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Youngs Double Chocolate Stot & Porter

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9 Reviews

Brand: Youngs / Type: Stot & Porter

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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    9 Reviews
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      18.09.2011 10:04
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      A lovely smooth stout with a chocolate aftertaste. Very nice indeed!

      A few years ago my hubby came home with a couple of bottles of this stuff and asked whether I'd like to try it. Well, I'm not really a beer fan, though I do quite like stout, and I have to admit that I was a bit skeptical about combining beer with chocolate, but being a committed chocoholic, the idea of a chocolate stout fascinated me, so I tried it.

      The stout pours much like any other and you end up with a lovely creamy head. I gave the glass a sniff and you really do get a slight hint of bitter chocolate! I took a small sip and to my utter surprise this stout is really good! It has a lovely rich flavour, a very smooth, creamy taste and you do get a slight aftertaste of dark chocolate. It shouldn't work...but it does!

      That was a few years ago, and we enjoyed a glass of this many a time...then for some reason you couldn't get it anywhere. Our local shops stopped selling it and it just disappeared.

      Yesterday I decided to go and buy ingredients for my Christmas pudding (I make one about this time every year and the recipe has stout in it) and went into my local Tesco to buy some Guinness or something. To my utter surprise, there was Youngs Double Chocolate on the shelf....after all this time! Naturally, I got a bottle, some of which will fortify my pud, and the rest will be savoured later on by myself and my hubby! I'm so pleased to see it back on the shelf!

      Anyway, onto the technical bit.....

      The ingredients in this stout are:
      Natural Mineral Water,Pale Ale Malt ,Chocolate Malt ,Oats ,Sugar ,Hops ,Yeast ,Natural Chocolate Flavouring.

      It is sold in 500ml bottles with a distinct purple label and costs about £1.89 per bottle.

      I bought my bottle in Tesco and I am not sure whether any other retailer sells it, but it's worth looking.

      So, if you want to try something a bit different, give Double Chocolate Stout a go!

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        21.02.2010 18:23
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        A nice slightly indulgent treat

        Young's Double Chocolate Stout is an addition to their already established and popular ale products. The double chocolate comes from containing both chocolate malt and chocolate flavouring. In my experience it is not found in as many places as traditional Youngs ales, but you can occasionally find in larger supermarkets as well as off-licences or other food stores which have a particularly well stocked ale section. It retails at around £2.50 for 500ml.

        It comes in an attractive 'real ale' style curved bottle with dark glass and purple labelling. It contains 5.2% alcohol which translates to 2.6 units per bottle.

        On pouring, it is rich and dark like any other stout, however with more of a browny tinge perhaps. The scent of it is overpoweringly that of stout, albeit on the sweeter side - more Mackesons than Guinness. Like other stouts it has a lovely rich velvety texture and the first taste that hits you is that of sweet stout. The chocolate taste is one which does not really hit you until afterwards but becomes more prominent as you drink your way through the bottle. It is my opinion that it is more the chocolate malt that you can taste rather than the actual chocolate flavouring as it does have that grainy taste.

        I would definitely say that the chocolate flavour complements the stout flavour, as it shares the same dark rich qualities. I was a little concerned that it may be too heavy and sickly compared to the dark taste and texture of stout, but no it works really well and the quantity of chocolate has obviously been well considered as it is not overpowering. If you are buying this as a chocolate purist for a chocolate hit however, you will probably be a bit disappointed!

        I am a general fan of all stout from the sweeter types, which I have fond memories of my mum giving to me when I was sick with an energy-zapping virus for much of my late teens, through to classics like Guiness - and I certainly enjoy this as much as any others. However, my husband is a Guinness fanatic and has stated that he finds it too sweet for his tastes.

        Being a stout, it is obviously heavier than an ale, and I have found that I have enjoyed this best over the length of an evening rather than with a meal. It is definitely a real treat for me, and something that I would continue to buy as and when I see it, and I would also buy it as a present for people as an alternative to the traditional stouts for them to try.

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        10.01.2008 16:33

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        I first tried Youngs double chocolate stout some 4 years ago. My daughter bought my first bottle as a Christmas present. I like to try any of the 'out of the ordinary' beers, and this is certainly one of those.Perhaps the person expecting it to be ultra chocolatey may be disappointed,but as a beer / stout I find it excellent drinking.This Christmas again I had a case as a present. Again I was not disappointed, in fact I realise just how much I enjoyed it.My main problem is finding an outlet that sells it. It now being part of the Wells and Youngs stable and me living in Bedford it would not be a problem.Now have a stock to last me a few months.Excellent stout.

