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7 Reviews

Brand: Duvel / Type: Ale

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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    7 Reviews
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      07.12.2003 23:41
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      skip this first bit to be able to read the review with capital letters intact. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. <b r> Duvel, from Brouwerij Moortgat, Belgium. Behave yourself you little Devil you... I had intended to be a good lad. Having spent a small fortune on beer stock for Christmas the week before, I made a decision not to buy any more this weekend. No harm in looking though eh? Wandering down my favourite Asda aisle, up among the oddball brews, a red and white box was peering down at me from the shelf edge, "Buy me" I heard it say, "Go on you know you want to". Duvel, it may be called but the beer devil in me was still listening as I turned to leave and it leapt into my trolley. Who was I to argue? £5.49 for 4 bottles and the usual clincher, a free glass in the box.... not just any old glass either, a real Duvel tasting glass, huge tulip shaped thing with Duvel in gold on the front. Damn those marketing guys! Back home, everything packed away I read the box. Covered in information and a bright yellow flash proclaiming that Michael Jackson (not the scary one) a well respected beer and whisky expert, had put this brew in his top ten Belgian beers. A winner then! About the Beer The beer itself has been called the champagne of beers. Not to be guzzled this stuff, it is still brewed by the family Moortgat at the Duvel Moortgat Brewery in Puurs, Belgium started as a brewery-farm in 1871 by great great grandfather Jan-Leonard Moortgat. Top Stuff It's a top fermented ale (the yeast floats on the wort during brewing), conditioned in the bottle, which means there's yeast in there for secondary fermentation. It's not a white beer though, you're ideally supposed to leave around 1cm of beer in the bottle to avoid disturbing the sediment which goes against the grain a little....I prefer not to pour beer down the sink so I tried one with the yeast in the glass and one without, in the interest of research? It's Definitely Alive! The huge tulip glass
      provided will hold a full pint of ale but the squat brown bottle only provides you with 330ml, confused? Well on opening the bottle there is a fair rush of CO2 and you need to get the glass over on its side, otherwise the head won't fit in there! If you ever see a photograph of Duvel, you'll see that the glass is half full of beer and half full of white foam. Not just any old foam though, it's like whipped cream and stays with the drink to the end, fantastic! Flavours and Alcoholic Poisoning The flavour is very complex. As I've said before, I?m not good at distinguishing myriad hints of hot plastic and llama dung, ala Jilly Goolden, but the overwhelming scent of spices like nutmeg and cinnamon along with the bitter hops and malt all waft up at you through the neck of that glass. Similar flavours to other Belgian beers such as Hoegaarden but with a hell of a lot more body class. It's delicious, not too gassy despite the constant bubbling from the bottom of the glass. I left one glassful standing for 45 minutes, the head just sat there like a meringue and the stream of bubbles never stopped. How's that for dedication to the cause of consumer research! Incidentally, the glass I tried without the yeast thrown in lost its head after a while so now I sling the lot in and be dammed! Also present is the alcohol. At 8.5% ABV I'm sure I could smell it on its own, I could certainly taste it! The golden colour of the beer also has very faint greenish tinge to it, which I always associate with powerfully alcoholic brews. You won't need too many of these before the legs disassociate themselves from the brain and you develop your own greenish tinge around the gills. Overall If I were to wander down the beer aisle at Asda again and spot another box I wonder if I'd if would find it's way into my trolley again? I think it might. The name Duvel derives from the Flemish for devil, and if they put it
      up on that shelf, sitting at shoulder height, the angel on my other shoulder hasn't a snowballs chance in hell. Now where did I put that glass? Cheers Chris

