Welcome! Log in or Register

Rage Against The Machine in general

  • image
£31.23 Best Offer by: amazon.co.uk See more offers
15 Reviews
  • Sort by:

    * Prices may differ from that shown

  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    15 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      12.02.2010 16:17
      Very helpful
      (Rating)

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      wish i saw them live and i will hopefully one day

      Firstly, did anyone manage to see then at Reading? If you did then you are so lucky!

      The first time I heard them I must have been around 13. This powerful rock rap combo combined with heavy riffs and lyrics that pumped you full of adrenaline! I had officially hit puberty and been rushed into a state of anarchy. Ok well not quite but still I had heard the most inflectional and inspiring group of the 90's.

      Although splitting up and troubles going on within the group, if you ask around Rage are still as big as ever. I absolutely love them and genuinely think they are un beatable in what they stand for. They rival the work of public enemy with their conspiracy theory's and desire to constantly be unconventional.

      I can literally listen to them during any time of the day and in any mood. I've heard people call them 'cock rock' I'm assuming this is because so many boys listen and like them not so much girls. But it doesn't matter because what ever genre you like , Rage seem to fit in nicely with everyone. See at their shows you have ever one from the grime and garage lovers to the punk and screamer mental lovers.

      The band split with their front man Zac and formed Audio slave which I actually thought were every good (nothing compared to Rage). Rage use majority of the time these immense heavy riffs which are filtered through out the track audio slave are more a conventional Verse bridge chorus development band.

      I would not hesitate to recommend them to any one. It takes a while to get into them but once you are in you're not coming back out!

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
    • More +
      05.02.2002 05:44
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      5 Comments

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      A few years back, my younger brother became a bit of a metalhead. He used to come home with CD's from an all manner of strange bands, with names that resembled Nazi Death Squads. At first we ridiculed him, calling him names and laughing at his strange dress sense (something about wearing black in the middle of summer...). Then as time passed we grew to accept him for what he was...a teenager with a rather large CD collection and money to burn. Whilst looking throught his room for some of my own CD's, I happened upon a CD entitled "Rage Against the Machine", with a picture of a man on fire on the front. I made the sign of the cross and put it back in its place and left the room in a hurry, making sure to avoid making eye contact with the pictures of "Ozzy" on his wall. Then one day while I was sitting in my room, I heard a different type of music coming from my brothers 1000watt speaker system, which sounded completely different from anything he usually played. For one thing the vocalist didn't sound like he was being choked to death whilst simultaneously being kicked in the groin. I was intruiged, so I asked him what it was. To my surprise he told me that it was Rage Against the Machine, and that was when my love affair with Zach de la Roche and co. began. Now as you may have read at the top of this op, I wrote "Road Rage Against the Machine". The reason for this is simple. When I'm driving in town and feeling a bit under the weather, out comes my Rage tape and things all seem better (that was almost like some lyrics there...). In fact, even if I'm NOT feeling under the weather, the tape goes on. And just for the record I'm not some angst ridden teenager who hates everything, I just know good music when I hear it. And the original album, of which my tape mostly consists of, is one of the greatest albums I have ever had the pleasure to listen to. To be honest, I had nev
      er really heard anything like it at all before. The heavy guitar mixed with the rap style lyrics, shouting out about opression and racism, really appealed to me. I've never been a big rap or hip-hop fan, I mostly like something with a bit of guitar and some singing, but this was fantastic. It was also relaxing in a strange sort of way, as singing along to the songs helped you get rid of all of the pent up rage inside you! Nice one! So when I heard that Zach had left the band, I felt that it was a bad day for the music world as even with a new vocalist I don't believe that Rage would be the same. But even so, if you see any of Rages albums in a store anywhere I would advise you to buy them. Even if your a heavy metal fan and don't like rap, the heavy riffs that are banged out should appeal to you, and the pure energy and rage that the band emits should send the hairs on the back of your neck standing tall. I cannot stress enough how good this band are and how good they're records are.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        06.10.2001 01:48

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        It opens with the sight of Tom Morello strapped with his double neck guitar and the greatness begins. You are first treated to a excellent cover song. "THE GHOST OF TOM JOAD" is quite awesome. but it is nothing for the next song. their performance of Vietnow is my favorite performance by them every caught on tape... Other songs featured live are People of the sun and awesome performance of Bulls on Parade.. Bullet in your head, Bombtrack, Know Your Enemy, and Killing in the name of.. Also a fantastic performance of Freedom that blows the cd version away. There are also the videos for Killing in the name of(but it's horrible), Bullet in your head, Freedom, Bulls on parade and People of the sun. There is also a great poem by Zack. My only complaint is on Know your enemy I don't like the effect Tom uses on his guitar... but hey that is not enough to ruin this great video. If you like Rage you will like this... that is all that needs to be said.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        26.08.2001 23:01
        Very helpful
        (Rating)
        1 Comment

