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Newcastle Brown Ale

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      08.03.2013 18:28
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      A good bear to combine with a hearty meal

      Newcastle brown (also known as Newkie brown) is a dark, heavy beer with a strong flavour. It's not as thick as a stout (like Guinness) but it is heavier than lager (also ales, unlike larger, are not carbonated).

      Because of its strong flavour Newcastle brown ale is often used for cooking, but I much prefer to drink it rather than cook with it.

      The bottles it comes in are basic, unpretentious looking thick, cheap glass containers with something of a vernacular look (the correct glass to serve NBA from is a equally thick glass tankard- no fancy pants branded glass for this working class tipple.

      NBA has a obvious sticky caramel taste that I think all darker beers tend to have, I like it a lot, but I do sometimes prefer something a little lighter, and a little more refreshing, or some times I like the heavy stout but with the creamy taste- it's rare that I am 'in the mood for a NBA' but when I am, there's nothing else on the market that can satisfy that craving.

      Try it!

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      05.06.2012 19:08
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      Great stuff

      I have always enjoyed a pint of Newcastle brown Ale, as has my dear other half. We are not snobs when it comes to our booze, and we will, in fact, drink most things, especially if they are free. I started to drink Newcastle Brown Ale years ago and enjoy it now still, some twenty-odd years later. There is nothing like it in my opinion. It is a taste all of it's own.

      Newkie is best served VERY cold and I say this from personal experience. Theories nothing worse that an pint of this that has been allowed to get to room temperature. That's just pure sabotage. This beer is just the best. The colour alone will win you over. It is rich and dark and near to red brown, unless that's just my eyes. There is a lovely kick to it and you can really taste the malt. It is rich and dark and very moreish and thirst quenching, all at the same time.

      One a Friday or Saturday night, if we are staying in, I have my bath and light my candles which I place all around the sides of the bath. I stick in my earphones, lie back in the bubbles and my dear other half presents me with a full pint of cold Newkie while I lie there and forget about what a bloody rotten week I've had at work. If I'm lucky, she'll wash my back. It's pure nectar. Bliss.

      It's mild, at only 4.7% alcohol by volume and I can usually manage to knock back a fair few bottle of this over the weekend. Not as many as my other half mind you - she beats me hands down every time and drink me under the table. It's a homely, old fashioned and tasty ale and reminds me of my dad.

      It's not too gassy and doesn't fill me up and not a weekend goes by without me having a bottle or two of this.

      Great stuff and highly recommended.

      If you haven't tasted Newkie, you haven't lived!

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        04.02.2012 14:53

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        our go to ale, it is the one and only

        My husband is a huge fan of this brand, it would be his go to beer if he was given a choice. This ale always gives a nice full flavour, not too gassy, as some bottled beers can be. Has a nice top to it, and a good long drink very flavoursome.

        I would buy this for myself and my husband as we both really enjoy it. I was introduced to it as an 18 year old, not many teenagers would have this kind of ale as they favoured the fizzy becks or coronas. I found this was a much better flavour and not so chemical tasting.

        Price wise, this ale can come up as a little on the expensive side, but if you shop around you can find some good deals on this brand. Also its a good ale to use in cookery, this may not please some readers but it really adds the full flavour to the beef and ale dishes.

        I hope you found this review helpful.

        Thank you for reading.

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        21.07.2011 12:25
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        The brown ale ward doesnt exist but a part of me wishes it did.

        "They've got a special department in the Royal Victoria Infirmary for people who have went mad with drinking brown ale you know"
        "Don't be daft; it's just an urban myth"
        Just an example of the argument that is probably happening somewhere in Newcastle whilst you are reading this review. It is unusual for a beer to have such an unusual reputation but there you have it. Newcastle Brown Ale will send you a bit crackers..... Or will it???????

        I have heard this statement many times and it simply isn't true. When I was just 21 and had a healthy appetite for alcohol (which has since blossomed into a full blown addiction) I decided that it would be a good idea to drink 12 bottles of the stuff just to see if I would indeed be carted off to this mystic wing at the local hospital. Strangely enough as I approached the last of my bottles of malty, sweet tasting, murky reddish brown 550ml, 4.7% locally brewed ale, I did not see dancing fairies, did not start bouncing off the walls or demanding to fight the next bloke who looked at me the wrong way. No, something quite different occurred. I appeared to be having a good time. This (although what I was hoping for) is not what I expected given the stories surrounding the beer. I felt in a good place and was very proud of my achievement. I still tell the story to this day and I am very proud that I managed it and survived. Only time will tell if my liver emerged unscathed from the encounter. My hangover certainly reminded me of my achievement the next day.

