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Guinness Draught

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Brand: Guinness / Type: Ale

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    23 Reviews
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      25.03.2013 03:47

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      absolutely fantastic beer, one of my favourites

      I absolutely love Guiness, it is my go to pint when i'm not feeling very adventurous. I do like the odd refreshing larger, but my heart is with the heavy ales.

      For all it's reputation, guiness isn't actually that heavy- the creaminess counteracts the heavyness, so you're left with a rich but perfectly drinkable beer. I've never had more than 2 pints so maybe it's not something you can drink all night, but i'd happily give that a try!

      People think it is black, but it's actually a super dark ruby colour- hold it to the light and see. It is an acquired taste, but I don't know anyone that actively dislikes it, more than they're not usually in the mood for such a flavoursome pint.

      I haven't found it to go well with many foods, so I usually try and keep it for drinking on it's own. The draught version is the best, but the can's are also great, and amazingly manage to keep the creaminess.

      The drink is legendary for it's thick creamy head, and it certainly lives up to that- you'll notice that they have to pour it in two halves, which presumably is to keep the head under half an inch!

      Because it's so popular it's usually pretty cheap relative to whatever else they sell there. Recommended, delicious.

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      02.09.2009 17:57
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      A healthy choice of beer

      Guinness is absolutely synonymous with the Irish way of life, and whilst I tend to just drink it around St. Patrick's Day (to ensure that I get the novelty hat!), it's a rich, quality product that's very refined and well crafted. In fact, it's frequently referred to as almost resembling a food, in that it's very filling, like a good meal. Moreover, as a personal aside, I have a relative who drank a pint of it every day, and they lived to their late nineties!

      Unlike other lagers, Guinness has a very dark, black colour, and brown head, distinguishing it from other products from the outset. It also has a very, very unique taste that, admittedly isn't my favourite, but it's still clear that a lot of care has been taken with its composition - you can taste a lot of different nuances to its taste, which is more than be said for most house beers like Carling and Carlsberg. Strangely, despite being so refined and being touted as a "food", it's actually marginally better for you than most beers, weighing in at less than 200 calories, whereas most premium beers like Stella are in the 220+ vicinity.

      Because it is so rich, though, I do have trouble drinking a lot of it, which was recently a problem when I bought four pints to ensure that I got the novelty Guinness Hat at St. Paddy's Day! It takes me a while to plough through a pint of the stuff, where as more watery beers like Carling I could drink in a few minutes if need be. Needless to say, if you're bar hopping, it's probably not the best drink to get, but if you're up for a calm night in the pub, give it a whirl and revel in its robust taste!

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      18.07.2009 21:41
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      Give Guinness a go!!

      I am not (or should I say was not) a Guinness drinker until this week, but now I think it will be part of my shop. Okay I'd heard of the brand. I knew what it looked like, I mean who hasn't, but I have only ever tried it back in the 80's, during my teenage years. I don't think back then my pallett had been trained enough, because at the time I was a lager 'man'. Since then I have tended to steer more towards beer.

      So why after 20 years did I decide it was time to try Guinness again. Well to put it bluntly it was on offer, working out at a mere 50p a can. It was something I couldn't let go.

      I bought 8 cans for £4.00 and immediately on my return they were refrigerated. Tonight, being Saturday night, I decided to treat myself. Out came the can and it wasn't long before the 'black gold' was sitting in my pint glass. The story goes that to pour the perfect pint it should take 119.5 seconds. To be honest I never timed mine, and I guess the fact it came from a can, would make this statement less accurate.

      Guinness began to be brewed in 1759, at St James Gate Dublin. It has a great tradition in Ireland and around the world and is renound for its colour and taste. It is black in colour with a white head, and tastes very rich and stout like. It is very creamy and has a great body to it. It is a lot thicker than a normal bitter,and has more of a taste.

      On my can it says that my 440ml has 1.8 units of alcohol and the acoholic volume is 4.1%.

      This drink will certainly be in my trolley more often. I may even try it more often whilst out in the pub. Well done to the Irish!!

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        30.01.2009 11:22
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        Brilliant tasty beer

        I do not think that there is anything more aesthetically pleasing to the eye than a perfectly poured pint of the black stuff. Even though it is 10.00 am on a Friday morning I am positively salivating thinking about tucking into a creamy pint this evening.