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        08.12.2002 23:57
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        Hello, and welcome one and all to an alcohol opinion. I'm going to be giving my thoughts on Duvel beer. Well, the beer is brewed in a place called Breendonkdorp in Belgium, but I do apologise for stating the obvious LOL. Its a wheat-like beer, and is bottle conditioned, which means that when you buy a bottle of it, there will be little bits in the drink. These bits are generally bits of yeast which continues to ferment the beer whilst in the bottle. Theoretically then, you could lay this bottle down for a while, and drink a more refined beer months down the line. But why wait? Its tastes blinking lovely already. Unlike most British bottle conditioned ales, the "bits" should be poured into the glass and drunk with the beer. This adds to the all round flavour of Duvel. PACKAGING You can get this on draught, but only in a very small number of outlets in the UK, and to be honest, the bottled variety is good as good, if not better. So, bottles are found at a load of supermarkets, are are 330ml dark brown glass bottles. However, why I am drinking this one, well, its because in Sainsburys now they are doing 750ml sie bottles of this stuff, but obviously its more expensive. (Prices will follow.) The bottles have a white label with the word "Duvel" on it, and a fair bit of writing in a few european languages, including English. PRODUCT This is a very lively drink. Pour it into your glass with some care, because you will end up with a massive head at it can last for absolutely ages, and more importantly, if you pour the beer too fast, you will look a prat in front of your mates, and they will mock you. Duvel itself is a pale golden colour and it smells of erm... Duvel beer. Its hard to describe it, but this smell is typical of Belgian Trappist beers, even though its not a genuine Trappist beer. The laste is light and fruity, and has no lingering afterta ste. You can te
        ll you've drunk beer, but thats about all really. There's no bitterness - as mentioned in the disdvantages above, this beer is almost lagery. (Only joking about that being a disadvantage.) The strength is typically Belgian though. At 8.5% ABV, its not a session beer. In fact its not easy to find in pubs anywhere - whether bottled or draught. It's not a trendy drink, and quite rightly so - its too strong for that. Overall this beer is a nice drink. I drank this to unwind after a terrible week at work, in the knowledge that next week will provide more tension than this one, and the week after that will be even worse. What a nice run up to Christmas. Well, thats all part of being a Trade Union Rep, an EHO, and a Local Government Officer I suppose. So, watch out for more beer type ops - there may be loads to come :( Would I buy another 750ml bottle of Duvel - NOPE !! The beer is lovely - really, a lot of people would like this - but at £3.25, I think it was for a 750 ml bottle, and at around £1.30 for a 330 ml bottle, its cheaper to go small. Thanks for reading this.

