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Aero Chamber Plus Device Infant Mask

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      24.03.2013 15:25
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      necessity for us

      My son has recently been suffering with an everlasting cough and very rattled breathing. This had lasted for over 6 weeks and his breathing was really worrying me. The doctor prescribed him a Ventolin inhaler to help clear his airways. This is the type of inhaler used by asthmatics but is also suitable for the short term treatment of lingering coughs and breathing issues like my son has. My son has just turned two so would not be receptive to giving him the inhaler in his mouth so the doctor also prescribed this aero chamber to help me administer this to him.

      The chamber is designed specifically for young infants like my son. It is a plastic tube which, at one end has a yellow rubber seal to insert the inhaler into and at the other end a clear rubber mask to fit over the mouth and nose. On the side of ours, there is a picture of a teddy bear being given the chamber and inhaler. It is quite a big contraption and I was extremely nervous as to how my son would respond to this.

      Before first use, you need to wash the chamber. You do this with warm water, removing the rubber seal but not the mask. Once completely dry, you can reattach. The Ventolin inhaler fits neatly into the seal and then this can be compressed once the mask is over your child's face. After introducing this to my son, he was still very cautious of it and I did find it a struggle to use when he was resisting it. The chamber and mask is quite bulky that I really needed more hands than I had to administer this - one (at least!) to steady my son, one for the mask and one to compress the inhaler. Obviously, with a more willing patient, this would not be quite so difficult.

      The mask is a nice fit over my son's face and the rubber is really soft that, even with his resistance, it cannot hurt him. It masks his mouth and nose neatly and, with a little pressure, I am confident that it is airtight. The rest of the chamber is sturdy and well made too - it certainly stands up well to any dropping we have done!

      Overall, this is pretty much a necessity for giving a young child an inhaler and does do that job well. It is a little bulky but once you get used to it, you really appreciate the job this does.

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      22.02.2013 15:04
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      A good spacer even if I've grown sick of the sight of it!

      I first had to use an AeroChamber spacer when Tyler was around 4-5 months and had his first case of Brochiolitis- it's typical in babies under 1 during cold/damp weather- we'd just entered Winter. Brochiolitis has similar symptoms to asthma- wheezing, coughing etc. I became concerned when he was struggling to take his milk feeds and even vomitting up some of them. He was given a nebuliser at hospital and then i was given a spacer and inhaler to take home to use until symptoms cleared up. He had bronchiolitis 2 or 3 times more that Winter- one ending up in a week long hospital stay (very scary, hooked up to a drip and given an oxygen mask!). Since then we had no problems and were advised if wheezing started again just to use spacer again. I haven't been on Dooyoo this last week though- this is because Tyler became wheezy again and was coughing so much he was crying- we had 2 nights sleeping on the sofa or he would sob all night! A doctors trip confirmed Tyler developed an upper respiratory infection so I'm having to use the spacer again. Now having fresh in my memory the usuage experience I thought it'd be time to write a review!

      There are two sizes of this mask- I believe we got the second size when Tyler was 6 months. Our smaller stage masks always had orange ends whereas our larger always had yellow ends, I'm not sure if this the is the regular colour code or just coincidence!

      The chamber is a tube with coloured ends and a rubbery mask which goes over the mouth and nose. The tube itself has a picture of a teddy on it along with product name, manufacturer, address etc. There is also a 3 step instruction picture using the teddy- showing you to shake the inhaler, put it to the patients mouth, the third picture shows a happy teddy. I assume the use of the teddy is to give a child-friendly impression!

      The spacer comes with a leaflet containing usage and washing instructions. You are advised to wash the spacer before use and then once per week.

      Using it is fairly easy, you shake the inhaler, insert it into the spacer and then place it over the childs mouth & nose. It is important to make sure a seal is formed. You then push down the inhaler- you will be instructed on number of puffs and how long to leave mask on by your doctor.
      Now it may be useful when first using this to have another adult with you. Occasionally when giving the inhaler to tyler (more so as he got older) I needed to keep a handon his face to stop him from shaking it around and one holding the inhaler why my partner grabbed his arms! He didn't find the experiene a pleasure and would fight it. If you are new to using this and find your child reacts in this way don't panic. Everytime we've had to go back to these Tyler reacts the same way but within a day or two of using this reguarly the tears stop as he knows what to expect and it is over quickly. I count to ten while I hold the spacer over his mouth and then it's over. It may be useful to your child if you count the seconds you need to hold it also.