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        When i first listened to some of Rage Against The Machines songs, I thought what the hell is this rubbish, as I was into garage music and used to that. But after I got bored of garage and I started listening to rock, and I began to like Rage Against The Machine. Also by watching their music videos, it made me like the music a lot more. I dont know why , but it just did! :) Unfortunately their vocalist, Zack De La Rocha left the band earlier in the year and I was very disappointed because he was the one along with Tom Morello, the guitarist, who gave the band a boost and made them sound more better. They produced four albums, one in 1992, 1996, 1999, and 2000. Their last album in the year 2000 was called Renegades and it wasnt completely their own songs, because it was done by other people but they just improved it into a rock version. I think all their albums were great, except for that im not sure on their album in 1996, called Evil Empire, the first 2 songs were good but the rest I didnt like. Their album in 1999, called Battle Of Los Angeles was rated the best rock album! Tom Morello is famous for doing his own scratching noises and using switches which are his own guitar effects that he does, this makes the music sound better from my point of view. I never get bored of listening to their music, i still listen to their album from 1992 which has one of their songs called Wake Up which featured in The Matrix soundtrack at the end of the film. That song was actually produced in 1991. If you have seen any songs around of Rage Against The Machine, be sure to listen to them because i dont think you will be disappointed especially if your already into rock music! On a good note, they have a new singer from Soundgarden, another rock group, and they will be releasing an album in October and have already written around 20 songs, but I think they will be changing their band name. So current Rage Against The Machine fans, like myself, will be
        looking forward to that.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
        • More +
          04.07.2001 17:17
          Very helpful
          (Rating)
          15 Comments

