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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

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      06.07.2002 01:15
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      Hi last opinion was of this solitary message: Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap

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        06.07.2002 01:13
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        What can I say? Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap Crap

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          18.11.2001 05:32
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          Two Fabulous Works: a Galactic Astrological Concert & a Song with an Unsolved Riddle ----------------------------------------------- I own three different recordings of ‘The Planets’ and two of ‘Enigma Variations’ (and I’ve heard more of both) – and this disc has my favourite version of both! Sir Adrian Boult (1889-1983) conducts both pieces, and he is a fantastic conductor – Holst and Elgar being two composers whose music he directed many, many times. Boult, in fact, was a friend of Holst’s and conducted the world premiere of ‘The Planets’ in 1918! I’ll continue this article by reviewing the two pieces separately and then giving a general summing-up of the disc as a whole: ---------------------------------------------------------- Gustav Holst – The Planets (1914-16) [duration: 47.17] [1] Mars, the Bringer of War [2] Venus, the Bringer of Peace [3] Mercury, the Winged Messenger [4] Jupiter, the Bringer of Jollity [5] Saturn, the Bringer of Old Age [6] Uranus, the Magician [7] Neptune, the Mystic If you’ve heard anything by Holst, most likely you’ve heard ‘The Planets’, or at least the first movement, “Mars” – it is often used in films (particularly “Mars”). I must have heard “Mars” in at least 3 or 4 films (most recently in the Bollywood [Hindi] film, “1942: A Love Story”—considering that Holst was inspired by Indian sources [see below], I found this amusingly appropriate). “Mars” has been called ‘the most devastating piece of music ever written!’ In fact, if you like ‘orchestral’ movie-music (like John Williams ‘Star Wars’ music), you’ll probably really enjoy ‘The Planets’. I don’t mean to under-rate ‘The Planets’ in any fashion by sayin
          g this (nor do I think John Williams is anywhere close to as good as Holst) – I simply mean that it’s an easy classical piece to listen to, even if you’re not much of a classical music fan. “Mars” captures the horrors of war quite uncannily(remember that World War I lasted from roughly 1914-1918)—bestial, massive and terrifying. “Venus, bringer of peace”, as the title suggests, reminds one of a tranquil pool in a green forest, with sunlight filtering through the leaves. “Mercury” is like someone running, feet barely (or not) touching the ground, and has a mischievous quality to it. “Jupiter” is the centre-piece of the opus (and Holst’s favourite movement) and is very noble and grand, and somehow uplifting (it was later arranged to the words of "I Vow to Thee, My Country"). “Saturn” is very heavy, slow and black-like a grim struggle for life. “Uranus”, following this dark bit, is a crazy, ‘magical’ movement—starting out slow and then speeding-up (and sometimes ‘crashing’). “Neptune” is the ethereal finale, with a chorus of ghostly female voices. Holst was influenced by the music of Edvard Grieg (‘Peer Gynt’ – “In the Hall of the Mountain King”) and particularly Richard Wagner (‘Der Ring des Nibelungen’-see my review of Götterdämmerung). Though Holst is primarily known today only for his orchestral pieces (and mainly just for ‘The Planets’), he wrote many different types of music, his early work being mainly opera. He was influenced in his choice of themes by ancient Indian texts; his early work includes the operas ‘Sita’ [1900-6] (based on the heroine from the Indian Sanskrit epic the ‘Ramayana’) and ‘Savitri’ [1908] (based on an episode from the Sanskrit epic the ‘Mahabharata’), as well as the c
          horal piece ‘The Cloud Messenger’ [1910-12] (based on the Sanskrit poem ‘Meghaduta’). He also wrote an orchestral piece based on the writings of Thomas Hardy: ‘Egdon Heath’ [1927], as well as many works for ballet, chamber, string orchestra and other arrangements. His early interest in astrology is revealed in 'The Planets'. As I said before, this is my favourite recording of ‘The Planets’, made in 1978-Boult conducting the London Philharmonic Orchestra. ------------------------------------------------------------ Sir Edward Elgar – Enigma Variations(1899) [duration: 31.17] One day when Elgar returned home from giving music lessons, he was fiddling about with the piano, trying to relax after a frustrating day (probably teaching mediocre students…) and being improvising a little tune. His wife overheard it and complimented him on it – and then he set to speculating how