      I don't know if you can purchase these yourself but you shouldn't need to, a doctor will prescribe these and order replacements if necessary.

      These work a lot better for us than the regular spacer that children have to suck on. I can say this with confidence because the first night of his wheezing before the doctors trip we had misplaced his Aero Chamber spacer. We had a big plastic one with a tube the child sucks on so we attempted that just to help him breathe more easy. He kept trying to push it out with his tongue and it was very hard and distressing to get him to take it!
      AeroChamber is definitly a good spacer and from experience I know it works!

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        19.02.2013 16:17
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        Ideal for toddlers who need to take inhalors

        The week before my little girl went in for her grommet insertion and adenoid removal, she developed a bit of a chesty wheeze. Worried that she wouldn't be allowed to have her operation if she had a chest infection I took her to the doctor who checked her chest and advised that it was clear, but that she would give me an inhalor to use until my daughter had her adenoids removed.

        She gave us the inhalor and a Aero Chamber Plus Device Infant Mask. I'd never seen one before but basically it's a long rubber ended chamber which you slot the end of the inhalor into. The other end is a face mask made for a toddler / small child's face. The tube is clear, and has little brown teddies on it which my daughter loves. The rubber ends are a bright orange, and the face mask is opaque. Overall it looks a bit odd but it serves a purpose and they've tried their best to make it look friendly.

        So, after a few 'sample goes' of myself and my husband exaggeratedly breathing in when the mask was fitted my daughter got the hang of it. One puff of the inhalor fills the tube and then my daughter can then breathe it in through the mask. It's a really effective way of giving an inhalor to a small child who can't take one in the usual way and after a few uses she was used to it and then using it to (pretend) give inhalors to all her dollies and stuffed animals!

        Her operation was a week ago now and she no longer has to use the Aero Chamber Plus Device Infant Mask but it was great for the time we had it and I can only recommend it - we got ours on prescription so I don't know how much they would cost to buy, but if you child needs one I am sure your GP would give one on prescription to you. I highly recommend it - without the Aero Chamber Plus Device Infant Mask we really would have struggled to give her the inhalor and had her chest not been free of wheeze she probably wouldn't have been allowed to go under the anaesthetic, so for us it was a lifesaver.

        Simple design, tailored to children, five stars out of five.

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        17.02.2013 22:17
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        A great aid to getting young children to take inhalers

        Recently my son had a respiratory infection and alongside antibiotics my GP prescribed for our 10 month old an inhaler to use to help open his airwaves to make it easier for him to breathe as his chest sounded tight. The inhaler was Ventolin that is used to treat asthma but he informed me that this was the correct medicine to help open my son's airways during his infection and that this was only a short term use. Alongside this inhaler he prescribed the Aero chamber plus device. When I collected this for the pharmacy the pharmacist showed me how to use this with my son and gave some tips on technique to get him to use it.

        The chamber is a sealed device that has at one end a soft orange section that the Ventolin inhaler tube slots into. At the other end there is a clear plastic mask that has a valve on it allows the exhaled air out of. The tube itself is made of clear plastic with a picture of a teddy bear on it and teddy bears lungs. I think this is to try to make it appeal to young children but the teddy bear pictures have no interest to my son at 10 months at all and certainly don't make him happier to use the chamber. How much the actual pictures will help older children take to the chamber I am unsure. The chamber itself is made from tough clear plastic and this has coped well with being knock and dropped by my 10 month old with no cracks in it during the couple of weeks of use.

        To use the chamber is very simple you insert the inhaler at the orange end where there is a gap you then hold the mask over your child's mouth and nose and press the inhaler and allow them to breath the medicated air for a minute and if you then have to do two inhalers you repeat the process. Now when I say it is simple to use it is but the real tricky bit is when you put a child into the equation. Now my 10 month old son when faced with this was not the happiest child or the keenest to use it. The pharmacist had recommended letting him have a play with it to get him use to it. We did try this with it but really in the week or so that we were using this even though he had played with it he never was really happy using the chamber and it often resulted in him being upset using it.

