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  • It ain't a mushroom!
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      25.09.2010 21:39
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      Great

      In March both my children became veggies and after a month of offering a veggie and a non veggie dish every day I started to prefer the look of the veggie meals. The first meal I had was a quorn based shepherds pie, someone told me to make quorn great you have to add lots of flavour, to be honest I added no more than I would have in a meat version and it looked, smelt and tasted far nicer. You dont get the same oil slick that you would with meat, and my hips tell me thats a good thing. we have tried all the quorn products availble and the only one we dont rate highly is the plain burgers, kids tend to load them with cheese and onions and sauce and then they dont mind them. I am a very happy quorn customer and the price is great too, the helpline were brilliant when I phoned them with a query back in march and they sent out a free recipe book and a £1 off voucher for my call. The recipe book was a bit basic but at the start it gave me the confidence I needed. Well done quorn you are doing a great job, even my husband is converting and he is a man who I never thought would see the veggie light. I even served up a quorn shepherds pie to my 97 year old grandad and he did not have a clue. infact he commented on how lovely it was. Buy quorn and save a few pound at the checkout.

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      10.09.2010 23:17
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      it's an opinion

      I don't eat meat and neither does my family so we do buy a lot of quorn products. Many years ago if you didn't eat meat there was little vegetarian stuff about, it was vegetable textured protein stuff. Quorn is good for you it is low in fat, low in calories (some products may seem high but it will be the added stuff) high in fibre and a good source of protein. In 1990 the first branded home cooking product was launched - quorn pieces. Things have come a long way since then and now there is lots of quorn products to choose from - not all great. The main ingredient in all quorn products is mycroprotein. This was originally made because in 1964 the population was quickly growing and there was widespread forecasts that there would be a shortage of protein by the 1980's. By the time quorn products were on the market the threat of protein shortage seemed to have ceased. So instead it was launched as a healthy and versatile vegetarian food. Quorn on its own is quite bland so a lot of products do add flavouring and it can taste herby or garlicky etc. For example quorn chicken like pieces and fillets are bland if you eat them on there own if they are added to stuff with a good sauce then they taste great. But a ready meal of lasagne is quite tasty and garlicy. Quorn now have quite a range which means there is a lot more vege stuff on the market since I first stopped eating meat 20 years ago. They have products which they class as cooking from scratch which includes chicken style pieces, mince, fillets, swedish style balls and things that I have never managed to find like Italian style balls and sweet chille stir fri strips. They have ready meals such as lasagne which are nice and tasty but as with all ready meals a bit small, cottage pie which I can make better using the quorn mince, and korma which my daughter likes. I buy a lot of their deli style slices for sandwiches - the ones I buy are ham, chicken turkey and stuffing and peppered beef. My favourite is the ham which I find quite tasty, the beef is a bit too peppery for me but the rest of the family don't have a problem with it. They also have quick things like a range of burgers, sausages pies and pasties. I am not going to go through everything that is produced because they do stuff like pate and lots of things that meat eaters eat only made with quorn instead of dead animal. Anything you make with meat you can make with quorn (you might have to season a bit more). I am not going to preach but now more than ever it is a health thing, there are so many cheap cuts of meat now a days because of the credit crunch that people are eating the real crap. Its cheap stuff and that is why we are getting animal diseases. Quorn and soya provide more protein and stuff don't dismiss that vegies don't get enough protein and vitamins we probably get more and there is nothing hard about eating a dead animal! If you want to know the full range of quorn products then visit their website which is easily found by typing quorn into google.

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        17.03.2010 21:00
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        hmmm

        Ever since I was young I have never really been a huge fan of meat and for the past 6 years I have been a vegetarian on and off (I stopped being a vegetarian because it was an 'inconvenience' for an ex boyfriend mother ... bad decision I know but easily rectified as since then I have returned to my vegetarian way for a year). Even when I wasn't a vegetarian I had always had quorn included in my diet by my mother who would often use it in her cooking due to its low calorific content, for example I don't think i have eatten real mince in a spaghetti bolognaise since i was about 4 years old and as I love quorn it really doesn't bother me. *** What is Quorn*** Quorn is a Mycoprotein which is a type of fungus I believe and its the leading meat substitute in England. Quorn is classed as a health food and holds the Vegetarian society seal of approval however as it uses eggs as a binder it is not suitable for vegan's. ***Range*** Quorn holds a large section of the market for all meat substitute products and has a vast range of products, these include; Quorn pieces and fillets (like chicken) Quorn Mince Quorn Burgers Quorn Sausages Quorn sandwich meats (ham, turkey etc) Quorn Sausage rolls Quorn Scotch Eggs Quorn Lasagne Quorn Shepherd Pie Quorn Dippers Quorn Peppered Steaks Quorn Beef Style Pieces Any many more. As you can see the range pretty much covers everything and makes quorn a versatile alternative for almost any meal. I personally sue quorn in Stir Frys, lasagna, Curries, Chilli and Barbeques. The versatility of Quorn means that noone has to miss out, for example I can still enjoy a full english breakfast with my family and just have Quorn bacon and sausage instead of the real thing or I can eat at the family BBQ and simply cook Quorn burgers and frankfurters instead. ***Ideas*** Personally I adore the products website www.quorn.co.uk as it involves a section just for recipies. The section includes ideas for slimmers, snacks, meal and things that are ideal for the family. Because of how similar Quorn is to reagular meat many children will eat it and I tend to feed it to my little cousin, he enjoys the pizza topped quorn burgers as they add a bit of fun to meal time and I even let him add his own toppings so it involves him in the whole cooking process. The product can be used in a variety of ways and added to British, Greek, Italian and a varitety of other dishes from all over the world. I believe it works particularly well in Indian and Italian dishes as the flavours bring out the taste of the quorn. ***Taste and Texture*** Each of the Quorn dishes are changed to taste like what its immitating for example the bacon strips taste liek smoky bacon crisps in my opinion which is not at all off putting. The texture of the quorn is normally the same and it is quite firm but is easily chewed and certain products do have that 'melt in your mouth' quality that some meats can possess. ***Price*** Quorn can be quite expensive so it is best to shop around. At the moment certain products can be brought in Asda for 4 products for £3 and these include 4 quorn sausages and quorn burgers. The most popular products are the fillets, pieces and mince and these normally cost between £1.50 and £2 depending where you shop around but one packet can easily accomodate a family of four and I find the average meal prepared fully with Quorn will cost about £5 for all four of us. I hope this has given you a better insight into the world of Quorn and the foods us vegetarians get to enjoy =) Loulou129

