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Heinz Farley's Rusks Original

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25 Reviews

Brand: Heinz / Age: 4 months

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      28.04.2013 16:34
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      great for a baby on the go

      When I started to wean my daughter a couple of weeks ago the first thing I thought of for her to try was rusks.

      I had used these with my other two children and they had always been a big hit! I picked some up from the supermarket when I was doing my weekly shop. You can also get them in Boots or Superdrug too.

      The rusks come in a square box and inside is two packs of rusks wrapped in silver paper. The rusks inside are round in shape.

      When I used them I broke them into two at first as she didn't eat much then. 2 weeks on and she easily eats one with no problem at all. The information on the pack says that the rusks are packed with vitamins and iron. They are great for babies as they don't contain any salt, flavorings or colors.

      I think the great thing about rusks is that you can mix them with milk or water and feed them with a spoon or you can let your baby hold them and feed themselves which my daughter really seems to love doing.

      The rusks seem safe to give to your baby to hold as they melt in their mouth so no bits can break off and risk choking them. The rusks last for ages in my daughters hand so is good when I want to keep her occupied. I usually give her half of one as they are easier to hold and still last a long time.

      The other great thing that I have found is that you can just pack a couple in a little Tupperware box and put them in your change bag then if your baby gets hungry when you are out and about you have a ready made snack.

      The only bad thing I would say about them is that they can create a real mess. My daughter who is 6 months old seems to like nothing better than to wipe it all in her hair, her ears and all over her clothes so If you like having a lovely clean baby then maybe they are not for you!.

      I would definitely recommend these as a great first food for your little one as they are so versatile and portable, they can be a ready made food without needing heating up or preparing they are ready as quickly as you can get them out of the pack.

      When I used them with my other children they seemed to love them for ages I had wondered if they would get bored with them once they got the taste for more flavors but they didn't seem to.

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        31.07.2012 22:56
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        An occasional treat

        I started weaning my son at 5 months and besides mashing my own fruit and veg I wanted to find something else that I could give him. Many people mentioned rusks to me to use as a breakfast, and just to mash it with his milk. I thought this might be a good idea as he was getting bored of his weetabix and porridge.

        I found them easily on the shelves amongst all the other baby things. I bought the tall box with 9 rusks in which are foil wrapped I bought these for around £1.30 although you can also buy the wider box which contains 18 rusks for just over £2. There's a picture on the front of the rusk with a little teddy popping from behind it and it all looks very baby friendly!

        It was when I got them home that I realised that these contained quite a bit of sugar in them, I have to admit on first reading that it really put me off using them as I wanted my baby to grow up on healthy food. But I decided that every now and again wouldn't harm my baby and so decided to just try half a rusk mashed with his milk and see what he thought.

        The rusk soaks up the milk quickly and mashes easily and forms a sort of paste! I have to admit that when my baby tried these he loved them! I'm not too surprised as I tried a bit of one and have to say I was rather keen on the sweet taste of them too! I don't give them to him too often just every now and again when he is getting bored of his usual breakfast.

        As he got older I started using them as finger foods, as they are easy for your child to hold and for the fact that even without teeth your baby can gum them and they dissolve in the mouth so you don't have to be to worried about any chocking hazards.

        I have to admit I do like rusks, I think though they are definitely more of an occasional treat rather then a food staple as you can't justify giving your child something that high in sugar every day! And I have to admit as well I am rather partial to a rusk when there in the house!

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          23.09.2011 23:00
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          I'll stick to porridge, thanks

          I have just started to wean my little girl (just six months) after exclusive breast feeding from the get go.

          My health visitor, weaning nurse, and family all suggested that I purchase Heinz Farley's Rusks and mash them with milk as an introduction to solid food. So off I went to the supermarket to investigate.

          Now, after having nothing but breast milk for six months I wanted my baby to move onto healthy foods. I mash a lot of fruit and veg for her, and when we are out and about I give her Organix baby jars, which have no added salt, sugar, preservatives or junk. I am always careful to check the labels even on those, to be absolutely sure that I am protecting her little teeth (or tooth, should I say).

          I picked up the box of Heinz Farley's Rusks in Asda, they were on offer, a box of 9 for £1, they are usually around £1.29 or thereabouts. Each rusk is 17g in weight and they are packaged in a tall cardboard box with a foil package containing the rusks inside, for freshness.

