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Toothcare in General

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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

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      05.09.2002 02:59
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      *UPDATED SEE BOTTOM OF OP* 'Ah, dosnthgf fgefgl suiu btrdss' And those were the first words I spoke after the dentist had finished fitting phase 1 of my dental braces project. It wasn't really those letters but I think you get the idea - I couldn't talk in anyway that resembled speech. The first part of my brace, (not visible at first, as it was sat under the roof of my mouth. in a shape I can only describe as 'horseshoe') came after a couple of years preparation work. Once every few months I would go to the Dental Hospital, in Newcastle (near St. James' Park) and I would wait in the colourfully painted waiting room of the Children's Department. At the age of 11 I was (and still am at 14) still required to use the Children's Department, with its large, colourful toys, screaming kids and a TV that always showed ITV. The dentist would lead me into a large, low-ceilinged room divided into several areas like mini Dentist surgeries. Here, I would sit down on the dentist's chair and He would poke around in my mouth, taking notes. Once, I had to go and have photos taken of my teeth. Another time, x-rays. The next time I went these really small rubber bands (literally they could only just fit around the top of my teeth) were fitted round the top of my teeth (the teeth round the side of my mouth) in an attempt to widen gaps so they could fit this metal thing that looked like a black hoolahoop around 1 tooth on each side. This 'hoolahoop' would one day connect several pieces of my brace together? but not for a while yet. Then, one day, after nearly 2 years of 'preparation', I was required to go and get the first part of my fixed brace fitted. I remember that day well, it was June 2001, I had had no sleep the previous night, and I was really nervous. To this day I still don't really know why. I think I thought it was going to be some kind of operation or something. When I got
      there I was surprised to see exactly what the first part was. Not the brackets to go round the front of my teeth, as I had expected, but a horseshoe-shaped metal band that would sit on the roof of my mouth connected on both sides, pushing all the teeth outwards. Reverting back to the start of this op, as I mentioned, I could not talk properly for about 3 days, and even after then, it sounded like I had a lisp. I spat more when I talked, as this metal object in my mouth meant I was creating more saliva in my mouth. Before the brace, like you, I was used to eating normally. When I got home I unusually felt the need to eat a pear. I started eating, and immediately I was filled with shock. The brace! It got in the way! I was trying to eat food, but not used to something already in my mouth. At first, it was just that problem. Then came the pain. Aches, filling my mouth. With this foreign object in there, I was absent-mindedly fiddling with the damned thing with my tongue. As a result of this, my tongue got cut a few times and came up in ulcers. I had to eat liquidised food for nearly a week. I tended to stick to yoghurts. After a week, the unusual feeling of the brace wore off. The pain remained a while longer, but then, I just kind of forgot about it, and with no attention the pain left. (you will find this with most aches and pains - ignore them, think about something else and they will go away. Unless of course you've just chopped your hand off, in which case this method may not work.) I got used to the brace but the lisp remained at the best of times, just to annoy me. (I'm sorry, I know I?m making it sound as though the symptoms of a fixed brace have minds of their own) After a few months times moved on, and it was time to return to the Dental Hospital, for 'Phase 2'. (Actually I forgot to mention what was actually wrong with my teeth, and that may come in useful in the next part). Basically, my 2 front teeth had a mas
      sive gap in between them, and my incisors, which had come through, but, with a big lack of space, they had to sit up there. Even if, for any reason, you still don't understand, I'm sure you get the gist - my teeth were screwed. Big time. Therefore my brace aimed to have all my teeth lined up nicely, in about 2 years. Now, about 'Phase 2'. This time, I actually got those brackets fitted. I was told no: chewing gum, bubble gum, toffee, fizzy drinks etc. Basically, no fun for a young teen. As usual, it hurt at first, it felt unusual, but not so bad as last time. Of course, the new brackets on the front of my teeth scratched away at my gums. For this reason, they give you this wax, made from vegetable oil, to put on the sharp brackets. This means whenever the brace starts playing up, just put the wax on. Unless of course you lose it. Anyway, between September 2001 and June 2002, I went back to the old Dental Hospital. I got no new brackets, but each time they changed the wire, and each time they made it tighter, so the couple of days after each visit were painful when it came to eating. Especially stuff like crisps and toast. Then, when I was on holiday in August 2002, while I was on holiday in France, I ate something that dislodged part of the brace. I think it was the chewy French bread. It could have been a particularly chunky Milka bar I ate. Whatever it was, it caused the horseshoe band to come loose on one side of my mouth. In fact, the only thing stopping it from hanging down onto my tongue was the tiniest piece of remaining glue. Therefore for the rest of my holiday, I had to be careful what I ate, and how I ate it. Fortunately, my next appointment was in the following days after we came back, so I didn?t have to put up with it for long. Unfortunately, the appointment was on the day before my 14th Birthday. I would have painful and sensitive teeth on my birthday! When I went to the Dental Hospital, th
      ey actuall y too k out the horseshoe band, saying that I didn't need it anymore anyway. They didn't even mind I'd broken it! You'll remember when I first got that band my tongue couldn't help but explore it' I was now so used to having the band it now felt weird to have nothing unnatural there! They changed the wire on the ?Phase 2', or only remaining part, unfortunately the only visible part as well! I still have it now, and, yes, it did hurt a little on my birthday. However, I am used to the pain now anyway, it?s just a bit of a nuisance really! So that?s the story of my brace so far. They said 2 years at first, but apparently the whole treatment has gone quicker than anticipated so perhaps it'll be early 2003 when I'm free from it all, with nice teeth. I plan to update this op every time something big happens. At the moment, 2 of my teeth, not the front ones, but the 'second front' ones (sorry I don?t know their real name!) are pointing outwards a little so the brace is fixing that. The dentist said that I'm nearing the end of my treatment now. After this is fixed, I may get a removable brace, rather than a fixed one. At the beginning of my treatment, about 3 years ago now, they said they might have to remove some of my teeth, but fortunately they figured a way of fitting all my teeth in nicely. They also said that later in the treatment I might need a bottom brace, but at the moment that looks unlikely as my bite has come along well. Oh, by the way, I forgot to mention, during one of the particularly long periods between my appointments, my overbite was so bad I could pretty much fit my tongue through it. It was getting out of control, but they managed to fix it. Overall, my brace has been good. Well, I went through pain, annoyance and lots of questions from friends. But, in the end, my teeth have gone from terrible to good, and they're still improving! *UPDATE* Ye
      owch! I just ha d a major accident a few days ago. I was running in the dark (long story) but slipped on a sheet and fell FLAT on my face. My brace cut straight into my upper lip and it was bleeding like I'd just been shot. Oh, it hurt as well. Don't let that happen to you, it can happen in sports as well. - Some advice for people who may be getting a fixed brace - - Don't eat chewy foods - It dislodges your brace and it does hurt. - Don't bite into an apple - That also hurts. Cut i t up into slices. Annoying, I know, but safe. - Don't drink fizzy drinks like Coke - the sugar gets stuck behind the brace and rots your teeth. You may have stains on your teeth later. - Don't get in a fight - you won't want it broken. - Be careful in contact sports like Rugby. - Ask your dentist for more advice.