some of their friends might play this tune: thus the ‘variations’. So the first track is the ‘original’ tune [probably more properly called a ‘theme’, I’m not a classic musician….], and the remainder are how Elgar thought that some of his friends (and one of their pets!) might play the tune, or how the tune might be altered to portrayed them: [5] Theme [6] First Variation - C.A.E.: Elgar's wife, Alice, lovingly portrayed; [7] Second Variation - H.D.S-P.: Hew David Steuart-Powell, a pianist with whom Elgar played in chamber ensembles; [8] Third Variation - R.B.T.: Richard Baxter Townshend, a friend whose caricature of an old man in an amateur theatre production is captured in the variation; [9] Fourth Variation - W.M.B.: William Meath Baker, 'country squire, gentleman and scholar', informing his guests of the day's arrangements; [10] Fifth Variation - R.P.A.: Richard Arnold, son of the poet Matthew Arnol
          d; [11] Sixth Variation - Ysobel: Isabel Fitton, an amateur viola player from a musical family living in Malvern; [12] Seventh Variation - Troyte: Arthur Troyte Griffith, a Malvern architect and close friend of Elgar throughout their lives - the variation focuses on Troyte's limited abilities as a pianist; [13] Eighth Variation - W.N.: Winifred Norbury, known to Elgar through her association with the Worcestershire Philharmonic Society - the variation captures both her laugh and the atmosphere of her eighteenth century house; [14] Ninth Variation - Nimrod: A J Jaeger, Elgar's great friend whose encouragement did much to keep Elgar going during the period when he was struggling to secure a lasting reputation - the variation allegedly captures a discussion between them on Beethoven's slow movements [15] Tenth Variation - Dorabella: Dora Penney, daughter of the Rector of Wolverhampton and a close friend of the Elgars; [16] Eleventh Variation - G.R.S.: George Sinclair, organist at Hereford Cathedral, although the variation allegedly portrays Sinclair's bulldog Dan paddling in the River Wye after falling in; [17] Twelfth Variation - B.G.N.: Basil Nevinson, an amateur cellist who, with Elgar and Hew Steuart-Powell, completed the chamber music trio; [18] Thirteenth Variation - ***: probably Lady Mary Lygon, a local noblewoman who sailed for Australia at about the time Elgar wrote the variation, which quotes from Mendelssohn's Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage. The use of asterisks rather than initials has however invited speculation that they conceal the identity of Helen Weaver, Elgar's fiancée for eighteen months in 1883/84 before she emigrated, also to Australia; [19] Fourteenth Variation - E.D.U.: Elgar himself, Edoo being his wife's pet name for him. The are actually two ‘enigmas’ in this piece: the first is who each variation portrays (answers given above :) ). The second is t
          hat Elgar suggested that there is ‘a popular tune which does not itself appear in the variations but of which the theme is the counterpoint’, though he may have been joking. Joking or not, this has, of course, invited much speculation and probably theses have been written on the topic—possible answers being variously given as “Auld Lange Syne”, something from Mozart or “Rule Britannia”. I’m not quite sure how to describe this piece, other than that I like it and also find it ‘easy to listen to’ classical music, particularly as it is made up of 15 short bits (the variations on the theme), rather than consisting of very long movements. This particular recording was made in 1970-with Boult conducting the London Symphony Orchestra. If you know Elgar, you probably either know ‘Enigma Variations’ or his lovely ‘Cello Concerto in E minor’ (particularly the version performed by Jacqueline du Pré). I know less about Elgar than Holst (http://www.elgar.org has good info), so I won’t provide any more background for him here. --------------------------------------------- Even though these pieces were recorded in the 70’s, and thus are not digitally recorded, the sound quality is excellent and both were later digitally remastered, further improving the quality. Sir Adrian Boult, personal friend of Holst, conducted both pieces throughout his lifetime and the two pieces were recorded at the height of his career, after he had had about 60 years of experience! I don’t think you can find a conductor who understands either piece better than does Boult. Even if you are someone who must have DDD recordings, I only suggest that you consider that the conductor and musicians make more of a difference to the overall quality and you probably couldn’t distinguish this from a DDD recording anyway. Overall, as I said in the beginning, this is a wonde
          rful disc because I think it has the best versions of both of these pieces of music (at a great price, usually round £9). ‘The Planets’ and ‘Enigma Variations’ are classical music which are fun and easy to listen to, even if you aren’t a classical music aficionado.

