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Young's Waggle Dance

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5 Reviews

Brand: Youngs / Type: Ale

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    5 Reviews
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      10.09.2009 15:04
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      Nice for a change and different taste!

      I was thinking what to do for a review, when I spotted this bottle of ale on the back of the breakfast bar. I had got my husband a few different bottles of beer for a change from his usual Fosters or Carling( I know that they are lagers). As he enjoys a couple of cans from time to time I thought the taste of these would make a complete change. He has had these before and really enjoyed the honey taste that this one has.

      I love buying these different ales as the titles on the bottles have me in fits. This is called Waggle Dance, it comes in a clear glass bottle, fatter on the base then goes up where it then goes into a slim neck with a metal lid on top. You will need a bottle opener to flip the lid of ( don't try what most people do, thats to try and flip the edge of the lid on a table with a slam!).

      The label has a picture of a bee hive with a bee flying round it. Waggle Dance is apparently the name that is given to a bee when it performs this to inform the hive that it has found a source of nectar. The ale inside is a lovely golden colour and on opening it has a lovely aroma. It's taste is a delicate honeyed hops taste and slips down the throat a treat. It says that it has a grassy lemony nose, but I can't say that I have noticed that. This bottle is 500ml and is Alc 5.0%, if you have this in a draught form from a cask ale it is a little lower at Alc 4.0% Im not sure as to why that is.

      This is made by the brewers Wells and Young, this used to be just brewed by Young but merged with Wells in May 2006.
      They are both well known brewers for many years, as Wells is known for it's Wells Bombardier and Youngs for it's Youngs Bitter.

      It is said that the taste for these bitters depend on the purity of the water it uses as well as the best hops ect. and being that this Brewery has it's very own water- well from where it uses all the water for it's brewing, so it can depend on it being purified to the best possible standard. You would think that because this has honey in it it would be very sweet, but it really isn't and has a smooth delicate taste.

      These Ales can be bought in many supermakerts and retail for around £1.69p a bottle, so it won't break the bank for the odd lovely treat!

      I will give this product 5 stars as it is a premium Ale!

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        13.09.2007 20:54
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        honey makes it sweet, smooth and lovely.

        I have decided that i am going to try some of the more weird and wonderful beverages that my local off-liscence has to offer. I will try anything once.

        Waggle dance.

        Strange name, isn't it? Well, the waggle dance (for those who don't know.) is the way in which honey bees communicate in their little hive, in order to tell their little mates in what direction, and how far the nectar is from them. They make little figure of eight movements, and the number of turns, and the direction helps them to communicate.
        So, whats the link with the drink? Well, as far as i am aware waggle dance is the only beer that is brewed with the addition of honey. South American honey to be precise (though what difference that makes i am not sure, but then again i am not a brewer.).

        So, as the beer itself has been made with the help of the humble bumble, it has been associated with the summer. A drink that brings a little bit of warmth to you whatever the time of year.
        well, what do i think of it? The bottle is nice, though uninspiring. Clear glass, with a black and orange label. On the label is a picture of said bee, flying towards a flower on a girls hat. above this is the sentence "a light and refreshing honey beer". It is described as being a pale ale. Weighing in at a descent 5.0% alcohol, it has strength in depth, and i am hoping that this gives it character.

        So here goes!!!

        Well, pours nicely. Plenty of head, nice and fizzy. Light and golden in colour. Bizzarely enough it is almost the exact colour of runny hunny.

        And the smell? Light, and sweet. Very much like a lovely dessert that you would get with your sunday dinner.

        But now for the moment of truth! Very smooth. Light in taste, but not without its own individual nuances. Sweet (strange that, isn't it?) but without being sickly so. The honey flavours are balanced by a healthy dose of hops, which makes it well balanced and delicate. Very easy to drink (perhaps a little too easy!). usually, i am not a fan of this type of beer, but this is very drinkable indeed. No after taste at all, it goes down easily, and is very agreable indeed.

