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ELC Bits & Basics Ready Bright Finger Paints

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5 Reviews

Manufacturer: ELC / Type: Painting

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    5 Reviews
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      14.10.2012 13:39
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      Cheap paints but I guess you get what you pay for in some cases

      I never knew there was a difference in paint when I decided to do the whole arts and crafts thing with the little one, I thought paint was paint and you can either use your fingers or a brush with them, well that's how I thought it was when I was growing up anyway. I always like to make sure that I have a good stock of paints and accessories to do arts and crafts with and I really like to encourage my daughters development and creative side, and it is also a fun thing for her to do too. I thought I would start out with this little set. I had a look on amazon and found them at the bargain price of £3.00 including postage and packaging, which for four pots of finger paint works out at 75p a tub...bargain! ==The Product== The paints arrived really quickly; four little pots of finger paints in bright colours, blue, pink, yellow and green. On opening the pots I discovered the paint was really thick and almost sponge like, I did not like the texture of it at all and neither did my daughter. When we started to paint with them we found the paint to be very lumpy and because of this the paintings ended up being like 3D with the paint taking forever to dry, there were patches of lumps all over the paper. Even if I were to thin them down a bit, you would need a good whisk to get all the lumps out and I wasn't about to waste a good whisk on painting. Cleaning up the paints was really easy, none of my daughters clothes were stained and the paint washed off really well, which is always a good thing ==Verdict== I wouldn't recommend this paint, a little does not go a long way with these, although the colours are nice and bright and the price was really good, I am sure you can get better quality paints on the market for your child. To be honest I expected more from the Early Learning Centre, I have bought other things from there and I have never had any problems with the quality, until now. This hasn't put me off buying things from there in the future either, it's all trial and error I guess. I think from now on though I will stick to Crayola for paints and anything arty, their sets are quite good and at a reasonable price for better quality.

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        09.08.2011 23:47
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        A great thing to do on a rainy day

        My children love anything arty so while browsing ELC shop I found myself drawn towards the craft section. That is when I came across some finger paints and knew these would be perfect for a messy day in with my babies. The paints cost me £4 and for my money I received a pack of 6 paints all in different bright colours. These include orange, blue, purple, pink, yellow and green and each of these colours are bright and attractive shades of the colour which I thought was great and this is one of the things that pulled me towards them. The paints come in individual 100 ml pots which have a screw top lid on them so they can be opened and secured really easily. We just tend to tip a little in there pain pots and then put the pots away as my eldest boy can get into the paint and this equals a big mess. I always keep a cloth to hand to wipe the rim of the tub as it can get messy tipping some on the palette. The paint itself looks rather strange when you first open it as it is really thick and gloopy compared to usual paints we use but after a stir it comes a little thinner. We found that the paint is actually a great texture for my little ones to use on their fingers as it is not too runny so that it falls off there fingers and means they can more freely around the paper without having to rush. The mess is easy to clean up we always wear aprons so we do not get it on our clothes but I find it easily wipes off my wooden floor and table with a cloth and hot water. It says they are suitable from 3 years plus but to be honest as long as children have supervision I believe it is fine for a younger age my 1 year old 2 year and 4 year old all love to play with there paints and as there are no small parts I believe it is fine. Over all they are great for getting arty with the children they are thicker than usual paints so it sticks to children's fingers long enough for them to something with it and they are not bank breaking which is good as we seem to be having a lot of rainy days inside.

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        09.08.2011 22:48
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        Perfect, well-priced finger paints for creative little people

        I bought this set of paints when I was looking to preserve the hand prints of my daughters. The hand print sets on offer at various places were quite expensive, and after shopping around these paints seemed like the cheapest option. They were reasonably priced, had a good selection of colours, and were made by the Early Learning Centre, who I trust to provide good, safe products. There are six pots of paint in the set - pink, blue, green, yellow, orange and purple. The pots are clear plastic with screw-on lids, making it harder for little ones to get into the pots themselves when your back is turned. The actual paint isn't runny, it's quite squishy, and therefore doesn't spill easily, something that's very important when babies and toddlers are involved! Regular poster paints tend to get splashed everywhere, so it's a nice change to use these non-runny paints. For the handprints I used a paintbrush and painted it onto their hands, just using the pink paint on that occasion. They've since done many more handprints, all using the same method, as the pots aren't big enough to fit flat hands into. Being the consistency it is it's not made for using with paintbrushes and you usually end up with blobs of paint on the brush. The paint comes into its own when used for its intended purpose which is finger painting. I personally don't like having messy hands, but most kids seem to love it and like nothing better than sticking their fingers into the pots of paint and smearing them all over paper, and anything else that's nearby. We've used ours for many different things, including handprint butterflies and fingerprint peacocks. The level of paint never seems to go down very much, despite having used it many times, making it very good value for money. Red paint would have been a nice addition to the set, meaning that kids could learn how mixing the three primary colours results in the secondary colours of orange, green and purple. The paint washes off hands easily, but I can't vouch for clothes as they've never managed to get it on theirs. I always have a piece of wet kitchen roll to hand for wiping between colours (I don't like getting colours mixed in together) and when they've finished before the" mad dash to the sink before they touch anything." I also make sure they wear an apron and have a messy mat underneath where they're working. The paints currently sell at the Early Learning Centre for £3 for all six pots which I think is great value.