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            28.10.2001 02:56
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            Because the ticket said something about tenors, I was under the impression that it would be a bit like the actual 3 tenors - lots of opera. I naively trotted along to the Waterfront Hall with my mum and her friend. She had paid for the ticket, so I was prepared to watch without being too critical about quality. That changed. Three Irish Tenors indeed. It was more like 2 Irish tenors, an English bloke, two thirds of a Christian praise band, a technician on a keyboard, a pianoist and a showboat cabaret singer. I want my mum's money back. I first became unwary when I entered the auidtorium, and noticed the cotton candy hairdo's all around. Granted, they were interspersed with the sleek heads of trendy twenty-somethings, but the overall impression was that of a grannies' convention. In the background was the ominous sound of a boron, the faint sawings of violins, the high-pitched whistle of a flute. The stage was bathed in an eerie green glow. Aliens, I prayed to myself. Let it be aliens. It was not. It was the green of Ireland. Behind us a women repeatedly squawked 'Gale's mother's done there. Down there. Do you see here?' We kept an eye out for Gale's mother, but didn't spot her. If you're out there, Gale's mother, your daughter's friend is looking for you. Between each piece there were nasty links similar to those of Nigel Kennedy at last year's Classical Brits. 'I'm taking you on a journey to a deep dark land in Romania . . . ' became 'We're taking you on a journey to the lurid green land of Ireland, through the bogs, to admire the cowslops in the fields.' At the end of every piece, the pianoist waved his hand in the air, not, it seems,to ask for permission to use the bathroom, but to bring everyone off together. Absolutely shocking. Backers should be heard and not seen. They should also be of enough technical ability that they don't need a conducto
            r onstage to tell them when to stop playing. The pianoist, it was exaplained later, was the musical director. He made frequent use of windy chimy things to add a background to the Oirish songs. How lovely. How whimsical. How very clicheed. The interval was a welcome relief. After downing my warm orange juice we trudged back to the auditorium. The second half was marginally better; they opened with three of the most famous operatic pieces in the world, all of them tranformed beyond recognition. I got a faint strain of what might have been the Toreodor's Song, but I'm only guessing. All three tenors had microphones, which made their words very unclear. The two youngest men had nice voices, but lacked control. The bald one was piercing. Not sure how much of that can be blamed on the sound system. Perhaps they are used to playing venues of hundreds of thousands where they need microphones. The eldest member had a lovely voice which resonated with experience, but he confined himself to Irish ditties, which was frustrating. One felt he would have coped much better with 'Caruso' than the bald man, so consumed with emotion that he could hardly sing. There were no more than about 6 truly operatic pieces in the programme. The rest was diddly-dee Irish twaddle; fine in pubs in Dublin, but not designed for big concert halls like the Waterfront. They were nicely sung, but without any real emotion or feeling for the music. I'm not a big fan of Irish music, but this was a truly off-putting experience. The programme was aimed at the Americans, the English, the Europeans, but it wasn't a show for the Irish. It resonated with leprauchauns and shamrocks, but for someone who has lived here for 12 years, it's quite enough to have them at the bottom of the garden, without seeing them in the theatres as well.