        The small mask fit nicely over both his nose and mouth and it was easy to get a nice seal with it initially but then as I depressed the inhaler it would come away slightly from the face. But I had been assured by the pharmacist that the value allowed the medicine to be locked inside till it was breathed so I was reassured as I quickly got it back into place that none of the dosage was lost. It was this holding it in place that caused most of the frustration for my son as he just wanted to pull it away from his face to hold it and play with it. We had to experiment with different positions to see what would enable him to get to take the medicine. We personally found that to lay him back in our arms with one hand tucked under my arm being the best. Once in this position he would allow me to a degree to hold the mask over his face. He liked to try to reach for the inhaler itself and this reaching would generally enable the first minute to pass without too much fuss then we would have a bit more difficulty with the second dose.

        The other option we tried on the recommendation of the pharmacist was to give him the inhaler whilst asleep. We did this with only a modicum of success as he wriggled away from it even in his sleep.

        The value that is on the mask section works well and in a lot of ways hearing this going in and out I found to be reassuring that I had both a good seal as it didn't sound if there wasn't a seal. Also by hearing the value going in and out I knew he must be breathing rather than holding his breath during the time the mask was on so the medicine was going in.

        Whilst I can't whole hearty recommend this device for getting your child to take an inhaler it certainly was easier to do this with my 10 month old than get him to take the inhaler properly. Also this device I found to be more user friendly than the spacer devices I have seen previously during my nurse training and tried to get children to use. So 5 stars from me for it did help my son to take his medicine and it did help him with his breathing. As we got this free with his prescription I can't really comment on value for money but it can be bought for around £13 from chemist direct and compared to the bulkier spacer devices this sleek chamber is much better. This is due to its compact design and it is much sturdier and portable if using long term with asthma.

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          21.06.2012 00:03
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          An indispensable item when your young child is prescribed an inhaler

          My fifteen year old daughter was diagnosed with asthma at a very young age and relied on Ventolin inhalers administered through a spacer device for years, until one day she just 'outgrew' her asthma and I didn't see one of these huge and very clinical balloon style spacers again until last year when Hollie caught a nasty cold which lingered as a chest infection. Only I *didn't* see the ugly spacer, as Hollie's prescription was filled with a much more child-friendly Aerochamber Plus device.

          The idea of any kind of spacer is to allow someone who needs Ventolin to get a measured dose, this is the paediatric version but they are beneficial to some adults as they help you to breathe the medication in naturally which is better (and easier) than using the inhaler in the usual 'puff' manner in shortness of breath circumstances. My mum is 60-odd and regularly uses her adult sized spacer to help ease her asthma; she is a chronic sufferer so has a rubber mask attached to hers, but they are generally available with a simple mouthpiece.

          The Aerochamber Plus in particular is tube shaped, patently designed with children in mind it's brightly coloured with yellow trim and teddy bears printed on the clear tube. At the moment my seventeen month old son has a chest infection and to be honest the design is lost on him, but (then) three year old Hollie did appreciate it and it helped encourage her to use her inhaler on the regular basis that I'd been advised. The mask is attached to the spacer, which makes sense as it's designed to be used with very small children so a mouthpiece would be pretty much useless. It covers the nose and mouth, forming a good seal while having a soft and pleasant feel to make the process (ordeal?) of administering an inhaler to a toddler easier for mum and little one.

          David hates the mask, really hates it. Mostly I'll do it while he's sleeping but on occasion have judged my timings wrong and had to use it while he's awake - then it takes both me and Mark to keep him immobile enough that I can keep the mask in the correct position! This isn't the fault of the Aerochamber though, they seem to have done everything possible to make it comfortable for the little one - although older, Hollie seemed to tolerate the mask much better so I'd say this is definitely something that will get easier as your babe grows.

          The hole that has been punched out of the end of the spacer is perfect for sliding a standard size inhaler in, it's a good tight fit so none of the medication is lost or wasted. The Aerochamber works through valves and needs to be shaken before use, before pressing the inhaler and holding the mask in position for a few breaths. It's very simple, the only thing you need to watch out for is ensuring the inhaler itself is inserted correctly into the spacer as it's such a snug fit that it'll sometimes stick slightly - this is something you'll get the knack for though and it'll quickly become second nature to get it right first time.

          One thing I really like about the Aerochamber Plus is the instruction sheet, it's just brilliantly done for a product like this. One side tells you how to use the device and the other has instructions on how to wash it, the clever thing is that each step is not only given in text but also has a small illustration of a teddy bear carrying out that particular step. This is great; having a rubber mask pushed onto your face while you're feeling breathless and poorly must be so horrible when you're a very young child, being able to show Hollie these sweet pictures reassured her and helped turn inhaler time into a kind of story to take her mind off it a little.

