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Berol Handwriting Pen

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11 Reviews
  • no Smudges
  • Neater Writing
  • Lid is a choke hazzard
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    11 Reviews
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      13.05.2014 19:54
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      Berol Handwriting Pens - Bargain

      Berol Handwriting Pen
      I had no idea these pens even still existed until we had an old retired teacher come to our school to give some students one to one English lessons and she identified that one of them was struggling to hold and use a pen and would benefit from one of these. We started to stock them in the school shop and they sell at just 35p each. Available in black, red or blue as these are aimed at students the school stocks blue and black. I have started to use these when I realised my usual nice writing pen had gone missing and decided to give one of these cheapies a try. They really are very easy to write tidily with and are a nice thickness and texture to hold. The barrel of the pens is red and the lid is colour coded to the colour of the pen as is the end piece. Somewhere between a felt pen and biro, these are not quite the fashionable gel pens we have come to love, these traditional pens are finer than most colouring style felt pens and I used to sometimes buy fine liners from the school shop to use for things like card making and outlining, however these are far superior, despite being 20p per pen cheaper, they actually do a better job for these functions as well as handwriting.
      As I am left handed a smudge free pen is essential and I do find that some Gel pens smudge. Not so these little bargain priced beauties. I can read back what I have written and it is smudge free, which is so much easier than having to try and write at odd angles to avoid a smudge.
      The only downside that I have found is that the lid does not stay on the end very well and is therefore easy to lose. Without the lid the pen soon dries out and is thrown away. The lid is very basic and quite small so is easily lost. I would also strongly advise keeping these pen lids away from babies, toddlers and young children as I consider them a choke hazard. This is especially a problem when the lid doesn''t stay on the pen in use as it means you need to put it somewhere safe and replace it before putting the pen away somewhere safe out of reach of tiny hands.
      Supplied singularly or in packs of ten these pens are available from W H Smith and all good stationery stores.
      Thank you for reading

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      18.03.2013 12:05
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      My old pals

      I don't know about anyone else, but my Primary school (i know, i'm surprised i can remember back that far too) decreed that a Berol handwriting pen was to be brought to all of our handwriting lessons as biros weren't good enough to teach us how to write neatly.

      I can see why- i've never had particularly neat handwriting, but due to the difference in resistance biros and Berol handwriting pens have on the page, it's easier to scrawl really quickly with a biro this produces barely legible writing, whereas a Berol handwriting pen forces you to take your time with your writing, thus allows you to produce particularly neat (or at least legible) handwriting.

      As you may already know, quite often Berol handwriting pens come in packs of two for 99p (at last check) thus prove to be quite a bit more expensive than your average biros. They are a red plastic pen with a rather thick white and black nib- good for particularly young children who are a tad heavy handed.

      These pens were particularly good at allowing you to learn letter shapes and the right way round of letter- though i found them horrible when i was trying to learn joined up handwriting- namely because the ink would always smudge every time i tried and i'd quite often come hope with ink stains everywhere. I've also always been a horrendous pen chewer, and as the lid is rather hard plastic i took to chewing the black top of the pen itself which quite often led to a black face. The ink of a Berol pen doesn't taste nice, i'll tell you that much.

      Although these pens did essentially help teach me how to write, as i've grown older i've only really found one good use for them since. They create problem when writing note for lectures and such like due to having to take your time with the pen, and as most assignments these days have to be typed up or sent electronically there isn't much use for them in later academic works. Exams and such like i often find that it's better to get everything you can down rather than focus on the examiner's ability to be able to read my work- but that's just me and might be why i lost a few marks in my exams. It's just in things like lectures and exams you need to be able to jot things down quickly without the risk of getting covered in ink and smudging everything. I know there probably is a way to do this and have neat handwriting, but i never learned that particular knack and thus stick to my spider scrawl with biros.

      The one thing i still use Berol handwriting pens for is outlining my art work. Because if thick nib that can be easily wiped if it gets a bit clogged these pens provide a distinctive yet not to thick definers that you just can't seem to get with paint or other pens i've used.

      All in all these were my handwriting pals when i was younger, but now are my art pals.

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      30.05.2011 08:49
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      Good product and good value when on offer

      In many ways, it's a little sad that children thesedays seem to spend relatively little or no time writing and rather more time at the keyboard or exercising their digits with the infernal and incessant texting or those damned computer games that have robbed so many children of their childhood.

      There speaks an old fart if ever I heard one, eh?