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          07.02.2010 23:23
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          Quorn - Tastes like meat but isn't.

          I have been a vegetarian for over 6 years now and use a wide range of Quorn products. **What is Quorn?** Quorn is a mycoprotein, it is made from a member of the fungi family, but doesn't taste anything like mushrooms. Quorn is high in protein, dietary fibre and has essential amino acids. It is low in fat and has absolutely no cholesterol. Quorn has a vast range of products, from snacks to ready meals and a selection of these are show below: Snacks: Cocktail Sausages, Golden Poppin' Bites, Mini Cornish Pasties, Mini Sausage Rolls, Mini Savoury Eggs, Deli Slices, Mini Spring Rolls, Satay Skewers. Ready Meals: Cottage Pie, Lasagne, Toad in the Hole, Curry & Rice. To Cook From Scratch: Mince, Chicken Style Pieces, Beef Style Pieces, Chicken Style Fillets, Italian Style Meatballs. With five of us in our family, I don't use ready meals, as that would work out far too expensive. I do like to have some snack Quorn in the fridge or freezer though, for when I fancy a quick, tasty snack. I also buy a lot of chicken & beef style pieces, fillets and mince, to use in meals I cook from scratch. These are the products I find most useful, because they can be used like their meat equivalents. They are also cooked very quickly, much quicker than meat and they taste the most like meat. I find that quite important, as I did enjoy the taste of meat and only gave it up for ethical reasons. Quorn products are now widely available and you will find a good selection in most supermarkets. They do tend to be a bit more expensive than meat, but Quorn products seem to be on special offer on a regular basis. I always stuff my freezer to bursting points, when it's on offer and find that I hardly ever pay full price. If you are following a vegetarian diet or are watching your weight or cholesterol, I would definately recommend trying Quorn. It is a versatile product and makes a very good substitute for meat.

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          09.03.2009 01:20
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          thumps up

          I'm not a vegetarian but I do have a lot of friends that are so I do eat a lot of meat free products as it is easier to just cook quorn rather than make to separate meals for when they come round to eat. I have grown quite fond of quorn and don't mind the taste. I also find that it is much easier for my children to eat as it is very soft and they don't notice the difference. One of the things I like to cook is a good old stew using the quorn chicken style pieces. This goes down a treat with my friends.... 1. Boil some water in a pan and add about 6 vegetable stock cubes (I use oxo) Add 1 onion chopped. 2. Add carrots, potatoes, Swede, parsnips, and mushrooms 3. Boil on low heat 4. Add the quorn. I usually defrost this before putting it in but you don't have to. 5. When all the vegetables have gone soft add some cornflower to thicken. I also add some Bisto meat gravy graduals. I was surprised that these are suitable for vegetarians. Its best if you leave the stew for a few hours before eating as it gives it time to stand and for some reason tastes better. I have found these chicken style pieces really nice and I don't think they taste bad at all. I have found myself using them when I am just cooking for me and my children as it is different to having meat. The texture is very different as it is very soft. Almost like dumplings. I don't think the taste is all that different. It is rather cheap too. The average price is about £2 for a packet but I find this is always on offer. I bought some from Asda this week for £1. I always stock up as it is always handy to have in. I like to make curry with these too. I usually fry the quorn like I would my chicken and then add your sauce. I also make stews and curries from the chicken fillets and find these to be of a better value actually. I like the quorn mince too. I usually make chillies etc with these. I have met a lot of people that really dislike quorn but find it really nice. Its lucky for me really as I have a lot of friends who come my house for tea who are vegetarian so it saved me money to just make a vegetarian dish. I would never stop eating meat all together as I would defiantly miss it. I just find it makes a nice difference to eat something that's not meat for a change.

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            10.02.2009 11:17
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            Healthy but I can't eat it

            Quorn is a vegetable substitute for meat but to me it is nothing like the texture, or consitency of meat. The feel of the pieces in my mouth is really enough to make me want to push the plate away and leave the table in disgust. It is made from a highly nutritious and totally vegetarian mycoprotein which is an excellent source of dietary fibre. It is naturally low in fat and calories so is likely to be of benefit to those trying to lose, or control weight. 100grms of minced quorn contains 2g of fat, while conventional lean minced beef contains around 16g. Quorn contains no cholestrerol and tests have shown that it may even reduce cholesterol in the body. It is easy to prepare and comes as sausages, minced, or even in chopped pieces. It can be cooked from frozen and treated the same way as you would cook meat or poutry in pies, casserole, rice dishes, pasta dishes, etc. This is a popular alternative to meat dishes for vegetarians and those who wish to reduce cholesterol intake but I must admit to finding it tasteless and a bit like swallowing textured foam. I cannot deny the possible health benefits of this meat alternative but I really cannot eat it. Friends have recommended Quorn but I really hate the stuff and would not buy it again.

