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      25.08.2008 21:30
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      Henna is probably the most used herbal product in south asian festials and celebrations.

      Henna is actually a plant usually found in Africa, southern Asia, and northern Australasia in semi-arid zones. I wouldn't call it tattoo; it's more like a dye. The application is simple; you just add water to the henna powder, make a paste, apply it, wait till it dries up and then wash it off, leaving the pattern. Nowadays, it has turned into a big market, with companies making henna cones, which are ready to use and easy to use for making patterns on hands and feet. Henna can be used on any part of the body as it's totally harmless. Most of the times, it is used on hands and feet. But it rural areas, it is used on hair instead of hair dye. Even on nails instead of nail polish! It is mostly applied before weddings and festivals by females. Young girls gather and apply henna on each other's hands. It is applied on the bride's palms a night before the wedding, called "mehndi". The word mehndi is synonymous with henna. The henna for the mehndi night is bought by the bride groom's family. Girls holding plates of henna and candles dance in circle, usually lead by the bride groom's sister. Then they put their henna plates in the middle and dance around it. Women usually add other stuff along with water to the powder, usually vinegar, with the belief that it darkens the color. Other women leave the powder soaked in water for a night with the same belief. I wouldn't be wrong if I say henna is one of the most used herbal products in Pakistan, India and Afghanistan. It has become an important part of our culture.

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        14.10.2003 00:54
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        • "No age limit where tattoos you have to be 18"

        The thought of having a tattoo scares me, to think going through pain to get something that in year you will probably regret and dislike. Henna is your safe option, I had one done last summer on my ankle of a chinese symbol, it lasted about 3 weeks and to be honest with you by that time I was glad it had gone. The process of having it done was pain free, alittle cold at first but that was all. You just have to wait for it to dry and it peels of leaving the image you asked for. Hearing about the girl who had a reaction to henna leaving her a scare makes me feel lucky it didn't happen to me, but my advice would be to ask what type of henna it is before having and make sure your not allergic to any of the contents. I have also brought many henna kits which I have used on myself and they are good vaule if you are a good artist. But can be abit messy.

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          29.08.2001 03:00
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          I’ve always wanted a tattoo, partly because it would drive my Mum insane, but mostly because I think they can look pretty cool. Ever since my elder sister got a gorgeous blue dolphin tattooed onto her stomach, I’ve been riddled with envy and desperate for one of my own. However, as I am only sixteen, I’m going to have to wait a few years before a decent tattoo artist will touch me with a needle. Still, it’s not the end of the world. Until I am old enough to get a real tattoo, I can have great fun experimenting with Henna. Henna is a traditional herbal cosmetic and has been used by women from South Asia, the Middle East and North Africa for over 9000 years. It is used to decorate hands, fingernails and hair, often for celebrations such as weddings. Its reddish colour is considered to be very beautiful and to bring good luck in the countries where it is traditionally used. The dye found in Henna will stain skin, nails and hair red, burgundy, dark orange or reddish brown very safely and easily. I discovered Henna for the first time not long ago when I was on a day-trip to Brighton with my friends. We were wondering along the pier when we came across a little Henna tattoo parlour, and decided to get tattoos done. I picked a little cat - very appropriate considering my name is ‘Cat’ I thought! The man applied the Henna paste to my shoulder quickly and skilfully, and in under a minute my tattoo was completed. At eight pounds it was quite expensive, but definitely worth it. My tattoo lasted about three weeks, but after it had faded away I wanted another one. Deciding it would be good if I could give myself a Henna tattoo whenever I wanted to, I bought myself a Henna kit from a shop in London. The kit contained fifty grams of henna powder, a cone to apply it with, a small bottle of lemon juice, and a tattoo stencil. At only three pounds it was a bargain. Transforming the Henna powder into a paste is r elatively easy. You take about a tablespoonful of the powder and add a couple of teaspoons of strained lemon juice to it. A little clove oil or powder can also be added at this point to help darken the colour. Next simply mix and add more lemon juice if required until you have a thick paste, then cover the bowl or put with cling-film and leave for a few hours before applying to your skin. Wash and exfoliate the area of skin you want to work on. Using a plastic applicator bottle or cone, you can now apply the Henna paste, either by using a stencil or, if you have a steady hand and are feeling brave, by freehand. Once the design is complete, dab the area with a lemon and sugar syrup to help seal the colour. Then just leave the Henna as it is for about six hours, taking care not to smudge it. The dried paste should flake off the skin by itself after this time, but if it doesn’t, scrape it off with your fingernail or a plastic knife. The Henna tattoo should last between two and four weeks, but it can last longer depending on the quality of the Henna and the care taken when applying it. You should be able to lengthen the life of your tattoo by covering it with sun block when you go outside, and Vaseline when you take a bath or shower. However, a warning must come with using Henna. Many people are attracted by ‘black Henna’ – a product which has an additional dye added to the paste to dye the skin jet black. Often the extra chemical is PPD, which is extremely dangerous because it is a toxin that is able to get into the bloodstream through the skin. Once in the system, PPD toxins can damage the liver and cause serious damage, so it’s best to stick with natural Henna, which is risk-free. Henna has recently become very popular in western countries. Several popular books have been published on the subject, and Henna supplies are becoming more and more available across the world. Celebrities including Madonn a, Sting, Demi Moore and many others have been photographed wearing Henna, and many people have been eager to explore this harmless body art. So for those of you who want a beautiful tattoo without having to be touched by a needle, now you know what to do!