        A lot goes into reating this perfectly poured pint however, as it is imperative that a cool clean glass is used for the pouring. Also, there is a knack to it and as a former bar tender I have been lucky enough to have been shown just how to pour a perfect pint by a Guinness guy who goes round pubs in Ireland to make sure it is poured correctly. The glass has to be tilted at a forty five degree angle when pouring. You have to stop when you have poured two thirds of the pint into the glass and let this settle. Once this has settled you finish off the pint by pushing the handle away from you. Let this settle and then give to the customer. This should take 180 seconds to do. The annoying thing is when this does not happen, as it really affects the taste. You often see a pint just poured straight in one go - not good, please stop doing this!

        I have had a Guinness all over the world, from Fiji, to New Zealand, to San Francisco, to Paris and New York. But nothing tastes quite like a pub down the local, or at least in any pub in Ireland. This i think is because the Guinness you drink in countries outside Ireland is brewed by local distillers and it is just not the same way it is done in Ireland.

        In my opinion it is the nicest pint of any beer you can get. There is a chocolatey taste to it, with a definite bitter after taste, but not so bitter to be sharp or off putting.

        Also, there is more vitamin C in a pint of guinness than in 8 oranges (just do not ask about how many calories are in it....)

        It varies in cost depending on where you are and what pub you are in. My local sells it for £2.80.

        This year is the 250 anniversary of Guinness and I plan on celebrating with several pints!

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          19.10.2008 13:02
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          A warming winter drink with a fruity edge.

          This is a review of Guinness Draught as sold in cans.

          I purchased my Guinness in a six pack for £5.99 at my local Spar. Each can contains 440ml of dark stout. The can contains a 'widget', this is a device which enables the pourer to produce the traditional looking Guinness in a glass, i.e. a rich dark body with a thick creamy head. This should be served cold.

          Each can contains 4.1% alcohol, which is 1.8 UK units. There are 148 kj and 35 kcal per 100ml (remember there are 440ml per can!). Each 100ml also contains 0.3g of protein 3g of carbohydrate and no fat whatsoever.

          I was first introduced to Guinness by my Dad, great Irishman that he is. I was expecting the first LittleBob and had been diagnosed with anaemia so Dad thought this would get some iron in me. Apparently it has been traditional among Irish women for generations to drink a bottle of stout regularly throughout pregnancy as a means of combating fatique brought on by anaemia. Now, I now know that alcohol should not be consumed during pregnancy, but the zero policy on pregnant women boozing has only been introduced fairly recently, so 17 years ago Dad (and I) thought the occasional Guinness would be OK.

          Since having Little HonestBob number one I have indulged in Guinness fairly rarely. Although it is now fairly acceptable for women to drink pints of lager or cider in pubs, it is still fairly rare to see us with a pint (or even a half) of Guinness, hence I stick to wine when out. I do, however, buy the occasional can (or six) of Guinness for at home. I don't consider it a summer drink, but now that winter is drawing in and I've been forced to have the central heating on a couple of times, I'm back on the Guinness.

          Now, for the bit that will offend Guinness drinking men..... I add a couple of drops of blackcurrent to my Guinness. I find it too bitter without it. I add less than I did in my youth, but I still prefer a blackcurrent flavour to my Guinness.

          So go on girls, give it a try (but not if you're pregnant!).

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            08.10.2008 15:48
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            An iron brew from Ireland

            Guinness
            A thick brew that is only mildly bitter
            Smooth, creamy and black
            A wholesome brew, traditional, born of the Emerald Isle
            A man's drink, working class... well it used to be
            In recent years it's become more 'trendy' and therefore less exclusive.
            But it remains a dear old friend who never lets you down
            Black as tar
            Full of secrets.
            With a lovely well proportioned head
            The stuff of legend
            A meal in itself and full of iron... so they say.
            It's good for you... it must be.
            But watch out, it's heavy and can pile on the pounds.

            I once drank nine pints and ended up in a rough part of Liverpool in a rough part of a pub where I was entertained by a man eating a pint glass. And when you've drank nine pints of Guinness it's impossible to make a quick get away because your legs turn to lead. If you do manage to exit you have to walk slowly with straight legs because you can't bend your knees.

            My last pint cost me £2.60 and it tasted even lovelier whilst watching Liverpool beat Man Utd 2:1.

            Still worth every penny!

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              07.10.2008 13:00
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              Olde Age Beere

              The age old beverage...

              It's amazing to think that Guinness was first made in Dublin around 250 years ago.

              Ten years after its creation, the product was exported for the first time - six and a half barrels made the trip across the sea to England. Since then, the product has gained a worldwide appeal and is now a truly global beer.

              Guinness is technically classified as a 'stout', which is defined as being a darker beer made using roasted barley and / or malts.

