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John Adams Chocolate Coin Maker

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10 Reviews

Brand: John Adams / Type: Crafts / Age: 6 Years+

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    10 Reviews
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      17.02.2014 21:47
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      Would not reccomend. Lovely idea but just doesnt work! Don't waste your money.

      When I saw the John Adams golden coin maker I thought what a lovely idea. The age on the box is 6+ but I bought it for my 3year old son so he could watch and help a little. It all looks fantastic and at the price of £20 I thought it would work quite well. How wrong could I have been! What you get: The golden coin maker comes in an attractive box with happy looking children holding the handfuls of the golden coins they've made on the front! The description on the back says "A truly magical experience that's lots of fun and really easy to use." (I think not!) In the box is: -the golden coin maker -Chocolate melter -Mould holder -Coin/medal moulds and rings -Spread and scribe tool -8 double sided coin/medal embossing discs -Golden net bags and golden elastic -Golden foil sheets IT DOES NOT COME WITH ANY CHOCOLATE INCLUDED. However, you can use any chocolate buttons or chocolate chips. The price: I bought this for around £20 in Argos but the price ranges from £15-£20 in other stores and when on offer. If the machine worked properly and was easier I would happily of accepted this price but the way it is I would pay no more than £5 for! Age suitability: The box says that its for ages 6+. As a 22 year old I found parts of this tricky so would be extremely surprised if a 6year old could use this. It also states for use under adult supervision. Using the product: When I unpacked and started using the product it seemed great! Lots of lovely contents like the net bags etc. to create realistic coins. At first it seemed easy to use, my 3 year old was able to melt the chocolate in the melter and spoon it into the moulds with a little support. We then took them to the freezer to set (20-30minutes). You then have to cut out the foil circles, this is another part that does work well, popping the foil in the cutter and twisting the knob makes a perfect foil circle. After this it starts to get fiddly. To start the foiling you have to place the coin in the holder and press the knob down. The foil doesn't fit properly around the chocolate and then fits even worse when you try to do the other side. When you remove out the mould the foil comes off even more! I tried to squash it back on properly so we could emboss the coins. This is where I came across the next problem. The embossing does not work. I was doing this myself and tried a few times but could not get it to work! All in all this is a lovely idea but really doesn't work and I would advise anyone against wasting their money on it.

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        05.11.2013 14:25
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        steer clear of it

        My son had seen adverts for this and insisted on getting it for his sister's birthday (9). She was excited to be able to make these chocolate coins you can find in sweetshops. However, it is soooo fiddly. Despite reading the instructions, we still did not end up with anything half decent to show for the hours spent. OK, so there are a number of stamps that can be used for the outside of the coins. Despite turning the crank far more times than we were told, the pattern was hardly visibly imprinted on the coins. The chocolate takes forever to melt and then when you do put it in the fridge/freezer to solidify, it does not come out as intended. We did have better luck using white chocolate. Perhaps that is the way to go. However, I think you are far better off just buying your kids bags of ready made coins and get them a more useful arty/crafty toy. There are also loads of plastic parts which all need to be washed after use. Beware, this will be a time-consuming chore for you and you may be left with pretty unimpressed kids. Don't let the adverts fool them or you!

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        05.11.2013 10:45
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        Overall rubbish - A good idea that dosnt work properly

        My son (age 6 at the time) asked & asked for this ..So i bought it, think it was around £17 at the time. We had a quiet time shortly after the celebrations of christmas to sit down and be creative. We set it all up, and began to make, a gooey mess! we followed the instructions, melting the chocolate buttons(not supplied) in these plastic things that you fill with warm water to supposingly help the chocolate melt!! then you put them in moulds - this part i must say was tricky as its is a small ammount of chocolate in the plastic water things(which take forever to melt anyway) so your sort of scraping and scraping tiny ammounts into the mould! its frustrating. Then in the fridge for 2 hours!! we gave up on the wait and went back to them the next day. The chocolate had set into a soft chocolate coin, that you couldnt handle properly without it breaking & squidging. we attempted to wrap one of them with the gold foil on opening it wasnt an coin anymore just a chocolate blob! we never used it again and it is still in the brand new looking box with all the brand new looking equipment. A waste of time and money. whoever thinks up these things musnt test them out. Worse then Mr Frosty!! stay clear, if you have to buy it cheap as possible! Thumbs down from me