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        22.11.2002 17:19
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        Need a beer? or are you a chocolate junkie? WHAT! YOU'RE AN ALCOCHOCOHOLIC!!!! Then have I got news for you, Angus. Here's a little product that can satisfy both those cravings in one fell swoop. But first, a word from our sponsors...... YOUNG'S is a traditional family brewery which is famous for it’s cask ales and has been in business at the RAM brewery in Wandsworth, London since 1831. Deliveries are still made by horse-drawn dray and the brewery is home to geese, peacocks, and the company mascot, a ram. You could be forgiven for thinking that this was an op about London Zoo. For more information about the brewery, and their range of beers: http://www.youngs.co.uk The beer we are tasting today is YOUNG'S DOUBLE CHOCOLATE STOUT. ** But what is a stout? Well, it’s a dark brown to black beer made with highly roasted grains and is traditionally top fermenting. Sweet stouts are usually associated with London and hoppier, dry stouts, with Dublin. ** And the chocolate? Chocolate malt is the result of heating, almost burning, the barley to around 200 C. This generates a complex array of roasted flavours and a dark colour. But wait, there’s more to it than that. Young’s Double Chocolate Stout was the first beer to to be made with added chocolate, both as bars and as essence, and was introduced in 1997. In fact the label, with the scrolled capital C in the word chocolate, and the rich purple background colour, is reminiscent of a well known British milk chocolate bar. Can you guess which one? The chocolate bar is nice enough but I’ll choose the beer every time. YOUNG'S DOUBLE CHOCOLATE STOUT is brewed with Crystal, Chocolate, and Pale malts along with Fuggles and Goldings hop varieties. They then add chocolate bars while brewing and chocolate essence before bottling. I'm still not sure where they got the name fr
        om though. -----------------------Intermission------------------ A guy goes into a pub and asks the bartender for a drink. Then he asks for another. After a few more drinks, the bartender notices the guy looks worried. "What's the matter?" the bartender asks. "My wife and I got into a fight," explained the guy "and now she isn't talking to me for a whole 31 days." The bartender thought about this for a while. "So, what's the problem?" he asked. "Today is the last day." ------------------------------------------------------ Open the bottle time.... * THE POUR * Not quite black - but as close as makes no difference - with a good, foamy, light brown head which lasts quite well and leaves a decent amount of lace on the glass. There’s a hint of spice on the nose, with a deep, rich, dark malty flavour and a slightly sweet, treacly tone. Not much in the way of hops though. * THE TASTE * Full-bodied, and with an extremely silky-smooth texture, it has a lively mouthfeel. The spicy aroma transfers to the tastebuds as ginger but it’s very subtle and not overbearing. Upfront it tastes creamy and a little like fudge - very sweet, but again, not sickly sweet. The finish is balanced by the bitter chocolate leaving a very satisfying and comforting aftertaste. * THE VERDICT * At 5% ABV, this is a big beer but not too strong. The use of chocolate may surprise many people but it’s not really that strange as malts with a chocolate-like flavour are very often used in stouts. This makes them an ideal after-dinner beer, rather like a liquid dessert. This beer in particular lends itself to that end very well. It’s certainly not a session beer and I don’t think I’d really like to drink more than one of these of an evening. I don’t
        think it would particularly enhance a meal like poached salmon either. I’m not a huge fan of chocolate, I can take it or leave it, but stick it in a beer and I think I prefer to take it. Would I drink it again? - I should cocoa. Thanks for reading, Sláinte ©proxam2002