              The product is said to have health benefits when consumed regularly. This is due to the fact that it contains antioxidants which can lower the levels of harmful cholesterol which line artery walls. However, like any alcoholic drink, consuming too much of it will negate any of its possible health benefits.

              The taste of Guiness is rich and creamy but not too bitter - although this can vary quite a bit depending on the establishment you happen to be visiting. The head is very creamy, and according to Wikipedia, it's created by the beer 'being mixed with nitrogen when served'.

              It's often traditional for the bar person to create a shamrock on this creamy head, using the beer tap as the drawing tool - However, I've seen some woeful attempts at this in various pubs, with the end results looking like squirrels ranging through to mangled genitalia.

              Guinness is great if you fancy a change from lager and want a bit of flavour. It's quite a filling drink though, and in my opinion, makes you need the loo a fair bit more than with regular beer. However, I do find that i'll get less of a hangover if I stick to Guinness on an evening out.

              Price wise, Guinness can vary dramatically depending on the venue. Generally expect to pay £2.50 a pint - although Wetherspoons are currently running their voucher promotion where it's only around £1.30.

              Overall 9/10 times, Guinness for me is an enjoyable drink - although I know it can be a marmite love it or hate it kind of thing for many people!

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                01.05.2008 13:27

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                Guiness is absolutely superb.I especially like the fact that wethgerspoons are doing it cheap with vouchers. Although last nite i had a couple too many and couldnt cycle home properly.I had to do election duty for mayor race today and ive got a six pint hangover. I'll probably have corn beef hash to soak it up later.I like to go to different pubs evry day,but in a rota system.Monday curry club tuesday- steak club..that sort of thing. And the guiness varies from pub to pub. I think i prefer wetherspoons best.They have vouchers.

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                30.01.2007 13:52
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                A great tasting pint only spoilt by the price

                From the moment you step into a pub and order a pint of Guinness start believing the hype. Guinness is a drink that is everything it is made out to be, sleek, sexy, stylish and very, very tasty. It almost seems an exclusive drink that only a certain select few actually drink, because if you go into any bar or pub the percentage of Guinness drinkers compared to drinkers of other brands is very minimal, in England at least.

                When ordering a round including Guinness be sure to order it first as it is only part poured to start with and then left to settle (remember the ad). The pint is then topped up to leave a black looking pint with a snow white head (if you hold a pint upto the light Guinness is actually ruby red). It looks even better when it is poured into a clean straight glass.

                Guinness tastes smooth and velvety and slides easily down the throat which means several more can be drank quickly compared to other beers. Beware though, because of this and an ABV OF 4.1% it can leave you with a condition called Guinness tongue which leaves you slurring and talking gibberish.
                There isn't the hoppy after taste that you get with other beers which means you don't actually get sick of the taste of it.

                The cost however is a little bit on the expensive side and costs on average £2.50 a pint in Evesham, Worcestershire where I live although there are cheaper places to get it like Whetherspoons.

                The best place to get it though and I can vouch for it, is Dublin and a trip to the Guinness Hopstore to see the history of it wouldn't go amiss and you can even sample it for free.

                Beware though Guinness should be kept properly otherwise the taste does go off.

                Overall I would recommend Guinness to anyone and would drink more of it myself if it wasn't for the price.

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                  27.03.2006 02:51
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                  Tasty, smooth, refreshing

                  I'm about to go to Ireland for a few weeks so I decided to drink guinness before I left. I could only get it in cans but it turned out well. Initially, the taste was a little disturbing, kind of a burnt chocalate taste. But after a few sips I was hooked. Once it hits your stomach, it sits nice and you already want more. I'm still more of a bass fan, but I'll sleep easier now, knowing I can enjoy a nice guinness on my trip.

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                    13.09.2005 09:28
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                    The Famous Black Stuff

                    It’s amazing how your drinking tastes can change over the years isn’t it? I distinctly remember drinking pints of mild when I lived in Birmingham but it’s hardly in vogue these days and probably the last preserve of Brummies wearing flat caps taking a break from racing their pigeons. Then it was a combination of bitter and lager otherwise called a “Mickey Mouse”, then lager for years and most recently bitter. So there was an air of inevitability that I would finally try Guinness in my 40th year. Ironically, my good lady had got a taste for the big G when she was pregnant with our first. Something to do with plenty of iron in it or something. Maybe it was just a brilliantly conceived excuse on her part (he he).

