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      19.07.2014 19:18
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      A classic !

      Leffe is a classic Belgian beer ! I would risk saying it is my favorite beer along with Delirium - both belgians. Leffe has a lot of variations - for all kinds of tastes - so it is very difficult you won''''t find one to love ! The taste is very good, it''''s refreshing and 500 ml can less a lot of time, since it is usually well concentrated. Always a good call !

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      13.04.2013 19:00
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      Excellent blonde Abbey beer

      When I first started drinking beer, I was around sixteen. The go to choice was what most teenagers opt for, particularly as alcopops weren't around. It was Budweiser, the sort of sugary fizzy beer that I would not even touch today. Decent beers are thin on the ground. Belgium has a history of producing great beers, and Leffe is undoubtedly the most famous of all of them.

      Ironically enough, Leffe is now owned by Anhauser-Busch who make Budweiser. Thankfully, the two beers are worlds apart. There are a large number of different Leffes, but the best selling is Leffe blonde. This is an Abbey beer. Monks in Abbeys were permitted to brew beer, and they made some great brews. The Abbey that is supposed to have first produced Leffe was around since the 12th century.

      Leffe is great to drink, though some might find it cloying. A deep golden colour, pouring correctly into the glass produces a luxuriously creamy head. The aroma is sweet, though the taste is not. It's not sour either. Banana, vanilla and spice dominate. This is a beer that tastes of beer, like it should. But at the same time, it has a uniqueness about it that no other beer has.

      If you have to drink a beer ice-cold, you don't like the taste of beer. Leffe is best enjoyed colder than a pale ale, but no more than that, or you start to lose the subtleties that you are paying for in the first place. Leffe Blonde is a premium beer, and you pay accordingly. But it's no more to buy at the supermarket than, for example, London Pride.

      Leffe goes really well with fish and seafood, though it will bring a touch of class to most meals. The one caveat with Leffe is that it is not weak. At 6.6%, you need to be careful if you're having a pint and driving afterwards. I normally buy the large 750ml bottle at Sainsbury, where you can often get two for a fiver.

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        11.03.2011 23:39
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        A nice Belgian Beer!

        Leffe Blonde is another of those beers I wouldn't dare try back here in the UK, if I am to try any beers such as Leffe they will be abroad where they severely lack decent cider or anything commercial such as Magners. I recently sailed on a sailing ship in the Canaries, and on board they had Strongbow which I guess is a valid alternative to my beloved Magners but once that had run out I turned to Leffe.

        It is a blonde beer, something I'd barely tried before therefore the taste was quite uknown to me bar the odd sip of my Dad's beers while growing up. Leffe Blonde is a Belgian beer, dating back to 1240 and is quite a strong one at 6.6%. You'd think 3/4 of a century they've had more than enough time to perfect a taste, and it isn't too bad to be honest.

        The first thing that gets you about this beer is not the strength but the taste, it's as if the strength is subsidised within the taste therefore not apparent. It has quite a wheaty taste to it which is what you'd expect but coming from a cider drinker I can cope quite happily with drinking Leffe, it's not my favourite alcoholic beverage by far but it is definitely one of my favourite beers.

        I'm not a keen chef or anything but for those of you who like to mix beers like this with food, Leffe's official website (www.leffe.com) has guidelines on what you could mix it with. There's quite a variety of combinations and recipes but they're too complicated for my liking!

        I often buy it when it's on offer in Tesco, you can get 2x 750ml bottles for £5, and they usually sell at £3.53 each in store so it's definitely worth a buy for the big bottles, but only when they're on offer, I think the individual price is quite steep. It's also available in 330ml bottles which are the ones I drank while away in the Canaries but I'm not too sure on the pricing.

        I would and have recommended Leffe to friends, usually as an alternative when what we usually drink is out of stock at our local shop! It's really nice and surprisingly refreshing. They like it and have actually ended up drinking it more than I do! Give it a go, 2 for a fiver in Tescos right now, 750ml of 6.6% blonde beer - bargain! I only give it 3 stars because it's not my favourite type of alcohol, but if you are a beer lover this is definitely for you.