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          29.07.2002 19:34
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          Belgium is famous for making top-of-the-range chocolates, and I love them. But I would walk right past those spectacular pralines every time for their delicious beers. The variety and quality of Belgian beer is astounding, from the Trappist beers right down to the mass produced brews like Stella Artois and Jupiler. Stella is about as poor a beer as you can get in Belgium! Somewhere in between those two extremes, but very close to the top of the pile, is Duvel. The history of DUVEL is closely linked to the Duvel Moortgat family brewery which was established in 1871 in Breendonk, Belgium. After the first world war, in 1918, Albert Moortgat tried brewing a beer based on English ale and went off to Scotland to obtain a sample of the local yeast. (a master brewer but a bit of a numptie at geography) After initial resistance by the local brewers, who wanted to protect their product, he was eventually able to obtain a sample of yeast that would form the basis of his successful beer. Right through to the present day, yeast from the same source is always used. When the brew using the new yeast was first sampled in Breendonk, it was described as 'a real devil'. And so, this beer was marketed under the name of DUVEL. Due to the top quality of this unique beer, sales have increased year after year. Today, the fourth generation of Moortgats oversee the production of Duvel, and it is available all over the world. Duvel is Belgium’s best selling specialty beer and Michael Jackson calls it “one of the five greatest beers in the world.” It is made with a Danish barley malt and, Styrian and Saaz hops (the same as used in Pilsner Urquell). The beer undergoes three fermentations, the final one taking place in the bottle and lasting five weeks. It is paler than some Pilsner type lagers, yet it is technically an ale, in that it is made by top fermentation. DUVEL is best served b
          etween 6C to 10C. in a traditional, tulip shaped, Duvel glass. The beer should be poured by tilting the glass to an angle of about 45 degrees so that the beer pours into the curved side of the glass and then runs slowly to the bottom without being overly agitated. The design of the glass allows the foamy head to fit comfortably within it. The shape of the glass also helps release the aroma of the beer. ------------------------INTERLUDE--------------------------- A police officer pulls a bloke over for speeding and has the following exchange: OFFICER: May I see your driver's license? DRIVER: I don't have one. I had it suspended for speeding. OFFICER: May I see the registration for this vehicle? DRIVER: It's not my car. I stole it. OFFICER: The car is stolen? DRIVER: That's right. But come to think of it, I think I saw the registration in the glove box when I was putting my gun in there. OFFICER: There's a gun in the glove box? DRIVER: Yes mate. That's where I put it after I shot and killed the woman who owns this car and stuffed her in the boot. OFFICER: There's a BODY in the BOOT?!?!? DRIVER: Yes, mate. Hearing this, the officer immediately called his back up. The car was quickly surrounded by police, and the sergeant approached the driver to handle the tense situation: SERGEANT: Sir, can I see your license? DRIVER: Sure. Here it is. It was valid. SERGEANT: Who's car is this? DRIVER: It's mine, officer. Here's the registration papers. SERGEANT: Could you slowly open your glove box so I can see if there's a gun in it? DRIVER: Yes, sir, but there's no gun in it. Sure enough, there was nothing in the glove box. SERGEANT: Would you mind opening your boot? I was told you said there's a body in it. DRIVER: No problem. Boot i
          s opened; no body. SERGEANT: I don't understand it. The officer who stopped you said you told him you didn't have a license, stole the car, had a gun in the glove box, and that there was a dead body in the boot. DRIVER: Yeah, I'll bet the lying b**tard told you I was speeding as well. ------------------------------------------------------ Back to the beer..... • The Pour • It fizzles and sparkles as it's poured forming a beautiful, slightly hazy, yellow-golden coloured beer with a large, near perfect, white, foamy head. The massive carbonation encourages the fruity aromas which immediately assail the nose, followed by a bright hop aroma with hints of clove and a nice bready yeastiness. • The Taste • The beer is light to medium in body, with a mouthfeel that is very fizzy and bubbly, like a sparkling wine. The taste is at first decidedly spicy but turns more balanced with some hop bitterness. The spiciness is quite aggressive, but it seems appropriate. There's a bready yeast characteristic on the palate as well as fruitiness - oranges perhaps. The unique taste of the fruity yeast and pale malts makes for a moderately spicy, delicious brew with a slightly acidic but fresh taste that masks its strength perfectly. Very clean and refreshing. • The Verdict • DUVEL looks like an ordinary lager when poured, but on tasting you quickly discover a far more subtle brew. The taste and aroma have more in common with a rich, malty ale. It is a deceptively strong beer, at ABV 8.5%, and therefore is more suited to gentle sipping rather than wolfing down a six-pack. It is a beautifully crafted beer and I think, quite unique. A lovely beer for a Summer's evening. This is a beer I drink quite often and it especially compliments seafood. In recent times in the UK, DUVEL has started appearing in many off licenc
          es and you can also buy it from most supermarkets. Priced at around £1.55 for a 330ml bottle, it's not bad value when you consider the quality and strength of this beer. I've even found it in Asda for £1.35. A presentation box containing two bottles and one Duvel glass only costs around £3.20. Annoyingly, it costs around 50p a bottle in France and Belgium. Would I drink it again? - Are the UK's tax and duty levies verging on daylight robbery? Thanks for reading, Sláinte ©proxam2003