      When I was younger, I learned to love writing and a lot of emphasis was placed on writing at school, to the extent that even punishments comprised writing lines. I am not necessarily advocating a return to days gone by - that's just unrealistic, but I do think everyone would benefit from being able to put the computer to one side, grab a pen and do some proper writing.

      There are so many pen types now available to consumers that it can be difficult to choose between them. Personally, I prefer a thick pen with ink that flows well. The type of pen you use does seem to affect the quality of writing and I find that these Berol Handwriting Pens fit the bill in a lot of ways. These, plus the old green Ball Pentels are my favourite pens, discounting for the moment my collection of fountain pens which occasionally get an airing.

      Berol Handwriting pens come in bright orange and although this makes them easy to locate, it's a horrible colour for a pen in my view. That said, when viewing the finished product - i.e. writing - you can't tell what colour the pen was.

      You can get these rollerball pens in a variety of colours and nib thickness but the volume sales come in blue and black and a medium nib. I use the black medium ones and it is these that are most commonly available in singles and multipacks in a number of different outlets. The colour of the ink is readily identified by the colour of the end of the barrel and the top of the cap.

      I find they do help my particular writing style because the ink flows freely, yet dries quickly on the paper. They are good for writing on most surfaces, but not always the best choice for greetings cards where the ubiquitous 'biro' often produces a better smudge free result.

      One of the biggest frustrations for pen users is when the ink leaks out all over the place and I have in the past had a few accidents through keeping ink or rollerball pens in my suit jacket pocket for example. Now I tend not to carry these Berols or any other such pen on my person. Whilst they do click shut which should in theory prevent the problem, it does require a quite a firm closing action and all too often if you don't take particular care to ensure that it snaps fully shut, you can reach for your pen which clips to your inside pen pocket and bring out only the cap, leaving the pen and the ink within it at the bottom of your pocket. The ink is washable so in theory at least such accidents should be recoverable.

      For me, these are best stored horizontally and I have a variety of pencil cases and little drawers around the house where I will invariably find a good selection of pens, these amongst them.

      They do last quite a while and provided you replace the cap firmly after use, they don't dry out. They also seem to last quite a while before running out. The nib is plastic and robust. The thickness of the pen suits my particular traditional grip. It is just under 14 cms long and is plain orange, save for the Berol Handwriting logo, the nib size and a little line and the word Click to give you an indication of when the pen is fully clicked closed. Whilst there is also an audible click sound it isn't very loud.

      I do occasionally try out other pens from time to time and as many of us find, pens seem to accumulate and reproduce, such that we have hundreds of the things all over the place. I do always tend to top up my Berol supply when I see them on offer though.

      They are about £2 each but can often be bought in multipacks of 2 or 3 for less than half that unit price.

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        25.10.2010 15:14
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        Recommended.

        OK, lets get one things straight....the Berol Handwriting Pen is ultimately just a pen and its not something that I can get myself very keyed up about writing about! Having said that, the Berol Handwriting Pen is usually one that I pick up when out shopping when I am in need of pens, simply because I regard it to be a good quality reliable standard pen which doesn't cost the earth. I tend to buy them in bulk because it generally works out cheaper that way.....especially because I need to use a pen every day all day in my job - and therefore having a supply is useful. I recently bought a pack of 12 from Rymans for £19.99 (discounted) - which isn't a bad price considering when bought singly, each pen is £1.99 - therefore resulting in a saving of 33p per pen (or £3.96 overall).

        The Handwriting Pen has a medium nib and is of a rollerball style - which results in a smooth and neat handwriting finish. The ink (I use the black ink, red ink and blue ink pens) flows easily and without having to scribble away on a scrap piece of paper to get the ink flowing, which I often find to be the case when I use a Biro. According to the information supplied, the result is a 0.6mm line - which looks neat and also allows for someone like me with very small hand-writing to still have text which appears legible!

        Although Berol claims that the ink is washable, I have to say that my experience is that this isn't the case. I washed my uniform with a pen in the pocket and ended up with ink spolts all over my uniform. When I rewashed it to try to get the ink out, this didn't happen and, to be honest, the ink didn't even really fade at all. Therefore, this wouldn't be my pen of choice for young children who will inevitabily get the ink everywhere they shouldn't!

        Using the pen is comfortable - although my job does not require me to sit and write reams of writing - although I do use it frequently and regularly. If I was someone who had to do a lot of continuous writing then I would probably consider a pen which provided softer support around the barrel - but for short, frequent use that is not an issue.

        The ink lasts a decent time - although the barrel is not refillable as far as I am aware. If I am using my pen regularly and frequently every day throughout the day, I find that each pen lasts me about two weeks - which seems like a decent enough time.