          The box states you can introduce them from four months mashed with milk (though currently the World Health Organisation advise that milk alone should be given to a baby until the age of six months to protect their intestines and to protect agains allergies, especially to gluten, which these rusks contain), and from 9 months as a finger food.

          I was shocked then to find that this 'staple', this 'recommended' rusk, has 4.9g of sugar per 17g rusk! To put this in perspective, this is about a teaspoon of sugar, more sugar than there is in an adult digestive biscuit. I simply cannot justify giving this to my daughter. Sure she will love it - what child wouldn't love something so sweet - but I don't want to a) damage her teeth, or b) introduce sweet biscuits as a food source, this sends out the wrong signals. My daughter is six months old - she doesn't need sugar.

          So I am sorry I have to give Heinz Farley's Rusks one star out of five. I am aware that they do a reduced sugar version - I wish they did a sugar free version. I do want to introduce finger foods to my baby and would have loved to give her rusks but I will not be giving her something so unhealthy. I am not trying to be the perfect parent - my daughter will, in time, get treats, but I don't want to give her unnecessary sugars or have her bouncing off the walls. I now give her baby porridge (no added sugar, mixed with breastmilk) as an alternative to mashed rusk. This allows my daughter to sleep longer with a full tummy, feel contented, but not full of sugar.

          I've since checked Heinz' baby jars and found them to be full of sugar too, so to be honest I am not sticking to Organix and the occasional Boots Organics because when I give my daughter mashed fruit, or oats, or rice and milk, that's all I want to give her - there is no need to give a baby a teaspoon of sugar, and I can say without doubt that I will never be giving her a Heinz Farley's Rusk of any variety. This is the first time I have reviewed an item based on the fact I picked it up on the shelf, saw the contents and put it back down - but this is my review based on that, and I hope that it is OK. I have tasted them, they are, as expected, crumbly and sweet, just not for little teeth.

          The rusks might be OK for older children as a treat but I can't imagine toddlers really wanting rusks, as there are some great (and healthier) snacks out there for the 7, 9 and 12 month categories. These rusks are not for us, but each to their own.

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            10.08.2010 21:52
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            Ok for occasional use, but please don't feed your baby too much sugar

            Farleys rusks have been a brand that has been used with small babies for years. My mum used them with us when we were small, and both my sisters used them with my nephews, so i had no hesitation getting some to try when my first baby started weaning.

            They are now known as Heinz Farley as the two companies merged a couple of years ago. Farleys was a brand also recommended to me for baby milk, as it was at the time the only baby milk made in the UK.

            They are a bit like a spongy biscuit. They are very absorbant so you can mix them with a little bit of breast or formula milk and use it to spoon feed your baby when they are first learning to eat. Or, alternatively, you can give them to an older child as a finger food when they are learning to feed themselves.

            I personally have never given them to my babies as a weaning food, but both of my sisters did. This is because i believe that they are far too full of sugar, and when you then come to give your baby other foods you are not going to be able to get them to eat a good variety of foods from the start, and then lead to other problems as they grow. For this reason i have used baby rice and then added my own fruit and veg purees to this.

            As my babies got to about 8-9 months and were starting on finger foods, i did try them on the rusks as a finger food. They are quite good for this as they are soft but chunky. You can give them a whole rusk or break it up into smaller pieces for them. This makes it a lot better for portion control and makes it easier for a small child to handle.

            I liked the fact that you could just stick a few in the changing bag, and it meant you always had something with you for them to munch on, but i did not buy too many of them as i was quite worried about the sugar content, and i also disliked the way they would dissolve in the babies hand once they had been sucked and then the resultant mess would find its way onto my clothes. This happened with ordinary biscuits too, so i much preferred to give them a bit of toast or fruit loaf to suck on.

            I know there is a huge market for babies food that you can purchase, but personally, i think it is a convenience that it is not necessary to use. Babies can eat the same food as adults. They can eat normal biscuits like digestives and rich tea. Often, babies love these foods because they have more sugar than our products. The only thing i did watch was that i wasn't then given them a huge portion of a salty food instead.