                    If you are going to try the world-famous Irish stout then why not make it a special occasion? I was going on holiday to Ireland and had lost count of the people that had told me that Irish Guinness tasted so much better than the English version. Of course, I wouldn’t be able to compare notes as I hadn’t actually tried the English version apart from in Guinness cake but that doesn’t really count does it? So anyway, there I am a tourist like hundreds of others surveying the pubs on the sea front at Dingle, Kerry. The reason for me peering in through each window was to check out their vegetarian menus and what a decent choice I found for once. Having settled on a rather quaint looking establishment, me and the family went in to grab some nosh and I was minutes aware from no longer being a Guinness virgin.

                    So we’re in the pub and I ask the barman for a tab. He tells me “no” to start with but the twinkle in his eye gives away the fact that he’s only joshing. He does smile and eventually says “no problem”. I think about asking him to tell me a bit more about Guinness before I finally partake but he doesn’t look the type to take me too seriously so I don’t. Besides, he’d probably come up with all kinds of old Oirish blarney instead.

                    If I had have asked him I’m sure he would have told me all about the eponymous Arthur Guinness taking a 34-year old lease on Mark Rainsford’s Ale Brewery in James’s Street, Dublin in 1759. Innocuous enough at the time given the amount of competition in the market but the supply of water did make it a good location. Up against tough breweries from London, Guinness wanted to establish a local demand for home made beer and so his “porter” beer containing roasted barley and giving it its dark colour came to challenge the English giants together with the popular local demand for whisky, gin and poteen.

                    Guinness’s brew became hugely popular and the conception of a more full bodied version in the 1820’s gave rise to the expression “extra stout porter” and hence the derivative “stout” (porter beer being a colloquial term drawn from porters in Convent Garden and Billingsgate markets). By 1914 the St. James’s brewery was the largest of its kind in the world and with the huge operation that is Guinness today, it still retains that mystique established by the Dublin formula founded on the waters of the river Liffey.

                    Well, of course, the barman didn’t tell me any of that but simply carried on serving his customers. We sat down and chose our meals; I waited for my first pint of Guinness which duly arrived after a few minutes. I’d seen many a pint of the black stuff over the years and told that the gen-u-ine pint has the shape of a Shamrock in its head. Hmmm....I’m sure this is merely a gimmick and the fact that I didn’t have a shamrock in my particular pint didn’t put me off. I knew that the ideal serving temperature is best served at 6°C (that’s 42.8°F), with the legendary two-part pour. As everyone who knows anything surely must know, first tilt the glass to 45 degrees and carefully pour until three-quarters full. Then place the glass on the bar counter and leave to settle. Once the surge has settled, fill the glass to the brim. It takes about 119.5 seconds to pour the perfect pint. Not that I was checking with my stopwatch or anything but maybe some do, who knows? How did I know all this? Well, there’s been enough ad campaigns harping on about the famous Guinness pour usually employing the dulcet tones of Rutger Hauer and an armchair and I watch the ads, don’t you? *grin* It’s that unique mix of nitrogen and carbon dioxide that helps create Guinness Draught’s liquid swirl that tumbles, surges and gradually separates into a black body and smooth creamy head.

                    So aaaaaaaanyway, the taste. 40 years of history shuddered as I put the glass to my mouth and supped like many other pints had been supped before it but never a pint of Guinness. I was expecting it to be very strong and thick, what with that macho dark colour and stuff. It really did taste slightly sweet with a bitter aftertaste. My nose wrinkled a little but the creamy head eased my through into the main body and I managed to surface without a Guinness moustache (is that good or bad?). There was a distinctly thinner, watery taste to Guinness than I’d imagined but then I was convinced from the look of it that I’d get something thick and syrupy. It would make a great story if I told you how I went on to neck a further 7 or 8 pints, sang Irish rugby songs at the bar with a travelling band of minstrels and got thrown out onto the street at kicking out time. The reality is that I quietly finished my meal and continued with my holiday *yawn*. I could also list a string of Guinness-centric recipes like Guinness cake and stuff but you wouldn’t want that either, would you? Guinness is for drinking, surely?

                    As far as strength goes, the abv is generally around 4.2% but it varies around the world according to the version of Guinness being served. Draught comes in all shapes and sizes these days with Guinness draught in cans, Guinness Foreign Extra Stout, Guinness Draught Extra Cold and Guinness Original in bottles all available in pubs, clubs and your local supermarket I’m sure. Like most things these days, the price of Guinness will fluctuate according to where you drink it. I thought beer and spirits were quite pricey in Ireland and seem to recall paying something like 4 Euro for a pint but over here in England it’ll be par at anything between £2.50 and £3.