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          29.08.2002 09:47
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          Beer and chocolate? These two things don’t really go together, do they? Beer and crisps, yes, but surely not chocolate? Hmmm. Very odd. The first time I ever heard of this strange concoction was here on dooyoo, over a year ago. Some chap had written and op about it and I can distinctly remember thinking that it sounded thoroughly revolting. Little did I know that I’d one day be sharing a bottle of it with the author of that original op. Funnily enough, my comment on that op was one of the very first encounters I had with the man who now shares my bed, the washing-up and my PC (damn his Mac not working), as well as the odd bottle of beer. I was sitting on the sofa, happily sewing curtains when he offered me a glass of choccie beer. I don’t drink a lot of beer, just the odd glass now and then, but being a bit pre-menstrual, the word “chocolate” was enough to invoke an immediate positive response. Yes, yes, bring on the chocolate! Obviously, being only a very occasional beer drinker, I can’t give you an opinion from a connoisseur’s point of view, but I know what I like and what I don’t and this one isn’t going to have me rushing off to the local off-license in a desperate quest for more. Of course, if you’re already a devout stout lover (no, I don’t mean a tubby person who’s good in the sack - I’m talking about somebody who likes to drink thick, dark brown beer), you may well see this stuff in a completely different light to me. I’ve never been a great lover of stout, y’see, and Young’s, even though they make this sound oh-so enticing with the words “double chocolate”, have done very little to change my mind. Quite honestly, whilst downing this stuff, I couldn’t help feeling I’d been conned. All I could think was “where’s the damned chocolate?”. Ok, so it’s the right colour and th
          e cream, caramel coloured head gives the impression that you’re about to experience something that’ll have your taste buds begging for more, but I’ll be buggered if I could taste the chocolate. BUT, and this is where it becomes interesting, about half an hour after finishing my glass, a distinct chocolately taste started to emerge. A sort of belated after taste. A bitter chocolate taste, rather like cooking chocolate. Unfortunately, it also left my mouth feeling very dry. Actually, when I say it’s the right colour, I’m not being entirely accurate. According to the people at The Ram Brewery, who are responsible for this strange combination of malt, barley, hops and chocolate, it’s ruby coloured. Maybe if you hold it up to the light you’d see a reddish sort of tinge to it, but both on the table and in my hand, which is where you’d normally see a glass of beer, it looked dark brown. Personally, I think chocolate beer should be brown rather than ruby anyway. If I bought a bar of ruby coloured chocolate, I’d expect it to be strawberry or cherry flavoured chocolate, not beer flavoured or even just plain old chocolate flavoured. No, chocolate beer should be brown, and if I’d noticed that ruby colour, it may well have put me off. Another interesting point is that whilst the beer has nothing more than a mild aroma of chocolate, the empty glass positively oozes chocolate. I kept sniffing at my empty glass for ages and wanted more. A very strange effect indeed. Not being particularly knowledgeable on the beer front, I had no idea who Young’s were or that they were based in London. Oh lord, my dad would be ashamed of me! I’m so lucky to have the good Mr O, who really does know his beers, to give me all the relevant information I’d need. Did you know, for example, that in Central London, Young’s still deliver by horse drawn dray? Or that the Ram Brewery is the oldest
          site in Britain on which beer has been brewed continuously? It’s true, they’ve been doing it since Elizabethan times, way back in 1581. They’re a bit crafty though. The label’s purple and gold and immediately made me think of Milk Tray. Well, to be honest, I first thought of Dairy Milk, but they don’t have purple wrappers do they? Whatever way, there’s definitely a connection made when you see the label. I’m certain they’ve devised this stuff purely for the sake of capturing the female “that time of the month” market. Anyway, now that you know not to expect too much of a chocolate sensation from this, I’ll tell you that it is actually quite drinkable. Not great, I wouldn’t go out of my way to get it, but if somebody’s offering then, yeah, sure, I’ll share a bottle. Mind you, according to the bottle, this “double dose of pleasure” could earn me a reputation, so, considering it has 5.2% alcohol content, I guess I’d better be careful who I share it with. ~~+~~+~~