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            11.07.2010 20:52
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            Rusks are evil

            Government guidelines now state that a baby should be exclusively fed breast milk (or formula) until they are 6 months old. Of course, these are guidelines and every baby is different, with some not being ready until they're 7 months and others ready before 6 months. There are signs to look out for such as demanding more feeds, waking at night (when previously sleeping through), chomping on hands and interest in watching you eat that can mean baby is ready for something other than milk. I always say, you know your baby best but if you think that he's ready for solids then speak to your Health Visitor before starting him on the journey to joining family mealtimes.

            ===First Tastes===

            Heinz themselves state that their rusks are an ideal first food for babies aged 4 months and over and this is a statement that I completely and utterly disagree with. As far as I'm concerned Heinz Farley Rusks are just about the worst thing you could give as a first food for a 4 month old baby. I certainly won't be giving this to 14 week old Freddy when he's ready for solids. Now before you ask how I can review these when I've no intention of using them, let me point out that I have four other children and I regret to say that I did give them rusks until I discovered how evil they are.

            I will agree that Farley's rusks are easily mixed with breast milk, formula or even water to make a smooth, glutinous paste that's as thick or runny as you like. I'll even agree that most babies love this mix and are very keen to eat it, mine always gulped it down. But there's a reason babies love them so much, and that's down to the enormous amount of sugar they contain. Each 17g rusk contains 4.9g of sugar, that's equivalent to over a teaspoon's worth of sugar, which means they are incredibly sweet. Considering the fact that guidelines state that we shouldn't add any sugar to baby's first foods, doesn't this seem a little excessive to you?

            The next point to consider is that the packet clearly states that these are suitable from 4 months and yet looking at the ingredients they contain wheat flour, which in turn contains gluten. The advise on gluten hasn't changed in the almost 19 years since I weaned my first child, and that is not to give it to children under 6 months as doing so could increase the risk of gluten intolerance in later life. Even with my older children, I never risked giving them rusks until they were 6 months or older.

            The final point to consider as far as rusks as a weaning food is who terribly messy they can be. When babies are learning to eat, a lot of the food dribbles out of their mouths, and with rusks this leakage has a tendency to get everywhere and stain (especially white bibs).

            ===Finger Food===

            Not only are these rusks advertised as a first weaning food, they are also promoted as a finger food for older babies. Oh my gosh, I still can't recommend them even for this. Let's get the good (if you can call them that) points over with, older babies and toddlers love the taste of these, in fact, to be honest I do too. They are sweet, crumbly, just melt in the mouth and are very, very moreish. They're also a very good size for toddlers to grab hold off, larger and thicker than 'normal' biscuits toddlers have no problems picking them up and transferring them to their mouths. They also pose little risk of choking as they dissolve so easily. They are also very low in salt, have no artificial colours, preservatives or flavourings, no GM foods but do have added vitamins.

            Right that's the good points out of the way with, back to the bad. Again the amount of sugar is extraordinarily unhealthy and all the supposed good additives of vitamins can be found in a normal healthy diet, which these do not promote. I wouldn't even give these as a treat, I can't help but wonder how much these rusks (and similar foods) contribute to overweight toddlers.

            ===Price And Availability===

            Heinz Farley's Original Rusks are available in two different size packets from most supermarkets (should you still wish to buy them). 9 rusks will set you back about £1.29 (14p/rusk) while 18 cost about £1.98 (11p/rusk). They are also available in a reduced sugar and banana varieties for about the same price, but these still contain 3.5g of sugar per rusk.

            ===Allergy Warning===

            These rusks contain wheat and therefore gluten and are unsuitable for those with a gluten intolerance or allergy and also not suitable for babies under 6 months. They also contain milk, but do not contain eggs or soya and are suitable for vegetarians.

            ===Recommendation===

            Although I was weaned on these rusks many, many moons ago and have used them with my older children, I cannot in all conscience recommend these to anybody. The fact that they contain so much sugar and gluten means that they are anything but the ideal first weaning food. They encourage a sweet tooth, and a much better choice is baby rice, which is bland and can then be added to vegetable purees. They aren't even a particularly good, or healthy, choice for a toddler, rice cakes are much healthier and just as easy for them to eat. Even a digestive biscuit has less sugar in it!!! Therefore, Heinz Farley Original Rusks get 1 star out 5 from me, and that's only because I can't give them minus 5.

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              25.06.2010 20:10

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              Everyone I know loves these for their kids and for themselves!