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          ‘Rage Against The Machine’ have been called the best band ever by a hell of a lot of people, I myself have three albums of theirs, and I would say that it might just be right. Rage Against the Machine was formed in Los Angeles in 1991. Vocalist Zack De La Rocha was previously in a band called ‘Inside Out’ and took the name "Rage Against The Machine" from ‘Inside Out's’ second unreleased album. And so the name was found, the name that would create shockwaves through both the music industry, but also the political world. This is a timeline of what happened to the band from there: [1991] First public performance, somebody's living room, Orange County, California. [1992] Self-produced 12-song cassette released. Includes "Bullet In The Head"--this original version is later included on Epic debut album. Through fan club and at live shows, tape sells over 5,000 copies. 07/13/92 Rage supports Porno For Pyros on the latter's debut performance in Los Angeles. 09/11/92 First of two shows on the second stage of Lollapalooza II, Los Angeles, California. 10/01/92 Rage begins first European tour, supporting Suicidal Tendencies through to 10/24/92. 11/06/92 Rage Against The Machine released on Epic Records. The album remains on the Billboard Top 200 Albums chart for 89 weeks, peaking at #45 in February, 1994. 12/26/92 "On the strength of the album, they must be viewed as one of the most original and virtuosic new rock bands in the nation..."-- Timothy White, Billboard. 01/23/93 Rage headlines "Rock For Choice" benefit at The Palladium, Hollywood, CA. Also appearing: Screaming Trees, Eddie Vedder, Mary's Danish, 7 Year Bitch, Exene Cervenka, Green Apple Quick Step. 03/08/93 Rage begins US tour with House Of Pain. 07/18/93 Appearing at Lollapalooza III in Philadelphia, Rage creates si
          lent protest against censorship by standing naked on stage for 25 minutes without singing or playing a note. Each band member has duct tape across his mouth and a letter scrawled on his chest, spelling out "P-M-R-C" (for Parents Music Resource Center). 04/28/94 Rage organize benefit concert "For The Freedom Of Leonard Peltier," California State University, Dominguez Hills, California. Rage headlines bill including Cypress Hill, Quicksand, Mother Tongue, X and Stanford Prison Experiment, with guest appearance by the Beastie Boys. A check for $75,235.91 is later presented to the Leonard Peltier Defense Fund. 10/22/94 Rage plays "Latinpalooza," a joint benefit for Leonard Peltier Defense Fund, United Farm Workers, and Para Los Niños, at Grand Olympic Grounds, Los Angeles, CA. Cypress Hill, Lighter Shade Of Brown, Fobia, Little Joe Y La Familia, and Thee Midnighters share the bill. 12/30/94 Higher Learning, music from film directed by John Singleton, is released on Epic Soundtrax. Includes new Rage track, "Year Of Tha Boomerang." 08/17/94 Rage Against The Machine certified US platinum for sales of one million copies. Album also certified platinum in Australia, Canada, UK, France, Belgium, and Chile; double platinum in New Zealand; and gold in Germany, Denmark, Holland, Norway, Sweden, and Switzerland. 08/13/95 Rage organize and headline benefit concert, Capitol Ballroom, Washington, D.C. Show raises more than $8,000 for the International Concerned Friends And Family Of Mumia Abu-Jamal. Also appearing: Handsome, Sullivan Brothers, Girls Against Boys, Chuck D. of Public Enemy, and Kathleen Hanna of Bikini Kill. 04/13/96 Rage appears on NBC's "Saturday Night Live." Their scheduled two-song performance is cut to one song by the show's producers when the band's crew attempt to hang inverted American flags from Rage's amplifiers. 04/14/96 Rag
          e video for "Bulls On Parade," directed by Peter Christopherson, premiers on MTV's "120 Minutes." 04/16/96 Evil Empire released on Epic Records. 04/20/96 Rage plays free concert, the Velodrome at California State University, Dominguez Hills, California. 05/03/96 Rage begins headlining European tour in Madrid. 05/04/96 Evil Empire enters Billboard Top 200 Albums chart at #1*. 09/11/93 Rage headlines sold-out Anti-Nazi League benefit, Brixton Academy, London, England. Supporting acts include Lush, Senser, Headswim and Green Apple Quickstep. Show raises money for League activities and publicizes 10/16/93 anti-Nazi march in London. 10/14/93 Rage begins headlining US tour with "Rock For Choice" benefit at The Palladium, Hollywood, California. 11/04/93 Sold-out headlining show, Roseland, New York City. 11/17/93 Rage begins US tour with Cypress Hill in Denver, Colorado. 12/19/93 MTV "120 Minutes" premier of "Freedom" video, directed by Peter Christopherson. Combines live performance footage with scenes from 1992 documentary Incident At Oglala and text from Peter Matthiessen's In The Spirit Of Crazy Horse. 02/01/94 "Freedom" is the #1 video in the USA, according to CVC Broadcast & Cable Top 50 chart. 11/25/97 "The Ghost of Tom Joad" single and RATM live concert video is released. As captured on their self-titled debut album (Epic Associated), the music of Rage Against The Machine is a fierce and uncompromising meld of punk-inspired hard rock and politically-charged rap. Less than two years from the time of their first public performance in an Orange County living room party, the Los Angeles-based band has created a growing storm of both controversy and fan support. Rage's influences range (in their words) "from Bad Brains to Malcolm X, from Led Zeppelin to Che Guevara, from M
          inor Threat to Martin Luther King Jr., from Public Enemy to the Clash." Rage Against The Machine was co-produced by the band with engineer Garth Richardson, who has worked with Red Hot Chili Peppers and Ozzy Osbourne. All sounds are the product of guitars, bass, and drums; no samples, keyboards or synthesizers were used to create this music. What was used was the raw musical power and highly charged language of such key Rage songs as "Settle For Nothing," "Killing In The Name," and "Bullet In The Head." This last-named track is also the first video by Rage Against The Machine, even though FCC regulations preclude airplay. Before signing with Epic Associated, Rage Against The Machine recorded a 12-song cassette, which sold over 5,000 copies at the band's live shows and through its fan club. In fact, the present album version of "Bullet In The Head" is taken directly from that self-released tape. In its first year of existence, Rage Against The Machine opened shows for Ice-T's Body Count, Public Enemy, and Pearl Jam. The band supported Perry Farrell's Porno For Pyros on the latter's July 13, 1992 debut performance; toured Europe with Suicidal Tendencies; and appeared September 11-12, 1992 on the second stage of Lollapalooza II in Los Angeles dates. "On the strength of the album," wrote Timothy White in Billboard, "they must be viewed as one of the most original and virtuosic new rock bands in the nation...Rage Against The Machine generates the most beautifully articulated torrent of hardcore bedlam that one could imagine. And the hopes invested in these humming murals of urban din are equally visionary." (Many thanks to Gavin who helped me put this together, like the huge Rage fan you are) Since the band broke up their has been quite a lot of talk about them getting back together at some point, just without Zack De La Rocha, which he is just a li
          ttle peeved about, having been the one who came up with the band name, and some people have said that he is the one that gave them such success. Being an amazing vocalist, one of the best of all time. I have also been in many debates over this band, a lot of them have thrown up good points. One of them was when you listen to a song, what are you more interested in, the riffs or the words, is it the tune your looking for, or inspirational words. I would say it is a combination of the both, but I would also like to hear any comments at the end of this. Maybe try and get a discussion going. Would be pretty cool. Okay, thank you anyone who read this all, there is a band who have had a huge musical influence on me, and I just wanted to share some stuff with you. J Mr.T

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments
            More Comments
          • More +
            17.02.2001 19:42
            Very helpful
            (Rating)
            1 Comment