        It does have a handy clip on the cap so that you can slide this only paper or - in my case - my uniform so that it is always easily accessible.

        Overall, I would recommend this pen for someone who needs a decent quality pen which helps you to produce legible handwriting!

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          24.09.2010 13:43
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          A great pen!

          When I was at school there was only one pen I would nag my mum for - the Berol Handwriting Pen. I used to love these pens because they were easy to write with and they'd make my handwriting look good. Fast forward 15 years and I am still writing with these pens and I've also recently purchased two Berol Handwriting Pens for my four year old niece, who is currently learning to write at school.

          These pens can be bought in light blue, dark blue and black and you can pick them up in most stationary stores, or on-line. I usually pay around £4.00 for a pack of ten pens, or £1.00 for a set of two. You can spot Berol Handwriting Pens almost instantly by just glancing at the shelf because they are a distinctive orange colour.

          The thing that makes Berol Handwriting Pens unique is the fine fibre nib that distributes ink evenly across the page, there is always a consistent flow of ink and the pen glides smoothly as you write. Berol Handwriting Pens are also really comfortable to write with and although writing is almost effortless, the pen leaves a strong ink line behind.

          Writing with these pens is a really comfortable experience and you can produce neat handwriting with them, which is why I think they're the best pens for little ones to learn to write with. These pens can go for hours without the lid before they dry out, so if your little one doesn't put the lid back on the pen instantly then it's not a problem. Plus, if the pen was to break then you can be safe in the knowledge that the ink is 100% washable, so no clothes will be ruined.

          I have been using Berol Handwriting Pens for years now and I don't think I'll stop buying them anytime soon. In my eyes these are the perfect writing pens. Five stars.

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            10.09.2010 15:55
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            A brilliant pen that I recommend everyone to try.

            I have been a huge fan of these Berol handwriting pens for such a long time, when I was at school (not that long ago) I struggled enormously with my handwriting, mainly due to me being left handed and holding my pen a bit awkwardly. Bless my mum and dad, they tried all different types of techniques and bought me shed loads of pens, they even trekked down to a special left handed shop in London to find a pen that would help my handwriting look legible. Nothing really helped me get a smooth line so I would stop and start my letters and it would end up looking an inky mess. That is until a lovely little teacher bought me one of these pens, I remember feeling super excited and loved that it looked like the colouring pens we used in our class. I still prefer to use these pens today and are my first choice of pen for my children, this is why I love them so much ...................

            The look of the pen isn't anything fancy, it is red plastic with black writing on it. The tip of the top of the pen is either blue or black depending on what colour ink is in the pen. To my knowledge there are only these two colour choices. At first my daughter wasn't too keen on these pens because she much preferred the glitzy, flowery, pretty pens instead of this 'boring' one, but even she has admitted it makes her writing look nicer than other pens.

            The pen has a push close lid with a clip on the side, this is good to keep them in place in your bag or jacket pocket etc.

            The nib is white plastic, it has a special ink flow cartridge inside enables you to write smoothly. This is what makes the pen 'give' you nicer handwriting, it is easy to just glide along the paper.
            The nib gives a line width of 0.6mm which I believe is just slightly thicker than an average biro.

            One of the amazing features of this pen is that you can leave the lid off for up to fourteen days and it will not dry out, obviously it is best to keep the lid on, but kids will be kids !!!

            You can buy these pens from Pretty much any Stationers or supermarket. They come in a pack of two which costs in the region of two pounds. I think this is amazing value for money, I use my pens every day and I would say each pen lasts me about three months, I am not writing essays or anything so for students the life would be less.

            A brilliant pen.

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              22.06.2010 12:24
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              One of the best handwriting pens you can buy

              Berol Handwriting pens are very widely used within schools especially for younger children who are just learning how to form letters from the alphabet or going on to make whole words. The Berol Handwriting pens are a great way to get used to working with a writing tool and are easy for young children to get to grips with.

              The Berol Handwriting pen has a nice quality fibre tip/ nib, which is neither too fine or to large for the job of writing text. I find they are one of the best writing tools around, as they have a good steady flow of ink to the writing tip and have good consistency of colour when on the page.

              *********************************************************
              The pens casing comes in the same classic off red shade that it did when I was at school and its easy to spot amongst other products on display, when you go out to look for replacements. It clearly says on the side of the pen that its a Berol Handwriting pen in black italics, which means its easy for younger children to take the right pen out of their pencil cases for handwriting at school.