              Tasty baby biscuits that EVERYONE will enjoy. Can be used for weaning baby as you can mash them up with baby's usual milk and gradually increase the consistency for baby to get their little gums around lumps! Also a wonderful finger food - my 3 year old still enjoys these (as do I!). You can do all sorts with Farley's Rusks - add in some pureed fruit to jazz it up or some lavoured yogurt!

              I think the rusks are have a great texture and, being a mum who worries so much about choking, I find even if baby takes a big bite from these Rusks, they melt quickly and easily in babies mouth. Everyone I know thinks Rusks are brill and I always make sure I have a box handy as they keep my fellas busy for a while - I've even caught them picking up the crumbs when they are done lol. I also find myself gving the boys one of these after their dinner as a treat!

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              03.04.2010 16:40
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              A great biscuit

              I remember these from when me and my sister were little, we used to love them but I couldn't remember how they tasted, so when my neice became old enough to eat them (well gum them to death!) I had to try one, and I can now see why kids love them, they taste great!

              Rusks are just a simple biscuit made especially for children and toddlers, and can be given to babies from about 4 months old. I found this is a great thing to give to a teething child as it helps them to relieve some of the pain in their mouth whilst getting some nutrition. You can buy these in different size packs, usually for less than £3 a packet. They also come in different flavours nowadays, which is something we didn't get when I was a baby.

              They come in original flavour, reduced sugar and banana flavour. I think you can also get an orange flavour but I am not sure on that one. They also come in teddy shaped biscuits, which are indivdually wrapped, so you can take them out and about with you. Handy for when you go on day trips with your little ones.

              I have only tried the original flavour ones, as has my niece, so I am unsure what the other flavours taste like. You can buy these in most places as they are widely available. You can get them in places like Boots, Superdrug, Tesco, Morrissons, Asdas, Local Chemists and many other places. You can find them quite easily I believe.

              I recommend this to everyone who has kids as they really do seem to keep kids quiet and are yummy little biscuits too, heck try one for yourself, I am sure you will love it!

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                29.01.2010 22:43

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                Children and adults alike love these

                My children love farleys rusks and will quickly polish off the whole box. My four year old eats them alot and she definatly likes them more than the baby! I think they seem to grow on you with age. I started off using these as a first weaning food for both my girls and would mix a bit with some of their usual milk. It makes a perfect runny texture to enable your baby to get used to solids. You can then begin to add different foods such as mashed banana or apple to it. Once my children got a little older they would dip them in yoghurts or just eat them like a biscuit. They are the perfect size to take out and about as a snack and can be eaten any time. You can get them in a few different flavours now but my children seem to prefer the origional ones. You can also get them in handy little snacked size packets with four mini ones in. You can get box of 18 for under 2 pounds which is a bargin. Children love them and so it seems do many adults so give them a try.

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                28.01.2010 22:29
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                My lad loves them

                *Why, Where From & How Much*
                Other than being fed these as a child I had never eaten one of these and heard many a person tell me whilst I was pregnant in 2008 that I would love rusks.

                As soon as my little boy reached the magic weaning age of 4 months I bought a box of these rusks to try out and I can honestly say that I can not see the appeal, for adults anyway!

                A 150g box contains 9/10 rusks and a 300g box double that. The smaller box is often available is supermarkets for around £1.00 - £1.29. The alrger box will set you back £1.99 at Boots. Asda currently have their Baby & Toddler Event - running until 6th February wher you can pick up a 300g box for just £1.00.

                They are widely available in supermakets and chemists.

                *Nutritional Bits*
                Each rusk provides:
                70 calories
                1.2g protein
                13.5g carbs
                1.2g fat
                and loads of vitamins, minerals and irons.

                They are very low in salt, egg free, suitable for vegetarians and contain no artificial colours, preservatives or flavours.


                *My Experience*
                Well, Jakes actually!
                I am not keen on these and would rather have a more yummy chocolate biscuit than waste the calories on these.

                When Jake reached the age of 4 months I purchased some rusks to crush and add to milk. They are fairly easy to crush and dissolve well in slightly warmed milk. I would give this to Jake initially just on the mornings or 'breakfast' and gradually introduced many other foods in the form of purees until he was able to take bigger lumps / more textured food.

                Now at 15 months my son eats rusks almost daily, although would always toss them aside in favour of fruit (or chocolate!).