        Unlike most ale it is recommended that Newkie brown is served cold. There is a star on the bottle that turns a blue when it is at its optimum temperature. I personally am happy having it cold or warm. It is available in pint form in a very limited number of pubs (so limited I can't even give you a guide price), in can form for ale heathens for around £1 per can and in its iconic bottle form for around £1.50. Strangely enough I can pick up a bottle at one of my local pubs for £1.40, a whole 10p cheaper than the supermarket. Can anyone else say that they can drink cheaper in the pub than at home?

        It is as deeply associated with Newcastle upon Tyne as the Tyne Bridge or Newcastle United Football Club. It is America's biggest imported ale and it can be found hiding in the fridge of most bars in the country. A friend of mine recently went on holiday to Jamaica and the barman told him he had a drink he would never have had before. Out came a bottle of brown ale. I can only imagine the look on my friends face.
        If you are a drinker from Newcastle you must sample this. It is a part of your heritage and has been brewed since 1927. If you like your ales then it is a must as it is iconic and tastes very fine. For those who do not like ale then you may be pleasantly surprised as it is like no other ale I have ever tried and you may be pleasantly surprised.

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        27.11.2010 11:20
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        Treat it with respect; it's part of the Geordie heritage.

        We spent a number of years in the North-East and a large number of our family still live there. Although I have never been a big drinker, my beer of choice became Newcastle Brown Ale.

        I seldom buy it now because every time we get a visit from one of our sons, they bring some down for me to enjoy when the fancy takes me. They always bring bottles rather than cans and it's from the bottle that it is still traditionally sold in pubs throughout the North-East and elsewhere. You'll often hear punters ask for "A botte of Dog", having used dog exercise as a feeble excuse for nipping down to the pub. Traditionally, the barman will take the bottle top off and give you a small sized glass. This is because most brown ale drinkers like to regularly top up their glass and in so doing maintain the frothy head through which you drink the beer.

        The product itself is something of an acquired taste, being really quite malty with a definite aftertaste. It is this aftertaste that puts off a lot of people, but this is just a matter of taste, I guess.

        I liken Newcastle Brown Ale to Guinness in some respects in that, unless you are a seasoned drinker, you can't really drink too much of it in a session and remain unaffected. Although it is a much thinner brew than Guinness, it has a similar smooth taste and is best savoured in mouthfuls rather than quaffed in gulps.

        Most prefer to drink it slightly cold and the bottle itself contains a means of testing the temperature by colour change of the label. It is said that the way the beer is stored can have an adverse effect on the taste. However, drinking primarily the bottled variety, I have never had a bad pint.

        You get 550ml of Newcastle Brown Ale in the clear glass bottle and it is 4.7% proof - a little less strong than it once was, but too much of the stuff can certainly do you some damage by way of a thick head and evil botty burps which creep along the ground and then reach up and grab you by the throat.

        Consolidation within the brewing industry has meant that the drink which has been associated with Newcastle and Scottish and Newcastle Breweries in particular has been brewed in Tadcaster in Yokshire for the last few years. This shouldn't really matter, but somehow it does.

        For a number of years in the North East, you drank in either an S&N pub or a Vaux pub (Vaux, based in Sunderland, closed over 10 years ago). It is sad to see the local identity of brewing to be diluted in the way that it has.

        I would heartily recommend this product.

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          02.08.2010 19:45
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          When I was much younger, I was a lager and alcopop drinker. Nowadays, I'm all about the real ales - and for that we can thank Newcastle Brown .

          Many people might not class Newkie as a real ale - after all, unlike many, it is recommended served cold - it even has a little star gadget on the label that changes colour to indicate perfect drinking temperature .

          It was, the first time I tried it, a whole new experience in drinking. I wasn't sure I liked it at first sip. I still wasn't sure after the first bottle. Or the second. I was midway through the third when I decided 'Well, I clearly don't dislike it' and probably on about the sixth when I actually decided I loved it . That opinion wavered the next day when I had a stinking hangover- but overall, my opinion was more good than bad!

          The beer itself is a lovely rich reddish brown, and when poured there is a slight fizzy head that vanishes quite quickly. It has a satisfying and quite deep malty flavour, with a hint of sweetness and a touch of nuttiness . It isn't as strongly flavoured as many beers, and there is nothing that really shouts at you for attention. It is, however, very drinkable , especially when nice and cold.

          At 4.7, its mild enough to have a few bottles at once, and light enough not to leave me feeling like I've eaten a full meal as some beers do .