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            22.01.2002 22:17
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            Can you name 3 famous Belgians? Jean Claude Van Damme, Hercule Poirot, Plastic Bertrand? (OK there might be more..) My point is that Belgium has always been a quiet sleepy (I?m not saying boring) kind of country, which traditionally has not excelled in very many cultural areas and has not often achived worldwide praise. However in the fields of food and drink the Belgians do have a place at the top table. Bruxelles is considered by many the gastronomic capital of Europe and has far as beer is concerned Belgium is one of the best producers. When I talk of Belgian beer I?m not talking of weak artificial toxin laden lagers guaranteed to provide gargantuan hangover the following day. I?m talking of expertly produced bottled ale more akin to the traditional British real ale than the fizzy European mass produced products. Most Belgian bottled beer is produced on a small scale by independent breweries sometimes run by Trappist monks. Although not made by monks Duvel is the undoubted King of the Belgian Beers. ***A BIT OF HISTORY*** Duvel is produced by the Moortgat Brewery in Breendonk. Jan-Leonard Moortgat first established the brewery in 1871. Moortgat gradually with the help of his two sons Albert and Victor expanded the family business. The Moorgats were always looking for ways to improve their product and in 1918 Albert decide to try and brew a new kind of beer based on the types of British ale he had come across. He travelled to Scotland to obtain a particular kind of yeast used by local Scottish brewers. At first Albert was shunned by the brewers who wanted to protect the integrity of their product but eventually after travelling across Scotland and visiting many breweries he managed to obtain a sample of his desired yeast. Even today this yeast is used in the production of Duvel. When Duvel was first produced in 1921 it was described by tasters as ?a real devil? hence its name ?Duvel? and today another generation of Moortgat
            s are making the beer in the same way that Albert did more than 60 years ago. ***PERSONAL EXPERIENCE*** I first tasted Duvel in Amsterdam many years ago whilst staying with a Dutch friend of mine. When we visited his local bar he suggested that I try a bottle of Duvel, I had not developed a taste for English Ale at the time and I tended to avoid bottled dark beers but he assured me that Duvel was a ?light? beer in appearance at any rate. As he showed me the almost ritualised pouring of the beer in to the specially designed glass (like an oversized elongated Cognac glass) producing a golden glowing liquid with a rich froth on top, I sensed that this was something special. I raised the glass and took a gulp to which I received a horrified look from my friend and those around me. I was stopped and told that Duvel was not a gulping beer but a sipping beer. It must be treated like a fine wine or Champagne. I took a sip and was converted. The description of Duvel as the champagne of beers is not so spurious as at first it might seem. Like Champagne the secondary fermentation of the beer occurs in the bottle as the beer matures. This gives Duvel a very distinctive refined taste. ***HOW IT?S MADE***(the technical bit skip if you want) Like any beer Duvel is a blend of hops, barley and yeast added to pure spring water. The alcohol is obtained from the fermentation an extract of sprouting barley, which is then seasoned with hops to create the flavour. The added yeast produces the alcohol and the carbon dioxide from the sugar present. The careful balance between alcohol content, hops and gas give the beer it distinctive qualities. For the making of Duvel only the finest barley is used, this is known as double-row summer barley. The barley has to be germinated before it can be used to brew with. This involves soaking for two days and then laying it out on the germination f
            loor, for the process to take place. After a time rootlets and leaf shoots can be seen sprouting. Inside the barley enzymes are produced that will eventually convert the starch present in to malt. After 5 days the barley is dried on the kiln floor with hot air. All this process takes place in the Malt-house. The next stage takes place in the brewing hall where the malt is mixed with the brewing water. In the case of Duvel the water used is natural spring water obtained by the breweries own springs. The resulting mixture the mash is heated in stages to allow the enzymes to break down the starch into fermentable sugar. After a filtration process the liquid component, the ?wort? is separated from the solid, which is then boiled. At this stage the hops are added to provide flavour. The hops used in Duvel are from Czech and Slovak varieties considered of the best quality. They provide a bitter taste to the beers with a pleasant fruity aroma. The sterile boiled extract is then pumped to the fermentation vessel after it is cooled. Two types of yeast can be used when brewing beer depending on the type of beer desired. Ale yeast or (Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Carlsbergensis) is needed for top fermentation which takes place at a temperature of 7 to 12C over a period of 10days. The yeast sinks to the bottom hence the name top fermentation. For Duvel lager yeast (Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Cerevisiae) is used for bottom-fermented beer. In this process the temperature is kept at 20-26C for up to 8 days, the yeast this time floats to the top forming a thick froth. After this stage the beer is transferred to maturation vats and stored at 0C. After maturation the beer is filtered and then bottled. Dark glass bottles are used to prevent oxidation. In the case of Duvel a secondary fermentation is required to take place in the bottles so sugar and an exact amount of active yeast is added just before bottling. The beer is kept at 22C for 10 days and then cooled down to
            6C and kept for another 6 weeks. At this stage the beer develops further its fine aroma and subtle taste. The whole process from beginning to end takes 3 months. No additives or preservatives are added and the beer is not pasteurised, in essence it is a pure, natural product. ***HOW TO KEEP IT AND DRINK IT***(the essential bit!) The bottles of Duvel must be kept upright in a cool dark place and must be allowed to settle for at least an hour before pouring. For the best taste the beer must be drunk at between 6C to 10C. A clean, dry (not chilled) Duvel glass should be used. The use of the right glass is not just a gimmick. The traditional Duvel glass allows the beer to be poured correctly tilting glass at an angle of about 45 degrees so that the beer pours in to the rounded curve at the side of the glass and then runs slowly to the bottom without being agitated. The beer must not be poured quickly otherwise the yeast sediment at the bottom of the bottle will become mixed in and cloud the contents. It is also useful to slightly turn the bottle in your hand as you pour again to prevent the sediment from entering the glass. A small volume of liquid and sediment ~1cm should be left in the bottle after pouring. If poured correctly the beer should be a clear golden colour with a thick, creamy foaming froth on top. The design of the glass allows you to fit the froth comfortably within its volume. The shape of the glass also captures the aroma of the beer, which is released when the glass is tilted on drinking, thus a strong fruity odour is noticed to complement the bitter malty taste when the beer is drunk. It has a fizzy full bodied slightly acidic but fresh taste that perfectly complements its strength. Duvel looks like an ordinary lager when poured but on tasting you quickly find a subtlety of taste and aroma and strength more akin to strong real ale. It is a deceptively strong beer (8.5%) and care should be taken not to consu
            me too much! ***AVAILABILITY*** When I first started drinking Duvel it was rather hard to find in the UK but more recently it has started appearing in many of the better off licence chains (try Oddbins) and you can also buy it from Sainsburys. Priced at around £1.55/bottle and considering its strength and quality it is a real bargain. For an interesting present to a beer lover a presentation box containing two bottles and one Duvel glass only costs £3.20. Enjoy it but remember sip don?t gulp! Thanks for reading and rating this opinion. © Mauri 2002