                They taste a bit bland in my opinion, only very slightly malty. They definitely look a bit better than they taste, though with that pale colour I am not surprised at their lack of oomph! They do last ages in Jake's little hand and go quite soggy and soft in his mouth.

                They are an ideal finger food when your child can feed themselves and encourage hand-eye- co-ordination (How a child could miss their small mouths with one of these is beyond me - they are huge!)

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                  24.01.2010 10:06
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                  yummy

                  ive always liked rusk for as long as i can remember and would even be tempted to buy them now for myself
                  however i have a young baby and when startng her on solids rusks was one of my first point of call. i bought her the normal ones to start with but now i would only buy gluten free.
                  when you5 baby is young you can mix with some of their milk until it goes to a smooth consistency and feed baby. make sure bowls and spoons are sterilsed. my baby absolutely loves rusks and i cant feed it her fast enough!!! when your baby gets a bit bigger and can hold food independantly you can give him/her a whole rusk to munch on!!
                  i wuldnt recommend giving baby all the time as i think they are quite fattening but i think its a great way to introduce your baby to the wonderful world of food!

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                    28.12.2009 16:04
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                    Tasty spherical creamy biscuits - Go on, you know you want to!

                    I'll start off with a confession - I don't have any children....yet. for that reason, I am not going to harp on about the goodness for kids. I do however, at times, have the sudden urge to taste some of these and be catapulted back to childhood. I have been to Asda today and saw a value box for the grand total of £1! Now, who can argue with that? I controlled myself and only purchased one, and I am proud that I managed this level of self control ;-).

                    The packaging is pretty simple - a box, within which there are 2 foil wrapped tube shaped bags of goodness. There's a picture of a cute brown teddy bear (which has been part and parcel of the logo since day dot) that's been chomping its way through a rusk on the front of the box. The speech bubble states 'finger food on the go', which to an extent, i agree with. I must admit that I couldn't eat a few without the aid of milk. On the back this is depicted with what appears to be the same cute teddy pushing a bottle of milk with the remark 'mash with milk'.

                    Originally manufactured by Farley's in the 1880's they were taken over by Heinz in 1994 in a 94million deal, and have amassed a cult following, not just babies, but also students.

                    A well known fact amongst the bodybuilding fraternity is that Farley's Rusks are packed with vitamins and minerals that would stimulate growth. The rationale behind it is that it will aid muscle growth during their bulking phase and give them much needed calories that they require. This is in the same way that a child needs calories for growth.

                    To look at, a Rusk is a creamy, vanilla colour and has a slightly rough texture to it. It looks a little like a mountain side that's been eroding for years, and like wine, you know you're going to experience an amazing taste explosion in your mouth.

                    In 2009 the Children's Food Campaign called into question the nutritional value of rusks, considering their 29% sugar levels. An article in The Independent in May stated 'More sugar in rusks than a chocolate digestive'. I guess it's about moderation and with the addition of sugar free rusks, you can still give your child this delicious treat without this concern.

                    I enjoy boiling some milk and then dunking a couple of these bad boys in and seeing them sink to the bottom. Once I have left this concoction for a minute or so, I mix with a spoon to make it into a sort of paste. At times I have to add a little more milk, just to get the consistency right, then it's just a case of GOOD TIMES :-)!

                    ~~Nutritional information~~
                    (per rusk 17g)
                    Energy 294kj/70kcal
                    Protein 1.2g
                    Carbohydrates 13.5g
                    (of which sugars) (4.9g)
                    Fat 1.2g
                    (of which saturates) (0.5g)
                    Fibre 0.4g
                    Sodium Trace
                    Vitamin A 19% RDA
                    Vitamin D 17% RDA
                    Thiamin 18% RDA
                    Riboflavin 18% RDA
                    Niacin 17% RDA
                    Calcium 17% RDA
                    Iron 20% RDA
                    (RDA = recommended daily allowance)

                    ~~Ingredients~~
                    Wheat flour, sugar, vegetable oil, raising agents (ammonium carbonates), calcium carbonate, emulsifier (monoglycerides) niacin, iron, thiamin, riboflavin, vitamin A and vitamin D.

                    ~~Dietary information~~
                    - No artificial colours, preservatives or flavours
                    - Very low salt
                    - Suitable for vegetarians
                    - Egg free
                    - No GM ingredients

                    Contains:Gluten, Wheat, No added milk ingredients, but made in a bakery which uses milk.