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            17.08.2001 01:34
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            Last summer, my friend and I had another one of our ‘great’ ideas. Her being a fashion/ trend worshiper, this was how the plan went: We’d go for our last minute holiday shop in London, and finish it off with going to Oxford Street’s famous Selfridges, where we’d heard that they did ‘really good’ henna tattoos. So, all set with our shopping lists (that’s not really, true, I don’t do shopping lists, I can’t cope with lists…too organised for my liking, but it sounds good) we caught the train to Oxford Circus, and let the shopping commence. When everything in sight was bought, we trundled down the street to Selfridges. After half an hour or so of searching and wrong directions from the staff, we finally found the henna tattoo artist’s little booth...only the henna tattoo artist wasn’t there. However, we were assured by another girl working there that she would be back in 10 minutes. So that gave us time to look around, and I fell upon a little book about the art of henna… …Henna is a traditional art of body painting, which originated around the Middle East, India, Pakistan and North Africa. It is a paste made from finely ground leaves from the Henna plant, to which hot water is then added. Henna has many names, due to the different languages of the areas from which it originated. (A few examples are, Mendee, Jamica Mignontte...But you didn’t really need to know that, I was just feeling all showy-offy). Henna has always been used for body decoration, although it was also used for other purposes, for example, the Moroccans rubbed it on their palms, because they believed it would reduce body temperature, and the ancient Egyptians painted it on the fingers and toes of Pharoahs before they were mummified. It’s only been in recent years (i.e. the last five or so years) that the art has come over seas and been taken in by the western fashio n culture. So, what happens when you get a henna tattoo? Well, the paste is applied in the pattern that you’ve chosen, and then you leave it- taking care not to crease the skin as the paste is drying, else, the end result will be distorted. The paste will dry to form a hardish crust, which will then flake off, leaving a browny-orangey mark where the paste was. The henna is NOT permanent, and will last for anything up to a few days to a few weeks. There are debates about how good this can be for your health as it is a substance alien to your body, which you allow to be absorbed into your skin, and therefore into your bloodstream…but then again, who knows?? …So anyway, the lady comes back from where-ever she was, and we get our tattoos done- I wanted a little butterfly, but she said that it’d have to be quite big because she wouldn’t be able to do all the fine detail (isn’t that what artists are supposed to be good at??) So I settle for a less detailed, slightly larger than wanted butterfly. When it’s finished, she covers it up with some tissue, and tapes it to my hip, to protect it from clothing while it dries. On the train, a few hours later, I take the tissue off to find...the lines of the butterfly about 7mm wide, lines smudged from the so-called ‘protective tissue’ and the shape barely resembling a butterfly! But don’t let my bad experience put you off, henna tattoos are a great idea and to buy your own kit is not that expensive (anything from about £6-7 upwards), and even if you are the remotest bit artistic, you’ll be able to create something half-decent. So by all means try henna, but by all means, avoid Selfridges like the plague! A little tip if you are going to buy your own kit- henna paste comes in tubes, but be sure to get a tube with the finest nozzle you can, this way you will achieve much clearer results and the detail can be much finer. You can also buy coloured henna pastes, but personally, I think the original stuff looks best. You can buy the kits from most high street chemists like Superdrug or Boots, and also most beauty salons.