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          08.11.2012 16:31
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          2 stars

          Before my eldest daughter broke up for the recent half term, a letter came home explaining that after the holidays they would be learning all about chocolate. She is only in class 2 so I assumed they would most likely be learning about how it's made, how it melts and can be made into different shapes, so I thought during the holiday it would be good to do some activities with chocolate at home. When I offered to do this with her, she excitedly told me she had seen an advert on the TV for a chocolate coin maker and pretty please with a cherry on the top could we get it?! I set to work looking for said chocolate coin maker and soon came across the John Adams one. We have lots of experience of John Adams sets, some good, some not so good, but I decided to take the plunge and pay the £12 to buy it (RRP £14.99). In preparation for the chocolate coin makers arrival, I stocked up on lots of chocolate buttons which were recommended to use, plus coloured buttons from the baking aisle in the supermarket, so we could experiment with orange and strawberry flavoured chocolate for something a little different. The chocolate maker is described as a little mini factory which comes with a melting unit, moulds and lids, gold foil sheets and embossing discs. To use it is a fairly long process, you melt the chocolate in the melting unit with warm water. I can see why it recommends warm, as obviously young children and boiling water don't mix, but this process is painfully slow. You place the circular moulds into the unit and then place the chocolate buttons into the moulds to begin the melting process. Once it has melted you place a lid on top of the coin and then put in either your fridge or your freezer. If you have the time to wait I would recommend putting in your fridge but this can take 40 minutes to set, whereas it will set in around 20 minutes in the freezer. While you are waiting for the coins, you can take the opportunity to make the foils. Once the foils are on the coin you can emboss the foils to any of 20 messages or pictures including Happy Birthday, Good Luck, Best Mum, Merry Christmas, or pictures of a football or smiley face. You can also make your own design with the tools provided. It is slow to make the chocolate, etc but once the sets are in the fridge/freezer you are playing a waiting game. You are able to buy add on packs which include extra moulds but I thought this was just a rip off to be honest. The gold foil that comes with the set, really isn't enough to make more than a handful of coins and after this you will need to buy some more, which I wasn't particularly happy about. Luckily it works well with standard kitchen foil, but I still wasn't impressed by the small amount of foil supplied. So my thoughts on the set? We didn't particularly like it. I found it fiddly and a bit of a nuisance to be honest and after the first time we used it I went online and bought some chocolate lolly moulds and some lolly sticks. We had much more fun making chocolate moustaches on a lolly stick and sticking all kinds of colours in. I was able to heat the chocolate at much higher temperatures and help my daughter to pour the chocolate in and decorate them. If you plan on making anything chocolaty with your child, I would recommend making lolly's at home yourself as opposed to buying this machine. It will be going to the charity shop at the earliest convenience.

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            22.08.2012 21:29
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            My son really enjoyed using it

            Out of all the crazy making machines my kids have had this one is my sons favourite. He had it for Christmas a few years ago. At the time it cost £15 and I've seen them in Tesco for the same price recently. The kids on the front of the box look like they're enjoying it. The machine itself is a good quality plastic, it's blue with yellow 'handles' and red knobs. It is easy to assemble. It doesn't take up too much storage room as it's not very big, the box is about a foot long an the shelf. The toy is suitable for children aged 6+, my son was older than this and my daughter even older but she enjoyed using it with him. Included in the box were coin moulds and rings, a spread tool, ten embossing discs for putting designs on the coins, net bags and foil sheets- although not many of these, we had to use tin foil out of the cupboard. I used chocolate drops rather than buttons to melt in it, although either will do. After melting some chocolate drops/buttons in the melting bowls you put it in the coin mould, when your coin is ready you can make your golden coins. First my son cut a disc of foil with the foil cutter, put the foil disc into the top of the machine placed the coin on it and then covered it with another disc. You press down the top to seal the chocolate coin in the foil. It's then removed and placed in your chosen embossing mould, the machine then presses the design into the coin. As for cleaning it, warm water and a bit of washing up liquid does the trick, it's not fiddly because the tray the chocolate is melted in is a separate unit. My son loved this maker, he made us loads of coins that he'd chosen the designs for. He got really pleased with his efforts- for example his brothers birthday coin! I would recommend this toy, it does work but sadly as with everything my son outgrew it, It never broke and still works. The last time I saw it, it was in one piece so it must be sturdy.