          Overall, 4 stars. Not the most exciting beer on the market certainly, but perfectly drinkable .

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            27.09.2009 22:05
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            A nice ale at a decent price.

            I must admit i absolutely love Newcastle Brown Ale and there's nothing better than watching the footy with a few bottles or even a few to start the night off.

            It seems to have a distinct taste and is up there with the best in the market. Usually supermarkets such as Sainsburys and Asda do a deal 4 bottles for a fiver which is a good deal.

            It is exported all over the world and according to a friend who has just visited the US has seen them sold in bottles half the size and is very popular drink in the states.

            Up until recently i thought they had taken newcy brown ale off the tap in bars but it is still available in the pub outside of St James Park the Strawberry.

            Usually the hangover is not too clever and at 4.7% i do usually have a headache the next day, although that doesn't bother me once i get round in the drinking mood again.

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              28.07.2009 00:31
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              One of my favourite ales

              I've been getting into my ale recently, and where better to start than Newcastle Brown Ale? It has a volume of 4.7%, and is most often sold in snazzy looking pint bottles, although as a result they do tend to cost a bit more than your normal drink. Still, whilst I hold no allegiance whatsoever to Newcastle, it's homely sort of charm is definitely infectious, and in that way it seems a lot less capital-driven and a little more friendly and inviting, even if, of course, this is just simply clever marketing.

              You'll know the logo and design of Newcastle Brown Ale from across the shop, which makes it stand out from some of the other more bland blends of alcohol, as well as making it easy to spot if you're not shopping around and just gunning for it. The logo is very distinctive, and no doubt presents a symbol that those living in Newcastle and those who support the football team will instantly identify with.

              Taste-wise, this is definitely one of the better ales that I've tried - it has a sweet taste that balances the fine line between sweetness and too sweet. It's a rich drink, both in heritage and in composition, and thus it's something of a dichotomy - it promotes the working class North East means of its production, whilst appearing somewhat more robustly composed and sophisticated in its texture.

              Ale is without a doubt an acquired taste, but if you like a nuanced drink that's got a rich taste and a rich heritage (although the taste is the most important!), then this is the ale for you!

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              14.07.2009 21:52
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              A great tasting Ale from my roots.

              As Busker said in his geordie song, Home Newcastle, 'i'd walk the streets al day al neet for a bottle of ye own broon ale.'

              You won't be surprised to know that Newcastle Brown Ale started being brewed in Newcastle Upon Tyne in 1927. It is manufactured by Scottish and Newcastle.

              Brown Ale is 4.7% alcohol and is traditionally sold by pint or 0.88 pint bottles and can be consumed in a Wellington glass ensuring regular top up to keep the head right. Brown Ale has a strong association with it's local region much like Boddingtons and Tetleys in Manchester and Leeds respectively. It was sponsoring Newcastle United at one point and by having the River Tyne as a silhouette in the blue star. Locals call Brown Ale, Broon or 'Dog'. This is used in the context, 'I'm going to walk the Dog' which actually means the person is going to the pub. Those away from the region often call it Newcy Brown which sounds rubbish in my opinion and takes away from it's north east heritage.

              Brown Ale has a very distinctive logo which you can spot from a mile off which is always helpful when looking for it on the shelf in a southern off license. The blue star with the bright background and big Newcastle Brown Ale writing makes it very clear and personally proud to see the name Newcastle banded about.

              As for the taste, i love the taste of Brown Ale and it is one of my favourite alcoholic beverages. It is a drink that tastes great if it is your first drink and great if it is one of many, but it can tip you over the edge if you've had too much alcohol, believe me i know! Some complain Brown ale has too many chemicals but I focus on the rich taste which has the right level of sweetness and a lovely texture. It looks like a picture as well. It is a fairly rich ale with a moderate alcohol level and It sounds cliche but it just works.

              Now i'm off to walk the dog.

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              08.01.2009 18:57
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              Newcastle Brown has been brewed in Tyne and Wear since 1927. No link has yet been proven but this was also the last year that Newcastle Utd won the football league championship. It's the one drink from behind the bar that's guaranteed to give me a splitting head ache even after just one bottle. The first time this happened I'd already consumed three or four pints of other ales and beers before I began swigging the 'Broon' stuff, so I couldn't be sure whether 'the bottle of dog' as it's also sometimes known, was to blame. Only further dedicated research over the years has left me in no doubt that Newcy Brown is for headbangers. I should have guessed this because the mate who first introduced me to it was a real headbanger and drank bottles of it by the dozen. Newcastle Brown ale is now a heavily marketed export brand. Amazingly in the 1990s it became the best-selling bottled beer in the UK, as well as the top-selling bottled beer in Europe. Whether this is still true I'm not sure.