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              01.06.2001 05:01
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              I think the fact henna does fade is wonderful, you can be artistic but it can change as often as you want it to. There are some wonderful easy to do designs, they vary in price but are normally inexpensive. I use henna as a statement of the way I feel, I like the way if I have an important interview to go to I don't have to wear the Henna tattoo. It gives you the freedom to experiment without the fear that you are stuck with it for life. If you like the design then get a real tattoo, it is like a trial run. The henna tattoos can be very difficult to do, unless you go to a professional to get them done. They are painless and can last 2 or 3 weeks depending on different pastes and preparations. Henna is a great way of expressing your individuality.

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                01.06.2001 04:43
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                • fades

                When a person has tattoos it tells me one thing; that they are dependable and reliable and live by their convictions. I know that that may seem outlandish since the people most likely to have tattoos are the criminal underclass and rock and roll musicians, but it does display to the world that these people are bold and brave enough to stand for a message that they intend to clutch onto forever. I like to ink people up myself, only as an amatuer. First off I would never make it as a pro since I won't do flash- that absurd nonsense that is generic and will eventually be painfully removed anyways. All my work has some sort of flair and significance, so I guess I wouldn't make it in a business peddling individualism when I am such a tyrant. So it really irks me to see henna (unless its a cultural thing with Indians) because to me it sends the message "we want to be cool like real ink people but we lack the conviction to do it" So just think about it the next time you want henna done, you are telling the world that you are a shifty trendy weakling that wants to follow the crowd but doesn't have the guts and tolerance of pain to commit

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                  15.03.2001 13:48
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                  It was only after I read a dooyoo opinion on Henna tattoos that I decided to have a look if I could get a packet next time I was out and about. To my surprise the local supermarket sold them, and for a very cheap price of 28p a packet. In a packet you get two long tattoos, and three small ones. There’s also a chewing gum and that’s got a tattoo inside. So, I do think you get your money worth considering the fact these days you can’t even buy a bar chocolate with 28p (obviously depends on which one you buy.) They are quite simple to apply, you damp them with some water, press it on your skin and then peel off after a minute or so. Some of the designs look very good, and although you can tell they are fake, they are not that bad quality. I was going out so I put two one the long one on my upper arm, it looked ok and it didn’t crumple of as some can do. It was quite easy to remove, just wash with soap. Although, I did use them I do think they were more for young children than adults. The designs varied and some were really good, Chinese writing and even a dragon. I have seen celebrity’s wear them but I sire they use the Henna powder and have them printed on, this is a good method of having your own dark red tattoos. Get some henna powder from an Asian store, mix it with water so it’s not thick or buy the cones which are much easier to use. And get someone to draw you a design, it’s best if someone else does it for you, can get mucky. Leave it on for a while and then rinse off. The good thing is if it is done properly it won’t smudge. The end results are good and better than the tattoos. However, it can be a bit difficult to take off so you’ll have to wait while it washes off, which can take a couple of weeks. Overall the Henna tattoos are good but more for children than anything else.