              I usually keep 1 or 2 of each of the colours of the pens, so 2 black and 1 light blue, 1 dark blue, as I find they are great for last minute homework jobs including more arty homework. These are the only 3 colours that the pens can be bought in at the moment. Many junior/ primary schools prefer pupils to stick to the blue Berol pens for handwriting, but older children seem to be allowed to write in either black or blue.

              **********************************************************
              I can recommend these handwriting pens for use by crafters too as they offer great versatility and can be used for outlining, shading, cross hatching and also for writing verses etc, on hand made cards. I find they give a nice clear 0.6mm line on paper, when in use.

              The beauty of the pens is that they give the softness of a gel pen without the big smudges that gel pens cause. So few if any pen marks on your sleeves when leaning on your work. If a mishap does occur then thats not a major problem as the ink is 100% washable and does come out successfully.

              *********************************************************
              The ink in the handwriting pens is good quality stuff, it seems long lasting on the page and if you do leave your pen lid off for a few days, I have found that they don't dry out immediately. This has given me a decent chance to hunt down the lost pen lid in good time. In case of a lost lid I would advise you wrap the tip in a bit of cling film just in case, as you will be 100% certain that the ink will remain useable for several weeks without its lid that way.

              These pens are a great writing product, I like the way they glide along paper, the feel and handling of the pens is great and the fibre pen tip never scratches the page, which many cheaper copies can do. I can pick up a set of 10 pens for between £3/ £4 or a set of 2 pens for around £1. They are long lasting and its worth keeping a few around the home as spares for the children or to use for crafting purposes. A full 5 stars for Berol Handwriting Pens as they do the job well and have never let me down.

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                20.06.2010 23:13
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                I'm not sure how it works now, but when I was a child, we had to write with pencil at school, until our writing was deemed tidy enough, and our spelling good enough, to be trusted with a pen. For me, always in a hurry to get my work finished, it took me an awfully long time to get a pen, as I always focused on doing as much work as possible rather than getting it done neatly. Finally, when I was ten, I was trusted with my very first pen - a Berol Handwriting Pen.

                I never understood why these were my schools (and indeed every other schools) pen of choice. However, I now know that these pens contain washable ink, which probably explains a lot - I'm sure the school would not have wanted us all to keep ruining uniforms. Not to mention the trend when I was younger for pen tattoos . I can certainly see the appeal of washable ink now that I'm a parent.

                The pens are cased in thick orange plastic, in a perfectly cylindrical shape . I might have liked this when I was young, I can't be sure, but nowadays I have to say I prefer a comfortable rubber gripper on the side of my pens . They have a medium nib-size, and the lid matches the colour of the ink (in this case blue, although also available in black) and has a small clip, allowing it to be securely attached to a pocket or a notebook . I don't remember this handy clip from my younger days, so perhaps this is a new addition.

                The nibs are the fibre type, so you do need to make sure not to press down too hard when writing, otherwise you'll ruin the nib, and despite your best attempts will end up with what I call 'Doctors Prescription Writing', an illegible scrawl that takes ages to decipher.

                The ink flows wonderfully though, so I see no reason why you would need to press these down too hard, and the pen glides across the paper easily with no leaks or mess, and the pen itself is light and comfortable to grip . Having asked my daughters teachers, these are still the pen of choice in schools, so I let my daughter practice with these at home . I'm ashamed to say her handwriting is much tidier than mine - a decade of condtant typing has led to my own handwriting being near enough illegible - perhaps I could do with going back to school.

                These pens typically cost around £1 each . They do last a good long time however (I purchased mine for a course I was taking and find one pen has lasted me through 8 months of coursework) and they are pretty solid - I've had no leaks so far.

                Yes, it's just a pen . BUT, it's a good quality pen, and one I would recommend.

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                  07.02.2010 15:17
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                  super pen

                  Ah yes, this one takes me back. My brother still uses these occasionally (in his artistry.) The Berol Handwriting Pen is a step up from the common pencil and the clumsy and messy biro. It is a tool designed to help anyone of any age get to grips with putting pen to paper.

                  When I was younger I was pretty good at writing and I was always writing stories, even at home. I do remember having some of these pens floating in the bedroom. I would use them to write stories and also to draw with, though they are specifically designed to write with.

                  Available in a blue or black, the pen is sturdy and very robust, meaning you can gnaw it, chuck it around and stamp on it and it won't snap, like a biro might do. With a nice firm body you can grip it quite contetedly and write keenly. The nib has a rather fine and delicate point to it (but not ridiculously so), which might throw younger kids to begin with, if they have been working with crayons. But you will soon master the art and learn that the right angles that suit you. The pen does seem to work from a variety of angles, meaning you do not have to hold it vertically, as with some finer nibbed pens. The pen is designed to help you develop good handwriting.