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              02.07.2010 09:00
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              We played once with this and probably won't again

              My son must have nagged me for John Adams Chocolate coin maker for at least eighteen months and I continually put it off but after a friend gave me a special money off voucher for Tesco I decided to purchase it for him this Christmas just gone. I managed to get the coin maker for less than £10.00 with the voucher I had but I can honestly say that I wish I hadn't bothered at all. I note that online you can purchase the chocolate coin maker for £14.99 from mail order express but I would say please save your money. A couple of days after Christmas we decided to get the set out and have a go at making some chocolate coins. Little did we know at this point that there were 33 steps to just make one coin! I find this totally ridiculous. How a child is meant to hold their attention for so long to make just one coin is beyond me-more so as there is a period of putting the coins in your freezer! In the box you get the main melting unit, moulding bases, lids and rings, a spreading and scribing tool, 10 double sided embossing discs, golden net bags and elastic and golden foil sheets. In theory this all sounds great until you realise that you don't actually get any chocolate! You purchase this separately for around £3.00 and to be honest you do get a lot of chocolate chips and they would last ages as you only need a couple per coin. You also only receive a few sheets of small golden paper meaning that after just a few coins you need to be going buying more. You begin by filling the melting unit with warm tap water. You do not use boiling water. You then place it flat down on the table. It has two circular moulds in it and you need to place the moulding bases into those, and then add a moulding base. Once you have done this you place 5 chocolate chips into each base and they will begin to melt. As it melts you can spread it using your tool providing. It is important to note it can take 5-10 minutes for them to melt! When it is melted add a lid to the top and put them flat in your freezer for 20-30 minutes. You can also put them in your fridge but it will then take 40 minutes to set. At this point you can empty and refill the melting unit if you wish to make some more. Whilst they are setting you can cut your golden foil by putting it in the main unit and clamping it, then cutting it. You need two discs per coin and I would say you can get a maximum of four discs per sheet of golden foil. When you remove the moulding sets from the freezer you must be very careful when trying to get the chocolate out! We managed to break one of our chocolate coins immediately! You then move on to putting the foil on our coins using the main unit. You can then follow the instructions to use the unit again to emboss your coins. There are many little messages such as Best mum, I "heart" you, Merry Christmas etc that you can choose from. This was the part my son enjoyed the most-seeing the message he chose imprinted on to the foil and in turn on the chocolate coin we had made. The design wasn't very clear on the chocolate though in my opinion. So that is pretty much it. And guess how many chocolate coins we have made since we have had it? FOUR!!!! That was all we made on that day and my son was so bored with it that we haven't bothered with it since. He recently asked for it out again and then remembered how much fussing around and waiting there was to do with it and changed his mind. I think the product would be much improved if there was the ability to make many more coins in one go-at least then although you were waiting still you would be able to have more of an end product. You do have the option of buying refill packs which contain extra moulding bases but I think this is a total con. You should be provided with more initially so that you can make a decent amount of coins to start off with. Definitely do not waste your money on this product unless you want to spend a long time making four chocolate coins at a time!

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                10.01.2010 16:37
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                Chocolatey fun for all the family!! - But guess who gets left to tidy up?!