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          19.01.2011 17:26
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          Painting is messy but so much fun

          Nine month old Freddy loves his art activities, he always has a huge grin on his face as he produces the latest masterpiece, whether he's using crayons, chalk or in the case finger paints. When I first stocked up on art supplies for him my first port of call was The Early Learning Centre as although their art materials may cost a little more they are, without exception (so far) better quality. The ELC sell two different sets of finger paints, the standard set and the ones we bought, the Bright Fingers paints. In both cases you get a total of six tubs of paint, each of which contains 100mls of very thick, gloopy, washable, non-toxic paint. Although these paints are advertised as being suitable for children between the ages of two and six, I see absolutely no reason why younger children should not be able to use them, as long as they are adequately supervised and assisted by an adult. As I said, Freddy is only nine months old and he is perfectly able to use these pots of paint. While the standard set of finger paints contains the basic colours (red, yellow, green, blue, black and white), the Bright set has colours that I think are far more visually stimulating, with orange, purple, pink, green, yellow and blue. ==Preparation Is Everything== The tubs of paint come packaged in a slightly flimsy cardboard box, which has all the safety information printed on it in various languages. Personally, I don't think this box makes a very good long term storage solution and so I will be buying an 'art box' in the very near future. Each of the paint tubs is made from transparent plastic, with a sturdy screw top lid. I have no trouble opening and closing them, but luckily enough Freddy's not quite perfected his lid unscrewing technique. I would say though, that children within the recommended age group would have little trouble opening them, so it's best to store them out of their reach. As the packaging helpfully informs us, these paints may stain, so it's a good idea to do a little preparation before letting your little artists loose. Personally we use a splash mat to protect the floor and a mini-artist apron to protect Freddy's clothes, but newspaper and an old shirt would work just as well. I would also suggest having a bowl full of warm, soapy water ready for when your child has finished, because they will get messy. Once everything is ready, I simply sit Freddy in his chair, push him next to the table (he has a convertible highchair, very handy for artwork), give him some paper and then open a couple of pots of paint and then let him get on with it. ==Shhh Mini Genius At Work== Each of the pots is just the right size for Freddy to put his hand in and squelch the paint before starting on his 'picture'. Although the paint is extremely thick, it does transfer easily to his hand and from his hand onto the paper. The colours are extremely bright while wet and the paint is just the right consistency for Freddy to be able to spread it over the paper with his fingers. Admittedly, I did have to show him what to do the first time, but now Freddy has no trouble squelching his whole hand into the pot and seems to take great delight in just doing that, let alone painting. That's not to say he doesn't like actually painting with the paint, because he does. He takes great delight in spreading paint over the paper, his table and himself (thank goodness for the apron). With Freddy being so young, I only get two tubs of paint out at a time, so that he's not overwhelmed with choices and so far we've been quite lucky in that he's only transferred a little of the colours between pots. But from the way the colours have mixed together on the paper, be warned, if you child really goes to town dipping their hand in one pot then another you will end up with six pots of murky brown paint. As well as using our hands to paint with, we have also tried using brushes, sponges and even potatoes with this paint. Although it is quite hard to load paint brushes with the paint (due to how thick it is), once it is on the brush is gives pretty good coverage and is easy to wash out. It's also excellent for potato printing, the pots are big enough to fit a medium sized potato in for dunking and because the paint is so thick it doesn't drip everywhere, meaning that the only marks on the paper are the ones your child actually wanted to make. Once Freddy has finished his paintings, he's near enough always covered with paint, so we normally run a bath to get him clean. So far I've not had any trouble washing the paint off, not even when he decided to paint his face blue. I can't say I've had any problems getting this out of his clothes, but that's because it hasn't got onto his clothes. Freddy is always stripped down to a vest and then wears an apron when he does artwork. It did wash out of the fabric cuffs on his apron though. As the paint is so thick, the finished pictures can take quite a while to dry, although actual time obviously depends on how much has been actually put on the paper. I'd say it normally takes about an hour for one of Freddy pieces to dry enough for it to be put on the wall. As for the pots themselves, well because it's so thick the paint seems to last for ages, although if the pots are left open the paint will dry out. Although I will be buying more of these finger paints when they dry out, I'll also be keeping the pots for 'normal' paints as they are such a good size and seal with screw top lid. ==Shhh The Artist Is Learning== As well as being lots of fun, painting is a great opportunity for your child to learn, no matter how young they are. The very first thing Freddy learnt about paint, is that it doesn't taste very nice, he only tried eating it the once. As well as learning cause and effect as he does his painting, Freddy is also learning that getting messy is fun. I don't know about you, but I think that babies and young children need to experience getting messy. As he creates his masterpieces, his hand-eye coordination and fine motor skills are improving as he refines his ability to swirl the paint over the paper. Although he's too young to really understand, I also talk about which colours he is using and what happens when they mix together. Hopefully this will help reinforce colour recognition as he gets older as well as teaching him about how different colours are created. Finally, any form of art is a wonderful outlet for children just learning to express themselves and finger painting is no exception. But as with anything else, what your child gets out of using these finger paints, depends not only on your child but also on how much you get involved. So why not throw off your inhibitions and join in, it's great fun forgetting we're the grown-ups, rolling our sleeves up and dipping our fingers in those pots of paint. ==Final Words== Although I could have bought cheaper finger paints from other retailers, I'm really glad I paid the £4 for these bright finger paints from the Early Learning Centre. There is a decent amount of paint in each pot, and true to their name the colours are indeed bright, even when dry. The actual pots are also good quality, with leak proof, screw top lids, and can be re-used once the paint has run out. The selection of colours is also pretty good, but I must admit that as Freddy gets older I will probably need to buy the complimentary set so that we have a full range of colours. The paint is also a nice consistency, thick enough so it doesn't drip but not so thick that it's impossible to work with. Freddy also loves his painting sessions and takes great pleasure from using these and even better, it's easy to wash the paint off him when he's finished. As to the recommended minimum age, well I'd say take that with a pinch of salt, as much younger children can use these as long as they have help. And so I'm giving The Early Learning Centre Bright Finger Paints a whopping five stars out of five, as I am finding it very difficult to find fault with them. The cardboard box they are supplied in could, perhaps, be a little sturdier, but really that's the only minor gripe I have.