            Advantages

            Disadvantages

            In a galaxy far away the spaceship trooper Spock utters with whimper "Captain, We've an unidentified object straight ahead. I think it's some form of covers album". Captain Kirk replies with a haughty disdain "Get with the program man!!!!!! A covers album it may be, but this is no ordinary covers album. Re-adjust your ears". After several months in planet Rage the wait is finally over and we get to hear what is sadly going to be RATM's final album. The fact that its a cover album doesn't even come into the equation in most cases as the band have taken the lyrics as a blueprint and taken them to places they've never seen before. With rumours of the band trying to poach Cypress Hills B Real as a replacement for Zack perhaps the best place to start would be the cover of aforementioned bands "How Could I just Kill A Man". Sticking as close to the original as possible, pumping up the bass line and adding some trademark Rage guitars. Whereas the original had that wacky style Cypress Hill are known for, this version is perhaps all the better for the attacking rasping vocals. The version of Devo's "Beautiful World" shows a side we don't see often enough with the band. Crooning vocals slide perfectly over a soft gentle guitar riff while eerie electronics bleep in the background. Having not heard the original its hard to compare but its easy to see the influence Devo has had on contemporary artist such as Mansun. While some may question lyrics like "Its a beautiful world we live in" all is forgiven when the final goodbye is "For you.....not me". With some strange choices such as "The Ghost Of Tom Joad" (originally an acoustic song by Bruce Springsteen) and Pistol Grip Pump (obscure hip hip track by Volume 10) amongst the more conventional choices (MC5, the Stooges and The Rolling Stones) it makes for great listening. Over the years the band have cons
            istently broken boundaries and they've had effect on bands that don't even know it yet, this album goes half way to explaining why with the covers including everything from hip hop, punk and all the way through to folk music. Of course we'd have preferred an album of original songs, but this is still an essential purchase for the fans and even more essential for Nu-Metal fans to show them the light and ultimately the end of an era. Alex McCann

            Comments

            Login or register to add comments
            • More +
              01.02.2001 01:25