                GOLDEN COIN MAKER, JOHN ADAMS. PRICE - £19.99 from Argos CONTENTS - Golden Coin Machine, Chocolate Melting Unit, Coin, moulds and rings, Spread and Scribe Tool, Ten Double Sided Coin Embossing Discs, Golden Foil Sheets and Net Bags and 130g of Milk Chocolate Chips. USES - This machine is supposed to teach children the secrets to making there own chocolate coins, whilst allowing them to print the designs which they want onto them. The designs range from cute pictures to endearing slogans, such as "Best Mum", "Best Dad" and even "Best Mate". DESIGN - The machine my daughter has is not the one pictured but the special pink edition. The machine and the contents are the same in every way, apart from their colour - This whole set is a bright cerise colour. INSTRUCTION MANUAL - Even the instruction mannual is cerise, with dark purple writing and diagrams. This special edition is definately not one for the boys!! The mannual is easy to read and has step by step instructions for setting the machine up and the coin making process. The mannual comes with large diagrams which help children understand what the words are meaning. However I woul recommend helping your child with this project, not just because some of the steps are quite tricky but also due to the mess factor. I could not imagine what my kitchen would look like if I left my daughter making coins in it alone for half an hour!! COIN MAKING PROCESS - Before you start I think it is a good idea to give everything a wash since your child's tounge will probably end up licking most fo the equiptment!! It is also a good idea for you and your child to both wear aprons, as believe me this can get messy!! First you need to fill the melting unit. This is like a thin bottle which lies flat on your kitchen counter and has two circular coin shapes on top where you place the chocolate. The unit needs to be filled with very hot water so it is advisable for you to do this. I thought it would need boiling water to work which would have made the plastic unit extremely hot, but to my shock you are advised against this, and thankfully the tap water works fine. Next you are to gradually fill the coin circles with the little chocolate buttons provided. Each one take exactly thirteen. However once you run out of these cadbury's, asda or any other make works fine. They are a bit larger though and I found you only need seven or eight of these larger buttons. The chocolate takes a little while to melt and you have to help it along by poking it with the spreading and scribing tool provided. This is a job which my daughter loves, especially as she gets to lick the end when we are finished!! The only down-point I found with the melting unit is that you can only make two coins at a time, which can turn this activity into a rather lenghty process. Once the molds are filled with the melted chocolate they need to be put into the fridge to set. It recomends a time of twenty minutes, but I found it needed closer to forty or fifty minutes. During this time you can melt more choccolate to make more coins but as there are only four molds provided, your child will still have a considerable time to wait until the next step. It would have been more useful to provide about ten molds. I find it best to do this process at night so your child can look forward to engraving and covering the coins in the morning. Next you have to cut gold foil circles using the cutting machine. The blade is plastic and is completely covered so it is safe for your child to do this. It is relatively easy and requires them to insert the foil into the machine and turn the dial in a circle. Turn the dial slowly for better results as I found turning to fast can rip the foil. The next part is quite tricky and took us a few goes to get it right. You have to take the coin out of it's mold and into the foiler, along with two foil circles for each coin. I found the chocolate melted really quickly an it is best to touch the coins as little as you can. The foiling process is done by the push of a button but doesn't always work great and sometimes the coin can look a little untidy. As said, I think with practice this can be perfected. Next is our favourit part. You choose which designs your coin is to have, one for each side. Again simply place the coin and disc into the machine and turn the handle till it clicks six times. However I found you are better to let the handle click ten times to ensure the design takes. The fun now comes, when you can eat your own coins, and mummy is left to wash all the mess!! DURABILITY - My daughter has had this for two years, and because everything is made out of plastic, it is very durable and has a good longevity. CONCLUSION - I would recommend buying this, however we paid extra for the pink set. I would recommend buying the regular set unless your child really wants it in pink. It really is not woth paying extra just for a different colour. My daughter really enjoys this activity, and as she gets older she is able to take more and more responsibility during the process. It is an activity that you need to allow sufficient time for, probably an hour for the melting, and two hours for the making, so is not something to try and attempt in a hurry. It is suitable for children ages five upwards I would say, however younger children will need much more help, and will probably make much more mess!! It is a good way to start introducing children to cooking and processes in the kitchen, however not the most healthiest!!