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        06.08.2002 01:17
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        I don't visit the dentist as often as I should. The very good reason is that, although I value my dentist highly, I rarely nowdays seem to escape without a large bill. Exactly a year ago a back tooth crumbled and the remains needed to be extracted. My dentist tells me that I have "very good teeth indeed" for which I am grateful. However, since I had already lost a tooth close to the damaged one, the answer was a permanent bridge. So a couple of weeks later, after 3 appointments, I left the surgery showing my new smile to all and sundry, but with an addition of nearly £1000 on a credit card. When the sweet receptionist called me 6 months later with my reminder, I told her that I was still recovering from the last financial extraction and would let her know. This morning I returned and, sure enough, a crown is needed. I shouldn't grumble as, when it comes down to it, I can have the work done. I feel strongly that the NHS falls down on this sort of thing, and someone else less fortunate would have just been left with a gap and eventually false teeth. A friend of mine has been told that she will have to wait 6 months for an NHS bridge. Even then it may well not be the permanently fixed variety. Over the years I have been drawn to the video running in the waiting room which graphically stresses the dangers of silver amalgam as a medium for fillings - the concern being that these amalgams contain 50% mercury. This morning, once again I watched the monitor as a better alternative to the available women's magazines, while waiting for an X-ray to develop. I had time to watch it right the way through and was impressed enough to dive into the net on my return home and print out reams of information on this subject. During my research I discovered that the video I had been watching was taken from a BBC Panorama programme shown during 1994. Having read the transcript of this (http://www.amalgam.ukgo.com/pantran
        .htm) I felt disturbed that the British Dental Association and the Government felt that there was no need to worry about this issue. It also became clear that the BDA hadn't even seen the results published in papers after extensive research. The BDA's fact sheet at the time stated that they had no concerns about children's teeth being filled with mercury-containing amalgam, despite the World Health Organisation's very real fears about this. My dentist only uses white material for fillings. However, to repeat myself, silver amalgam used by other practitioners contains 50% mercury which is known to leak from dental fillings; and research has been widely conducted in order to establish the subsequent probable health risks. To quote from the above website, mercury is "the most toxic non-radioactive metal known to man..." and this morning I watched men wearing full protective garments as they disposed of old amalgam fillings. Added to this, when ten year old fillings were scrutinised, it was found that 40% of the mercury originally contained had evaporated. The vapour would have been ingested. Tests on students who had volunteered to take part in experiments found that two thirds of the mercury found in the body came from dental fillings. Not a nice thought. It is not my way to quote too much from research results, however extensive and worrying, since I do not have the qualifications to query them. There is also the danger that I may lapse into an essay. However, having seen the Panorama programme, read the text of it and further delved into the subject, I found again and again that the leaking of mercury from fillings into the body, particularly the brain, has provoked deep research into diseases such as Alzheimers, MS, ME and other such illnesses. The findings from many sources appear conclusive and governments worldwide are being pressed to take this issue seriously. In at least one case by their own
        Public Health Authority. For those of us who have been happily living with a few of the old fillings, it seems that our diet, particularly if containing selenium, acts as a protection in that, with other minerals it aids removal of mercury from the system. Added to this is the fact that dental fillings are not the only source for the metal. However, the newer copper-containing fillings, used since the sixties, seem to leak a higher percentage of mercury due to the ease with which copper corrodes. This is an answer to those who say the material has been used for 150 years. The general advice seems to be don't rush off to have fillings replaced. However, if your dentist considers that there is no hazard with this amalgam, change to another dentist. In the meantime, make sure that children are not treated to this type of filling. The white alternatives are widely available and there is no need for any other sort to be used. In any case they are cosmetically preferable. Any dentist who still prefers the old-fashioned and ugly metal fillings is still in the dark ages. Mine won't even have them on the premises and I live in the sticks, not the fashionable town. A final thought. Mercury has been banned for all uses where a human may ingest it. Yet, astoundingly, this does not include the amalgam in our mouths. A few websites dispute the concerns, but an overwhelming majority promote the banning of this practice. The website in my 4th paragraph has numerous links to research findings together with questions and answers. It also includes the transcript of the Panorama programme which started me on all this. *Addendum* Sexy Kay's comment reinforced my own misgivings about writing this op. Please can I stress that I am not suggesting that those with silver fillings are going to become ill. After all, generations before us have had to use these. However, the information available has been there for a long t
        ime, but is only found by accident by people such as myself. It is for this reason that I felt concerned to inform and I have no worries about the silver fillings I have. Valerie