          Incidentally, cleaning the device is simple enough but do read the instructions as it's a bit more complicated than just washing it. It needs to be thoroughly air dried and you also have to allow for soaking time, it's best to clean it immediately after use to ensure it's thoroughly dry for when you need it again. It's important to keep your Aerochamber Plus clean inside and out, I store David's in a make up bag to keep it free from dust but when his current course of Ventolin has finished will dispose of it as if my son is having difficulty breathing he'd be at the doctors rather than me trying to medicate him myself with an existing spacer and inhaler.

          If purchased this spacer will cost around £12, although if your doctor is prescribing an inhaler for a very young child then they should automatically offer to add one to your prescription - if not ask for one, as to expect a baby to use an inhaler without a spacer makes it a pointless exercise. The Aerochamber Plus is not to be shared for hygiene and (presumably) cross-contamination reasons, another reason why I don't store it for 'next time' although providing you clean it thoroughly you'd obviously be fine to keep it if your little one has a more long term illness.

          This spacer is, quite literally, a must have if your child is in the unfortunate position of having minor breathing problems. You simply couldn't administer a baby or toddler's inhaler without it, it's brilliantly designed and makes life with a poorly infant a little more bearable all round!

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            28.08.2010 12:45
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            Device that aids parents in giving medicine to young children.

            When my daughter was just 9 months old she developed a harsh cough that just seemed to get worse. I took her to the doctor who recommended I gave her an inhaler to alleviate the severity of the cough. I was a bit taken aback as the first thing that came to my mind when I heard an inhaler was that she had asthma. I had never had a history of this in my family thankfully. The doctor reassured me that it had no connection to asthma. It was just used for young children.

            I brought the prescription to my sister who is also a pharmacist and she told me I would need this Aero Chamber Plus Device Infant Mask in order to administer the inhaler properly. She said it was a bit pricey at 30 euro but I knew it was essential. The inhaler itself only cost me about 10 euro. You don't need to get a prescription for this device but you would to get the inhaler.

            The box that it was packaged in was very clinical looking. Plain white with a red and blue line through it. It is about 30cm long and the inhaler is inserted into the end while the other end that has a face mask is placed over the babies face. It is made of plastic and the face mask is made of rubber and small enough for a childs mouth and nose to fit. Firstly you press the inhaler away from the child and then you place the mask directly on their face as soon as possible. You have to make sure they take 5 deep breaths and then you have to repeat until necessary. I had to give my daughter two puffs, so this meant she took ten deep breaths before we were done. It is to be given every morning and night. My daughter had an immediate improvement in her health.

            It worked exceptionally well but my daughter hated it and i found it hard at to keep the mask on her face as she struggled to take it off. Eventually she came around when I pretended to use it on myself first and she thought it was a game.

            It is necessary even if your child is crying because in the end its for their own good. It can be used for years which makes it an excellent investment. It comes with a travel bag and I have it stored in a press in my kitchen. At first I thought I would never get use out of it but Im glad that whenever my daughter has a cough I can take this and give it to her.

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            18.08.2010 22:51
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            Helps breathing

            Working in a day nursery I come across a variety of childhood illnesses and asthma and chest infections seem to be on the rise. At work we call this a spacer and we use it for various children who have ventolin inhalers which is the blue inhaler with the pump top. They all have there own don't worry not using same one with all children! Ventolin is the main asthma medication the children in my care have it as a preventor if they are cheasty then we give it to them in their diagnosed dose to relax their muscles in their airways helping them breathe more easily.

            Now the problem with Ventalin inhalers on their own is that some children are not inhaling the right dose and so it is has little or no effect the problem them is do you give more and risk overdosing because you don't know how much has been inhaled or not give enough and find the have an attack. Being in a nursery we cannot afford to take these risks either way so thats where the spacers comes in.

            The sparcer is made of a tube with one end to insert the inhaler and one end which is mask shaped which fits over the childs nose and mouth. You pump the ventalin into the spacer and then the child breathes it in through the mask meaning you can be more sure they are getting the correct dose.

            I really recommend these spacers or aero chamber as its called here and we recommend every parent who is struggling to take their inhaler ask their gp for one some of the children in my care have been automatically issued with one with their inhaler but others have not even been made aware of them. Then can be purchased online for around £14 but ask your doctor first before using as I am not a medical professional but have seen how effective they are.