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            07.08.2010 08:42
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            A decent purchase

            I love doing arts and crafts with my son and have always encouraged it from an early age so when my son's uncle asked what he could buy for his third birthday I suggested some arty products. One of the presents he bought my son was the Early Learning Centres Bits and Basics bright finger paints. The set consists of six individual pots of finger paint and is selling on the ELC website for £4.00 which is a really good price in my opinion. The set comes in quite a flimsy cardboard box. Ours is just about holding itself together these days but there really is no need to keep the paints in the box as they are all self contained anyway in little plastic pots with a screw top lid. The paint pots are 100ml. The colours that you get in this set are orange, yellow, green, pink, purple and blue which I think is a good mixture of colours. The actual paint itself is thick and looks a bit disgusting! It is great though for the purpose of finger painting. You simply need to put a finger or a few fingers in the paint and away you go. My son and I have actually used these paints to rub it all over our feet and then do foot prints which is a nice activity to do and also a nice keepsake. The paint says it is suitable for children aged 2-6 but I would say that with supervision you could use these with a slightly younger child. Now my son is five he doesn't really play with the paints so perhaps six is a little old though I would imagine if I planned an activity involving them he would take part. As with many craft activities it is important that your child wears either old clothing or a protective apron whilst playing with these paints as the contents will stain. Should you get some on your clothing if you soak the stain and give it a little scrub quite quickly you may be fortunate that it will come off. Whenever we do this kind of activity I always make sure I either have a packet of baby wipes handy or a wet flannel so that we can wipe the paint off immediately. This is also useful for when your child wants to change the colour they are using as otherwise you may end up with all your colours mixed to a multi coloured kind of sludge! So would I recommend these finger paints? Well yes I think I would recommend them if you enjoy doing arty activities with your child as I feel at just £4.00 for the set it is well worth the money and it will last a long time as you don't need much paint at all per activity.

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