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          15.04.2002 03:06
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          I chose to write this to help all those who are fighting a losing battle against this malady . We are talking industry standard bad breath here and NOT FOOD BREATH .( Chew a gum if you have food breath ) I suffered from chronic halitosis for 12 years and spent thousands of pounds on treatment in vain . I had the best set of teeth but I smelled like rotten eggs and my tongue was yellow/white . Here's how you treat your problem . 1) Remember the best person to see if you have a problem is a breath specialist .Don't waste your time with your dentist ( here in england they know nothing about it and classify it as cosmetic) . I'll give you references below to the specialists in america . 2) Get your teeth cleaned by a dentist . Floss and brush . Don't listen to his bollox .. unless you have a tooth problem . Remember dentist is for your teeth . Breath specialist is for your breath . 3) Right now .. get your self esteem up . Here's the cure . Get Trioral rinse , paste and a tongue cleaner . QVC sells them . Dr Anthony Dailley is the best doctor to consult ( www.breathcure.com) . Your halitosis will vanish in 10 days . 4) I'm getting hydrofloss from Dr dailley now . It is hailed as the mother of all inventions in america . I'll post more if I find it useful . Supposed to be much much better than waterpik . 5) If you want to know what causes bad breath then visit www.therabreath.com but don't use their products . It did not work for me . Might do for you but it's efficacy is poor because it contains traditional chlorine dioxide . 6) It never comes from stomch .. so start eating . If this does not work for you then I'll drop my pants in front of the queen . I'm a living example . Sympathy towards all the sufferers . Don't despair and try it . You will NOT find anything in UK web sites .. they are old and outdated .Go to websites from US . Plenty of s
          pecialists in california . Good luck ! Hydrofloss is expensive .. about 150 dollars Trioral is about 20 pounds .