                    Since finally breaking my duck I’ve had a few more pints. To tell you the truth, it went nicely with my meal and wasn’t too strong so definitely a nice wee drink. However, too many of these and I think the bitter aftertaste would eventually catch up with me so Guinness will remain an occasional distraction for me. It didn’t seem appropriate to toast the England boys on their famous Ashes win yesterday with a pint of Guinness and it was the last thing on my mind following the football debacle in Belfast from a few days ago *sigh* but I’m sure there will be suitable occasions in the future where the black stuff will be wheeled out.

                    Thanks for reading!

                    Mara

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                      19.10.2004 16:54
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                      Guinness Draught

                      A lot of people are put off Guinness with their first taste - the bitter, burnt flavour can sometimes take a bit of getting used to. The first time I ever tasted it was when I was but a lad and, along with a couple of friends, had 'acquired' some bottles of Guinness and Carlsberg Special Brew from the back of a parked delivery truck during school lunch-break. The rest is mostly a hazy blur, but I do recall thinking that the bitter taste of Guinness was horrible.
                      Ten years passed and I resisted the urge to drink it again, although many of my friends were avid consumers of it. They would offer me a sip but I still thought it tasted horrible.
                      Not until I was 25 did I learn that the secret of drinking Guinness is to ignore that initial shock of bitterness from the first sip, but to let the creamy goodness coat your palate. After that, it slips down beautifully and you can then fully savour the taste.


                      The Guinness Brewery was founded in Dublin nearly 250 years ago by Arthur Guinness. Today, it is the largest brewery in the world and their beer is Ireland's largest export. It's brewed in over 50 different countries and I doubt there are many places on earth where Guinness is not on sale.


                      ? What is a Stout? ?

                      Stout has a lot of sub-styles (Oatmeal, Imperial, Sweet and even Chocolate) but Guinness would best be described as a dry stout. Dry stouts are generally low in alcohol (4.2%-4.7%), but big in body with just a little hop flavour which is dominated by a dark malt and roast barley character. A stout should be as black as night, and it should always be very smooth.
                      Another hallmark of some examples is an acidic note. Guinness includes a small proportion of sour beer in its blend to achieve this tart flavour. Apparently, this dates back to the colonial era when it was shipped all over the world and not surprisingly developed sour notes on the long journeys.


                      And since we're on an Irish theme...


                      A Spaniard visiting Dublin was talking to a barman when he used the word 'mañana'. The barman asked him to explain what it meant. He said that the term means "maybe the job will be done to-morrow, maybe the next day, maybe the day after that. Perhaps next week, next month, next year. Who knows - who cares?"
                      The Spaniard then asked the barman if the Irish had an equivalent expression.
                      "No." He replied. "In Ireland we don't have a word to describe that degree of urgency."



                      Back to the beer....

                      I've drank Guinness in many countries, including Eire, and I think it's a total myth that it tastes better in Dublin. A good pint is a good pint, wherever you are - it's probably the case that in Ireland, the cellarman does his job better as regards keeping stout in the correct condition.

                      THEY SAY:
                      "Available in cans, kegs and bottles with nitrogen and carbon dioxide. Pasteurised. Usually called Draught; sometimes called Cold or Extra Cold - same beer, but served colder.
                      Launched in 1961.
                      Ingredients: Pale ale malt, about 25 to 30% flaked barley, and about 10% roasted barley, with no other grains or sugars; several hop varieties, mainly Goldings (pellets and isomerized extract); a flocculent head-forming ale yeast."
                      http://www.guinness.com


                      Guinness pours to a pitch-black colour with a thick and creamy, tan-coloured head which lasts longer than the beer and leaves masses of lace.
                      The initial aroma is of rich, dark coffee with hints of dark, bitter chocolate some traces of licorice. There's some hop aroma, but not a lot - heavily roasted, darkened malt dominates the nose.

                      It's full-bodied and has one of the softest, creamiest mouth feels of any beer. It's an extremely complex brew: dry, with a noticeable taste of dark chocolate; bitter, with hints of darkly roasted barley and fresh-ground coffee; acidic, with some slightly sharp and slightly sour citrus tang and there's a woody, earthy flavour in the background. There's a little hop flavour too, but it's only really there to balance. It finishes very bitter, with a lingering toasty, slightly burnt, aftertaste.

                      ? The Verdict ?

                      At 4.1% ABV, Guinness tastes as though it has a much higher alcohol content. It's a filling and satisfying beer, but ironically, it's one of those beers that a single pint is just never enough! It's remarkably easy-drinking for such a robust, full-bodied brew and I have no problems sinking a few of these when the mood takes me.
                      As it is so full-bodied, I don't really think it's a great beer to pair with food, but it's a fabulous beer to cook with. It's great to use as a stock in beef stews and steak pies etc., or mix a little of it with some melted cheese and toast on a slice of bread for some 'Irish Rarebit'.


