also, perhaps a necessity of the space available on the original floppy disc or cassette tape, but in terms of the actual gameplay itself there’s very little to date this. The extreme difficulty is quite unfair, particularly when the player nears the end only to die in an accidental mis-jump due to the difficult controls, but the basic premise of Dizzy games makes them just as enjoyable today as they were originally, if a lot harder to come by.

        Many of the staples of the series such as the Yolkfolk, the energy bar, the inventory screen and Dizzy’s hat would only come into place with the next game, ‘Fantasy World Dizzy,’ and I would recommend the games that came after as the most easily playable and satisfying in the series. Nevertheless, ‘Treasure Island Dizzy’ was an important early development that vastly improved over the original and introduced many of the elements, enemy designs and items that Codemasters would continue to rip off in future games of the series. And as I said, that primitive synthesised music is completely great.

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