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                    21.02.2001 07:09
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                    My dissertation for university was actually on henna tattoo's. Here are a few pointers. Henna goes back centuries, however, it is not known for sure where henna originated from. There is evidence which suggests that henna was used in many different parts of the world at different times. Henna was used in Spain, Africa, Asia, The Arab countries. I had to do some intense research to find information on this topic as there was very little available. I found that there were very few books available and therefore I had to make use of the internet greatly. Those of you interested in the history of henna, I would recommend that you take a look at the following website as it is probably one of the best on this topic. (www.hennapage.com) Different parts of the world use henna in different ways, however it is very commonly used as a decoration for the hands, especially for the bride. In India, it is almost impossible to have a wedding without putting henna on the brides hand. Henna designs vary all over the world, in Asia, they tend to have very intricate and delicate designs, in the Arab countries they tend to use flowery designs, African designs are more bold. Henna is not permanent, that is one of the reasons why it has become so popular in the west recently. It is a temporary tattoo. Henna tattooing has become very popular in the west, however, there is a lot more to henna than henna tattoo's. Henna can be done at home very cheaply. You can buy a ready made henna cone for approximately £2. This cone allows you to paint intricate henna designs. You can also buy henna powder and make your own paste. There are different ideas on what you should mix with the henna powder to make the paste. Most older people suggest that tea and a little clove oil mixed in the paste add to the colour. When henna is applied to the hands and feet of the bride, it is said that she should hold her hands above smoke from cloves, this too adds to the colour. This does work, talking from experience. Having henna done proffessionally costs anything between £8 a hand to £30 a hand. But prices vary depending on where you are having it done.