        Overall, this is a very nice little drink indeed. As this is my first, i cannot say what it is like to drink several of these. However i strongly beleive that they would not be too sweet. I thought on reading the bottle, that it might be sickly, though now i beleive that it most certainly would not be so.
        It is not cheap, at around £1.50, to £2.00 a 500ml bottle. And i do not think that it is one that i will drink all the time. But for a change (and they say thats as good as a rest.), i think that this stuff is great. You could say i am sweet on the stuff! I got stung by the price, but now that i have tasted it I am buzzing with excitment! (do you like what i did there!?!?).

        Try it, next time you are in tescos. I got mine there for £1.69. I just got the one, in case i did not like it, but i needn't have worried. Recommended. G

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          28.09.2002 00:57
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          The beer called Waggledance was developed by the Vaux brewery of Sunderland in 1995 and produced by it's subsidiary, Ward's of Sheffield. When these breweries closed, 4 or 5 years later, Young's of London took over production. Young's has been a family brewery ever since 1831 when C.A. Young and his partner purchased the Ram Brewery in Wandsworth, London. They were the only London brewer not to switch to keg beer in the 70's and still make some of their deliveries by horse drawn dray. Their emphasis on tradition has repaid them with countless awards for their range of beers, which these days number 12 brands. Young's official website: http://www.youngs.co.uk ____________________________________________________________ Okey dokey, since this is an English beer I feel justified in relating the following joke: In the beginning, The Lord God Almighty, sitting on His throne on high, turned to His mate, the Archangel Gabriel and said, "Gabby, today I'm going to create Scotland. I will make it a country of dark beautiful mountains, purple glens and rich green forests. I will give it clear swift flowing rivers and I will fill them with salmon. The land shall be lush and fertile, on which the people shall grow barley to brew into an amber nectar that will be much sought after the world over. Underneath the land I shall lay rich seams of coal. In the waters around the shores there will be an abundance of fish and beneath the sea bed there will be vast deposits of oil and gas". "Excuse me Sire", interrupted the Archangel Gabriel, "Don't you think you are being a bit too generous to these Scots"? "Not really", replied the Lord, "wait 'til you see the neighbours I'm giving them". ____________________________________________________________ Back to the beer..... Where does the n
          ame come from I hear you ask. Well... Waggledance is the term that's used to describe the figure-of-eight motion that bees perform to alert other bees to a find of nectar. Hmm, that's interesting. * THE POUR * It pours to a crystal clear, deep golden-amber to copper colour with moderate carbonation and a small, slightly off-white head - the retention isn't great and the head didn't last long but it leaves a reasonable lace nevertheless. The aroma is quite pleasant, very strong honey notes are evident as well as some sweet maltiness. There's also a little grain to the nose and just a hint of hops. * THE TASTE * Medium to light in body, the taste is strange. The mouthfeel has a weird, dry and grainy texture and is quite musty, overwhelming most of the malt or hop presence. From the label we're told that Goldings and Fuggles hops are used but they're barely noticeable. Upfront there's some sweet malt and honey notes but these are soon overshadowed by a bitter and metallic taste. It finishes quite dry and bitter and eventually, a slight hint of honey in the aftertaste. It smells far better than it tastes. * THE VERDICT * At 5% ABV, this beer this beer does not impress. It promises much in the aroma but singularly fails to deliver in the flavour department. I would go even further. It is quite unpleasant and - are you sitting comfortably? - I didn't even finish my pint! To be honest though, I'm really not a big fan of the style anyway, but having said that, I was really disappointed with this offering from Young's. Would I drink it again? - Do bees swim in the ocean? Perhaps I could best sum up in a Limerickerish fashion: proxam returning from France sampled some Young's Waggledance he took a long drink poured the rest down the sink would he buy it again?....no chance Thanks for reading
          , Slainte