            5 stars

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              14.08.2010 21:18
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              An item which is really needed

              ==Aero Chamber Children's Mask==

              When Jack first started going to Crèche, he was forever picking up all sorts of coughs and colds and seemed to be poorly for more time that he did appear healthy. However I guess this has built up his immune system because (touch wood) he hasn't bee poorly with anything for a good while now.

              On particularly nasty bought of cold has left him with a rather nasty cough which didn't seem to be clearing after a good couple of weeks so I thought it best we went in and saw his doctor. It was a good job I did as it turned out that he had a little chest infection and was not only given liquid antibiotics (that yummy banana flavour I remember having a a child) but also a little asthma inhaler of the steroid variety. Of course him only being a little over 2 years old at the time the doctor also gave us a prescription for the aero chamber which will aid in administering the inhaler.

              Being under 16, jack doesn't have to pay for NHS prescriptions so we were able to get the three prescriptions for free but to buy the aero chamber on its own from various places, you would expect to pay around the £14 region.

              The aero chamber we received came sealed within a little plastic bag and needed only a little bit of putting together before we were able to use it. The design of the product is meant to appeal to both genders of children as the clear plastic tube is dotted with little brown teddy bears and the ends of the tube are a nice bright orange colour. The translucent rubber face mask is the only bit that needed fitting on to the tube but this was easily done by literally pushing it on until the rubber mask is sealed tightly to the plastic tube.

              The idea of the device is a pretty simple one but it does actually work. The outflow of the inhaler is squeezed into the hole at one end of the aero chamber and given a good shake before the other end of the chamber, the end with the rubber mask, is offered up to your child's face. The mask covers both the nose and the mouth and enables the child to breath in and out normally whilst you are free to spray the puffs of inhaler into the aero chamber and they are then inhaling only the medication.

              This sounds easy and a quick procedure but to a toddler this device still probably looks rather menacing even with the teddy bears! Jack wasn't in the least bit helpful when trying to get this mask on to him and it seemed that no amount of explaining what it was for (basically), coaxing him into it with a bit of reverse psychology or even bribery seemed to work very much. We had a few times where we did it when he was asleep and we could hear him wheezing and this was the easiest times we found but the others were a bit of a struggle.

              However the device itself does indeed work far better than if we were just tuck with a regular adult inhaler as holding you lips tight around this and then holding in the puffs would have been impossible.

              Jack's cough seemed to clear up within the week after having the course of antibiotics and using the inhaler with this aero chamber when needed. We have of course still got the aero chamber and if needed again we shan't bother getting another prescription for a new one as this is still in great order.

              For the fact that it aided us very well in administering the inhaler to Jack and I am sure it helps little children even day who have regular asthma I can only award the top score of 5 stars out of 5 and give it a very high recommendation!

              Many thanks for taking the time to read.

              I do hope that this has been of some help/interest to you.

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                19.07.2010 08:42
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                IS VERY EFFECTIVE BUT CAN CAUSE LOTS OF TEARS.

                My son suffers from asthma. He can go for long periods of time without needing an inhaler. But as soon as there is a change in the weather, his chest will become wheezy and he develops a really chesty cough. It is during these periods of time, he needs to take ventolin medication via a pump. It is an extremely effective medication and one which he will continue to need for the forseeable future.

                When my son first presented with these symptoms as a baby, the doctor prescribed him this medication, he also prescribed a aero chamber device. This device enables a more effective dose of the inhaler to be breathed into the lungs.

                This aero chamber which is more commonly known as a spacer, looks rather an odd item of equipment when first seen. It is a long plastic cylinder with two yellow plastic pieces attached to each end. The one yellow attachment has an area cut out in order for the inhaler to fit neatly into this space. On the other side of the cylinder is the other yellow plastic piece and this has a cloudy plastic mask attached. This mask is suitable in size for children and fits neatly over the nose and mouth area.

                The general idea when concerning the use of this spacer is that the mask is placed over the nose and mouth and then the inhaler is pumped into the other end. This is very helpful in ensuring that a child has the write amount of medication breathed into the lungs.

                Although there are cute designs of teddies printed onto the cylinder area of the mask. It doesnt take away the fact that this aero chamber is a really imposing and scary product. It is quite large in size and I can seriously understand why a child would feel threatened by this rather bizarre looking product.