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              22.11.2008 21:34
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              I love quorn meat. Its healthy qualities make it a great edition to any diet.

              I've never really been a big meat eater, even before i turned veggie a few years ago. I decided to finally take the plunge because ethically, eating meat was not something which sat comfortably with me (Dont worry, i promise not to preach! My other half is still a carnivore) and i deal with other people making their own choices in life, but personally it just doesn't sit right. Well... you know that deal i made about not preaching? Maybe ill just have a little preach... :P I know this is a review about quorn, but i just though it might be useful first to specify the different types of vegetarianism. A few too many times i have had the conversation; "Oh, your a veggie, cool, me too! I just eat chicken and fish!" Obviously, these distinctions can vary, i just thought it would be a good way to begin. - Vegan - Vegans eat no animals (including fish and seafood), animal bi-products (such as gelatin) but also eat no animal produced products (such as eggs or milk) Vegans also refuse to use leather or other bi-products. The hardcore! - Pescitarians - Pescitarians eat only fish, but no other meats. Honestly, i find this a little confusing... I always thought as fish as animals! But many people go through this stage between meat-eating and vegetarianism as a transition. - Vegetarians - Veggies eat no meat, fish or seafood. Also, veggies avoid animal bi-products but tend to eat animal produced products. As i say, these vary and many people have all shades in-between, i just thought it might be helpful. Quorn itself is specially produced for vegetarians as a meat substitute. Most quorn products are made from a type of mushroom / fungi called Mycoprotein. Mycoprotein naturally produces a high level of protein which makes it ideal for veggies to replace the protein normally found from meat in a balanced diet. Unfortunately, no quorn products are suitable for vegans as they all contain either egg whites or milk. One of the greatest benefits of quorn for veggies and non-veggies alike is the health benefits. Mycoprotein is very low in calories with less than 1% fat. Also, it has no cholesterol at all. I know many non-veggies like to use quorn when they are on a diet as it tastes just as good but is much better for you if you are watching the calories. Quorn has become part of the staple diet in my household. As i mentioned, my other half is not veggie but he prefers many of the quorn products to meat as they often taste like high quality meat, especially the swedish balls and the chicken fillets. Quorn generally breaks down in to several categories; ready meals, deli, snacks and ingredients. Ingredients ~~~~~~~ I break down ingredients into those quorn products which are designed to be part of a recipe. For example, quorn chicken style fillets, quorn chicken style pieces, Quorn Mince, Quorn streaky bacon and quorn swedish style balls. My verrrry favourite is the balls, for a lovely cheap meal, cook the balls in with some chopped tomatoes and some mixed herbs and serve with spaghetti. I did this for a big group of friends recently and they only realised that they wern't meat when they saw me eating them! My least favourite is the bacon. I didn't like bacon before so these don't really sell me. They taste more like ham. Much like meat, a single boiled piece will not taste special, but add to a nice recipe and you can get something fantastic. Just use recipes and add instead of the meat! Great for getting used to not eating meat and for 'bulking up' veggie meals. For a treat, i really enjoy the quorn burgers and the sausages too. There are many many ways of doing veggie products but to have something which seems like meat can be nice, but it also gives you a choice (and avoids those awful veggie mush in breadcrumb monstrosities!) Especially look out for the pork and apple burgers and the breadcrumb chicken burgers. Most of these ingredients can be found in either chilled or frozen versions, but both taste just as good. Ready meals ~~~~~~~~~~ For the busy ones amongst us, the ready meals are very handy. Most of these can be frozen so you can stock up and have them ready for whenever you need. My very favourite is the cottage pie. Quorn mince covered with potato in a healthy portion, and only 170 calories!!! Excellent for a diet and really tasty. Id also say give the sweet and sour chicken a try, and the lancashire hot pot. All excellent for filling up with nice warm meals in the winter. Also, if your cooking for two, quorn do two different sizes of many of there ready meals. This is really handy if your cooking for two and saves a few pounds. Quorn also do a range of pies which are well worth a try. the chicken and mushroom is very tasty and much lower in calories than the linda McCartney versions. However, if you really want a treat id say got for the linda ones, these are richer with nicer, thicker pastry. Included with the ready meals, i thought i would mention the chicken nuggets and goujons. These are only around 40 cals each and have a lovely coating. deli ~~~~ By deli i mean ready to prepare sandwich fillings and salad toppers. These take any effort out of things by stopping you needing to cook and they seem to be extending the range all the time. I love the fajita chicken style pieces. These are excellent in a wrap with some sour cream. yummmmy!! I also enjoy the ham style slices but i think these might be an acquired taste. They can seem a little flavourless unless you are having them with a salad sauce or in a sandwich. However, there are many varieties. If you dont like the chicken, ham or beef, give the bacon slices a try. Snacks ~~~~~ These i only get as a real treat because i find them quite expensive, and the range is currently quite small but seems to be growing all the time. Check out the cornish pasties for a nice snack on the go and the scotch eggs. I really missed these and the mini ones are an excellent treat at only 40 or so cals each. I once heard a very weird argument by a non-veggie that there was something 'wrong' in the fact that quorn is like meat. I don't actually understand why that is a problem! It certainly insn't for me because even if looks like meat it isn't meat! I love it. Its excellent for cooking with an adds and extra dimension to the veggy diet. At the end of the day, quorn is only one brand of veggie products. Some are tastier than others and like everything people will have their favourites and those they don't like at all. Have fun trying different meals and different recipes and just go for it! Just remember, supermarket versions can be just a tasty and a little cheaper. However, most stores do regular 2 for 1's and deals on their quorn products.