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                      15.02.2001 03:52
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                      [Update appears at end of op] Henna, or Mehndi, has become a popular alternative to the more common form of tattooing, thanks to big names such as Madonna having designs applied for videos and public appearances, but not many people know just where to buy it or how to use it. I was introduced to henna a few years ago by a friend, and I've been doing my own designs ever since, and decorating people when I've had the chance. I'm not claiming to be an expert by any means, but the following, I suppose, is a guide to what I believe is everything the beginner needs to know before starting to apply their own designs. What is henna? -------------- Well, henna is the powder that's made from grinding down the young leaves and twigs of the plant Lawsonia Inermis, usually found in Iran, India, Pakistan, Egypt and North Africa. Traditionally (and most well known) it's used in India to decorate the soles of the feet and palms of the hands for weddings, though it's been used for centuries in Egypt, Greece, Spain, and Turkey (to name just the ones I know about). In what forms is it available? ------------------------------ The most popular way to buy henna seems to be in paste form. It comes in tubes with a nozzle supplied for application, though with some brands a few different sized (and occassionally, shaped) nozzles are included in the box. The information leaflets are usually difficult to read and understand as they're originally translated from Indian, and not very well translated in my experience. The cost can vary depending on the type of store you buy them in. For example, I can buy a tube in an 'alternative' store in my area for £2, but by going about a mile further down the road I can buy the same product for about 50p in an indian shop. It's worth shopping around if you're in an area that allows you to do this, and thankfully, I am. Ano ther form to buy it in is powder. The companies don't usually supply the necassary extras in order to mix your paste, but these can be found in most peoples kitchens, and if not can be easily obtained from most stores. As with the paste, the instructions can be difficult to comprehend. The same thing seems to apply with price as with the tubes of paste, though the powder doesn't seem to be availble in as many 'alternative' stores as the paste is. It's also possible to buy henna transfers, but from all accounts they don't give a great variety of designs. They are easy to apply, but I don't feel the cost of them is especially good value for money, in some places costing as much as £5 for a variety of styles and sizes. Kits are available in some stores, supplying a tube of henna paste, stencils and instructions. The instructions in these kits tend to be much easier to understand as they're produced for the market at which they're aimed. I'm not a big fan of the kits simply because they're so expensive. I've seen them advertised in a few stores for around £7. If you consider you can buy stencils separately for anywhere between 25p and £1, once you've paid for your henna separately too you can save a few quid. Another disadvantage is that you may not like the stencils supplied in the kit. It's a good starting point though, if you've never used it before. How do you use it? ----------------- The tubes are very simple to use. Simply remove the cap, attatch the supplied nozzle, and away you go. A few tips though before you start : - Practice on a piece of paper first. That way you can get the feel of the consistency of the paste, how smoothly it flows, how much pressure you need to apply. - Always have some tissue or kitchen paper close to hand ready for 'accidents'. If you manage to get any on furniture or clothes, it wil l stain and can be difficult to remove. - I always have a pin at my side too. The reason for this is that the nozzle can become blocked with remains of twigs that weren't sifted from the powder before the paste was made. This is when the accidents can happen, as once you've removed the blockage the paste can suddenly start 'spurting' from the nozzle at an alarming rate (the first time this happened to me, it went half way across the room, hitting the carpet, sofa, and so on, on its travels.) The same thing can happen if you encounter a small air bubble in the tube. I tend to securely wrap some kitchen paper around the nozzle and squeeze very very gently until I feel it 'give', which means any mess (which is inevitable at this stage) is safely contained. - I keep a good supply of cocktail sticks at hand. The reason being, if I make a mistake on a design it can easily (and safely) be lifted off using the cocktail stick. What about mixing my own paste? ------------------------------- If you decide to try using the powder and mixing your own paste instead of using the ready-made tubes, you'll need some pointers. This is the easiest (and most effective) method I've used : - Place about a tablespoon of the powder into a small bowl and slowly add some fresh lemon juice until you get a thick paste. Bear in mind it's a good idea to sift the powder before you use it to get rid of any twigs, and seiving the lemon juice should remove the pith... both of these can block your cone (which I'll mention in a moment). - Mix in some very hot, and very strong tea or coffee until the texture of the paste resembles toothpaste. I use tea or coffee at this stage because it adds to the strength of the end colour. - Cover the bowl with cling film and leave it overnight (yes, overnight. It seems a long time to wait, but the end result will be worth it). - W hen you come to use your paste, add a couple more drops of lemon juice and mix it thoroughly. The acid in the lemon juice assists in extracting the colour from the henna. How do I apply it? ------------------ Well, there's a few options here. Some people swear by using a cocktail stick, some people use brushes (much like painting it on), but my favoured method is using a cone. They're easy and cheap to make, and simple to use (and faster than using a cocktail stick or brush). Simply cut a square from a freezer bag (or similar thick plastic bag) about 5"x5" in size. Cut diagonally. Taking hold of the two corners at either end of the longest edge, bring them together and past each other so that a point forms in the centre of the longest edge. Secure the exposed edge with tape (I find electricians tape works best, but cellotape works too), then secure all other edges where paste could seap through onto your hands. I usually wrap a little tape around the point of the cone too to strengthen it, but it's not always necessary. Use your own judgement. Once you've made your cone, spoon the