                  In terms of longevity, a pen can last a couple of months if you're fortunate. You can buy them on their on their own or in multipacks. A single pen should cost no more than seventy pence, which is a fair price.

                  So why this and not a biro? Well, the line is crisper, deeper and more satisfying and the look of the pen is better too. I feel you would be less likely to lose this too, thanks to the bold colours! A good starter pen.

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                  11.10.2009 17:03
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                  I am now nearly 18 years old and I first picked up this model of pen was I about 7 years old. I remember the pride when I was given the handwriting pen by my primary school teacher- those who demonstrated good hand writing would be awarded a pen at the end of term and allowed to write with this for work instead of just a standard pencil.

                  And to this day I have one in my pencil case- obviously not the original.. but they do last a fairly long time and don't tend to dry out unless you leave the cap off constantly. They are washable ink which means that you can get it off clothes (which I still manage to mess now...) and off your fingers if you have a strange writing style like mine!

                  They are fairly cheap as I remember- usually they come in sets of 2 which are about £2 so a quid each for these durable pens really isn't bad. (I know that they are durable because I am a self confessed pen chewer and the casing does not tend to split!).

                  I personally think that its a great pen for making your handwriting look neat and defined and it is especially good for kids who are starting to write fluently- the way it flows but isn't too blotchy is perfect for the standard exercise book and helps with the progression of doing 'joined-up' writing, which I had huge difficulty with when I was younger.

                  You can get these pens in blue or black, both of which look neat and professional enough for school work (opposed to the brightly coloured gel pens that me and my classmates used to use and the teachers used to despise!)

                  All in all I think this a great pen, which offers an alternative to the classic ballpoint (can look scruffy) or fountain pen (can smudge/blotch and makes writing take longer in my opinion).

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                    01.10.2009 17:31
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                    My daughter is now of an age where pens are being introduced for use in class. At Kaitlin's school they run an initiative to encourage the child to improve their hand writing skills, unfortunately just before the "pen license", the scheme the school runs, came out, my daughter started learning how to write joined up, so her handwriting became temporarily scruffy again!

                    Just before Kaitlin broke up for the summer holidays she was awarded her pen license, so of course when she returned to school she wanted to take some pens with her for her lessons.

                    Now I was under the impression that a pen was a pen, apparently not as they have a certain preferred variety, hence this review.

                    The pen I will now review is - "Berol by papermate - handwriting pens x 2 (black)"

                    After reading the blurb on the back of the packaging the main reason that these are the preferred pen of choice is the fact that these contain washable ink, though I cannot comment on this point as my daughter has yet to get this on her clothing, should touch wood now really!

                    The ink in these is also very easy to remove from hands, which of course my daughter always seems to have on her, and also from non-porous surfaces, which I take as scribble and graffiti from desks and such like, I don't condone this behaviour but am pretty sure my scribbles have gone down in notoriety from my former school!(Don't ask!)

                    The pens are made from durable plastic, with this particular pen cases being orange in colour, they are stated as medium, which refers to the nib size and comes with a corresponding colour lid, with a small clip on it to attach to a pad of paper, this is useful as my daughter does not have a good track record with keeping pens in her possession, she says she loses them but I am reliably informed that she shares her goods out between her friends, she hates it when I tell them to get there own mothers to buy them!

                    The pens in this instance write with black ink, though they are also available in blue ink, but Kaitlins school prefer black.

                    The nibs are the fibre type, with the nib being quite fine at the ends, so the child (or adult) have to make sure they don't use undue pressure when writing with them as the nib can break, and then splay out on the end making them unusable.

                    The ink comes out with not problems, but are also less likely to leak, another plus for school use as the kids have to carry everything in one bag, so a pen leak would be disastrous.

                    These pens are the perfect school aid, they fit a child's hand perfectly, thus encouraging good writing practises, they don't tend to leak too often, they have a clip to stop them going missing (hopefully and finally), the lid has a clicker on it, meaning that the id is less likely to fall off, again stopping the leaking issue!

                    Pricewise you will of course pay a little extra for quality, but in this case not much.
                    For the pack, which contains two pens, they are being sold for £2.00 at Asda, as part of there "back to school" range, but due to the kids being back at school, and the ever impending Christmas displays that are appearing all over the country, this range is now on sale, so can be brought as part of a "2 for £3.00" offer, there is a plethora of other pens sets to be had too.

                    For more information visit - www.asda.co.uk

                    Thanks for reading x

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