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                04.03.2004 01:50
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                I do not buy a lot of pre prepared or processed food, but Quorn is one of them. If you have not tried it before you would think that all Quorn is the same, tastes the same but it does not. The Quorn which imitates red meat is different from that which is meant to be a substitute for chicken. Personally I prefer the white Quorn it really does have the texture and taste of chicken, but I prefer not to think of it as a meat substitute more as a food in its own right. For example you get Tofu from soya beans which you can cut into blocks and fry, and it?s the same with Quorn. It is made from a mushroom protein rather than soya beans and is processed into a variety of products, including burgers, pieces, fillets, nuggets, slices, pate, sausages, mince and a wide selection of ready meals. I think that the Quorn mince is an excellent ingredient for all kinds of recipes ranging from the more obvious spaghetti bolognaise and shepards pie to something you may have created yourself. It does not behave like meat mince and you have to be careful how you use it, for example if you get a handful of minced meat and squash it in your hand you can mould it into a burger, this will not work with Quorn it will simply ooze through your fingers. The texture is different and you must treat it in such a way to get the best out of it. I have found that the mince does not have a lot of its own flavour, but on the upside it will take on the flavour of anything you care to cook with it. For example the use of a stock cube in cooking is the most obvious idea, and then if you want to add garlic, herbs and spices etc the mince will soak up these flavours like a sponge. It is the ideal ingredient for someone who likes to create their own recipes. The one thing about frozen Quorn is that unlike many vege minces is that it is not dehydrated which means it tends to have more texture and is firmer than a re hydrated mince, like beanfeast for example which is a bit sloppy, and to be fair not very tasty. I have never tried any of these minces without some kind of vegetarian gravy, or sauce to pull the whole thing together, to be honest I do not think it would taste very nice. It does not stand up very well on its own. The main area of interest to anyone on a diet is that Quorn is low in fat. I know for a fact that it can contribute to weight loss because I myself nearly a stone in weight whilst eating Quorn as part of a reasonably controlled diet over a period of a couple of months. I should have told the manufacturers before I started, they might have paid to use me as an experiment. They may even pay me now if I keep telling people what a marvellous slimming aid it is! I do not want to give anyone false hope you are not going to start shedding pounds the minute you start to eat the stuff, but I did notice the difference, also you do feel like you have had a proper meal, not like some of these weight watchers things in a tin which have no flavour and to my knowledge even less nutritional value. Comparatively speaking I think Quorn mince stands up very well against the other vegetarian minces for example Realeat do a similar mince. I actually prefer the Realeat version but that maybe because I have had enough Quorn to last me a lifetime, and you have to try other things as well. Its purely a question of personal taste. A 300g bag of Quorn is about £2.30 which is a competitive price compared with other vege mince, Realeat for example. I do not compare it with the price of minced meat because I prefer to see it as a separate product. There are also Quorn pieces which are great for stir fries. Treat them like you would chopped meat or tofu, fry them quick, with other vegetables etc and add your own sauces. The fillets, nuggets, sausages all good replacements for their meat equivalents, but I prefer to treat Quorn as a foodstuff in itself, and not just a replacement for meat. I think this is the best use of this product, then you can be more creative, in a culinary sense. Quorn is great for marinades, because it does not have any real flavour of its own. You can use your favourite marinades and sauces and transfer them directly to Quorn recipes. I have tried a multitude of meat protein substitute foods, and Quorn ranks amongst the best of them. It has the firmest texture and the widest versatility, the quality is there with Quorn, and with everything that has quality, it comes at a price. It can be expensive if you do not shop around. I have found that buying groceries like these are often found cheaper on the Internet. For anyone who is not used to a vegetarian diet and is looking to convert, the usual lacking element which is noticed is of course is the absence of meat. Red or white meat is a valuable source of protein and if you suddenly chop it out of your diet and just eat what is left, ie a few vegetables, and a bit of sauce maybe you are going to become malnourished in a very short space of time . Converting from a carnivorous diet to a vegetarian one (healthier by the way) is not something to be taken lightly, and can cause health problems if you are not careful. You can not just chop out a huge source of protein replace it with a few lettuce leaves and expect everything to be alright, it will not be. You will feel tired, hungry and under nourished, that is where these meat style substitutes come into their own. They replace the protein usually provided by the meat content of the diet in a way which is acceptable and apart from a few taste differences perhaps you could not tell the difference. There is a tremendous choice of protein substitute foods available, and I am not saying that Quorn is necessarily the best but I like it and think it is worth a try if you have not tried it. Another point on the vegetarian issue, some people would say that Quorn and its competitors is not a real food, it is synthetic and only a junk food substitute for vegetarians. I do not hold w ith this argument as for example, tofu which is equally a manufactured food has been part of the oriental diet for as long as their culinary tradition has been in existence. Tofu is a manufactured, extracted, source of protein and is presented in a similar way. Quorn is a similar type of foodstuff only it is taken from mushroom protein rather than bean curd. I think that long term however if you are using this type of food as part of a vegetarian diet, in place of meat you need to carefully work out your new dietary requirements or you may run in to nutritional problems. Having said all of that Quorn is marketed in some part as a fun food and I suppose it is. It is a good replacement for those chicken Mcnuggets etc, made from highly questionable food sources, ie animals raised in unsanitary and inhumane conditions which has been much in the news and consumer programmes recently. All that meat produced junk food is of highly questionable quality whether you are a vegetarian or otherwise, it has been for a long time. This Quorn product may not be the only alternative to an increasingly questionable animal based industrial food production diet, but I think it ranks among the better ones in an increasingly competitive vegetarian foodstuffs industry. There is also a quorn.com web site, the official home page for Quorn where you can find a plethora of recipes, nutritional information and miscellany of information regarding the product. Thai Quorn mince, stir fry Quorn mince with Singapore style noodles, Quorn mince and cauliflower bake, Sizzling Quorn fajitas just a few picked at random. There are recipes of the week and also an archive of recipes which have been collected over recent years. Well worth a visit if you are thinking of adding this product in to your diet. It is a bit more exciting than your average nut roast, and a lot more healthy than you usual grease burger.