paste into it until it's filled about half way. Push the paste down towards the point and make sure there are no air bubbles if you can. Once you're happy with it, bring the top edges of the cone together and secure them with tape. I also fold the top down once and tape it again, just to make doubly sure it won't seap out the top. Now all you need to do is snip a tiny amount from the point of the cone to form your nozzle. I always test it on paper first to make sure I've got the right sized nozzle for my needs, and if I haven't, I just snip off a little more until I do. It sounds complicated, I know, but it really isn't. When you've done it once, you'll wonder what all the fuss was about the next time you try it (well, I did anyway). What about designs? ------------------- I started off doing patterns on myself freehand, based on some of the Indian designs I'd found. Doing a simple search on the internet will supply you with many types of designs, from the more traditional Indian, to the more geometric Greek styles. Some sites will also supply simple black designs for you to use as well as the more elaborate dragons, flowers, and so on. It's also possible to buy magazines of flash (designs on paper which tattoo artists use) in some of the bigger stores, though they've been few and far between in my experience. Obviously, if you're even just the slightest bit artistic, you can do your own designs. Actually, let's face it, how many of you can draw a simple pattern without really thinking about it? Most of us can, without being great artists. Doing it will at least give you something original to show off. When I've decided on the design I'm going to use, I draw it onto my skin (or a friends, or anyone who happens to want one doing, depending whether I have a stall at an event or not) using an aqua coloured eye pencil, but you could use any colour, or a pen if you prefer. Either way, it's always useful to have guidelines on the skin before you apply the paste. How long should I leave the paste on? ------------------------------------- Once you're happy your design in finished, ideally it should be left for at least a few hours. Some people recommend 6 hours, some people recommend overnight. You can protect the design by applying a mixture of lemon juice and sugar once it's dried a little. The mixture forms a thin skin, therefore allowing little or no air to reach it and dry it prematurely. Some people also carefully and gently wrap kitchen or toilet roll around the design, then cling film, finally securing it with tape. This allows the paste to stay damp as long as possible, and the lo nger it takes to dry the stronger the end colour will be. Bear in mind that the colour of your design will darken over 24 hours. It should be orange when you first remove the dried paste, but will slowly darken to brown. The colour tends to be strongest on the soles of the feet and palms of the hands. How long does it last? ---------------------- The finished designs can last anywhere from a week to three or four weeks, depending on your skin type, how often you wash the design, how well you look after it. I keep it well moisturised, as the design only fades as your layers of skin gradually (and naturally) flake away. Can I get any colours other than brown? --------------------------------------- Yes, it's possible to buy other colours of henna, but one thing to remember... henna is naturally brown, so when it's a different colour there have been chemicals added to it. I've heard and read a lot of horror stories concerning 'black henna', where the person in question has ended up with extremely bad burns because of the chemicals used in the paste to make it black. I've also seen the photos on the internet, and trust me, it's not pretty. People have been scarred for life by using it. I would never recommend anyone trying black henna. If I refuse to use it myself, I'm not likely to tell others they should try it. I have sensitive skin, should I have henna applied? ----------------------------------------------------- Bear in mind that there is always a possibility of skin irritation whether you have sensitive skin or not. I've always skin-tested the paste on myself and at least one other willing friend or family member before using it at events. Just as well, as a batch I'd bought the weekend before an event caused extreme itching where the design had been applied. While the paste was still wet, the skin underneath started to burn and itch. When it was washed off (immediately I might add) as well as a light orange design being on my (and my freinds) skin, the design was also red and raised. This has only happened once in the years I've been using it, but it can happen, so doing a small skin test before you do a large design on yourself or anyone else is always a good idea. So, that's henna. I love henna body art, simply because you can do the designs yourself and change them when you want to. They're also useful for deciding if you want a permanent tattoo or not. If you're like me, you'll simply keep having a different design every few weeks or month because you get bored too easily. This ended up being a much longer opinion than I intended, I guess I got a little carried away. Thankyou for sticking with it if you lasted this long ;) ----------------------------- Update (22/04/01) ----------------- Since writing this I've found a few brands of the henna paste in tubes have differed in design. Where originally the tubes were always thin metal, making it relatively easy to roll down the excess, some brands have started supplying their product in a soft plastic tube. Now this, on first inspection, seemed like an excellent idea - less pressure on the hands (especially thumb) because of the more pliable material. However, this wasn't the case. Because of the soft plastic used for the tube it springs back when folded down, meaning the paste is that little bit more difficult to control (due to constantly adjusting the tube excess). Since the tube itself has changed in design, so has the nozzle. It's now longer than it was, and the base of it is wider to fit the tube. Yet more fiddling trying to get a good (and comfortable) hand position, and one which would also allow me to keep control of it long enough to finish what I was doing. After around twenty minutes of applying a design to a fr iend's arm, my hand was sore, sore, sore. There's a point to this, really there is. I'd advise that before you buy any tubes of henna, open the box and check what type of tube it is. It's a good idea to open it anyway and check to make sure you have the nozzle(s). They've never been wrapped in cellophane in my experience, so it's usually not a problem. You may find the plastic ones are easier to use, but I didn't. Okay, that's it for now. You can go. Run along ;)