              Advantages

              Disadvantages

              I’ve often wondered what nuns do for fun. Seriously. Not being deeply religious myself, I can only marvel at the level of commitment these women have made to God, forsaking in the process a multitude of everyday pleasures most people take for granted, such as rollerblading and curly fries. Of course, any satisfaction derived from these secular indulgences will be short-lived, whereas I’m told the time invested in prayer and celibacy will yield oodles of benefits I can only guess at. Avoiding eternal damnation, perhaps. But surely nuns must grow weary of their daily rituals from time to time, just as the rest of us do. They’re still human, after all. Since they can’t exactly hang up their habits for a night and cruise on over to the local bowling alley to knock down some pins and pints, what do they do to kick back and relax? I ask this not to be flippant, judgmental, or insulting, but to simply attempt to draw a comparison with Rage Against The Machine. (Bear with me.) One of the most politically active bands of the ‘90s, RATM have tackled dozens of weighty issues, ranging from the Zapatista movement in Mexico to the deplorable use of sweatshops by multinational corporations, from First Amendment rights to the plight of Leonard Peltier, a Native American convicted of murder whose guilt is doubted by millions. The band’s three studio albums have been loud, aggressive, and unapologetically outspoken, urging people to seek the truth, question authority, get involved, and fight the power. In their own way, they’ve been as passionate about their beliefs as nuns are about God. Yet they’re still a rock band, and though rebellion has always been an inherent part of rock n’ roll, fun and good times also comprise a good chunk of it. (This would help to explain such goofy groups as Quiet Riot and My Life With The Thrill Kill Kult.) It’s not impossible to bang your head and still say something import
              ant, but I used to wonder if RATM ever got tired of being so serious all the time and just jammed on old Nazareth tunes during rehearsal. To do so in concert, however, would present a whole new problem. Were they to play a vacuous song like “Smokin’ In The Boys’ Room” just for the hell of it, a portion of the crowd might conclude the band wasn’t truly sincere about the causes for which they campaigned and promptly lose interest. I mean, let’s face it: if some poodle-haired frontman encouraged you to help save the rainforest and then started yowling an Air Supply ballad, how much credit would you give him? The guy doesn’t even know what good music is, so what the hell could he possibly know about protecting the trees? (Naturally, I’m making the huge assumption that RATM would even want to play empty-headed crowd-pleasers; who knows, they might hate all things AC/DC with a vengeance. But for argument’s sake, let’s say they do feel tempted to cover “Big Balls” every now and then.) And so it seemed - at least to me - that RATM would have to keep their guard up at all times, because to relax for even a song or two might compromise everything they stood for. They could spank out all the KISS tunes they wanted in private, but we’d never get to hear it. The furthest they’d strayed from their usual incendiary sound on an official release was a live variation of the Allen Ginsberg poem “Hadda Be Playing On The Jukebox” which talked about the supposed collusion between the CIA, the FBI and the Mafia, among other things. Not exactly standard jukebox fare. And so I found myself asking much the same question: what do they do, musically, for fun? I got my answer with Renegades, an album of remakes on which RATM pay homage to the artists that first sparked their interest in music and demonstrated to them that it can be a powerful tool to raise awareness over i
              mportant social issues and initiate change. Every track is one with which the band felt a kinship, whether it be for the topic it addresses or the revolutionary nature of the artist(s) who recorded it. Experimenting with styles and rhythms outside the realm of what they had done previously, vocalist Zack de la Rocha, guitarist Tom Morello, bassist Tim Commerford, and drummer Brad Wilk have radically transformed the majority of the songs into new and exciting beasts, ones which salute the soul of their original incarnations yet are undeniably the product of RATM. You won’t find any updates of “Play That Funky Music” or “Wild Thing,” but this is still about as loose as they’re ever going to get. Hip-hop has been an integral part of RATM’s sound since their debut in 1992, and the genre is well-represented here. The opening cut, Eric B and Rakim’s “Microphone Fiend,” is straight off the old school tip - vivid, cocky, and sporting one def chorus. Over a fat bass line, self-described ‘militant poet’ de la Rocha raps the story of a young MC’s love of music: “I fiend for a microphone like heroin/Soon as the bass kicks, I need a fix/Gimme a stage and a mic and a mix.” “Pistol Grip Pump” by the all-but-forgotten Volume 10 is tough as nails and loud as hell in its push for unity and the right to bear arms. Commerford and Wilk grab the spotlight as they pump out a beat that threatens to shatter your car speakers. Some of the roots of gangsta rap may be found in EPMD’s “I’m Housin’,” another ruthless rhyme about protecting your turf and making sure everyone on the dancefloor knows who the man is: “I get hip to the scheme before it happens/If it gets wild, then I'll start cappin'/But for now, since everything's calm/Relate to the matter as I drop the bomb.” It’s Afrika Bambaataa’s “Renegades Of Funk,