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              10.01.2002 04:58
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              Duvel is probably the bestlager in... OK, you've heard it, but this time it's true. A lot fruitier than most "normal" lagers (though not sickly after a couple of pints like Hoegarden), Duvel (pron. Doo-v'l) is a true great. Introduced to me by a Belgian Uni friend, it tickles the taste buds to hysteria, but is suprisingly strong. It's taste is fairly sweet (in comparrison to most lager), quite crisp, and it goes down like a plane in the Bremuda Triangle (easily and quickly) - and there is still a bang at the end! Duvel is suprisingly strong, and you have to be careful to remember that you are drinking a very potent beer. No words can really do it justice, but make sure that you try it. Drink it very cold, in a rounded bottomed glass (in Belgium, the glass is as important as the beer, and each has its own type, designed specifically for it, to enhance the flavour). I also highly recommend Leffe and Chimay, two other excellent lagers, but this remains king. Despite these beer's expense, they are worth it, for the sublime taste, and because it doesn't take many of them to get you singing!

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                21.04.2001 08:16
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                duvel is a smooth and cheeky brew with a kick like a mule. It is fruity and goes down very easily and does not leave you feeling bloated or as hungover as some british brews tend to do. I would advise people to invest in a duvel beer glass if a taste for duvel is acquired as it tends to add to the drinking experience and I believe makes the beer taste even better. So in a nutshell 'you would do well to invest in a duvel.'

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                  25.03.2001 19:59
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                  I tried Duvel for the first time last night, after discovering the delights of Belgium's wheat beers and traditional ales over the past few months. This one's an absolute beauty - full-flavoured, fruity and designed to be savoured. This isn't a beer you can glug to quench your thirst. It's heavy, thanks to its 8.5% of alcohol, and drinking it is more akin to sipping a big Burgundy than gulping down a light Chablis. I probably don't need to write this, but if you're looking for a Stella-ish lager, stay well away. Duvel is cloudy, thick and syrupy in comparison; a totally different style of beer, although one which is far more interesting. The more wheat beers and ales I find from Belgium, the more I'm astounded by the variety and quality available. If anyone else has come across any good ones, please recommend them on this site.

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                • Product Details

                  Strong Golden Beer, 8.5% easy to drink so beware percent Alcohol, brewed in Belgium.