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                        05.12.2000 01:08
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                        You may have seen these in your local shop but never noticed them, but they are really good and for 25p a packet well worth buying. They are Henna tattoos, which you can put on your arms, and they look like proper tattoos. They look good on any part of your body and stay on for about 2-3 days. With the party seasons on it’s way I think they look really nice with sleeveless tops and crop tops, they come in various different designs and look quite real. I saw a lot of young girl wearing them and they looked really good so I went out and bought a few packets, they have some really good and different designs. I love the Chinese style ones best. The wording looks really cool. You may have seen David Beckham with a fake tattoo that’s how the designs are so they are well worth buying. But, if you are not into them I bet you’re little kid cousin will like them. It’s a really easy way of having a tattoo without the pain. You get one long design and about four or five smaller ones. You may think fake tattoos are for kids but they do look good on older people with the right tops.

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                          27.11.2000 00:10
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                          If you didn't fancy the idea of a permanent body tatoo, why not consider a Mehndi design instead??? Mehndi is basically Henna (I think, pls correct me if I am wrong), and comes in the form of powder, but u can buy it in tubes (like toothpaste) and there are many stencils that u can buy in shops such as Claire's Accessories. U can also buy Mehndi starter packs from the above shop, and create ur own designs. But I found it really difficult with that starter kit. It can be very messy too. And u also need some lemon juice to use as a kind sealant. The Mehndi eventually dries, and you have to leave it on your skin (overnight preferably). It lasts anything btwn 4 days to about 3 wks-depends on how u look after it. And it usually turns into light/dark brown colour. Nowadays, its much easier to have it professionally done. One of my close friends whom is Indian, made a beautiful design on my arm, which lasted for about 2 and a 1/2 wks. She now works part time at a tattoo/body piercing shop, 'cos she's really good at it. But you can also get it done at places such as Top Shop Oxford Street, London, on the lowest floor, and abroad I heard, like Greece! Try it urself, but I recommend you either find someone who knows how to do it, or go and get it professionally done.

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                            04.09.2000 01:24
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                            I have been fascinated by tatoo's since I saw a beautiful bird on a friends arm ....... Over the last few years I have seriously thought about having a permanent tatoo done but each time I have decided against it as I cannot imagine what it would look like when I was 88!!!!*g* I have however had henna tatoo's and these I love. They are not permanent and this means that you can change the style and pattern at different times. The only problem is that you have to have them done where you can leave the area alone and uncovered for a certain length of time to allow the henna to be absorbed into the skin properly........ this can be difficult!! All in all I think henna tatoo's are a good alternative to permanent tatoo's if you really are not sure.

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                            18.08.2000 18:29
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                            I ordered my Henna Tattoo Kit from Kleeneze, it arrived within the week, it contains a tube of Henna paste, design nozzles, cotton wool balls, design tattoo stencils sheet, and the instruction leaflet. I found it quite disappointing, it is rather difficult to use, although I still stand by my words and say, that the Henna tattoos are good, and when I had one done on holiday it lasted three weeks, and that was, with having a shower twice a day, and swimming everyday. To use your Henna kit from Kleeneze. You have to put the Henna paste on the stencils, and then put onto your skin and then go over with the paste. I found this rather difficult as the ink is in the form of a paste it doesn’t spread very easily, and comes out in lumps rather than nice and smoothly. This kit would be better if the ink was in a form of a pencil, rather than a tube of paste, it would be much easier to apply. I will keep trying and keep you updated on how I get on. My advice for now is, if you want a tattoo, but don’t want a permanent one, have a Henna one done, but go to a salon. I will keep looking for the Henna kits, but perhaps try different ones.

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                              12.07.2000 16:28

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                              Henna is a wonderful thing with many uses. It's a good way to test out ideas for tattoos - if you're unsure how it might look, whether you can live with it, have a trial run with henna as it will last a few weeks and allow you to make the right decisions on size and placement. Also having your hands and feet(especially with sandals)is another lovely way of making an event special just like buying a new dress. It can be hard to do at home though so practice before applying it to the skin or if you're unsure or not very artisitc it may be better to go to a professional.

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