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                  07.01.2010 08:40
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                  A great product

                  I bought this for my daughter for Christmas and so far we have had great fun. How it works There's a little bottle you fill up with hot water and then you put a disk into the slot at the top then a little ring. You just place the chocolate chips provided with the machine into the ring and they gently melt. There is a little stick to stir the chocolate and you do this in small amount of chocolate chips until you have melted about 13. Once you have then melted you put another disk on the top and put them in the fridge or if your impatient into the freezer. They take about 20 minutes in the freezer and about an hour in the fridge to set. Take them out once set and this is where the fun begins. You cut two disks from the foil and take the disk off and put it into the top of the machine with the foil at the bottom and clamp the lid down. Repeat this to wrap the top half of the coin. One the coin is wrapped in foil there are a number of design disks with I love you and swirly patterns and alsorts on them. You put one of the design disks under you coin and one on top in a little drew and insert this into the machine and twist the handles then once it's clicked about 6 times turn the handles back and take out the draw. Hey presto a chocolate coin like the ones you get in the shops. It even comes with little mesh bags so you can make a present for someone. Does it work? The first time we made them we left the chocolate too long to set it does say they have to be just set and we ended up breaking the coins but the second time (after following the instructions more carefully) we had some lovely designed coins. Price The machine is about £14.99 and includes everything you need to get started and the refill pack are about £3.99 which gives you more designs, the foil, some more moulding bases which are needed to melt the chocolate, and some more mesh bags. Is it worth the money I think so we have had a great time making coins and my daughter made some for her friend's birthday as a little present. Its one of the most used presents from Christmas and apart from filling the bottle with hot water a child can pretty much do it all themselves.

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                  22.05.2009 16:49
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                  A couple of minor drawbacks, but otherwise a great toy that does what it is supposed to do.

                  This toy enables you to melt, wrap and stamp your own chocolate coins or medals. It is aimed at children aged 6+ My 8 year old daughter saw this product advertised on television and kept asking for it. I resisted for a while since I imagined that it would be another one of those fancy, over-marketed toys that would only get used once. Eventually I bought it for her and I have to say I have been pleasantly surprised. I paid £14.99 for it from the local Toymaster shop, but it is possible to pay a bit less if you order online. Refill packs of wrapping foil, chocolate and net bags cost around £5.99 but you can easily substitute ordinary kitchen foil and a bag of chocolate buttons from the supermarket for a fraction of the price. The packaging is a colourful and sturdy box, which is quite robust and good for storing the toy when not in use. The age range is clearly marked on the front, as is the fact that there is "chocolate included". On the reverse are instructions to make your coins, and a list of contents. The box should contain the following: the main "factory" unit (for cutting foil, wrapping and stamping); melting unit; net bags and foil; rings, tops and bases for shaping and handling the coins; spatula; chocolate; instruction manual and design discs. Check carefully though - mine did not have the gold foil inside so I had to pay another visit to the shop to get the problem sorted. The design discs include a choice of various stars, flowers and swirly shapes, "I Love You", snowman, present, football, "Champion", "Good Luck", skull and crossbones, smiley face, sunshine, "Happy Birthday", "Happy Christmas", "Best Dad", "Best Mum" and "Congratulations". There is also a partly blank one for you to add your own design. To make your coins, you fill the melting unit (a small square plastic bottle) with hot water. The plastic base and moulding ring then fit onto the top. The instructions then advise you to add 13 chocolate chips gradually and stir them round until they melt due to the heat of the water from the container underneath. Now I have to say that whilst this is a safe method, it is also very slow and laborious. This is not made any easier by the fact that the water cools down as you go, making it take even longer. In the end we found it much quicker and easier to dispense with adding the water to the melting unit, just assemble the base and moulding rings and then melt the chocolate in the microwave for about 40 seconds. Obviously the manufacturer wouldn't advise this, and it needs adult supervision, but as long as you are sensible it works fine. The one thing you need to be aware of if you use the microwave, is that the chocolate coin will take longer to set than the instructions state. Whilst the chocolate is setting you can cut the foil - easy and safe to do using the covered cutter in the factory unit - and choose your stamp design. After the coin has set (15 minutes in freezer 40 minutes in fridge - longer if you used the microwave to heat the chocolate) you remove the top and bottom of the mould but keep the ring on, to transfer the chocolate disc into the wrapping unit. The foil is then wrapped separately around the top then the bottom of the chocolate disc by depressing the big button on the top of the unit. Sometimes this does not work that well and the disc gets stuck on the underside of the unit, however it does not cause too much of a problem as you can ease it off again with a flat knife and it does not affect the end result. Once you are ready to stamp, it is a simple matter of sandwiching the coin between the two design discs in the little tray, then turning the handle to imprint the design. The instructions say that in order to successfully stamp the coin, the chocolate needs to be freshly set, not left in the fridge overnight, but I find this not to be the case. On several occasions we have left coins overnight and stamped them successfully the next day. Once you have finished with it, the main factory unit it wipes clean easily. Removable parts can be hand washed. Conclusion And the end result? Not bad at all! Not as pristine as commercially made coins, but perfectly acceptable and my 8 year old is very pleased with her results. We have used the Golden Coin Maker on many occasions, so I am happy that it wasn't a "one play wonder". Family members have enjoyed receiving personalised chocolate coins as a fun, novelty gift. I personally don't like the chocolate that is supplied with the unit as the taste is a bit greasy, but you can use any other kind of chocolate - 6g makes one coin.