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        11.11.2009 13:58
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        Leffe is one of my favourite Belgian beers . I first sampled this when I was 19, and at the time it was still a relatively obscure beer over here- available only at a few bars in the city centre , poured from a bottle into a chalice shaped glass .

        It's really grown in popularity now it seems - most supermarkets sell Leffe, and all good offlicences stock it . It's no longer hard to find in bar - many pubs now have this on tap!

        Leffe is an 'Abbey' beer . I think it's is important here to make a distinction between Abbey and Trappist beers here. Trappist beers are beer still brewed at an abbey by monks, and the proceeds going towards the monastery or its community projects . There are currently only 7 trappist breweries remaining

        Many Abbey beers are only very loosely affiliated with the monastic lifestyle. In many cases, the abbey no longer exists, or the brewing process has come under the control of large brewery companies . The latter is the case with Leffe, although royalties are paid by the brewery to the abbey .

        Lets look at the history of Leffe . The abbey Notre Dame de Leffe was founded in 1152 in southern Belgium . Like many other abbeys, the monks chose to brew their own beer - not for profit or sale, but because water in its raw state was at the time deeply unsanitary - you risked your life if you drank it, given that the rivers were filled with sewage, junk, and the ocassional rotting corpse. You risked diseases such as Cholera, Botulism, and Typhoid .

        Small wonder then that many religious orders turned to beer brewing - part of the brewing process involved boiling the water, killing the bacteria there . And of course, any resulting ill health could then be blamed on a hangover - because the monks weren't shy about drinking the stuff . On fast days, the consumption of liquid didn't count as breaking the fast, so monks could easily consume lots of the stuff to fill up . In fact, historical records show that monks were allowed to drink 5 litres of the stuff a day .

        Despite drinking so much of it, they had a bit left over, and after paying a fee were given permission to sell their beer . Sadly life wasn't easy for the monks - in 1460 the Abbeys structure was damaged by a flood, and a fire in 1466 didn't help matters much either . In 1794, the outbreak of the French revolution resulted in the abbey being deserted, and the brewery and equipment being destroyed .

        The monks did not return to the Abbey until 1902 , and in 1952 the Abbey struck up a partnership with the Lootvoet brewery, handing over their recipe and allowing the beer to be brewed again at the brewery site in Overijse. This company has since been purchased by InBev, who now brew Leffe beers at the Stella Artois brewery in Leuven , with royalties being paid to the Abbey .

        Well, I didn't mean to ramble on quite as much as that - but the history is one of the things I love about Abbey beers - it's nice to have a story that tells about the drink . But now, onto the drink itself.

        Traditionally, Leffe is served in a Chalice shaped glass , and if you're drinking this in a pub, most will have proper Leffe branded glasses for you to drink from .

        When pouring, it is a bright yellowy gold colour with a generous foamy off white head and plenty of fizz . Taking a sniff, there is a very fruity aroma, banana, pear, and a hint of cloves, along with a hoppy scent ,

        Taking a swig, it has plenty of flavour to it, and a slight carbonation that dances across my tongue . The flavour is initially very malty, and quite sweet, but then changes to a slightly more fruity flavour, an odd but satisfying mix of banana and orange, before fading out into a slightly burnt caramel taste .

        At 6.6 percent, it is decently strong without being overpoweringly so . I do like this beer an awful lot, but I struggle to drink more than half a pint, simply because the beer seems to be very filling, and leave me feeling quite bloated. But a single small bottle to accompany dinner ( it really does go wonderfully with any kind of food ) is a lovely treat!

        I would heartily recommend this beer, and indeed many of the others in the Leffe range . A small bottle will cost around £1.75, and a larger bottle around £2.50. It is quite pricey (even more so in pubs) but I think this is a beer that is complex in flavours and very enjoyable to drink, and I think the price is fair for the quality .

        5 stars .

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          20.10.2009 12:04
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          lovely beer, smooth on the tastebuds

          The more i drink this, the more i wish i was a monk, as the monks invented this and it is easily one of my favourite bottled beers.

          The bottle is a very nice design, it looks like a well established beer and is one that tempts you to try it, which always helps to attract new customers.