              ” however, which best embodies the spirit of the disc. “No matter how hard you try, you can’t stop us now,” de la Rocha warns as he name-checks some of history’s greatest upstarts, from Sitting Bull to Malcolm X, then gets the crowd moving with a wicked call-and-response which brings to mind such past club faves as “The Roof Is On Fire.” Producer Rick Rubin was doubtful that anyone could cut the song down from its length of 12-plus minutes and still do it justice, but a single spin will prove that the band got it right. The inclusion of the Cypress Hill track may confuse some fans. RATM have vigorously protested the imprisonment and death sentence of accused cop-killer Mumia Abu-Jamal, yet here they are covering a song that casually discusses cold-blooded murder. (Their resurrection of N.W.A.’s notorious “F*ck Tha Police” off the Japanese-only release Live And Rare was similarly puzzling.) To understand the apparent contradiction, one must look beyond the blustery talk of gats and Magnums and ask how the narrator came to possess such a callous disregard for human life. This is an emergency broadcast to the posh mansions up on the hill, filled with sheltered people clueless as to what’s going on in the minimum-wage streets below: “How do you know where I’m at when you haven’t been where I been?/Understand where I’m coming from?” When taking out some young punk who tried to jack you becomes a routine part of surviving in the city, it goes without saying that innumerable problems exist within the present system and that a considerable overhaul is needed. Thus, “How I Could Just Kill A Man” fits in perfectly with the theme of Renegades, and RATM successfully translate DJ Muggs’ turntable throbs and looping squeals to real instruments. Just listen as the drums and bass explode during the finale like a salvo of cannonballs fired at the Trump Tower an
              d try to tell me it doesn’t make perfect sense. At first glance, “Street Fighting Man” would seem too obvious a choice for Renegades. Though wanting to tear down the establishment is a desire wholeheartedly shared by RATM, attempting to out-rock the Rolling Stones would be pointless. Inspiration for the album’s techno-flavored version came, surprisingly, from The Prodigy. According to Morello, the British big-beat masters (with whom he collaborated on “One Man Army” off the Spawn soundtrack) were the only band to give RATM a run for their money in a live show, and the axeman wanted to incorporate other styles with their music aside from the hip-hop sound for which they were known. The result places the defiant lyrics inside a dynamic new soundscape, though none of the frustrated anger of the original has been lost. Anybody recall the uninspired, passionless reproduction Oasis put out a few years back? Didn’t think so. Among the most successful songs are the ones by artists you’d never expect RATM to cover. As rock n’ roll’s most literate maverick, Bob Dylan has long used music as a form of protest (e.g., “Masters Of War”). RATM take the seething resentment of “Maggie’s Farm” and amplify it a hundred-fold, spitting out the chilling story of a slave about to rise up against his abusive, hypocritical masters: “I ain’t gonna work for Maggie’s brother no more/Well, he hands you a nickel, then he hands you a dime/And he asks you with a grin if you’re having a good time.” Take a tour through any major metropolis and you’ll find that the words are as relevant now as when they were first penned over thirty years ago, as the gap between the rich and the poor has widened even further. “Beautiful World” will come as the biggest shock to fans as Devo’s new-wave pop gloss is stripped away, leaving a largely acoustic bal
              lad (!) that more effectively highlights the song’s sarcastic description of a society defined by the superficiality of its populace. “Wonderful people everywhere,” de la Rocha whispers, barely concealing his disdain. “The way they comb their hair/Makes me want to say it’s a wonderful place.” “The Ghost Of Tom Joad” previously appeared as a bonus single with the band’s home video collection, but the version included here has been spiffed up by Morello and Rubin with additional guitar overdubs and echo effects and features a slightly different ending. Assessing the current sorry state of America, Bruce Springsteen’s tone of weary resignation is transformed into the outraged cry of a young man who sees his opportunities disappearing and vows to fight back: “And Tom says, ‘Ma, wherever you see a cop beating a guy/Wherever a hungry newborn baby cries/Wherever there’s a fight against the blood and hatred in the air/Look for me, Ma, I’ll be there.’” The best track on the album and one of RATM’s finest moments. “Kick Out The Jams” is a sloppy take on the MC5’s most famous tune that’s nothing special, though one can’t find fault with the sheer energy on display. Uncompromising punk pioneers the Stooges are honored with a rendition of “Down On The Street” that has the dirty groove of late-night, motel-room sex set to the tempo of beer bottles being smashed by drunken underage teens in a nearby alleyway. The scalding thrash of former hardcore band Minor Threat is faithfully reproduced on “In My Eyes” and its naked contempt for trend-following sheep and apathetic pessimists who can’t see what it’s really all about comes across like open-handed slaps to the face: “Did you f*cking get it?/What the f*ck have you done?/It’s in my eyes and it doesn’t look that way to me.” Makes Korn
              and Limp Bizkit sound like the Backstreet Boys. Two unlisted tracks are offered as extras, though neither earns a ‘must-have’ label. The live version of “Kick Out The Jams” is essentially the same as the studio one, it’s just played a bit faster. B Real and Sen Dog make a guest appearance on a stage-stomping delivery of “How I Could Just Kill A Man,” yet it, too, adds nothing of significance. These bonuses will be omitted from later pressings, however, so completists should get their copies ASAP. By now I’m sure everyone knows that Zack de la Rocha has called it quits, effectively pulling the plug on the powerhouse that was Rage Against The Machine. The remaining members have vowed to march on, and though other bands have lost their lead singers and survived and even flourished (Van Halen, Chicago), it’s still difficult to believe they’ll ever find another vocalist who complements their music as well as de la Rocha did. As a quartet they were damn near a force of nature itself, and Renegades is indisputable proof of their collective talent. With any luck, the departed frontman will give the album repeated listenings, realize the value of what he had with the others, and return to the fold. It would probably be blasphemous to ask a nun to pray for the passing of such an occurrence, but hey, it couldn’t hurt. I still haven’t an inkling as to what those ladies do for recreation, so a copy of Renegades might be just the thing they need to shake up their routine. Now jam, sucker!