              The bottled brew is promoted as being 'smooth like no other'. Personally I don't find it smooth at all. Like many a bottle of ale it's full of gas, too fizzy and is guaranteed to have you farting for England in no time. It must be a major contributor to global warming on account of all the methane and carbon dioxide that is generated during the production and consumption process. Although it's not all bad. There are said to be considerable benefits for those with constipation: drinking six bottles is supposed to ease the ailment. The alcohol content is 4.7% - a percentage that was a point or so higher in the distant past when some say it used to be a much more wholesome tastier brew.

              In appearance the beer has the complex tones of dark brown mud and when poured into the glass produces a short-lived soapy frothy head similar to that which you find on polluted rivers that flow past chemical factories in Poland. OK, I'll admit the beer has its moments when a mildly pleasant malty flavour with a hint of caramel rises to the surface, but overall one is left with an artificial taste that sticks to the tongue and palate like some waste synthetic residue. And then there's the acrid smell of saccharine that makes your stomach queasy and your eyes water... and that's only when you stand next to someone who's drinking it. It's a full-bodied ale in the sense that your body feels full and your eyeballs start swelling when you've had a bottle or two.

              Some say this is an ale that should be chilled before serving whilst others demand it must be served at room temperature. Perhaps that's where the problem lies. Apparently the flavour and quality of a bottle of Brown varies a lot depending on how it's stored. Bad storage in many establishments is one of the reasons - some claim - why the drink deteriorates over time whilst on the shelf. So maybe I've just been getting bad ones.

              At the time of writing a 550ml bottle can be purchased in supermarkets for around £1.70.

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                13.10.2008 20:54
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                A distinctive flavour and smell. A proper dark beer!

                Newcastle Brown Ale, referred to by those in the know as Brown Dog. Interestingly enough, this comes from the phrase, 'I'm going to see a man about a dog' came from - the person saying it was going to the pub for a bottle beer! Also can be know as Newkie Brown to the locals.

                Originally brewed in Newcastle Upon Tyne, the first bottle was brewed in 1927 and its been popular ever since. In 2000 the name was changed to simply Newcastle Brown after the makers thought they were losing youth sales due to the fact that ale isn't a popular drink among younger people. It was then renamed again a few years later after they concluded the name made no difference to sales at all.

                Has a distinct earthy flavour with a malty smell to it. It looks almost like a work of art when sitting on a bar top, due to its caramel brown colour. A real mans beer!

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                  01.10.2008 11:58
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                  Newcastle ale

                  Newcastle brown ale is one of my favourite drinks. It is very unique ale and not everyone will like it. Newcastle brown is brewed has been brewed in Tyne and Wear since 1927. Apparently it is sometimes referred to as a bottle of dog, although I've never heard it called that! The name came from the euphemism I'm of to walk the dog, meaning I'm of for a pint!

                  The beer comes in brown bottles with a blue star logo and is widely available in both pubs and supermarkets. The beer itself is very dark in colour and has a very distinctive sweet taste. It is strong full-bodied ale. I think the taste grows on you actually, as when I first tasted it many years ago I seem to remember I wasn't too keen!

                  The image of the ale has changed over the years from the drink of hard working ship builders and miners in flat caps to a bit of a trendy drink. The price of a bottle varies around the £2 mark.

                  If you have never tried this brew, then give it a go!

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                    12.05.2007 14:30

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                    Full of chemicals and tastes awful. Better sticking to real ales. Should be called "Gateshead Brown Ale" anyway that's where it's now brewed.

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                    08.12.2006 22:45
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                    Simply fantastic.

                    There is no better ale on the market today. Simply the best tasting beer available. Not only does it taste great, it's smooth going down. There's nothing better than pouring a Newcastle in a pint glass and watching it form, knowing you'll get the same great taste you've always expected from this fantastic ale. Chill a glass and pour to the top. Watch the head form...sit back, relax and enjoy a true nectar from God himself.

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                      19.03.2004 18:52
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                      the dog

                      There's a lot of hype surrounding NEWCASTLE BROWN ALE. Why, even back in the dark ages of my youth, when drinking beer was an exciting, illegal thrill, 'Nookie Broon' held a certain mystique. Maybe it was because all the bikers and the bad boys were partial to the stuff. Maybe it was the claims that it would get you rat-arsed quicker than any other beer (I wasn't too smart in those distant days of youth).
                      Be that as it may, for as long as I can remember, Newcastle Brown Ale has been a very popular beer.