          At 6.6% this is a rather strong beer, however it doesnt give you the hangover you think you might get once you have devoured a load of bottles the night. Its a rather smooth tasting beer, and feels great on the tongue and really tantalises the taste buds. It doesnt bloat you either so you can have quite a few bottles without having to move onto spirits or something else if your someone who gets bloated easily when drinking beer.

          Although a named brand on a glass will not have any difference to the texture or taste of this beer, the shape will probably have an influence. Chalice shaped glasses are seen as better suited for strong beers like leffe, and if you dont like to drink it out of the bottle then i would recommend a chalice shaped glass to get the maximum taste out of it.

          Leffe is brewed in belgium and is a brand of abbey beer, using knowledge passed from generation to generation and ingredients found in the wild near the abbey. All Leffe brands are brewed at the Stella Artois brewery in Leuven.

          There is also a Leffe museum in the town of Dinant which is open to visitors. Might be worth a visit if your in the area.

          Overall a great tasting beer, which is strong and doesnt bloat you, id highly recommend this. The only downside is that it might be a little pricey depending on where you buy it from

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            19.05.2009 12:20
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            Lagers are wrong, Leffe is right.

            This ale is becoming increasingly popular here in the UK. This is a good thing as this is a very tasty beer.

            First the facts, this is an ale - not a lager - it is top fermented.

            Secondly, don't pronounce it leff-ay. The beer is Belgian and the Walloons there (french speakers) would call it 'leff' (no accent) and the Flemish speakers pronounce the letter e at the end of words like this: 'leff-uh'. Take your pick - you'll probably have to point it out anyway.

            Finally this is an abbey beer. This is a cynical commercial response to the famous Trappist beers. These are a range of ales brewed by monks - what a life. Due to the popularity of these beers, and the strict rules governing who can call their beers Trappist, the large beer companies invented a beer genre to tap into the market.

            Leffe isn't brewed by monks, although allegedly once it was (though it wouldn't have resembled today's leffe). This beer is brewed ultimately by Anheuser-Busch InBev - the largest brewer in the world. This is neither a good thing, nor a bad thing.

            Okay - enough chat. How about consumption? Well, this ale is best served lightly chilled - not so much that you can't taste it - and for real authenticity in a leffe glass (or any goblet shaped glass). Leffe in a pint glass looks silly, and as it is 6.6% you don't want to be drinking pints of the stuff.

            With most belgian beers the head is an integral part of the beer, more for looks rather than anything else, so don't inch the ale down the side of the glass or it will end up looking flat and unappetising. If no head is appearing then swill the last inch of ale around in the bottle and pour to give the nice head. This should reach the top of the glass and only just peek over.

            The beer itself has a lovely rich, slightly caramelly and sweet flavour with an after taste which nicely draws you into the next mouthful. Lager drinkers often give up at this stage and buy a Fosters.

            The beer is available bottled in most supermarkets, quite a lot of pubs and bars (Wetherspoons for instance), and occasionally on tap. And if you are lucky enough to venture to Belgium then check out the Cafe Leffe bars to experience the rest of the Leffe range.

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              27.01.2009 09:30
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              Doesn't suit everyone, but is a solid contender when I'm choosing at the bar!

              I am a big fan of White Lager, and Belgian Lager, so Belgian White Lager? Hurrah!

              Over the past couple of years, Leffe has seemingly crept in to mainstream pubs across the UK, and Weatherspoons definitely seem to like selling it. Of course, I feel a slight pang of annoyance, as the "inside club" of those who've been to Belgium and tasted the real deal now have countless people asking if I've tried it yet!

              White Lager isn't for everyone. It tends to be much sweeter than your usual pint, and it is stronger than the usual lineup available. But if you treat your taste buds to one or two of these on a night out, I doubt you'll regret the experience. Leffe is also quite fizzy, especially if your drinking hole of choice serves the bottles rather than having it on tap.

              The only real comparable White Lager on mass sale in the UK is Hoegardden, which I can also recommend.

              Here's a great tip if you're aim is to forget the week on a Friday: eat a bag of skittles, or similarly sugary sweets, about 10 or 15 minutes before drinking White Lager. You'll have a very cheap night because the skittles will bolster the strength of the drink!

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                08.08.2008 13:20
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                Interesting Taste - Not my cup of tea...