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            27.06.2001 05:12
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            What on earth is it about Young's beers? We couldn't get them when I was in my formative drinking years down in Ashford. It was all Courage and Whitbread Fremlins, no mean beers though, if you had a decent cellarman looking after them. In fact there used to be a little pub in Ashford, the Trumpeter, real tatty lino and death-trap carpet kinda place but it used to sell the most divine Fremlins Bitter - New Year's Eve 1982 or thereabouts; several pints to the good in various other hostelries on a "reunion tour" and then that little place with plain old pumps and no decoration but the most memorable beer I've ever drunk. Appearances you see, can be very deceptive. The Trumpeter is no more but the taste of that beer will remain forever. After we moved to London in 1980, we used to visit the Richard III (The King Dick) in Greenwich which served Young's. Young's of Wansdworth; The Ram Brewery of legend and beers of the most fabled taste, power and potency. I was most disappointed. They got you drunk but there was no journey. Nothing to remember the process by except that feeling that you were either missing something or you just didn't understand what you were meant to be missing. I've tried Young's time and time again and always that same sensation that there really is supposed to be something special going on but I don't know what. You think I'm building up to the big reveal; that moment when I say that I've had that definitive Young's experience. Well, I'm soooo sorry to disappoint. I've drunk Waggledance. Silly name; it refers to the dance that bees do on returning to the colony to indicate where the nectar is. Bees=honey so the name tells you it's got honey in. And the label tells you, too - "brewed with honey for a strong, smooth taste". It also says that the pure honey sweetness is perfectly balanced by the Fuggles and Goldings hops. Ahh; "sweetness&q
            uot;, not taste. Silly me, I was expecting a beer which maybe had a honey taste to it. Mead probably. The colour hinted at it, a dull gold like clear runny honey in fact but no honey nose. It poured smoothly but with a large foamy head which I don't usually go for; I don't like the taste of beer foam, it's too bitter and that bitterness should be in the beer. The taste wasn't unpleasant, though. In fact, it was nicely set between not unduly sweet and not overtly bitter. If this had gone under a different name it would have been fine but I wanted honey and I wasn't getting it. Try as I might I couldn't detect it until well after I'd finished. Then, I could taste it on my lips for some reason. It was a very fine summer ale, served chilled and much appreciated this evening after suffering the 30 deg heat of the daytime. It would also make a nice winter beer, not a winter warmer though, I don't think it's heavy enough for that, although it is 5% abv. So Young's live up to their reputation, with me at least. They promise loads but they just don't seem to be able to deliver. I just can't see the point of making such a big deal of the honey factor if it is only used in the brewing process to impart no other quality than its sweetness *UPDATE* I've just been to the Young's website for some clues - don't know why I didn't in the first place, I suppose I thought most of the info would be on the label. Silly me. One line is the giveaway. It says that the pure honey (Mexican, no less) is added during the boil to impart the sweetness and that no honey essences remain. Well there you go then, there is no honey and that the slight taste I thought I detected afterwards must have been auto-suggestion or just plain old wishful thinking. I suppose if I was a real pedant I could refer them to trading standards but I won't, because it's still a fine ale in the right circ
            umstances, I just wish they'd change the name.

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              20.04.2001 05:30
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              A beer made of honey? It's true and it's delicious! Youngs make WaggleDance, a beer which is specially blende with pure honey to make a wonderful deep gold coloured ale, of 5% volume. You can't mistake this beer on the shelves, in bottles, as it comes with a wonderful honey coloured label, featuring a hive on the front, and the logo 'Strong, smooth and delicious'. Does the beer taste of honey? Not quite, but the honey does give it a sweet taste, reminiscent of drinks such as milk stout, and it is certainly a moreish drink. Despite coming in 500ml bottles (near enough 1 pint) it is very drinkable, and you can easily get through several bottles without feeling you've had enough. Thus quite a deceptive beer. Apparently the strange name of the beer comes from the strange dance that bees perform when they find sources of nectar, so that all their friends will come too. Once you've tasted this beer, I can guarantee you will be waggling round the house as well!

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            • Product Details

              Waggle Dance is brewed from the finest barley malt and, uniquely, a specially selected blend of pure honey to form a light colored, golden ale which is strong in alcohol with a smooth, rounded character. Brewer: Young & Co's Brewery PLC. Style: Ale. Alcohol Content: 5%