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            20.04.2002 17:15
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            Think of that perfect combination of beer AND chocolate and you have Young’s Luxury Double Chocolate Stout. As a long standing chocoholic AND beeraholic this was my dream come true. I HAD to sample these delights so I purchased a couple of bottles, for my husband and I (I hate to drink alone), and trundled merrily off home to give my taste-buds a treat. I was itching to enjoy that taste of promised luxury! Produced at Young’s Brewery in Wandsworth, it is a really dark ruby stout with a creamy bubbly head. Double Chocolate Stout is made from pale malt, chocolate malt, crystal malt, roasted barley, sugar and Goldings and Fuggles hops. They even add melted chocolate to the brew, after the fermentation process, along with chocolate essence. This all adds to that chocolaty texture. Young’s Brewery dates back to1533, where it was set up as the Ram Brewery. As one of the oldest known breweries in the UK it is steeped in history, and thus commands great respect amongst the beer drinking populous. It was bought by Charles Allen Young and Anthony Futhergill Bainbridge in 1831 and has continued, under the name of Young’s, ever since. It produces a number of fine and tasty beers, for example Waggledance, Ramrod, Dirty Dick and Winter Warmer. All are unique, so I was expecting good things of the Double Chocolate Stout. Young’s web-site (www.youngs.co.uk) gives a history of the brewery, a merchandise section and recipes, among other interesting features. My favourite recipe is for Young’s Double Chocolate Beer Parfait…sounds wonderful! There is also a link to Young’s Wine Direct site where you can purchase many of their creations (Double Chocolate Stout is £15.95 for 12 bottles). This stout is available in 500ml (just under a pint) bottles from selected Young’s pubs and in Supermarkets such as Tesco, Safeway and Co-op. It can also be found in Oddbins and some regional wine and be
            er sellers. Expect to pay from around £1.50 to £2.00 for a bottle, so it is quite reasonably priced for such a large sized bottle. I have never been fortunate enough to visit a pub where it is on sale, so I’m afraid I can’t comment on what it would retail at. Double Chocolate Stout weighs in at 5% ABV, so it not a weakling in the alcohol stakes. Tastewise, it is slightly sweet (but not overly so), with the bitterness of the dark chocolate showing through. There is the quite strong roasted flavour that you would expect in a stout, but this mixes well with the maltiness of the hops. It also has a slight coffee flavour with a nice chocolate aftertaste. The aroma is faintly chocolaty; with the hoppy and roasted smell predominating. The texture, when drinking, is pleasant smooth and creamy. If you want something that tastes of Mars Bars or some other sweet (and often sickly) brand then Double Chocolate Stout is NOT for you. It is more of a dark chocolate, like Bourneville. The chocolate is not as strong or luxurious as the name and label suggest, so I suppose some would say this is a bit misleading. I think it is really nice as it is though, because if it was any sweeter it may be harder to drink it in larger quantities (and I may be tempted to share a bottle!) The bottle is brown glass with a nice purple label displaying the product details, alcohol content and the Ram symbol of the brewery...but we aren't intersted in the packaging. I am much more interested in what is inside! Beware when you open the bottle because it is a very lively beer. The creamy head is quite foamy and is liable to spill if you don’t allow it to settle before adding too much to your glass. When adequately rested the beer will settle down nicely. The effect produced is aesthetically and sensually pleasing: The lovely aroma, and the contrast between the extremely dark brown (chocolaty) stout and the creamy beige head, make it a
            firm favourite of mine. I recommend Young’s Luxury Double Chocolate Stout as a really good and drinkable beer. I can think of few types of stout that are THIS creamy and chocolaty! I like the roasted taste of stout, but many people don’t like Guinness or Murphys: My mum, for example, says that all they all taste like burnt rubber. I think that this product is a lot easier on the palate for the “Stout Novice” and also maintains enough of stout’s traditional qualities to make it worth a try for the seasoned drinker. Try it with chocolate fudge cake for that ultimate chocolate experience. Try it on its own as a tasty drink on a cold winter’s night……but DO try it! BREWERY DETAILS: Young & Co's Brewery PLC, The Ram Brewery, High Street, Wandsworth, London SW18 4JD Tel. 020 8875 7000 Fax. 020 8875 7100 www.youngs.co.uk