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                  29.11.2003 19:11
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                  Although I am not a vegetarian,I have discovered the delights of using minced quorn,a meat free alternative to minced beef or pork. It has become such a part of my weekly cooking and with several advantages,that I thought I'd like to shate it with those of you out there that have not yet discovered thie product. -------------------------- So,What is Quorn? Quorn is made from a mushroom protein that is produced naturally called mycoprotein. Available in a variety of guises, mince,cubes and assorted burgers or ready meals, it is a meat free alternative. -------------------------- Why so good? Although I am not a vegetarian, I am aware of the fact that this product is a great replacement for dead animals, and in this has many good points. For those of us who are less concerned on the moral stand point it still has huge benifits.Quite apart from the fact that I enjoy a meal so much more if I am gaurenteed not to end up with a mouth full of fat or gristle(something that has long since put me off traditional minced beef),it has health benifits in the fact that it is high in fibre and protein,but very low in fat. -------------------------- Uses Now, down to the practicalities of minced Quorn.Available frozen or fresh,I usually buy the 300g frozen bag. It's amazingly handy,as it can be cooked from frozen,and fairly quickly. Throwing into such dishes as sheppards pie,lasagne,spaggeti bolognaise and chilli con carne has the best results and if added along with some sort of stock cube or flavouring,produces a substitute that is just about undetectable as a substitute.I have served it to over a dozen people without any of then realising it was not meat!! -------------------------- Cost and availability At between £1.79 and £1.99,the frozen minced quorn is available from all major supermarkets. Although this cost may seem a tad on the expensive side, it is for a 300g bag(ample to feed my family of 5),and it is regularly on offer.In the last 12 months at least one of the major supermarkets have offered it in thier BOGOF (buy one get one free) offers,at all times.Hence I have actually only paid a maximum of 99p a bag this year ,and my freezer is heavily stocked!! -------------------------- Technical data Ingrediants; Mycoprotein(88%),rehydrated egg white(free range),roasted barley malt extract. Nutritional info; (per 100g) Energy kj-397 kcal-94 Protein 14.5g Carbohydrate 4.5g -of which sugars- 0.6g Fat 2g -of which sturates- 0.5g Fibre 6g Sodium 0.2g **No artificial colours or peservatives** **GM free** **Vegetarian society approved** -------------------------- Packaging The frozen version of this product comes in a smallish polethyne bag,just big enough to contain the contents (no wasteful size there!!). The bag is white with orange and breen printing on the fron and depicts a tasty looking dish. A great deal of information is printed on the back or the bag. Unfortunately I could find no recycled information on the packaging..and in veiw of the healthy and enviromental implications of using this product,I was a little dissapointed at this. -------------------------- Contact deatils Qorn information service(free recipe ideas too) Quorn freepost SEA 4093, Croydon CR2 6UZ. Freephone (UK only) 0800174966 If you are dissatisfied with this product. Consumer Services Department, Marlow Foods Ltd.,Station Road, Stokesly,North Yorkshire TS9 7AB. Web site www.quorn.com -------------------------- Summery This is a healthy alternative to meat,and suites a great many recipies. The texture is similar to a coarse ground mince.And although a few people will tell the difference,I've only find they can if you tell them what they're eating!!! Although the price can be a little higher than the cost of minced beef for example,I consider it great value for money due to its benifits and a 300g bag is ample for meal for around 5 people Would I recomend it?..Yes,definately. **!!**!!** ADDITIONAL INFORMATION**!!**!!** i have decided to add a little on to the end of this op. There may be a small risk of allergy to this product.Please note it does contain a small amount of egg white. Also it is not suitable for those on a gluten free diet as it contains gluten.