                      Would I drink it again? - Sure now, go on wi' ye. 'deed I would.





                      Sláinte

                      ©proxam2004

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                        13.02.2002 20:10
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                        I’ve been drinking Guinness regularly for a couple of years now and as soon as I enter a pub it’s up to the bar for a pint of it. Just watching it settle in the glass is a pleasure for me. I’ve sampled it in pubs in Bathgate, Livingston, Glasgow, Edinburgh and various pubs around England but have never had the honour to have a “real pint” in Ireland. It’s qualities varies from pub to pub but still has the same dark creamy texture and more or less the same flavour. The quality of the pint depends on the quality of the pub. At £1.90 a pint it’s maybe a tad more expensive than your average pint of Tennants but the extra 10 or 15p is worth it. When first sipping the pint the creamy head will coat your throat, creating a path for the dark brown, ‘coffee’ tasting beer to flow down your throat. Maybe first time drinkers will think I’m going over board but once you’ve had that first taste trust me you will be going back for more. Some say it’s an aquired taste, maybe so, but still give it a shot anyway it beats any lager. One word of warning don’t drink Guinness then try to race one of your mates to finish a pint of lager it’ll only cause a mess in the toilet. I found this out to my cost during an Old Firm game. I may report back after my trip to Ireland to try the “real” Guinness. H L