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              03.07.2001 17:46
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              Can we dedicate ops? Nobody knows. I don't care then and will totter blithely over convention and trample it into the earth with my sensibly clad size 9s. Step forward jillmurphy, this one's for you. jillmurphy, lower case dooyoo giant, doyenne of the childrens book review, giver of sound advice, answerer of e-mails but most of all, legendary lover. Eh? Damn! Legendary lover of all things chocolatey. (Sorry, I still haven't got the new iMac keyboard yet). You'll enjoy this one, jill. It's got it in. And you can taste it. You can. Hang on though, this isn't running true to form. I had a go at Young's Waggledance because they said it was made with honey, which you couldn't taste. Also I said I had a bit of a downer on Young's ales as I thought they were a bit over-rated; promising loads but not really satisfying. Preconceptions and expectations which have been blown out of the water by the exocet of taste that is this beer. Some of you may well be aware that I don't even like choccy that much. Well I don't. Take it or leave it, me. I don't care much for rich things and the dark chocolate with 70% or more cocoa solids and all that does nothing for me. Sorry, bit of an unreconstructed Dairy Milk man meself. I know continentals that would kill for a bar of the purple wrapped stuff as well; I thought our continental neighbours were meant to be more discerning than us? It's just a taste thing then. But the Dairy Milk style must be buried deep in our psyche for the moment you spot this bottle it just yells "I've got chocolate in and I know you can't really resist me". It's got a purple label, that's why. Not any old purple, either. Dairy Milk purple. Not Lindt red and white with gold curly-wurly writing or anything else. Purple is the colour of chocolate in England and this is as English as they come. It's a stout though so how can it compare - yo
              u thought the oirish had a monopoly on the dark stuff didn't you? They do on bitter, flavourless, heavy, creamy topped stuff but have you ever had a Mackeson? Or any of the English milk stouts? Lovely sweet ,dark and refreshing beers. Marvellous beers with years of almost forgotten tradition behind them and this one should be up there jostling for the top spot. Pour it out and hold it up to the light. That's not evil black, it's a wonderful deep dark ruby red. Smell it - malt and er smell it again, take a real deep sniff - (are you still here, jill? Steady yourself now), choc-o-late. Not overpowering, just enough to make a difference. Take a sip. What a blast of flavours! Malt, hops, roasted nuts, a bit of vinegar even (but not as much as you'd notice) but right there taking command but not flooding the rest, is the cocolate. Not too rich, slightly sweet, but definitely dark, wonderfully mellow and comforting. It's real chocolate, too, not e-choc flavouring substitute added by machine. This is actually real dark chocolate essence and melted bars. The melted stuff is added to the boil; as with the honey in Waggledance there won't be much flavour left from this as it will be filtered out after boiling although it will impart some of the bitterness. Chocolate essence is added after filtration to give it the flavour. In addition the malts used include a chocolate malt as well as roasted barley (the nuttiness) and that distinctive Englishness and slight bitterness comes from the Fuggles and Goldings hops which feature in most classic English beers. In fact the sweetness of the chocolate and the bitterness of the ale, which I think would be a fine dark ale even without the choccy, counteract each other fantastically to provide a wonderfully smooth drink. There is even a note on the website from the head brewer to say that this combination is "surprisingly easy to drink". That is an understatement of colossal p
              roportions! I could drink this all day without the least bit of difficulty. I bet all this is wasted on jill, though. She's only been waiting for the name - soon as she saw that she was out the door.

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                24.04.2001 22:01
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                When I first saw this on the shelves in Tesco's I thought that the double chocolate brand was to do with the colour or the brew.When I realised it actualy had chocolate in it I had to have a bottle just to see how horrible it would be. Imagine my surprise when I found myself actually enjoying it. The chocolate flavour comes out slightly as an after taste but it is very pleasent. My overall opinion of it was a very nice drink to have with a meal perhaps. But you would not want to drink it all evening Youngs is a very old family brewery in Wandsworth South London. They brew some exremley good and very strong ales. They still own a good many local pubs and still use dray horses to deliver. If you are a bitter drinker try Youngs special you will certainly know you have had a drink after a couple of pints. Mick Gray

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                  23.04.2001 04:10
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                  I looked at the label and thought how horrible it would taste, but for a laugh i bought it just to see what it would taste like. Expecting it to disgusting i was quite suprised when it was really nice. The chocolate aroma is quite distinctive but not enough to take away the beer taste, you need to concentrate to taste the chocolate but once you do it makes you think how strangely nice it is. You wouldn't think that chocolate in beer would taste nice, alot wouldn't, but this beer really brings out the quality of chocolate in beer (laugh). Anyway try this beer and i'm sure you will like it, for all you alcohol lovers and chocolate lovers alike it's a real nice blend.

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                • Product Details

                  Delightful seasonal beer. Brewed from the finest ingredients including chocolate malt to deliver a delightfully smooth beer with a sensuous chocolate aroma. Brewer: Young & Co's Brewery PLC. Style: Stot & Porter. Alcohol Content: 5%