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            10.10.2001 21:55

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            Well this was me not so long ago! I had memories of school and being forced to listen and appreciate, enjoy it's melody, harmony and chords! What on earth did the music teacher do to me? It was as if I switched off as soon as I heard any hint of classical. I'm sure I speak for many out there. That changed when my husband, who has enjoyed classical for many years introduced me to it;gently of course. He brought me a CD called 'Unforgettable classics'(by EMI) the themes from advertisements. At first I could only picture the advert, but the more I listened the more the picture on the tv disappeared and I had my own image. If only the music teacher led us in gently too. It includes well known tracks such as Bach's Air on a G string (causes many a titter I'm sure) this is used for the Hamlet ad, and Tchaikovshy's Dance of the Reed Flutes (from the 'Nutcracker' ballet) this was used for the infamous Cadbury's Fruit and Nut advert. Mozart, Verdi, Holst and Beethoven are introduced amongst the tracks. In the past I would have shuddered at the thought of listening to them, but the tunes are delightful and I guess it's never too late to learn and gain new expereinces. 'From many an acorn an oak tree grows', and you move on to listen to other classical symphonies wihtout the horror of the music lesson from school. Anyone who is or was like me, it's worth trying a gentle approach, shut your eyes and enjoy.

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            24.01.2001 00:10
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            This album is perfect when you?ve had a long frustrating day at work. I love to come home and sit down in a darkened room to listen to this. It is packed full of some of the most beautiful classical music around. A large proportion of the 3 CDs is quite well known music, such as 'Nimrod' from Elgar's Enigma Variations, 'The Swan' from Saint-Saens' Carnival of the Animals, and Grieg's 'Morning' from Peer Gynt. Then there are pieces you will recognise from films, like the theme from Schindler's List (by John Williams), which has one of the most haunting violin melodies I have ever heard, and the theme from 'The Deer Hunter'. Then there are lesser heard pieces, ranging from movements fromRachmaninov's 2nd symphony (if you haven't heard this, you're missing out big time), Mozart's Clarinet concerto, Vivaldi's Four Seasons, Mendelssohn, Ravel, Beethoven and a wonderful arrangement for voices of Barber's Adagio for Strings. This album 'does exactly what it says on the tin'. It is really relaxing and lovely to listen too, and as well as containing popular well known classics, strikes a great balance with not so well known pieces and 'different' arrangements. It's a truly uplifting listening experience.

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            03.11.2000 01:48
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            Incantation and Dance is the perfect tune to listen to if you are trying to get into classical music. It is also a challenge to play, wherever you're sat in the band. It's composer is John Barnes Chance, an American, and was written in the 1960s in Greensboro, Georgia, for concert wind band and a whole pile of percussion. It is made up of two distinctive sections, the haunting incantation where the tune starts in the flutes before passing over to clarinets then the brass before launching into the dance where percussion run wild before the brass section explodes into life and the dance begins. Sycopation and cross rythmns fly about all over the shop from every single instrument. There is no one tune at any one time and Chance utilizes the capability of each instrument superbly. The ending is the perfect climax to a stunning piece of music. I have played this twice and the second time at the Royal Concert Hall in Nottingham, it was absolutly stunning and was the talk of many of the thousand strong audience. If you are a conductor of a concert band, BEWARE, it needs the full range of percussion and is very technical and a full and competent band is needed. If after this you would like a listen, go to a search engine and type "incantation and dance". The recording I listen to requires RealPlayer and the piece is performed by the ELHS Band from the US. Happy Listening!!!

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            13.10.2000 06:02

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            If you want your child to enjoy clasical music, be careful how you encourage it. Children will do exactly what they like in the end! They will think what they like, have their own ideas and choose their own type of music. Experience has taught me that the best way to encourage a child to enjoy classical music (or anything else) is to expose to as much variety as possible. No amount of pushing, and shoving, will make a child like it. If you want your child to have an interest in classical music you should provide the opportunity for listening, and teach the child about orchestral instruments, etc. You can't make a child into a musician or make it like what it hears.

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            08.10.2000 03:50

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            So how many people out there really think classical music is uninterested. boring and old fashion. Sadly i don't agree with this at all. I feel that classical music is the foundation to all of the current music, and many of the era's of music are still visuable in today's modern music. All children should be taught the foundations of music, their scales, instruments and basic composion. Many do not, but without the foundation of the music can not begin to unstand modern music. All 'classical' music reflects a certain mood, Mozart to me is reflecting peacful but also angry. Vividia lively and happy, the list is endless, each piece of music is different to many people, some like one composer more than the other, whereas another won't listen to Romantic era music but enjoy the classical era, each to their own, but one thing for sure, 'classical' music shouldn't be put at the back of the music shelf and overlooked for the likes of the spice girls. Who truely beliefs that in 300 years the spice girls will still be a classic to listen to whilst reading a classical noval by C. Dickins.

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            26.07.2000 19:32
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            I am a young conductor trying to find my way into the classical music business. I have been conducting for 8 years. I am well respected by musicians, both amateur and professional, that I work with. I currently conduct 2 amateur symphony orchestras and various other types of ensemble. Everyone who sees me and is involved in my hopes and dreams for a career conducting say "go for it, you have the talent and the passion, live your dream". I am female. And here is the problem. I am a woman in what is still undeniably a man's world. Ask yourself how many female conductors you could name, or even better how many have you seen? This is an issue that people within the trade don't seem to want to talk about, and yet all know is there. I was recently talking to some musician friends and we were discussing setting up a new orchestra. We soon got on to the topic of female conductors, and even my female musician friends, who are very enlightened people, admitted that at music college when a woman auditions for a conducting position, they simply don't take them as seriously as they would a man. This attitude is all-pervading. It's not that I'm not confident enough, not good enough, not loud or strong-willed enough, but I am a woman. We all know that there are a few bastions of the ancient musical world where men still vastly outnumber women, but for the most part music is not gender biased. I simply don't know how to get past this one remaining male stronghold. Clearly we need someone to make the break, do an Evelyn Glennie and become a role model, so that those with the power see that it may just be a good thing. But until those of us banging our heads against what seems to be a mile thick brick wall can get heard, where is this role model going to come from? I plan on making myself heard. I am not going to let myself be looked past simply because of my gender. But I think we all need to make a little nois
            e, and ask "where are the women?". Have a look around, and if you find one let me know, because I would like a role model, and I would love some encouragement.