                    In terms of storage the inner foil bag that contains these melt in the mouth biscuits should be twisted to make sure no air gets in. In general they should then be stored in a cool, dry place which is odourless. Kept in these conditions and you should be able to keep them for 2 years.

                    As the only ones on offer were the Original ones, I opted for these. You, however, have the choice of reduced sugar versions, of which there is a banana version and a gluten free one, to give you a little variety.

                    Although made for children, like I said, I do not feel in a position to preach about the goodness for kids. I can however tell you that they hit the spot for me and I will no doubt soon start regretting not having stocked up! ;-)

                    Thank you for reading!

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                      17.12.2009 19:41
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                      Healthy and packed with goodness!

                      The other reviews on Dooyoo fill me with considerable relief, that I am not the only one without children that absolutely loves Farley's Rusks! I was given these as a child, yet was bemused one day as I found my dad eating them despite the fact that all of his children are now adults! It made me realise that it's acceptable to buy these for yourself, although I had trouble convincing my girlfriend of that!

                      The box contains 18 cookie-like biscuits that can be generally consumed one of two ways - a) eaten simply as dry biscuits in a bowl, or the more popular method of b) drowning them in milk in a bowl, or dipping them in a cup of milk. I prefer pouring milk over them, as it VERY QUICKLY makes them turn to a lovely sludgy mush, that, while looking not so appetising, tastes lovely, and what's more, is quite healthy too!

                      I tend to eat three rusks per serving, but thankfully this is pretty low in fat and calories, amounting to a mere 3.6g of fat, 1.5g of saturated fat, and 210 calories, with a dash more for the milk too. It means you can have multiple servings in a day and not feel guilty, for nutritionally it is tantamount to a bowl of cereal. It is also packed with added vitamins, and boasts that it has no artificial preservatives.

                      These Rusks have a playful design and gooey consistency that will serve well for kids, but they also taste lovely and have apparently proven quite popular with adults too. They tend to run for about £1.90 a box for 18 biscuits, which isn't too bad given how my parents used to tell me that they were too expensive to buy often!

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                      03.12.2009 13:42
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                      Great tasting snack for adults, not just children.

                      I am 36 years old and have no children, but I still love to buy and eat (Heinz) Farley's Rusks Original. On many occasion I have approached the counter at food shops with a box of Farley's Rusks and quite frequently I have been asked questions by the shopkeeper like 'how old are your children?' or 'how many children do you have?', etc. I respond with 'I do not have any children and the rusks are for me!'. I think it is ok for adults to eat Farley's rusks and I love the flavour they give and they are pretty good for you and of course young children.

                      Mind you, I did enjoy eating rusks when I was a young child and it is a habit that I haven't given up. I still enjoy mixing the rusk with milk, so that it turns into a smooth consistency, which I enjoy, as it seems to bring the lovely malty flavour out even more. I also like to eat my rusk out of the packet and I could quite easily get through one box of Farley's Rusks in one sitting.

                      I would guess there are many adults out there who still enjoy eating Farley's Rusk, but I don't think I have met any. Maybe Heinz should create an adult brand, but I wouldn't want the recipe to be changed, as that is the reason I enjoy them.

                      So, I would think that rusks are good for everybody, whether a young child, teenager or adult and they contain healthy ingredients which carry healthy vitamins and minerals (see below).

                      Nutritional information (per rusk):

                      Energy 291kj/69kcal
                      Protein 1.2g
                      Carbohydrates 13.2g
                      (of which sugars) (4.9g)
                      Fat 1.2g
                      (of which saturates) (0.5g)
                      Fibre 0.4g
                      Sodium Trace

                      Vitamin D 17% RDA
                      Thiamin 18% RDA
                      Riboflavin 18% RDA
                      Niacin 17% RDA
                      Calcium 15% RDA
                      Iron 20% RDA
                      (RDA = recommended daily allowance)

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                      03.12.2009 12:36
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                      A very good product for babies weaning

                      Heinz Farley's Rusks original have been around for a very long time!, They are dry circular twice-baked bread, biscuit type snack which are aimed towards babies, however the packet now states - All ages, therefore they are for everyone.

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                      The Container:

                      The rusks come in a brown box (The packaging must have changed since the picture on here.)