                Whilst in theory, this aero chamber is easy to use. It does take alot of practice on the carers part, in order to develop the correct administering method. There is a very comprehensive information leaflet included in the packaging of this aero chamber. It gives very detailed instructions on how to fit the chamber together, how to keep the chamber clean and how to use the chamber effectivley. I found these instructions to be of great value to me. It gave me reassurance and confidence in the administering procedure.

                I have mixed feelings regarding the actula aero chamber. I do think it is a fantastic idea and does do the job effectively. However I think that this mask can be very harrowing for a small child. I have found that as the years have gone by, my son is now used to the mask and not phased by it at all. But this has not always been the case and when he was very little it would be quite a dreadful and upsetting experience for all of us. I found that sometimes he was so traumatised by the mask on his face that he would be hysterical. Obviously this did nothing to help his chest condition.

                Another problem with this aero chamber is that many baby's and children wriggle and hit out so the mask may become free and the medication gets wasted. This can lead to alot of stress for the parent and the child. I found that me and my husband would end up having rows because we were both stressed out by the whole situation.

                I should point out that I am a qualified nurse. Although I didnt specialise in children's nursing. But the point I am trying to make, is that when the patient is your child the situation becomes totally different and suprisingly, equally as unnerving as a parent who has no medical experience.

                The cost of these Aero chambers are very expensive indeed. Although they are on prescription, some gp's are reluctant to supply you with more than one and so they have to be well looked after. I also found when my son started school, that he needed to have an inhaler and pump on the school premesis. This proved to be a problem as I had to try and get another spacer for home use which didnt really bode well with the gp.

                I do value the aero chamber in high regard. It has certainly been of great assistance in the treatment of my son. He is now able to administer the inhaler via the spacer himself. Which gives him a sense of control and independence over his condition.

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                  20.01.2010 22:55

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                  It needs to be used but isnt a nice experience

                  I was first introduced to the aero chamber device ( which we call a spacer ) when my daughter was ill with bronchitus at a few months old. It is a pretty simple tool to use. You just insert the inhaler into one end and the other end goes over your baby or childs mouth and nose. You can then use the inhaler correctly on your child. When we first started using it we didn't really have any problems with it but now my daughter is older, 16 months, she absolutly hates using it. The mask part is very restrictive and is obviously scary for a small child who doesn't understand what is going on. My daughter now has to physically be pinned down by somebody to enable me to give her the inhaler and even then its a struggle. She becomes histerical whenever she catches sight of it and will throw it away. Even the pictures of teddy bears on the sides do not trick her into thinking that it is something fun. Obviously it needs to be used as there is no other product available to help your child use their inhaler but be warned its not a nice experience for you or your child

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                  29.06.2009 23:51
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                  Great idea if your little darling will comply!

                  The aerochamber plus is a device for infant and children that arent able to use an inhaler unaided.

                  It is basically a tube with a hole one end to fit the end of the inhaler and a mask type piece at the other end to hold over childs nose and mouth.

                  By depressing the inhaler into the chamber the child is able to breathe in the medication at a slower pace without the initial shock of depressing straight towards the throat.

                  Instructions for use:

                  Check that there is nothing inside the Aerochamber plus.
                  Insert mouthpiece of inhaler into inhaler port at the back of the device.
                  Holding firmly shake briskly.
                  Check that the inhaler mouthpiece is pointing straight towards the mask.
                  Apply mask gently over nose and mouth ensuring a good seal.
                  Depress inhaler at the beginning of an inhalation.
                  Hold mask for 5-6 breathes and repeat as precribed.

                  The aerochamber Plus is available with different size masks so appropriate one should be chosen. My 3 year old uses the child one but there is a smaller one available.

                  In all honesty although I think that the product is a good idea it doesnt really suit my daughter. After being in hospital a few times she associates the mask with her time in hospital and thus her crying makes it near on impossible for the device to work efficiently.
                  Actually the crying and upset usually aggrevates the condition.
                  I have allowed her to hold the device and 'use' it on her favourte teddy but no matter what I do she doesnt like the feel of the mask on her face.

                  Whilst in hospital I saw this device work with numerous children so I am aware that it does work - just not with my little darling!

                  The device is easily dismanteled and cleaned by soaking parts in luke warm water with mild liquid detergent for 15 minutes then air-drying.

                  For those with allergies please note that the Aerochamber PLus is latex free.

                  Ours was prescribed and I am unsure wether they are available to purchase.

                  Aerochamber Plus is distributed bt GlaxoSmithKline, Middlesex.

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