              Comments

              Login or register to add comments
            • More +
              09.12.2000 22:21
              1 Comment

              Advantages

              Disadvantages

              Zack may have quit the band, but he's left the fans a real mindblower to keep them going on with. This album hits like a revolutionary fist into the face of oppression. This is simply one of the most amazing diverse and searing albums you will ever hear. It gives a real insight to the music that shaped the band, whilst maintaining that unique Rage edge. Its almost ironic that the band are at an all time high on their last album, but its better to go out laike this than to fade away into obscurity. Without Zack, Rage won't be the same, but this now makes 4 of the greatest albums ever produced, and the live album comes out next year, Zack has left, but his legacy most definitely lives on.

              Comments

              Login or register to add comments
              • More +
                01.12.2000 00:20
                Very helpful
                (Rating)

                Advantages

                Disadvantages

                This RATM covers album is the last studio album featuring their recently departed singer Zack De La Rocha - there's plans for a live album release after this, but in studio terms it's the last, and it's just a shame that it's covers not originals. Hopefully this won't be the last RATM album either if the band are fit enough to continue, in any form. Anyhow, it's a fabulous piece of entertainment! It's 12 songs worth of rock, hip-hop and punk covers of various diversity. It's great because many of the bands Rage have namechecked (i.e. Public Enemy, Kiss, Bad Brains, The Sex Pistols)...are not on here! It's an unpredictable variety. There's also two live versions of the songs on the limited edition CD. The album artwork is quite minimalist aswell, it's just art coloured square lettering and an interesting inlay depicting how you could wtite a message on money - a piece of paper that no one will burn - as a form of protest; it's also a crime apparently. It also doesn't explain who the covers are by, although there are credits and a few liner notes (and links to political organisations) that explain things. And it doesn't list the current band line-up as on previous albums... Anyway, the album itself is really great. It's produced by reknowned hard rock producer Rick Rubin, and the most noticable thing is the warm and gourmet production. It's not tinkered or polished up too much, and so retains that raw, almost live edge. Zack sounds as emotive as ever, the drums sound as natural as can be, combined with gritty guitar and noticably boomy bass. Expected first single 'Renegades Of Funk' is an Afrika Bambaataa one (which incidently contains a chant from the original) and is proper funk rock, with some added bongos. It's got a kind of groovy but very dangerous feel to it, almost like the volatile RATM themselves. Also featured here is Bruce Springsteen's 'The Ghost Of Tom
                Joad' - it might sound like an odd choice to cover, but they pull it off surprisingly well. Fans who own the RATM live video can find semblance in the fact that this recorded version is different to the one on that video's accompanying CD single. I think it sounds better if anything! I haven't heard the original Rolling Stones 'Street Fighting Man', but Rage's version sounds very spiky, gritty and panicky. It's a pure body moving adrenaline rush. After this song is 'Maggie's Farm' with the classic sounding line "I ain't gonna work on Maggie's farm no more" etc., and some bluesy funk. RATM's mates Cypress Hill also get a nod here on 'How I Could Just Kill A Man', and again on the live bonus version where B-Real (possible new RATM singer too) and Sen Dog join the band to sing along. It's a great song, simply. Half-way into the album 'Beautiful World' is probably the only thing on the album that sounds out of place. It's good, but doesn't fit in with the other songs too much. It's a good and lyrically strong, wiry guitar (just guitar and vocals) ballad though. I think the song's by Devo, I think I read that in some magazine. The best bit is the harsh reality, that "It's a beautiful world for you - not me". 'In My Eyes' is basic fast 70's punk rock, this is possibly by The Stooges, they have atleast one Stooges cover here I think, and it's interesting as I doubt you've ever heard RATM purely resemble a punk band, it's almost like classic Green Day, maybe. I don't know who 'Down On The Street' is by, but it's still a mighty good tune - atleast RATM's version that I know of. 'Kick Out The Jams' is another cool funky rock cover, and features again as the second live bonus. The other songs are pure hip-hop adoration. I don't know the original artists, but 'Microphone Fiend' is
                a good definition anthem for hip-hop, and 'Pistol Grip Pump' almost makes you feel like the bass and guitars are pulling a trigger every other funky beat, and 'I'm Housin'' is just a great slab of pure unadulterated hip-hop, RATM style again. When I bought this album I only bought it as a RATM fan, as a salute to Zack leaving, I didn't think I'd like it too much. I know that's a bad reason for buying albums, but fans at any point of a band's career become collectors too forever, and so I bought this and was pleasantly surprised by it's pure and gourmet approach, even the packaging looks like it's an indie label release, although they're on Sony Epic. And it's a good varied selection of non-obvious covers, and interpreted in the classic RATM way. This is just an ace album! Most covers albums see bands belting out note for note stuff they played when they were at school or something, and they're boring, but this is different. It kind of makes you sad when you think that this indeed is that studio album with Zack, and it's a covers one, but atleast he exited in style, and RATM have made enough good songs to be known as legends. I can't wait for their live album (next year) now, and I'll be anticipating what now lies ahead for the band. For the time being, this is a great piece of audio entertainment; I'm giving it an unashamed 5 stars, and recommend it to all! It's another of the year's best albums.

                Comments

                Login or register to add comments
              • More +
                28.11.2000 03:22
                Very helpful
                (Rating)
                1 Comment

                Advantages

                Disadvantages

                Rage have just relesed there new cover album, "renagades" and dam its great! There new album is some of the best work the band have ever done and with covers of, "Mic fiend" and "How could i just kill a man" its a great piece of music! This album was released a few weeks after the split of rage but this album gives no indication of the pre-split tentions. There are 12 tracks on this album plus two bonus tracks on the limitted cd's. The songs are really great and the beats and guitars are as great as always. Tom morrelo hasnt lost an inch giving each song a new rage twist. The new simlple cover works well and lots of different combinations are avalible. This is one of their best works and a must have for all those true rage fans, nice one

                Comments

                Login or register to add comments
                • More +
                  05.11.2000 03:28
                  Very helpful
                  (Rating)

                  Advantages

                  Disadvantages

                  If you are reading these very words then i need not bother try to justify why i, couplled with many(but too few) feel that Rage Against the Machine were the best band of all time.Some of the ignorant at this stage may be asking why i used the past tense `were the best band` and my reasoning is totally justified. Zack de la Rocha has officially left Rage Against the Machine! Reports tell that the remaining members of the band will continue with their musically orientated political euphoria that Zack helped create but its difficult to imagine the band without the injection of passion and anger that Zack brought to the band. This is a sad time for Rage Against the machine fans and for those lucky enough to have seen Rages last ever British performance at the reading festival, those memories will live on and three beatifully crafted albums will always be present to remind us all how music should be done.

                  Comments

                  Login or register to add comments
                • More +
                  07.09.2000 00:34
                  Very helpful
                  (Rating)

                  Advantages

                  Disadvantages

                  Rage Against The Machine have a very powerful sound. Their style is kind of a hybrid betweem hip hop and metal, but is far better than the prospect of that actually sounds. They have a definite political message to get across in their music, which is always commendable, and some of the tunes they have come up with are utterly unmissable. Killing In The Name, Bombtrack and Bulls On Parade are worth checking out, if you want to see what I mean. Nobody makes music like Rage make music, and nobody screams like they scream. Intelligent, raw and loud, rage are a great band.