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                    16.10.2003 02:51
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                    I have been using Quorn mince for 4 years now, and every time I go to Tesco I buy some more, and every time I get home I have a fight with the freezer to fit it all in. Quorn is a trademark of Marlow Foods Limited. It is made from mycoprotein, which is a type of fungi. Here is a little bit of trivia for you: Quorn is now on the verge of selling it's one-billionth meal. Frozen Quorn mince comes in a 300g bag and easily goes round 4 people, whether it's used in lasagne, bolognese or whatever. The packet is white with the orange and white Quorn logo in the centre. You can buy it in most supermarkets I think, I currently buy mine from Tesco for £1.99 per bag. They sometimes have special offers on where you can buy 1 bag and get another free or half price, that's when I really go mad and buy even more! This product is very versatile. I use it in bolognese, lasagne, tacos, chillies and there are bound to be more that I just can't think of right now. You can buy it fresh or frozen (I buy frozen, as it is slightly cheaper). I can't really see the benefit of buying it fresh (unless of course you don't have a freezer), it doesn't take long to cook from frozen and the end result is exactly the same. This product doesn't require much cooking; it is a very easy meat substitute. It absorbs liquids and other flavours really well. Whenever I cook with it I always soften the mince in a little oil (adding onions and garlic etc first if I'm using them), add any other ingredients and then a sauce. I have used many different varieties of pasta sauces with Quorn mince and they all work equally well. You can also oven cook the mince or microwave it, both methods of which are clearly outlined on the packet so I won't bother going in to them here or you'll yawn. Quorn has an abundance of health benefits. It is a high quality protein, helps maintain normal cholesterol levels, is low in calories, hi gh in fibre and low in fat. The complete in gredients are mycoprotein (88%), rehydrated egg white (free-range) and roasted barley malt extract. Other important points to note are that Quorn mince does contain gluten, is GM free (as are all Quorn products) and contains no artificial colours or preservatives. My boyfriend describes this as 'an OK substitute for meat'. Other people have said to me that they can't really tell it's not meat (I like to think they mean it and are not just humouring me). It has been 15 years since I last tasted meat of any kind and I'm afraid I can't remember the taste of dead animal too clearly. There are other brands of veggie mince, which you can buy for around the same price, including Realeat VegieMince and Linda McCartney. Some supermarkets also offer their own brand but I prefer the texture and the taste of Quorn. There are other products in the Quorn range which I buy regularly, including sausages, 'ham', burgers, Swedish style balls and pieces (which you can use in curries, stir fries, casseroles and the like). The sausages are absolutely delicious and are my favourite veggie sausages. I have also been known to indulge in the odd ready meal, of which Quorn does a range, examples include bolognese, lasagne and enchiladas. You can find some recipes on the Quorn website, or alternatively just grab yourself a packet of Quorn and a little imagination! For a list of 2003 Vegetarian Society Awards nominations for the best meat or fish substitute see http://www.vegsoc.org/awards/2003/substinoms.html. Naturally Quorn mince and many other products from the Quorn range are on this list.

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                      29.05.2003 03:33
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                      Being a primarily vegetarian household I never offer a meat alternative when we have guests for dinner. I've even catered for the 'I don't eat vegetables so wont be able to eat a vegetarian meal' guest. I've nothing against meat eaters, vegetarianism is my personal choice but after 15+ years of a meat free diet handling fresh or processed meat products churns my stomach, I'll spare you the detail! Quorn products are widely available and offer a great alternative to a vegetable based diet and can also be a great substitute to meat in general. My sister first introduced me to Quorn many moons ago, without staking my life on it I guess that was over 10 years ago. I initially purchased some Quorn ready made meals for convenience and was never disappointed with the result however the price left a lot to be desired. Around 18 months ago I noticed whilst shopping a 'buy one get one free' offer on frozen Quorn and decided to chuck a few bags in my trolley I haven't looked back since. Available either frozen in bags or freshly chilled in trays QUORN MINCE is readily available form most supermarkets. At between £1.72 and £1.99 (dependent upon where you shop) for a 300g frozen bag I tend to stick with the frozen product as the fresh chilled, trays of Quorn are much more costly and no different in taste. Quorn derives from mushroom protein (Mycoprotein) and in its frozen, minced form looks like greyish gravel and I'll be honest not very appetising. So what do you do with it I hear you ask? Personally I substitute it in recipes that ask for beefed mince. Like meaty mince, Quorn needs flavouring too and although I have not tried it I can guarantee that on it's own it would taste quite vile. Prepared, flavoured and cooked in a caring manner and you've got a culinary delight in your hands! To date I've used Quorn Mince in the following dishes: Lasagne, Keema Curry, Shepard's Pie, Chilli C orn Carne, Spaghetti Bolognaise and Moussaka. My mother used to make the best Chilli Corn Carne I ever tasted but being a vegetarian could no longer eat it until of course I discovered Quorn Mince. Using Quorn as a substitute I'm delighted to say that the recipe is equally as tasty as I remember it so I thought I should share it with you! I serve this dish regularly with jacket potatoes and it keeps well for packed lunches and reheating the next day. CHILLI QUORN CARNE Serves 4 1 x 300g frozen minced Quorn 30ml corn oil 1 onion, peeled and chopped 2 cloves of garlic, crushed ½ green pepper, diced 1 tablespoon chilli powder 1 teaspoon paprika 1 teaspoon cumin seeds 1 tablespoon tomato puree 1 x 400g can red kidney beans 1 x 400g chopped tomatoes 15ml flour Salt & pepper to taste A little water Heat oil in saucepan. Fry onion until golden, add garlic and green pepper frying for a further 6 minutes. Stir in the chilli powder, paprika, cumin seeds, tomato puree, flour and salt and mix well. Add the frozen Quorn, cook until the Quorn seems unfrozen. Add the tinned tomatoes and drained kidney beans. Cover and simmer for around 30-40 minutes, keeping an eye that the mixture is not becoming too dry - add water if needed. And there you have it one of the best Chilli Con Carne's I've ever tasted. (Should you be a meat eater you can substitute the Quorn with 500g of minced beef.) So cooking with Quorn really is that simple. I've heard a few objections - my mum refused to use Quorn for years as the eggs used to grow the mushroom protein were not free range. Eggs used in Quorn are now ALL free range - my mother told me this last month, she received a mailing from the vegetarian society. Some people mentioned allergies - well like most products a full listing of ingredients is on the back of the packet and so if you're interested in Quorn check ou t the packets for any intolerant ingredients. If substituting Quorn for minced beef remember Quorn wont have the same fat content as meat would so extra liquid is normally needed to avoid the Quorn drying and sticking to the pan. Widely available from most supermarkets this product is regularly on offer so I normally stock up when offer prices are usually £1.99 for 2 bags. The polythene bags are small and wont take up much room in the freezer.

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                        19.10.2002 16:39
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                        • "It ain't a mushroom!"