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                          30.01.2002 21:50
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                          Nothing is more Irish than Guinness stout but this was not always the case in fact Guinness is a copy of a traditional type of English ale! MY OWN EXPERIENCE WITH GUINNESS Ever since going to University in the south of England I have been a confirmed real ale drinker. The south has some great local breweries making some great beers, Gales, Fullers, Harveys, Ringwood. One drawback of drinking ale is that it can be difficult to find a good pint, which can be a health risk! And in some pubs real ale is not stocked at all. So what do you do if you don’t trust the quality of the ale the landlord keeps or if you have no choice at all? One option is to drink Guinness. This is how I started effectively as a substitute for real ale, but over the years I have come to like the taste and more often than not it is my drink of choice in pubs. Guinness is a very complex beer known as ‘Stout’ (see below), which has a very distinctive taste. It is almost sweet with a slight bitter aftertaste. If kept and served correctly it is very creamy but not too gassy. It makes a perfect sipping drink, and since it has relatively low alcohol content it won’t get you too drunk too soon. A word of warning though there are danger to drinking it. A few years back I was fortunate enough to go on a stag weekend to Dublin (it turned in to 5 days). As the saying goes ‘when in Rome..’ so we were all drinking Guinness for the whole of our stay. The quality of Guinness in Dublin is superb, every pint tasted fresh and sweet a pleasure to drink. The quality was not the problem however, the quantity was! After I got home I found that my digestive system had undergone some strange metamorphosis and I’m sure this was due to my selective diet of Guinness to the exclusion of everything else for the duration of my trip. It took weeks for normal bowel function to be restored and for a period of months afterwards I couldn’t taste
                          Guinness without getting a queasy feeling in my stomach. I am glad to report that now many years on the symptoms have gone away and I am once again drinking and enjoying Guinness. So what is this wonderful drink all about…? A BIT OF HISTORY In December 1759 the 34year old Arthur Guinness leased an old brewery Mark Rainsford's Ale Brewery sited on Dublin's James's Street for £45 per year on a lease of 9000 years. His friends thought he was mad but Arthur Guinness proved them wrong. James’s Street was an ideal location having a natural good supply of water and many other breweries had set up there. In fact Dublin itself was a popular place for brewers with more than 70 breweries existing in the city at the time. Recent import regulations had made business bad for local brewers and favoured the larger London Porter Breweries, which dominated the market. Although the home made beer was not of a high standard it still was drunk by many people in the towns, in rural Ireland however whisky, gin and poteen were more common drinks. Arthur knew that there was a market for a high quality home brewed beer that would appeal to the native Irish. Arthur Guinness decided to take on the London Brewers and produce an Irish version of their ‘Porter’ a beer containing roasted barley, which gave it its dark colour. It was named Porter because it had been traditionally the drink of the porters in Covent Garden and Billingsgate markets. In addition to ales, Arthur Guinness brewed a beer relatively new to Ireland that contained roasted barley, which gave it a characteristically dark colour. This brew became known as "porter" so named because of its popularity with the porters and stevedores of Covent Garden and Billingsgate in London. Guinness Porter became so popular that it eventually outsold all imported beers and then became popular outside of Ireland.
                          Guinness was not known as ‘stout’ until the early 1820’s when the expression ‘an extra stout porter’ started being used to describe a more full-bodied variety of the traditional ‘Porter’. Eventually Guinness became known as simply ‘Stout’ and around this time exports were being sold around the world. By 1914 the St. James’s brewery had become the largest in the world. Although today there are Guinness breweries around the world all brews must contain a flavoured extract that is made at the original Dublin Brewery thus quality is assured. ****************************************** STOUT In general stout is a dark brewed beer made by a process of top-fermentation, using highly roasted malts. Guinness is a type of Dry Irish Stout. The alcohol content varies depending on where in the world you buy it. In the UK and Ireland it is about 4%, in North America it is slightly stronger at about 4.2% and in some tropical countries you can get an extra strong blend of about 7.5%. Other types of Stout exist; sweet Stout is made in England and is weaker 3.7% alcohol. A Russian version known as Imperial stout is stronger anything between 7% and 10%. HOW IS GUINNESS STOUT MADE? Guinness toady is made in the same way as the original brew of the 1760’s The main ingredient is locally grown Irish barley. The alcohol is obtained from the fermentation an extract of sprouting barley, which is then seasoned with hops to create the flavour. The added yeast produces the alcohol and the carbon dioxide from the sugar present. The careful balance between alcohol content, hops and gas give the beer it distinctive qualities. *MALTING, MILLING, MASHING, ROASTING AND GRIST* The barley has to be germinated before it can be used to brew with. This involves soaking for two days and then laying it out on the germ
                          ination floor, for the process to take place. After a time rootlets and leaf shoots can be seen sprouting. Inside the barley enzymes are produced that will eventually convert the starch present in to malt. The malt is now milled keeping the barley husk as intact as possible. A proportion of the Barley is roasted using vast roasting drums similar to those used in the production of coffee, this gives the beer its dark colour and distinctive taste. *BREWING* The next stage involves adding the grist to the brewing water this is known as mashing. The resulting mixture, the mash is heated in stages to allow the enzymes to break down the starch into fermentable sugar. After a filtration in the ‘kieve’ the liquid component, the ‘wort’ is separated from the solid, and then boiled in the brew house kettles. At this stage the hops are added. Hops give bitterness and extra flavour to the beers. The hops used in the making of Guinness come form around the world mainly from the US England and Germany although some are grown locally near Kilkenny. The sterile boiled extract is allowed to settle and then pumped, and cooled in the process, to the fermentation vessel. Ale yeast or (Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Carlsbergensis) is needed for fermentation which takes place at a temperature of 7 to 12C over a period of 10days. The yeast sinks to the bottom hence the name top fermentation. After a period of maturation the beer is then sent to the packaging plant to be stored in Kegs. HOW DO YOU DRINK IT? This seem quite obvious, but as with all beer the conditions in which it is kept and how it’s served will greatly affect the quality of the drink. Draught Guinness can be served quite cold, colder than would be ideal for other ales. The ideal temperature seems to be between 5-8 C. Most Pubs will keep Guinness at cellar temperature usually not as low as this so ordering extra cold Gui
                          nness is they have it is better to get the optimum flavour. A pint of Guinness can take some time to be poured and the process should not be hurried. The usual way is to pour about three quarters of a pint in a glass and then leave it for a minute to settle then carefully to pour the rest. Guinness should be dispensed using a mixture of nitrogen and carbon dioxide gases rather than (as is more usual with beer) carbon dioxide alone. The nitrogen makes very fine bubbles in the beer but is not absorbed by it so the beer is not over carbonated. This process produces a creamy brown head. In many pubs the barman will manoeuvre the pint so that a shamrock is made in the top of the head. If the Guinness is of good quality this ‘drawing’ along with the head should last to the bottom of the glass. Having told you about how you should drink Guinness I should also mention some of the more bizarre variations to these rules. *Black and Tan- Guinness mixed one to one with another lighter coloured beer such as lager. *Black Velvet-Guinness and Champagne in equal proportions (sometimes Cider is used instead of Champagne) *Purple Meany- Half Guinness, half bitter and blackcurrant cordial poured through the creamy head to give it extra sweetness. *Black Brother or Black Death or Black Monk- Guinness mixed with a variety of Trappist ales *Black and Red or Black Cherry-Guinness and Kriek (cherry) beer *A Drop of Diesel-. It is a pint of Smithwicks ale with a shot of Guinness dropped in. And the most bizarre of all! *Guinness and Vanilla Ice Cream known as ‘Golden Cream’- To a half pint of Guinness in a pint glass is added several scoops of Vanilla ice cream. After a minute serve with a long ice cream spoon. And here’s another way to enjoy the individual taste of Guinness (as long as you’
                          ;re not worried by BSE!) *Beef Guinness- (6 people) 3 tablespoons oil 1kg stewing steak, sliced into smallish pieces 7 medium onions, chopped 2 tablespoons flour 1litre of beef stock 1 bottle/3/4pint Guinness Stout 3 tablespoons brown sugar 2 tablespoons vinegar Salt Pepper Heat oven to 250C Place 2 tablespoons of the oil in the frying pan and brown meat. Place the browned meat in to large casserole dish. Brown the onions add to meat and season with salt and pepper. In a pan make roux with the flour and the remaining oil. Add the stock and stir, when the mixture is smooth add to the meat in the casserole. Mix the Guinness with the brown sugar and vinegar. Pour this over the meat. Cover and bake 2 and half hours at 250C. Serve with new potatoes and fresh vegetables. *************************************** ADDITIONAL FACTS AND FIGURES Draught Guinness is only one of many different sorts of Guinness produced. Variations include; *Canned draught Guinness using the draught-flow system. This is really a canned version of the pub drink. *Bottled Guinness-This is similar to Draught in its make up but yeast is added to the bottle giving secondary fermentation thus producing a more bitter, fruitier flavour. *Malt Guinness mainly sold in mainland Europe can be found in both draught and bottles. It is bitterer in taste and is slightly stronger. *Bottled Guinness Extra Stout/Guinness Original is stronger usually 6%, and has fuller taste. *A stronger bottled version sold in Europe has a strength of 7.9%. * Foreign Extra Stout- a blend of Guinness including one aged for three months. This is stronger than ordinary draught (7.5%) and has a shaper drier taste. The symbol of the harp, which is also the symbol of Ireland, on the Guinness logo, was chosen
                          by Arthur Guinness to foster a feeling of national pride in the drink. Guinness was once given out in hospitals to patients after surgery and to blood donors. This was because of Guinness’s high iron content. ************************************* So there you have, all you ever wanted to know about draught Guinness but were afraid to ask! I hope you found it of interest and if you haven’t yet go out and try some. Thanks for reading and rating this opinion © Mauri 2002