                  Comments

                  Login or register to add comments
                • More +
                  17.07.2000 00:17
                  Very helpful
                  (Rating)
                  11 Comments

                  Advantages

                  Disadvantages

                  Update: At the end of this review you may note a paragraph about rifts in the band and so on. Well recently Zach De La Rocha, the rapper/lyricist, left the band and is, as yet, unreplaced. There are rumours of the Cypress hill rapper filling the void but the future is still uncertain. I for one sincerely hope they can get it together and continue. Oh yeah, and soon what's left of Rage are releasing a live/covers compilation - I'll review it here once I've given it a good listen. A few people have said that they're going to buy Rage's first album on the back of this review. This has brought up horrid images of people spenging a wad of their hard-earned cash, bringing home a nice shiny new CD, putting it on the stereo, and then turning it straight back off again because they find it repulsive. I should warn that this is not an easy listen at all, and it takes a long time to really get into unless you are an angst-ridden teenager. Obviously I think it is well worth the effort, but my claims that these are the best band in the world are meant just in relation to (broadly) this type of music (ie. the kind covered by Melody Maker, etc. - can't think of an accurate term), so don't buy it if you don't like heavy guitars and rapping. Sorry, I know this is probably totally unnecessary, but better safe than sorry! Original opinion: 'Even The Guardian called them the best band in the world - who am I to argue?' I moved this review to the top because I think more people should listen to this band. The Guardian review refers to a gig at Wembley Arena which I went to earlier in this year. Having seen this phenomenal performance the reviewer declared Rage the best band in the world. The review can easily be found by searching The Guardian's website. I agree that there is no better band around at the moment. The first album is absolutely astonishing. They lost their way a little with
                  the rushed second album, but redeemed themselves with the third. The first album is one of the best albums I have ever heard and I can't recommend it strongly enough to anyone who doesn't absolutely hate metal/funk/rock/rap. In fact, I know a couple of people who hate this kind of sound who still concede that this is a special album. BUY IT! LISTEN TO IT! The riffs, arrangement, drumming, passion, inventive guitar playing and some flabberghastingly good songs make this album an absolute must. With Rage the political message is strong and unavoidable. The rage against capitalist society shouldn't be confused with the pathetic teenage-angst type ranting of recent poor imitations such as Limp Bizkit. Unfortunately Rage often get put in the same bracket, leading to many people ignoring them on the presumption that it's all teenage market-driven tosh. This is partly their own fault. When the first album came out, they must have known that 'Killing in the Name' would have been popular with rebelling teenagers, with it's refrain of "fuck you, I won't do what you tell me". But there really is much more to this band than random rebellion against anything because your middle class life is too comfortable, a la Limp Bizkit, Korn etc. Some of the lyrics are fantastic, there is real passion in the rapping (occasionally screaming) and the whole band work together to create immensely powerful emotions. Anyone interested in this band should DEFINITELY get the first album. The third is also strong, with Tom Morello showing why many believe he is the most inventive guitarist on the planet. You really will find it hard to believe some of these sounds came from a guitar! Real fans will also enjoy the second album, 'Evil Empire'. It has some great tracks, particularly 'People of the Sun' and 'Down Rodeo', but even these songs cannot compare with the brilliant 'Bullet in the Head&
                  #39;, 'Killing In the Name', 'Take the Power Back', I could go on but you should listen for yourself! I read an interview recently where Brad Wilk, the drummer, said that on the new album he was trying to create a definitive sound so that people could tell it was him drumming. This seemed odd to me, and rumours of rifts between band members are common. I have a feeling this could be the last album, at least with the current line-up, if not ever. :( But then I could be completely wrong :) Either way enjoy it! It's great stuff!!! If you ever get the chance to see them live do it! They're playing Reading and Leeds festivals this year.

                  Comments

                  Login or register to add comments
                    More Comments
                  • More +
                    08.07.2000 05:36
                    Very helpful
                    (Rating)
                    1 Comment

                    Advantages

                    Disadvantages

                    Rage against the Machine are without a doubt not only one of the best, but surely also one of the most important bands to emerge from the 90s. Tom Morello, the guitar genius is surely one of the most influential players to today's latest generations of bands and guitarists, such as Korn, Limp Bizkit, etc., etc.. Yet in this country, Rage are very much a cult band. This must change. Although they are self-proclaimed Communists, and their lyrics are very much geared towards America, I feel that Britain and its youth culture could learn a lot from this great band, instead of listening to dance music or the crap that fills our charts.

                    Comments

                    Login or register to add comments
                    • More +
                      27.06.2000 02:49
                      Very helpful
                      (Rating)
                      2 Comments

                      Advantages

                      Disadvantages

                      One of the best known bands with their own unique style of music, Rage against the Machine are a band who don't play their music to make money and earn fame. They are an idealistic band beliving in fighting for what is right, I myself do not have the same outlook on life as they do, however I have the utmost respect and admiration for them as they fight for what they believe in and not let anything stand in their way. In fact the lead singer spent some time in a guerrila seperatist group in Mexico. Full of integrity RATM support many charitys and support groups as you will find from the advertisements at the rear of their albums. The rap metal music which RATM plays is without a doubt one of the most passionate forms of music around, it invokes feelings of anger, disillusionment and rebellion. It is the only music that I have heard that fires up the senses and fuels your emotions like it does. While RATM's most famous song may be nothing more then frontman Zack de la Rocha shouting into the mike "F*** you I won't do what you told me" over and over (hardly their best moment but something which sticks in peoples minds), it does sum up RATM quite nicely. They are rebellious against capitalists and most forms of authority, but they are supreme musicians!

                      Comments

                      Login or register to add comments