                Leffe Blonde is marketed as being authentic Belgian abbey beer.
                At the wine shop nearest to me, it sells for around £2 a bottle, which is for the 330ml size. The price can vary greatly - when I was staying in a hotel in Belgium, I asked for two pints of Leffe, and was stunned when the bill came to around 16 Euros - not a bar I went to again...

                The beer itself is fairly light in colour, and is has a high alcoholic content at 6.6% volume.

                The taste is quite unusual, and in my opinion, not entirely pleasant. It's certainly not a beer which you could say is refreshing, although I do find it tastes better cold. The aftertaste is slightly bitter, but not unpleasant.

                There is definitely a range of flavors in this beer which I can't really describe, but i'm sure beer connoisseurs will enjoy. Overall it's not unpleasant, but not my beer of choice.

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                06.08.2008 18:37
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                Too sweet

                Leffe is a Belgian beer that like so many of the best things in life was originally made by monks. God bless those little chaps for making Leffe beers, whilst Leffe Blonde is by no means the best Belgian beer it was one of the first to make the British shores but it's modern day availability has come at a cost. Far from it's abbey heritage, originating as early as 1152, it's now part of the global company Inbev, who closed the original brewery and started brewing the beer at Stella Artois' brewery in Leuven.

                Leffe Blonde should be served in a chalice style glass, it pours a honey colour and has a lot of carbonation. The taste is initially rather like shampoo before becoming sweet and honey likes with hints of fruitiness and a bit of spice to it. Overall it's a bit sweet for my liking and makes me a pull a funny face. At 6.6% abv, too many of these and you'll find yourself sleeping in the garden, other Leffe beers are slightly better in my view.

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                  29.10.2007 17:12
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                  Not my pint

                  Having just tried this recently, I realised I had to review it. I'd had it hugely recommended and the shop down the road sells it (£1.39 a bottle, bit extortionate tbh), but with the eager sales man (the same guy who knows I'll go in there several times a week) advising me that it was "very good" (same thing he said about Kingfisher the week before), I should have realised he was wanting rid of it.

                  Now before I get into my third rant in almost as many reviews, it's not that Leffle blonde is terrible, far from it, but it's no a world beater like Cobra, Kronnenbourg or Kopperberg.

                  The beer is a light beer (though a strong light beer, unlike other similar beers such as Coors) and does have a bit of a thick deep taste which I would describe as having a tar like texture (much like how I'd explain dark beers or a similar strength). This is kinda nice for the first few sips but quickly becomes rather off-putting and kinda stomach churning by the time you've nearly had a bottle of it.

                  I know that people do like stronger beers/lagers (I myself love the 7% Okocim Mocne from Poland, and rarely drink anything beneath 5.2% light or dark) but they usually do have a somewhat offish taste (the Leffe Brune for example has an almost treacle like feel to it). Sadly this drink falls into this trap, and doesn't have the smoothness of it's rivals (lagers in general not just light beers).

                  The drink is from Belgium (and apart from the Brune version of the drink is the only drink I've had from Belgium apart from Stella Artois) so I'm not sure if the taste is somewhat one made for the Belgium palette (much like British Curry's are made for the Brit's palette) and with Stella tasting much like any other continental lager this may well be the case.

                  The price and taste are both huge negatives for this drink, it would seem to want to treat it's self as a premium light beer, but taste slightly worse than the cheaper (less alcoholic) alternatives so personally I'd rather good with a good old fashioned bottle of Coors or Miller but may drink this again every so often as it's a very averagey product for the price.