                        When I eat an egg I don’t see a fluffy, yellow baby chick that will never hatch. When I eat beef I don’t see a liquid-eyed baby Daisy the calf. When I eat venison I don’t see a Bambi. When I drink milk I don’t see a dairy cow in a permanent state of pregnancy. Morty and myself are both happy omnivores! So why on earth did we decide to go ‘Vegetarian?’ Not even ‘Fishetarian!’ but a total conversion! I like cooking and have the required time to experiment with food, so there were no problems dishing up Curried Kidney Beans, Lentil Bake or Chillied Chick Peas. There was no problem with Soya milk, spreads, cheese and yoghurts. However, after a few weeks eating this way everything we ate seemed ‘samey’ and sloppy and I could sense Morty could do with something to get his teeth into. The Quorn sausages looked the business with the label informing me “mushroom in origin,” and “made from a small, unassuming member of the mushroom family.” So the vegetarian meal of Quorn Herby sausages, buttery mash, mushy peas and onion gravy was very tasty and enjoyed by both of us. Within two hours of eating the meal Morty was violently ill. He was dreadfully ill all night long and at one stage when he asked me for a hand mirror so he could see how he looked, I refused as he was an alarming ashen colour and the sight would have scared him. We put it down to an over-chlorinated swimming baths and him swallowing too much of it during that day’s swimming session. But two weeks later after yet another appalling night of illness, sickness and pain, again coinciding with a swimming session and eating a Quorn product, then the realisation on the third night of no sleep and buckets that he hadn’t been swimming but had eaten a Quorn based meal we came to the conclusion: Swimming? No! Quorn? Yes, an allergy! Once I apologised profusely for feeding the poor man something that he was fiercely allergic to and swearing I wasn’t trying to see him off by blaming the swimming baths, I decided to investigate this product. After all, what is it made of? Was he the only person who suffered these violent reactions? Was it in processed foods on the supermarket shelves? So! What is it made of? ******************** Despite claims on the manufacturers’ labels that the key ingredient in Quorn is “mushroom in origin,” Quorn products contain no mushrooms. Rather, those products’ named as “mycoprotein” are actually a fungus known as Fusarium Venenatum, and is grown in large fermentation vats. In itself this is fine, except the labelling leads shoppers to think these are natural ingredients, as although mushrooms and Fusarium Venenatum are both fungi, this is an artificially created fungus found in British dirt samples finding its way into the food chain. There’s one thing it isn’t and that’s natural! It’s like calling a rat a chicken because they are both animals! Was he the only person who suffered these violent reactions? ****************************************************** Earlier this year, the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) in the USA filed complaints with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European food authorities about the safety and labelling of Quorn products. Although the labelling is very misleading and has annoyed food manufacturers who do use real mushrooms in their vegetarian food products, even more important is how many people do have an adverse reaction after eating Quorn products. I believe the number is far greater than reported. In tests by the manufacturer of Quorn products, Marlow Foods, a division of the multinational pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca, it was reported that as many as 10% of people who ate a Quorn product experienced vomiting, nausea, or stomach ache s within a matter of hours. How many cases go unreported? Isn’t it a possibility that, as we did, people blame something else for this wretched reaction because perhaps they just try a Quorn product once, don’t like it and forget they’ve eaten it? I consider the side effects from eating Quorn products are more widespread than we think. Fusarium Venenatum is a mould and a new entrant into the human food supply, and the FDA knew that a study showed that this product would make some people violently sick. Considering this product is sold in natural food shops and although it isn’t genetically engineered it is still introducing thousands of untested proteins into our diet with deceptive labelling consequently misleading the consumer horrifies me all the more. In the UK, where Quorn products have been on the grocer shop shelves for years, the Food Standards Agency has been informed of the concerns expressed in America over ‘mycoprotein’ based meat substitutes. “If Marlow Foods wants us to eat its fungus patties, the least they should do is not pretend that the product is made from mushrooms,” said Tim Lang, Professor of Food Policy at Thames Valley University. “The government should stop this classic example of deceptive labelling.” Is it in processed foods on the supermarket shelves? ************************************************ Well I wouldn’t know would I? My concerns are well founded here. It’s difficult enough food shopping these days as it’s necessary to carefully read all labelling but if Quorn is described as mushrooms and as Morty isn’t allergic to mushrooms then I could inadvertently buy a product containing Quorn. The thought of anybody being as ill as he was, hyperventilating with a deathly pallor, because they unintentionally and unknowingly ate a food containing something they are allergic to scares me. In some cases i t could be life threatening! I think Marlow Foods should be made to undergo more intensive testing on ‘mycoprotein’ and alter the labelling, telling the customer that Quorn is a fungus and a include a warning that the product can be an allergenic for some people in the same way food products have nut warnings. In praise of Quorn, it tastes really good, looks appetising, the texture has a good ‘bite’ to it and it can be formed into anything you want it to be. Mince, burgers, chicken, sausages and great for stir-fries. I had no adverse reaction to it and would still consider eating it even now I know it is a fungus and not a mushroom. It is a healthy alternative to meat, cheap and manufactured in an environmentally friendly manner, but for us it will always be known as a ‘Vomit-burger’