                      It has the Heinz logo on the front with Farley's rusks original written below.

                      There is a picture of a rusk and a cartoon character teddy bear holding a bottle of milk. He has a speech bubble coming from his head which says mash with milk.

                      On one side there is advice for usage and on the other side is all of the nutritional information and ingredients.

                      Inside the box itself are the rusks are stacked up tall and are in an easy to open silver foil sealed wrapper.


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                      Rusks are an ideal weaning food for babies, as they turn into a soft paste when mixed with warm milk or water. They can also be added to thicken up vegetable or fruit purees.

                      My 5 month old baby loves these at lunch time mashed up with warm milk, he is able to take it off the spoon really well and smacks his chops for more.

                      Rusks are also ideal as a first finger food as they dissolve in the baby's mouth, they are also ideal as little snacks when out and about.
                      Rusks contain Iron and Calcium, they contain added vitamins A and D and contain no artificial colours, preservative or flavours.

                      Each Rusk contains 20% of baby's iron requirement for a day.
                      They contain gluten and wheat.

                      The only problem I have is that they don't last five minutes in my house, although I'm not a fan of the taste myself, my 5 year old daughter and my husband, love them. I have to keep telling them off for eating them all!

                      The only other problem I find with this is that they make a right old soggy mess! It is easily cleaned up though with a couple of baby wipes.

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                      Ingredients:

                      Wheat Flour, Sugar, Vegetable Oil, Raising Agents (Ammonium Carbonates), Calcium Carbonate, Emulsifier (Monoglycerides), Niacin, Iron, Thiamin, Riboflavin, Vitamin A, Vitamin D

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                      Nutritional Information:

                      Taken from Heinz website.

                      Energy (kcal) 411 70
                      Protein 7g 1.2g
                      Carboydrate 79.5g 13.5g
                      (of which, sugars) 29.0g 4.9g
                      Fat 7.2g 1.2g
                      (of which, saturates)3.1g 0.5g
                      Fibre 2.1g 0.4g
                      Sodium 0.01g 0.002g
                      Vitamin A 450ug 113 77ug 19
                      Vitamin D 10ug 100 1.7ug 17
                      Thiamin 0.53mg 106 0.09mg 18
                      Riboflavin 0.82mg 103 0.14mg 17
                      Niacin 8.8mg 98 1.5mg 17
                      Calcium 390mg 98 66mg 17
                      Iron 7.0mg 117 1.2mg 20


                      Cost:
                      I paid £1.97 for a pack of 18 from Asda, I would consider these quite expensive

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                        03.09.2009 19:16
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                        Perfect food for babies (and adults)

                        Having three children 5 and under Farley's Rusks have been a regular item on my shopping list for many years. They are a perfect first food to give your baby, but even as my boys get older they still seem to be eating them and I know many adults like them too. They are a food for all ages.

                        Farley's rusks are a great way to introduce your baby to solid food, they contain seven vitamins and minerals, and it says one rusk will provide 205 of your baby's daily iron requirements. Not only are they good for you but they taste really nice.

                        They are suitable from four to six months and at first you need to crush the rusk and mix it with your babies formula milk. This will make it soft and easy to feed to baby.

                        When your baby gets to the stage where they are eating finger foods the baby will then be able to eat it without milk, feeding itself and biting the rusk. It will dissolve in the mouth so again a perfect first food to help baby learn to feed.
                        Once the baby masters this they can be eaten as a snack at any time, much healthier than your average biscuit.

                        All my boys love rusks and my three year old has them for breakfast, I just cannot get him to eat breakfast cereal so I suppose if he's eating rusks at least he's still getting a nutrious start.

                        You can buy rusks in two pack sizes. The smaller pack contains nine rusks and costs about £1.29 and the larger pack contains eighteen rusks and is about £1.89. Most shops only sell the single pack which I avoid buying because it is not good value for money as you can see in the price difference. At the moment I am buying them from morrisons. I think the price is the only down side as when you're eating them all the time it can work out expensive, I've probably spent a fortune on rusks over the years.

                        I have never seen an alternative brand to Farley's Rusks but I don't think I would change as all of the family really enjoy them.
                        My husband and dad both still eat them........they really are a food for everyone!

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                    • Product Details

                      18 original rusks. Biscuits for babies and toddlers.