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                    14.10.2002 22:20

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                    The Beer Festival Weekend - Advantages: Instant annebriation - Disadvantages: Tastes like sand, Hurts like glass

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                    17.09.2002 03:19
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                    Notre-Dame de leffe is a Norbertine abbey near the Belgian town of Dinant, on the River Meuse. Beer was first brewed here in 1152 but they ceased the practice around the time of the French Revolution. In the 1950's, to raise funds for maintenance, the abbot allowed a local brewer to make their beer. They now licence the Stella Artois and Hoegaarden breweries (part of the giant Interbrew group) to make a range of beers. Perhaps the most widely known is Leffe Blonde, a top fermented ale with a distinctly citric note which combines typical yeast characteristics with a fruity flavour. These flavours come not from added fruits but from natural compounds created in the fermentation. Leffe is the brand leader among Belgian abbey beers - and should be served cold at 5° C. Best served in its own stylish glass - with a logo which is reminiscent of a stained glass window - the chalice shape glass not only enhances the appearance of the beer, it helps retain the aromas of malt, spices and alcohol. Let's take a short break while I open a bottle..... ____________________________________________________________ A visitor to an Aberdeen bar was surprised to find the beer costing only 2p a pint. When asked, the barman explained that it was the price to mark the centenary of the pub opening. The visitor noticed, however, that no-one in the bar was drinking. "Are the regular customers not enjoying the special prices?" he asked. To which the barman replied, "They're waiting for the Happy Hour." Help ma Boab... Ah cannae find the bottle opener..... Old MacDonald - no, he didn't have a farm - was on his deathbed with his wife Morag maintaining a vigil by his side. She held his fragile hand, tears running down her face. Her praying roused him from his slumber. He looked up and his pale lips began to move slightly: "My darling Morag," he whispered. "Hush, my love,&q
                    uot; she said. "Rest. Shhh. Don't talk." But he was insistent. "Morag," he said in his tired voice. "I have something I must confess to you." "There's nothing to confess," replied the weeping Morag. "Everything's all right, go to sleep." "No, no. I must die in peace, Morag. I slept with your sister, your best friend and your mother." "I know," she replied. "That's why I poisoned you." ____________________________________________________________ Now we're in business.... * THE POUR * It has a beautiful bright yellow to gold colour and lots of carbonation, with a foamy white head which clings to the glass through to the end leaving a fine lace. The first thing that strikes me is the medicinal quality of the nose. There are vine-fruit aromas, a hint of banana and ripe pears, with some herbal hops and a little spicy clove-like aroma with a yeasty character. I can also detect a fruity bubble-gum tone to the nose and an underlying sweet malt. * THE TASTE * It's moderately full-bodied with a soft, viscous mouthfeel. Again, the first taste sensation is of a medicinal nature, due to the phenols, followed by a sweet malty, honey-like flavour. There's some herbal hop bitterness but that soon fades to a more fruity (oranges) and spicy taste. There is enough bitterness though to keep this beer well balanced. It's smooth, creamy and light with a faint caramel and rather bready malt character. The finish is a rich malt sweetness, which is well balanced by a spiciness and dryness. * THE VERDICT * At 6.6% ABV, it's a little too sweet for my liking. There are other Belgian blonde ales that are far superior to this one. Still worth trying though, especially if you appreciate the style. It's not bad, but for a Belgian beer I think it's far too clean &
                    filtered. I suppose the fact that a large multi-national brewery produces it doesn't help the cause. As I said it isn't a bad beer, but there are lots of Abbey-style Belgian ales and most of them are much better. Would I drink it again? Of course I would, but only if I couldn't get the far tastier Leffe Brune.....but that's another story. * I'm obviosly no gentleman! Thanks for reading, Sláinte

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                      14.03.2001 17:02
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                      Ok I’ll come straight out with it; Leffe Blond is one of my favourite beers. As you may have probably guessed it’s a Belgian abbey beer, which means monks originally created it (I doubt that is still the case). Despite its strength it is quite a light beer and that is reflected in its name and beautiful rich amber colour. I think it’s very fruity for a beer and its flavours seem perfect in a Leffe glass, which is like a large red wineglass, which, to me emphasises the delicate wine like fruitiness. If served properly it should be poured in one go, with the head being skimmed and the drink re-topped two or three times, (quite expensive if you own a bar). Slightly chilled it’s perfect on a warm summers day, with flavoured chicken, like spicy wings or southern fired chicken on a barbecue. You may think this would ruin the flavour but it only complements it. I couldn’t give many foods it goes well with though as it doesn’t with many, often have I opened a bottle with meal to be disappointed by the clashing of flavours, (curry is a good example of this).

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                    • Product Details

                      Abbey Brew, 6.6 percent Alcohol. Brewed in Belgium since 1152.