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            14.02.2002 16:06
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            ***DISASTER*** When I was 7 I fell over and smashed my front tooth (upper left central incisor to be precise). The tooth was broken off right down to gum level-very painful and I was left with a gap. This gap didn?t look so bad as only a year or two earlier I had gaps in the front after losing my milk teeth. So this tooth that I had broken was my new adult tooth! I don?t remember much about the treatment that followed except that at some point I had a crown/cap (a false tooth made from porcelain and lined with precious metals and made to look like a real tooth) made and this cap had a post (imagine a garden post and the principles that apply) attached to it, this post was cemented into what remained of my front tooth-the root. ***BIGGER DISASTER*** In my late teens, I foolishly tried to open a bottle cap with my teeth, I heard a horrible crunch and my crown and post felt awfully loose and I was able to pull it out. I had no pain funnily enough but as I hurried for an emergency appointment with my dentist I feared the worst. ***THE OPTIONS*** My dentist told me I had fractured the root of my tooth and it would no longer provide retention for the crown and post. The root had to be extracted and I had to have a small denture/plate made. This denture had a single tooth attached to it; it was made to the same dimensions of my palate and fitted by suctioning to the roof of my mouth. Although this denture was well made and was not obvious I hated it and asked what the options were. 1)The Denture As described above, it is a removable device (that you take out to sleep and clean) and not permanently fixed. Available on the NHS and costs (depending on the number of teeth) between £50-£150. If you go Private instead prices are the length of a piece of string! Anything. Reasonable price would be £150-£600 (again depending on the number of teeth and the material usually chrome or acrylic used in the palate)
            2)A Bridge This meant in my case a 3 unit (3 teeth) bridge where by my two teeth flanking the gap would be shaved down to stumps. On top of these stumps crowns would be placed and sandwiched between the crowns would be a solid crown to replace the gap. This is a fixed device cemented onto the stumps. Available on the NHS prices range ?for 3 unit-between £180-£300. Privately prices start at around £900. Although this option was preferable to the denture as it was fixed, I was not willing to have my healthy teeth cut down to stumps (they were not decayed or broken) so I asked what else. 3)A Rochete/Maryland Bridge A solid crown with a metal wing attached to it. The crown fits into the gap and the wings glued with dental adhesive to the back of the healthy teeth flanking the gap. Available on the NHS prices range between £120-£250. Privately prices start at around £350. I was in favour of this method more than the others but my dentist warned me that Rochettes tend to work loose as the adhesive degrades and more so with the incisors (front teeth) as they are used for biting into food. I asked what was available that once finished didn?t require further visits to the dentist. 4) An Implant My dentist explained simply that an implant was in effect a false root inserted surgically into the gum. The implant then had a post screwed into it, on top of which sits a crown. This was the best of the options as it is a fixed device that does not involve the other teeth. A false brand new tooth! I told my dentist I was very interested and he referred me to a specialist implantologist in West London. When I asked prices he said very expensive! ***The Consultation*** The Implantologist took a large x-ray of my lower jaw to see if I was a suitable candidate for Implants. I was, he went onto explain an implant as the following: ***IMPLANTS*** Are hollow titanium pole-shaped mechanism screwed into
            the jawbone underneath the gum where the root of my tooth once stood. The implant is left to strengthen then a post is screwed or cemented into the implant. This post is called a TME. The TME juts out below the gum line and provides retention for a crown, like a post and there I have it a new tooth with its own new root! Advantages An implant is free standing- does not involve other teeth. Statistically more successful than Bridges. Fixed device with no follow on treatments required. Not that much more in price to a (private) bridge. Disadvantages Not available on the NHS. Expensive and treatment is lengthy and split into 3 stages that take up to 9 months to complete, though you only see the implantologist about 6 or 7 times during this period. Involves minor surgery. ***PRICE*** My dentist warned me, so I wasn?t shocked when I was quoted £1,400. This is reasonable, some implantologist charge up to £4,000 for a single implant. There is no ceiling so you have to shop around but don? t let cost be your deciding factor. Reputation and a sense that I was in good hands made my decision. ***THE TREATMENT*** Was a lot less traumatic than I anticipated, during the surgery I was sedated (optional) and before I knew it, it was all over. The worst I felt was uncomfortableness as the stitches pulled, these were removed after 5 days. The implant was left to fuse with the bone and strengthen for 6 months. I wore my denture during the waiting period The second stage was to have the TME fitted and a temporary crown on top. The temporary crown is used to get the implant used to biting with a lightweight material. This was left for 3 months. The third and final stage was to have a permanent crown made from porcelain fitted over the TME. It looked and felt like a natural tooth and I was delighted with the outcome and the whole experience. ***CONCLUSION*** This technology can be us
            ed to replace any number of teeth; though expensive it meant to me, no denture and no cutting of healthy teeth. I have had no problems 7 years on and would recommend this treatment to anyone who has suffered from losing a tooth/teeth. Note they do need to be looked after in the same way as natural teeth, thorough brushing and dental floss! ***CONTACT*** Association of Dental Implantology UK 37 Halford Road Richmond Surrey TW10 6AW Phone: +44 20 8332 0321 Fax: +44 20 8940 0337 Email: adi.uk@btinternet.com Or check out the website on: http://www.adi.org.uk/