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                  11.05.2009 12:25
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                  Make Your Own Gold Coins

                  My son spends a fair bit of his time watching programmes on Nickelodeon. Well lets face it Sponge Bob can be entertaining from time to time. I quite enjoy the peace and quiet actually as it gives me a chance to get a well earned cup of tea and a sit-down for a few minutes in the relative tranquillity of my kitchen. The only issue I have with this channel is that it tends to be inundated with adverts for kiddies toys most of which are a load of old rot in my opinion. We were watching this a few weeks ago and I had promised my son a new toy as he had been given an excellent school report. (I know the pressure on them starts early these days doesn't it). Anyway he was watching a glitzy advert for the John Adams Golden Coin Maker. My peace was shattered with the words "mum come and see this". Well I caught the last few seconds and I have to say I thought that it might be good fun to let him have this. We usually have 'make and do' sessions in our household where my blue peter craft making skills come to the fore as we try and make things out of old egg boxes and toilet roll tubes. What can I say these items make a mean crocodile!!!! Anyway I thought I would purchase this as it would save on the old glue and paint mess ultimately leaving my magnolia walls in a pristine condition for another day. I shopped around for this product and was quite amazed at the variation in pricing. You can buy this item from most major toy retailers. I settled for getting mine from a private seller on Amazon which cost £12.99 including postage. Some outlets were asking £20 for the unit without postage which I thought was a little bit steep. I paid for my item which arrived literally two days later. Well I had addressed it to my son so it was waiting for him when he came back from school. There was much excitement as he opened his package which revealed his Golden Coin Maker. The coin maker comes in a very attractive purple coloured high gloss box. It has a picture of three extremely happy children on the front and a picture of what I presumed was the coin maker and lots of gold coins and medals. There is a box in the bottom left which indicates that this toy is for children aged 6 years and above. The John Adams logo is on the top left and there is golden coloured wording which states that this is the golden coin maker with the wording underneath. Melt wrap and stamp your own chocolate coins and medals. We took all the bits and pieces out of the box and laid them out on the kitchen table. I was actually struck by the size of the packaging compared to what was sitting in front of me on the table. A little bit excessive I thought. Anyway the items laid out consisted of a rather disappointing looking golden coin and medal factory. This was brightly coloured in red yellow and blue. It was made out of quite tough looking plastic however I was expecting something a little fancier. A chocolate coin melting unit, a collection of coin or medal moulds and rings. Moulding bases, moulding lids and moulding rings. There was also a spread and scribe tool. Ten double sided coin/medal embossing discs. Golden coin net bags and gold elastic. Gold foil sheets and milk chocolate chips. There was also an instruction leaflet which tells you how to make your delicious chocolate coins. I have to say I was non too impressed at this point however my extremely enthusiastic six year old couldn't wait to get started. The manufacturer gives you instructions regarding what else you will need apart from the vast array of items spread out in front of you already. These include a clean work surface. A clean damp cloth an apron, a freezer, access to warm tap water and scissors. Pretty self-explanatory really however I suppose forgivable as the toy is aimed at those aged six years and above. Well we had all we needed so it was time to start making our coins. Stage 1 As with all toys of this nature adult supervision is required at all times just in case