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              14.07.2000 20:21
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              Now, I might be a little biased here because I am a classically trained musician but I have no idea what my life would have been like without it. I first started learning clarinet at age 10 because one of my cool mates was playing it and I soon started paino and singing as well. Now I have left school, having achieved grade 8 singing and clarient and I have a baby of my own I am determined to introduce him to the wonders of classical music as soon as possible. I already play piano to him and he loves it when I sing to him. My hope is that he'll have my "ear" for music and want to learn with the passion I have. I have no intention of being a "pushy" mum and if he doesn't show interest then I won't push it ( I'll be disappointed though!) I just think that classical music can be a wonderful thing and can't be started too young.

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                30.06.2000 20:57
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                "Classical" is the term generally used to describe all music which is pre-jazz, right up to medaeval times, excluding world/folk music. However, if you take a look at the number of musical genres which have sprung up in the last 50 years, including rock, heavy metal, indie, electro-acoustic, techno, and dance, to name but a few, you will surely wonder how one genre known as "classical" managed to dominate Western music for over 500 years. Therefore I intend to take you on a mini-cruise along the timeline of sub-genres which make up "classical" music. Bear in mind that I can't include everything, but I will try to include the most influential/important periods. Let's start with Medaeval and rennaisance music, around 500 years ago. The recorder was big in those days, as was the lute. Think Royal courts with jesters, wenches and knights. Think William Shakespeare and the "Hey nonny nonnys" you find all over his plays. Medaeval music has much to answer for nowadays - the scales and music theory used are responsible for the melodic minor scale which causes so many beginner musicians to have terrible nightmares before music exams, with its ascending pattern of intervals quite different to its descending one. Included in the Medaeval bracket is Gregorian chant music, characterised by vocal harmonies moving in parallel 4th and 5ths, rather than 3rds, which we are more used to hearing nowadays. This is worth a listen, as is anything by Palestrina. Music soon developed, especially with the progressive work of composers such as Praetorius, Handel and Bach. It seems strange, but Bach, along with many other great names in the history of classical musicians, was seen as being a bit way out in his time. A bit like when a first hearing of Bjork. (Please don't flame me for that comparison, Bach lovers). Baroque Music, literally meaning "overly ornate" music, is usually characterised
                by lots of sequences, and grace notes. For classic baroque, try listening to The Brandenburg Concertos by JS Bach, or the overplayed Pachelbel's Canon. The Baroque Period lasted until the mid-1700s, when classical music began to peak. Now, why am I talking about "classical" music again? Well this is where it gets a bit confusing. Because for about 100 years the most popular sub-genre of classical music is now known as...classical. The Classical period includes great composers such as Mozart and Haydn. These are the best two examples of classical composers you will find. Classical music uses pleasing harmonies, and makes extensive use of various "forms" such as Sonata form, as well as compositions for a wider range of instruments, including the clarinet and Bassoon. In the early to mid 1800s, composers began to get in touch with their feminine side, writing long drawn out compositions overflowing with emotion and passion - the Romantic era was born. My personal favourite for "Romantic" music is Brahms, who wrote a couple of cracking sonatas for clarinet or viola and piano, as well as a multitude of other orchestral and piano works. These can be quite difficult to play, as they require a lot of emotion and feeling to fully do them justice. Other Romantic greats include Tchaikovsky (pretty much any spelling is acceptable these days) and Schumann. Pretty much any music written since the Romantic period falls under the umbrella title of 20th Century music. However this includes a huge number of classical styles including serialism (Shoenberg, Webern), impressionism(Debussy), minimalism (early Steve Reich), neo-classical (Bartok, Poulenc), and much more which does not seem to fit under any heading - Cage, Ives and Stockhausen, who put four string quartets inside helicopters and had the propellers going at the same time - that's classical music for you. Classical Music in its widest sense lost much
                of its audience when Blues and jazz began to develop, eventually progressing into popular rocknroll, and all the sub genres of pop that we have today. However classical composers have by no means disappeared. They have never stopped progressing and developing their ideas either. So if you get a chance to listen to some modern or contemporary classical music such as Michael Tippett (not quite contemporary any longer, sadly) Judith Weir, Stockhausen or Jonathan Harvey. Your perception of classical music might just be altered forever more.

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