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              03.02.2002 20:27
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              As many readers of my other opinions know I really find going to the dentist for treatment extremely difficult; well if Shane (my hubby) did not take me, then I simply would not go. Usually at the check-up my teeth are fine and need no treatment. My last visit was not like that however and an x-ray that revealed tooth decay forming under a filling and a crown was required to save the tooth. Oh NO. A Filling? Not much fun at all. The dreaded day arrived and I cringed as Shane drove into the dentist?s car park in Cambridge. The wait in the waiting room was unbearable. I want to escape. I wish I could take some Valium! The nurse then took me upstairs and I sat in the chair. The dentist was sweet. He put a needle in my arm (this is normal for me as I need heavy sedation). I do not really remember a lot about the procedure, due to the sedation. However my dentist is conscientious unlike the ?Ben? from ?My Family?, providing adequate information and reassurance about the procedure prior to the treatment. I would like to share some of my layman knowledge with you, thus providing some truth about crowning a tooth. SO YOU NEED A CROWN **Why does the Dentist Opt for a Crown** 1) A filling may have discoloured the tooth and you would like to improve the appearance of the tooth for cosmetic reasons. 2) Following a root filling a crown is often required to protect the tooth from further damage. 3) Your tooth may have been weakened by a very large filling. This filling then may need replacing in time and there is insufficient tooth left to hold another filling. (This is what happened to my tooth). **So what is a Crown** A Crown is the ideal way for restoring teeth, which have been broken, or have been weakened by decay or by a very large filling (usually for the molars at the back of the mouth). The Crown is designed to fit over the remaining part of the tooth, making it strong and gi
              ving it the contour and profile of a natural tooth. Another name for a Crown is a ?Cap?. This next point is for me and a lot of other people who have this type of treatment, the most important factor about having a Crown and that is: ** Does it Hurt to have a Tooth Prepared for a Crown** No, it does not hurt according to the dentist. As I said I do not know for sure as I am sedated. A local anaesthetic is used and the preparation should feel no different to that of a filling. If the tooth does not have a nerve, and a post crown is being prepared, then local anaesthetic may not be needed. (I am not too sure that I would like to find out!) May I also point out that once the anaesthetic has worn off then you will often need oral painkillers, as it can hurt a lot (and I do mean A LOT!) as the gum settles down. ** Treatment and Tooth Preparation Time ** I find that at least two visits are needed for a crown to be made. The first one is the longest as the tooth preparation, impression, shade taking and fitting the temporary crown, are all need to be done. These temporary crowns may be more noticeable (mine is silver/grey in colour, round and smooth), but they are only a temporary measure. At the second visit the permanent crown is fitted. 1) The dentist will prepare the tooth, drilling it into the ideal shape for the crown to be fitted. This will involve removing most of the outer surface of the tooth and leaving a strong inner 'core'. The amount of the tooth separated will be the same as the width of the crown to be fitted. Once the tooth is shaped, the dentist will take an impression of the prepared tooth, one of the opposite jaw and possibly another to mark the way you bite together. These tooth impressions will be given to the technician, along with any other information needed to make the crown. I would like to point out this is what I have been told as I have no reconciliation of this process! 2)
              This impression and tooth shade information will be given to a Dental Technician who will be experienced in making crowns. Casts will be made of the mouth and the crown will be constructed on these, in order to ensure that the crown fits correctly. The shade of the neighbouring teeth?s colour will be recorded, to ensure that the colour match looks natural and go with the surrounding teeth. The crown will be made to match the other teeth exactly. Once in place, the appearance of the crown has been checked. It will then be cemented in place with special dental cement. The cement also forms a seal to help hold the crown firmly in place. NB You will be asked if you like the crown before it is permanently fitted in place. Once in place the Crown will feel a little strange but this will settle in time. **Crowns Composition** Crowns are made of a multiple range of materials. New materials are continually being introduced, so Crown may vary. *Glass* These crowns look incredibly normal and can be used for both front and back teeth. Boy do they cost a lot though! *Porcelain bonded to precious metal* This is what the bulk of crowns are made from. A precious metal foundation is made and porcelain is then applied in layers over it. (I am having this type of crown for my tooth). *Porcelain and composite* Porcelain and composite resin materials can on occasion look the most natural. However, these crowns are not as tough as bonded metal crowns. *Porcelain* These types of crown are not as strong as a bonded crown but can look extremely natural and are most often used for front teeth. *Precious metal (gold and palladium)* These crowns are very tough and extremely durable, but are usually put at the back of the mouth, where they are not visible. (These are the gold cap you often see on people). I now have two and a half crowns (one is a temporary at the moment) and find that go
              od oral hygiene will help to prevent gum infection and any further tooth decay where the edge of the crown joins the tooth. It is advisable to use an electric toothbrush with fluoride toothpaste twice a day, plus flossing and the use of dental brushes will also help the build up of potentially harmful bacteria and plaque. I hope my guide to crowns has been useful. If you want any more information try going to www.dentalhealth.org.uk This site is very comprehensive. Alternatively write to: British Dental Health Foundation Eastlands Court St. Peter?s Road Rugby CV21 3QP Telephone 01788 546365

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                08.12.2001 00:16
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                Brushing your teeth and keeping them nice is the best thing to do in the world I really love to brush my teeth it is really good I brush my teeth in the morning after I have eaten my breakfast and then again after I have eaten my morning chocolate bar and then after my lunch and the after my dinner and then before I go to bed i like to use my c3po toothbrush that my olaojomo got for me My friend said hey quentin you gimboid why do you always clean yo teeth and I say to him that it is because I hate bad breath I hate it when I am in a lift and someone is standing close and has bad breath and if Iam on a tube train and some close breathes on me or if I have to kiss my auntie at christmas and she has taken a garlic pill but has chewed it and not swallowed it The worst breaths are smoking breath red pepper breath onion breath garlic breath beer breath burp breath sick breath and red bull breath I know that it is other people with nasty breath but I like to make sure that I donot have stinky teeth And that is the reason why I like to use colgate toothpaste as many times a day as I like to I as well like to go to the dentist every 6 months for a check up and I have got not any fillings And I like to chew some chewing gum sometimes and be all minty fresh all of the time My mum always used to say to me look after your teeth because you donot get anymore after these ones unless they are false and they will cost you a fortune My mum had some really good catchphrases sometimes and her man friend used to say to me quentin eise delyia malaga’s But I donot know what that means