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                            22.01.2002 06:08
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                            Guinness is by far Irelands most famous product and something the Irish must be extremely proud of. My experience with Guinness began many many years ago and I continue to enjoy this drink till today on quite a regular basis. If you really want to enjoy your Guinness then by far the best way is the natural draught version at your local pub. Most barmen or barwomen will know the perfect way to serve this exquisite nectar. It has to be served in a two-tier system. First is to pour the glass about two thirds full with the glass titled at around 45 degrees. Straighten the glass and wait for the contents to settle. Then fill the balance one-third with the glass in a straight position. This ensures that you get the remarkable head that one expects from this drink. Apart from the taste one aspect that stands out the most is the drinks dark almost black colour and the almost chocolate coloured looking head. What causes this lovely looking head is the nitrogen that is present in the keg. The basic ingredients of Guinness are malted barley, hops, yeast and water. Some of the malted barley is roasted and this is what gives Guinness its dark black colour. Guinness is technically a beer and when drinking it this aspect is certainly ascertained. However what stands this drink out from regular beer is its unique taste, which is primarily due to the roasted malted barley it contains. Guinness Stout is one of the most sought after and popular drinks in the world. A staggering ten million glasses of Guinness are consumed everyday throughout the world. As mentioned earlier I thoroughly enjoy this drink and have it at least two to three times a week. The drink not only looks magical but also has a healthy type of taste to it that is full of body. It’s as if you know your drinking something that’s good for you. Guinness may look like a fattening drink, what with its creamy head and all,
                            but as a matter of fact it only contains 196 calories a pint. This is significantly less than most other beers and other drinks such as milk and orange juice. The only problem I find with Guinness Stout is that after I have consumed a couple of pints my body just cannot take anymore. This is unlike regular beer, which I could easily consume four to give pints on the trot. Has anyone else experienced this before? Overall a magical drink and one to savour. NB. Some information contained in this opinion (ingredients etc) was obtained from Guinness’s Official Website at www.guinness.com

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                            The absolute definition of an Irish dry Stot & Porter. The head is legendary - creamy light brown, usually lasts longer than the beer does. Aroma is good, solid, pleasent. Color is dark and rich. Taste is full, rich, creamy. Slight bitterness. Aftertaste is solid, lingering, slightly hoppy. Clearly better than canned, and MUCH better than bottled! Brewer: Guinness. Style: Stot & Porter