                      My theory on its popularity is simple. When I started my beer-drinking career way back in the early 1970's, the big breweries were in a furious race to buy up and shut down all the competition and subject the masses to the uninspiring prospect of pint after pint of bland, lifeless (yet ridiculously fizzy), tasteless and nondescript, keg beer.
                      Newcastle brown Ale was a beer that seemed to have a bit more character and style (never mind the fact that it was brewed by one of the worst offenders of keg purgatory).

                      Which just goes to show how starved we were of quality beer back then - not to mention how naive.


                      NEWCASTLE BROWN ALE has been brewed in the Tyne-side city of that name since 1927. Within a year of making its appearance, it had won Gold Medals at the International Brewers Exhibition in London.
                      It's brewed at the Tyne Brewery which, since 1960, has been part of the giant Scottish and Newcastle group.

                      It is now the best selling bottled beer in the UK, and indeed Europe. It must be pretty darn good then, eh? So, with that in mind, I thought I'd add to their sales figures and treat myself to
                      a 550ml, clear glass bottle (clear?.... oh dear).


                      For more on the history of the beer and other trivia:
                      http://www.newcastlebrown.com/home_f.php




                      ---------------------------INTERLUDE------ ------------------

                      One night a Geordie was having a pint in the pub, when he noticed a fellow with a very unusual pair of shoes on. He couldn't keep his eyes off them so he says to the bloke. "Howay mistor! What kind ov shoes is them ye hev on? I'd like to hev a pair of them, man."
                      "These?" says the guy with the shoes, "They're Crocodile Shoes".
                      "Why man!" says the Geordie, "I must be thick in the heed but I divvent kna' what a Crocodile is!"
                      "Well," says the shoe-man, "a crocodile is a reptile, which inhabits many of the rivers of Africa - the River Zambesi is full of them".
                      "Thanks mistor!" says the Geordie, "I'll hev te hev a pair of them shoes".
                      So off he goes to Africa. Paddling his canoe up the Zambesi, he sees a huge crocodile. Being a hard-as-nails Geordie, he strips down to his keks, grips a knife between his teeth, and dives in. He swims up to the crocodile, fights it, kills it, drags it ashore, looks at it and says, "Bugger! Eftor a' that trouble it's got nae bliddy shoes on!"

                      ------------------------------------------------------------


                      Back to the beer.....


                      NEWCASTLE BROWN ALE pours to a warm, reddish, tawny-brown topped by a fizzy and foamy, tan-coloured head that disappears faster than a Geordie at a temperance meeting and leaves only minimal lace. There's an initial aroma of sweet
                      bread and caramel malt which is both crisp and clean and is tempered by a mild hop character. There's a faint, buttery diacetyl tone, some toasted grain, and a slight medicinal note as well.

                      It's mild bodied with a smooth and refreshing mouthfeel. The initial taste is slightly sweet and a little nutty with the faintest trace of chocolate. There's quite a good bready, biscuity malt character, with some buttery, caramel nuances which are kept reasonably balanced by some earthy and slightly oily hop flavour. There are some hints of graininess before a finish that is somewhat dry and bitter (a little tea-like) with a lingering nuttiness and a barely perceptible, bitter aftertaste.

                      ? The Verdict ?

                      At 4.7% ABV, this is a decent session ale, if a bit watery.
                      It's brewed using corn grits and added sugar, and it's pasteurised - so it doesn't quite qualify as a real ale - in fact it sounds suspiciously like one of those factory, adjunct-loaded, 'trendy' beers. Luckily, it doesn't taste like one.
                      It's perfect to accompany a pub meal and I've heard that it's an excellent beer to cook with although I've never tried going down that culinary road.

                      It's a beer that has achieved cult status but I'm not sure why....good marketing?

                      In conclusion, this is a decent enough ale and is a stalwart in a sea of oft-times fizzy blandness, but I sometimes feel that it is one of the most over-rated beers on the market

                      A bottle of NBA varies wildly on price depending on whether you buy it in a supermarket, an off-licence, a corner shop or a pub. It's everywhere! I paid £1.60 in a supermarket. You could pay more than twice that in a pub but that would be pretty dumb. It's also available in canny cans man, but I think canned beer is like canned laug
                      hter - it leaves a bad taste.

                      Would I drink it again? - Why I divvent kna' man. Depends if some bugger spills me pint.....



                      Thanks for reading,
                      Sláinte


                      ©proxam2004

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                    • Product Details

                      Brown Ale, 4.7 percent Alcohol. Brewed in the United Kingdom since 1927.