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                  17.10.2001 18:15
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                  I discovered the tooth stain eraser about 5 days ago when i was in Superdrug !! I'm not a believer in new high tech equipment that claim to take away the stains, BUT , this gadget is small, has a little handle and a small pointy bit at the end which looks like an eraser . It was £2.95 and i thought , not too bad a price , i'll just give it a try . As about a month ago i discovered stains , on the back of my bottom set of teeth.It's probably because i smoke , yeah yeah i know it's bad for you !! AAAAAAAAGGGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHHHH . I thought . And tried to scrape it off with scissors , Do Not Try That At Home !! So this came as a blessing as"whitening" toothpastes don't seem to work, i have an electric toothbrush and that can't handle such stains ! So i got home eager to try my new little gadget . I started rubbing it on my teeth it's a bit awkward as it was the back of my teeth and not the front , and you've got to get the backward and forward motion going , takes a bit of practise , as does everything . I sucked all the spit away , and my teeth were whiter, most of the brown stain had gone , i was truly amazed . It doesn't feel funny , it doesn't feel like someone is taking the enamel off from your teeth , it just feels , well normal. So my teeth are whiter at the back , clean and sparkly, and i would recommend this to any people that need a cheap easy way of getting rid of stains. They say on the packet that you should only use this 1-2 times a week , which is fair enough , i mean , who has the time to sit there and rub their teeth anyway ??

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                  01.10.2001 08:18
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                  Dental care??? Teeth??? What do I know??? The queen of extractions and dental infections!! Well, exactly, that's why I feel I can write on the subject, if only on what NOT to do! I'm an adult now, but up until the age of about 13 I had no fillings and strong teeth. I don't know when or how it started going downhill but from the age of about 13/14 the fillings started arriving and how. I am now missing 8 or 9 adult teeth, including two Wisdom teeth, which either had to be extracted due to severe infection or broke after previous root canal treatment for abscesses. Once a tooth has been filled or given such treatment as a root canal job it is much weaker and more prone to break or get re-infected. All of mine (about four) which were given root canal treatment and later crowned subsequently broke through weakness, it's a common thing according to my dentist. Once broken down to a sharp stub the only choice was extraction - in the last couple of years I have had a total of 6 extractions and so I am no longer afraid of the dentist as I feel I have already been through the worst several times. Most of these were main or back teeth - the molars - and one front canine ( eye or dog tooth) which was an extremely painful and traumatic extraction which I feel was a main trigger to my current condition of suffering M.E. OK, that's the lowdown on my dental history - now for the advice! Let's start with the basic equipment - to look after your teeth, and that includes gums and the whole mouth, properly you need (OK I'm being obvious here) a toothbrush (electric or manual), toothpaste, mouthwash, dental floss - Oh! And yes, a dentist! I feel like everyone's Mum saying this but remember to brush your teeth thoroughly (for about 2 minutes) every morning and evening, floss at least once a day and use mouthwash to combat plaque. Toothbrushes and toothpastes come in a multitude of sizes and varieties and
                  you can have any flavour toothpaste so long as it's mint, mint or mint!!! (Why??) If you're really opposed to mint in any strength then you can get a new herbal toothpaste or buy kids ones which often come in fruity flavours. A good toothpaste should contain fluoride for strengthening and protecting the teeth and shouldn't be too liquid as that makes it difficult to use. Dental floss can be bought in string or ribbon form depending on comfort (peoples' tooth gaps vary) and preference for ease of use but again it is usually mint flavoured! Mouthwashes again can vary - but at least there are "original" or Clove flavours available if you are not partial to mint. Most of these contain alcohol so children should be supervised with them and try not to swallow any. Their formulations vary - some are literally just for freshening breath and others help to protect the teeth too. Now we move on to *gasp* - THE DENTIST!!! I know many people are phobic in this department, myself included (formerly) but you really must have a check up every 6 months to avoid any potential dental horrors arising or ending up like me! For years I relied on my friend, a former dental nurse, to advise me - very helpful but couldn't do my fillings! True, dentists can work out expensive if you need treatment but a regular check-up (about £15 on the NHS) could avoid this. Either way, regular home dental care using the aforementioned treatment need not be expensive ?-toothpaste etc can be bought at budget prices from supermarkets and chemists if you are not fussy about brands and will be worth it in the end if it avoids £100s on dentist's bills. So, when it comes to dental care my advice is basically "do as I say not as I do" or you'll end up like me!!! ;o)

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                    30.09.2001 00:11
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                    I have become very dubious of Dentists lately after a particular bad experience with a filling and then after that an exploding tooth so when I felt a pain the other week I thought it was time to look for another dentist. I asked around friend's and somebody mentioned that Boot's the Chemist in Regents Street London had a dental surgery so along I went and what a pleasent suprise I had. The surgery itself was extremely stylish and clean the staff at reception were very polite and perfectly happy to talk to you and offer advice. When I got taken in a lift to the basement I started to worry OH NO not ali barber but it was all ok a very polite young dentist welcomed me and asked all the usual question's writting everything down on computer which I could see on a screen in front of me. Which I thought was a brilliant idea so you could keep an eye on what they are doing and how much it is costing you. The surgey room was very relaxing and the dentist and assistant were very polite and talkative which I found helped me to really relax. The work on my teeth was carried out very painlessly and my pain levels were considered as she asked if I wanted her to stop just to raise a hand. I would suggest anybody needing their teeth done to check them out they are quite expensive but the service and quality is so much better than that amnky surgery I was used to.