the relatively safe components somehow manage to turn themselves into a dangerous weapon!! We placed the coin making unit on the kitchen table. It is this point that the adult helper needs to fill the melting unit with hot water. This must not be boiling water just to ensure there are no nasty accidents with your little helpers. Once done you then screw the top onto the bottle. This looks like a hot water bottle really and I suppose it fulfils the same function really. You then place this melting unit onto a flat surface (next to the chocolate coin factory would seem like a sensible suggestion at this point for easy access. You then get two moulding bases and pop them onto the melting unit, add a moulding ring to this ensuring that they fit into the grooves on the moulding base. You then place five chocolate chips into each separate base. Once they start melting you can then add a further eight more chocolate chips into each base. When the chocolate melts you can then use your spreading tool provided which will ensure a nice smooth even finish to your coin, This will also remove any lumps and bumps and air bubbles which are in your chocolate if you stir very gently. After ensuring that the chocolate has melted completely put a moulding ring on top of it pressing firmly. You then remove them from the unit completely and transfer them into the freezer so that they go suitably hard. This normally takes between ten and fifteen minutes. While this is happening you can actually make more coins as this eases the boredom. Well waiting ten minutes can feel like an eternity when you are six!!! Stage 2 This is the stage when you finally get to use the chocolate making factory. Take a sheet of the gold foil and place a corner of it onto the cutter base. Close the lid and clamp the foil sheet into position, The lid should be held down with one hand. To cut the foil push down on the knob and turn it slowly until the cutter has gone full circle. You then lift the lid and remove the foil disc. You need to keep repeating this process and ensure that you have two discs for each single chocolate. Take the coins out of the freezer and remove them from the moulds. You then pop a foil on top of the coin maker add a chocolate coin and push the lid down firmly. Open again and the bottom of the coin will be covered in foil. Repeat the process again so that the other side is covered in foil also. You still have to stamp it with the design of your choice. For this add a moulding coin to the moulding ring and press down firmly in the coin factory. You wind the handle again and low and behold a chocolate coin will appear in the drawer. There you have it a chocolate foil covered coin. Woohoo and it only took half an hour in total to make it. You can then continue making enough coins to add too a net bag and can tie it with the gold elastic provided. Well my son made five coins which I have to say were quite large sized and decided that that was enough as he was bored with the very repetitive process. Basically that left muggings here to tidy up the mess and do the washing up. He also decided that the chocolate wasn't very nice either so all in all although I think it filled an hour I can't see it being used again. It is now gathering dust on the bedroom shelf. A bit of a gimmick really which will go down with the other flash in the pan games which seemed like a good idea at the time!!! and will end up at the next car boot sale we do. There are refills available for your coin machine if required. There is a number provided which will tell you where to purchase these. You will get extra foil, bags and chocolate. You can also use chocolate buttons which if Cadburys would make the choc coins taste a bit nicer. Overall unfortunately a bit of an impulse buy which will not be used again.

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                • Product Details

                  With this mini-factory, you can melt, wrap and stamp hundreds of golden wrapped chocolate coins and medals to share. The magical chocolate making and wrapping is lots of fun and easy to do. Make great presents for parents, teachers, friends.