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                          21.08.2002 19:40
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                          Quorn is a wider subject than would at first appear, however I will try to keep things within relevant boundaries. My road to vegetarianism was quite a long one, although steady. Brought up in a meat-eating culture, I nonetheless had twinges of confusion for many years, since I am deeply concerned with the welfare of animals. During the early 80's the first worried noises about BSE were being made, although denied by the Government. This was enough to push me away from beef. Since I spent some time looking after a friend's few duroc pigs, including playing midwife on one occasion, pork was the next to go. This left lamb, another animal I spent time with and soon I was one of those almost-veggies sneered at by the purists. Until a few years ago I ate only free range poultry, before I tipped over into the real thing, and now could not stomach meat anyway. Sadly in the meantime my husband died, and I lost any need for cooking other than the quick and ready stuff. For me pasta has never been an option, so what now? It didn't take long to discover Quorn, now readily available and with a wide choice of alternative meat products. Quorn has been marketed by Marlow Foods (a division of the giant Astra-Zenaca company) since the mid 80's. The distinctive and colourful packaging says that the contents are a mushroom micro-protein. This is not strictly true, and the Quorn website now states that the protein is from a fungus allied to the mushroom family. This could be because of the hoo-ha being kicked up by America's Centre for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), who insisted that this fungus is not strictly mushroom. More about that later. Previously the mighty Monsanto was brought to it's knees when they made the mistake of slipping GM wheat in among the natural crop and shipped it off to Europe; thus upsetting the Europeans and the British who don't like having a fast one pulled an d their choices of product removed. Perhaps the CSPI have this in mind. On to the product. Quorn makes a very suitable base for vegetarian meals and there is now a wide choice on the supermarket shelves. I must have tried most of the Quorn burgers, sausages, fillets, mince pieces and ready meals. Also available are moussaka, enchiladas and ready Indian and Mexican dishes, among others. Some of these are made for Sainsbury's and sold under their own brand. Because Quorn doesn't shrink and absorbs sauces very readily, it is easy to cook, looks nice when presented and, depending on the sauce used, can be very tasty indeed. Some dishes can seem rather bland for my taste. However, Fillets Provencale with a rich red sauce looks like chicken pieces, stays thick because it won't shrink and cooks quickly, as do all quorn recipes. No doubt some of you are thinking what my good friend said to me about all this. "If you are veggie, why do you want your food to taste like meat?" My reply has to be that my conscience hasn't told my taste buds yet. Nutritionally, Quorn has a lot going for it. The website http://www.marlowfoods.com contains a useful comparison quide which they tell is is from official sources. This shows that compared with meats there are considerably less calories, slightly less protein, a little more sugar, less saturated fat, it has a lot more fibre and is cholestorol-free. Check it out for the figures. Now back to the CSPI. This body has taken umbridge because Quorn is readily marketed in the UK and European markets. They don't like the fact that this has happened only since the 80's and state that too little time has been taken in testing the product. They also allege that "a small percentage of people have experienced adverse effects which they blame on Quorn." They are requesting feedback from these people. All I know is that, among other foods, I do eat quite a lot of Quorn. Although I have to admit that I have never had a weight problem and can adjust easily if I become too greedy, my weight has remained steady, my digestion as good as ever, and I personally feel that there will always be a certain amount of people with food allergies. The ready availability of substitute meat in my freezer means that I am able to eat sensibly (there was a time in the early veggie days when I wasn't eating enough) so I am not hitting the heavy stuff like cakes and bread. If you are newly veggie, experiment with Quorn to get you started. Prices are inviting with ready meals available from £1.99 upwards. I have just discovered their course country style pate. This contains the Protein, oven -roasted mushrooms, cream, brandy and herbs and costs £1.39 for 130g. I hope that there is not too much brandy in it as I am consuming vast amounts of pate on toast at the moment.

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                            09.01.2002 21:58
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                            I have just finished my lunch, the base of which was Quorn mince, and it was so delicious I thought that I ought to write an opinion about it. For those of you who don't know what Quorn is - where have you been? I thought that everyone knew about Quorn by now. Never mind, I'll tell you all about it. Quorn is a vegetarian alternative to meat and can be purchased as mince, in pieces or ready made into meals such as sausages, burgers, fillets of Quorn (like chicken fillets) etc. Quorn is made from a micro protein, which has its origins in mushrooms rather than Soya, and it is very tender with a slightly spicy flavour, which makes it taste delicious. It can be cooked in exactly the same way as you would cook ordinary meat - you can fry it, microwave it, cook it in the oven, in fact wherever you would use chicken, beef or lamb you can use Quorn. I am not a vegetarian although I am quite happy to eat vegetarian meals but the real benefit of Quorn as far as I am concerned is the fact that it is less than 5% fat, which makes even lower in fat than chicken! As a comparison, in 100g of minced beef you would get 15.2g of fat and 229 calories, whereas in 100g of Quorn mince you would get just 2.8g of fat and 91 calories, a big difference as you can see. The Quorn also contains 4.9g of fibre whereas the beef contains no fibre at all. The amount of protein in Quorn is lower than in beef but gram for gram it still has as much protein as an egg. Quorn is sold from the chiller cabinet at all the major supermarkets, and can be frozen on the day of purchase for up to 3 months. The pack that I have just used was 175g, which had cost £1.69 from Asda. Although I have to admit that I bought it when it was nearing the use by date and got it for 70p ? you just know there's going to be a bargain somewhere in my opinion don't you? For my lunch I have mixed the contents of my pack of Quorn mince with a tin of conden sed low fat oxtail soup, cooked it in a casserole in the oven and served it with a bit of garlic bread and it was seriously nice. On the outside of each pack of Quorn mince and pieces there is a recipe to give you an idea of how to cook it, the one on the pack that I have just used was for a Quorn Shepherd's Pie, which sounds delicious. There is also an address to write to if you want further information about any of the products in the Quorn range and that is: Quorn Freepost SEA 4093 Croydon CR2 6UZ Or you can call free phone 0800 174 966 All the Quorn products are covered by their own guarantee in addition to your statutory rights and if you are dissatisfied with the product for any reason you have to return it to: Customer Services Department Marlow Foods Limited Station Road Stokesley Cleveland TS9 7AB So Quorn tastes good, it's low in calories and low in fat - what more do you want from a meal?

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