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                      10.09.2001 19:25
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                      Breath odor, or halitosis, is a symptom of numerous disorders, some of them innocuous, and others quite serious. In many cases, bad breath is nothing more than the result of eating certain foods. The most frequent dietaty offenders are onions, garlic, and alcoholic beverages. Smoking produces an unpleasant breath odor, as does certain medications. Food particles trapped between the teeth, as well as buildup of plaque and resulting tooth decay, can lead to bad breath. In addition, breath odor can sometimes be a sign of a serious illness. ACUTE BRONCHITIS: A painful cough that brings up foul smelling phlegm is a common symptom of an acute attack of bronchitis. This condition often follows a severe cold or flu. ACUTE KIDNEY FAILURE: This is a medical emergency that usually comes on suddenly, completely shutting down the flow of urine. The feet may swell, and facial puffiness, shortness of breath, and headache may develop. In addition, the breath may smell like urine. BRONCHIECTASIS: This relatively rare disorder leads to an accumulation of mucus in the breathing tubes(bronchial tree) and is characterized by a chronic cough. As the disease progresses, it destroys lung tissue. Thus, the cough frequently produces thick and extremely foul smelling sputum. CANCER: Foul breath may be a symptom of cancer of the lung, esophagus, tongue, mouth, throat(pharynx), or voice box(larynx). Bad breath accompanied by other symptoms, such as spitting up blood, coughing, difficulty swallowing, and weight loss should be investigated by a doctor. CHRONIC GASTRITIS: A bad taste in the mouth along with sour smelling breath, heartburn, burning pain in the abdomen, and related symptoms may indicate chronic gastritis or inflammation of the stomach. DENTAL PROBLEMS: Tooth decay and disorders affecting the gums, are probably the most common cause of bad breath. Periodontal disease leads to the formation of pus that is di
                      scharged from the gums, causing foul breath. The gums bleed easily and are often eroded, making the teeth loose. ADVICE ABOUT BREATH ODOR FROM EXPERIENCE - Bad breath may simply be due to poor dental hygiene. - Brushing after every meal and flossing regularly usually takes care of the problem. - Using a mouthwash that controls oral bacteria is also helpful. - Seeing a dentist at least once a year can prevent serious tooth decay and gum diseases that cause bad breath. - Stopping smoking usually improves breath odor, and has many other health benefits as well. - Breath odor accompanied by a discharge, pus, coughing, or fever that continues for more than a few days indicates that a medical consultation is in order.

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                        03.08.2001 04:21
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                        In a recent Dental Health Authority report, the children in the primary school where I work, were near the top of the list for dental decay. Needless to say, not a record we boast about. It isn't really something school can deal with - or is it? We have joined a new Health Scheme, which encourages healthy eating, living, in fact healthy everything. This is primarily aimed at the young to encourage a healthy lifestyle, early enough to hopefully, lay the foundation for future years. Research has suggested that children who drink water regularly throughout the day find learning easier. We therefore, asked parents to stop sending sugary drinks into school, juice etc, but instead to send in bottles with easy open tops so the children can drink from them whenever they wanted to. We also have a drinking fountain in school and the children would be able to refill their bottles from it. In the letter to parents we reported the findings of the Dental Health Authority and of the research regarding water and learning. We said every child would be issued with a water bottle and that juice and sugary drinks would be banned from school in future. The only drinks allowed would be milk or water at break time and water and unsweetened juice at lunchtime. We could not however dictate to the parents of those children who bring a packed lunch but we thought common sense would prevail. The day following the letter home some parents complained that their children did not like milk or water and would not drink anything other than juice or pop. You can imagine our dismay when we discovered that these parents had approached a local newspaper to complain that their children were banned from bringing juice into school. It would appear that some people just don't want to be helped. These parents were however in the minority.

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                          02.08.2001 00:54
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                          After a bad experience at the dentists when I was 17, I’ve been terrified about going back. Last April/May part of my tooth just fell out whilst eating a piece of toast. My friend told me I should go to the dentist. Since I was in no pain I ignored him. Then by August I was plagued with lots of pain in the very same tooth. I took painkillers, drank whisky (it does relieve the pain), and generally put up with it. I was too ill to enjoy my birthday because I was too afraid to see the dentist. When the abscess returned in October, I finally gave in and went to see a dentist. However, with an abscess you have to take antibiotics to clear the infection before you can treat the tooth. By time I was due to go back for the treatment, I was too afraid! I’ve had a few minor toothaches since then, but nothing big enough to make me go back to the dentists. That was until this Monday. I was in absolute agony, with a toothache that throbbed all the way through my right cheek. On Monday I was terrified to even call the dentists, due to my general dentist phobia and my agoraphobia. However, a sleepless night & inability to eat made me call on Tuesday morning and arrange an emergency appointment. I went in, he diagnosed another abscess and gave me antibiotics. I am determined to go back next week and get the treatment I need. I don’t want to spoil another birthday just because I am afraid of dentists! If the same happens to you, PLEASE go. Believe me, I know how hard it is. I’m struggling with social phobia & agoraphobia as well as my fear of the dentist, but as a result I am poisoning my own body. For a day or two of discomfort at the hands of the dentist, you could drastically improve your dental health. If you don't, you too could look like a hamster! UPDATE I went back. Yes, I was afraid but I was actually in so much pain that I knew I HAD to go for my sanity! Almost fainted because I don't like the sig
                          ht of blood, but I got my tooth removed and I am so relieved. I won't lie and say it doesn't hurt, but it hurts a lot less in the long-term. I'm even going back to get fillings so I never have to go through this again. If you're putting it off, please go. Dentists are there to help not harm you.

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                            21.07.2001 03:03

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                            I went to the dentist about 3 months ago and he had a look at my teeth and said that i needed loads of work done on my mouth. Well i was not going to argue he's the proffessional after all. Now i hate dentists at the best of times which is why i did not question what he was saying but when he got me in the chair and got that drill going(ouch)i hated them more than ever the pain was unbearable even after about three injections,it lasted for two hours and he said i would have to come back two days later to have it finished off. Off i went in agony sure that he had left something out and sure i should'nt have been in so much pain. Well i went back and he took another hour of drilling and poking then said all done,it was a relief and yes the pain had stopped. I paid him about £220.00 and left but two days later i was at work when my tooth just exploded and i found half a tooth in my hand and the other half still hanging in my mouth. I thought that can't be right and asked to see a seperate dentist and he said he would repair it for nothing. I asked what had happened and he said that the hole had been packed to tight causing the pressure to blow out my tooth. I put in a complaint and have heard nothing since not even an apoligie. I paid £220 to have my tooth removed what a rip off and i lost a tooth that should have been saved(boo hoo). If you have any problems with dentist work please go back and tell them because if it was'nt for my partner i would have left it and had to pay all over again.

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                            21.07.2001 02:53
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                            • "lose customer care"

                            Yesterday I had the dubious pleasure of taking my 89 year old neighbour to the dentist.. She's a loving and sweet old lady and still has at least five of her own teeth. She needed a new set of dentures as the old ones had worn loose. Well, firstly the dentist has gone private so we were looking at a £200 bill for a pensioner just for a bottom plate, scale and polish. So she agreed to go for it after finding out there weren't many NHS options in this area. The scale and polish was the problem... picture this..... frail old lady lying on her back in the dentists chair, dentist drilling and scaling very old teeth that are slightly exposed at the gums (very painful).. water from the drill filling up the old lady's mouth..can you see the picture ? I was lucky to be sitting behind the dentist as I saw my neighbours feet start to bang up and down on the chair and she began to emit gurgling sounds. I jumped up and asked him to stop as I thought she was drowning.... and she was! Her blood pressure had gone off the scale and she couldn't stop shaking for the next 5 minutes. The dental surgery asistant was not sucking the water out as fast as it was going in from the drill ! Needless to say this wasn't a good thing to happen to someone so frail as she could have had a heart attack. We eventually got all the work done with another two little breaks for her to breathe. She's now almost there with a new dental plate to be fitted next week. I wonder if they teach dentists in their degree courses how to treat older people and what signs to look for to detect serious distress ? Has anyone else out there experienced this kind of problem?

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                            10.07.2001 19:14
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                            c omes to something when going private to the dentist is going to be cheaper

                            A lot of people are afraid of the dentist and yes I have been there too.

                            Not anymore. I read this advice many many years ago, followed it and now passing it on to you.

                            Get to know your dentist. No, I can hear your wisecracks before I even start!

                            Firstly ask around the neighbours who they go to.

                            Admittedly it is not easy to get on a Dentists list nowadays but keep trying. NHS are even harder to get on as they are taking on less and less patients or rather people are staying with them, and more and more NHS are going over to Private and if its anything like around here there is a waiting list.

                            Put your name down.

                            Before an appointment go into the Dentist and ask if he can spare you a couple minutes. Tell him how you feel and I guarantee he will help.

                            I hated going to mine. I knew I had to go but kept putting it off and the more I put off the worse it got. Mind you I have the added thing that when I was 8 I showed off at school on the school bars. I put my skirt over the bars and thought I could tip ne tail over and over. I couldnt and broke my front two teeth. It was years and years before in those days that they would crown them. I still have crowns, new, but you wouldnt notice and that was the beginning of my dread of dentists.

                            Anyway back to where I was, I told the dentist how I dreaded going.

                            Now, he stops during the treatment to ask if I'm okay, tells me exactly what and when anything is going to happen and even gives me a gripper so I can grab and squeeze that instead of breaking the arm of his chair.

                            To get me there he will give me the earliest appointment of the day so I dont have that awful feeling of having to wait till the afternoon and getting all worked up.

                            After all this I dont mind and neither do any of my family as they all follow suit.

                            One thing, if you are on NHS please make sure that you go at least once a year as after that they can and will (the dentist has no choice in the matter) take you off their list

                            Since I last wrote this my dentist has decided that in October this year he will change over to private as the government has interfered so much and need deadlines and for them to see a certain number every week. He has said though that going private he can charge what he wants no the government and most of the dental work will be cheaper.

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