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Booky Wook 2: This Time It's Personal - Russell Brand

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Genre: Biography / Author: Russell Brand / Hardcover / 320 Pages / Book is published 2010-10-15 by HarperCollins

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    6 Reviews
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      20.07.2011 00:27
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      An alright read. Fans of Russell should probably give this a go, just don't expect too much!

      I'm a huge fan of Russell Brand and, after thoroughly enjoying his first autobiography, thought it was only logical I have Booky Wook 2 a try.

      Russell writes, once again, writes with his beautiful take on the English Language making even the most mundane of descriptions almost poetic. There is no arguments to be had about Russell's writing style, he was a wonderful technique.

      There is, however, some dispute, rightfully, about the actual content of the book. I'm not one of those 'delicate' people and I am certainly not easily offended. I have no problems with swearing, detailed descriptions of sexual encounters and drug abuse tales. However I do feel there are only so many times you can read about these things before it becomes a little boring.

      Sure, parts of this book were hilarious, deeply moving and thought provoking. Others, however, were simply boring and repetitive. A lot of the antidotes written were old stand up material, things I'd already heard him say a million times before. I didn't feel I needed to read it again. In some cases I even found myself disliking Russell, something I, as a huge fan, never imagined I would.

      Although very insightful and more often than not enjoyable Booky Wook 2 is nowhere near as good as the first. Fans of Russell should probably give this book a go however I think very few will desire to re-read it and quote it as I did the first.

      I had high exceptions but simply feel the book was okay, nothing more. Nothing special.

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      05.06.2011 15:17
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      A funny read!

      I've finished reading Russell Brand's second book, "Booky Wook 2". here go my thoughts on it!


      Reader's appeal
      I read this because I really like Russell Brand. I am amazed by his style of speaking and I also love his crazy rockstar appearance! I think especially in the last year he has proven that he can do pretty much everything - from stand-up to acting and even singing.
      Since English is not my first language but defenitely my favourite, I am amazed by Brand in my own way. It is one thing to become fluent in a language and to be able to think in it - but the way Russell Brand is able to speak like he is made of Oscar Wilde quotes and junkie gutter is a thing to marvel at for me. I often find myself watching his performances or reading his books, thinking "I'll never be that fluent in English!". So his way of talking is magic to me!
      Last year in January I read Russell's first book, "My Booky Wook", which was so much fun. So of course, as I've now become quite a fan, I had to buy "Booky Wook 2" as soon as I found out about it!


      The plot
      Since "Booky Wook 2" is a work of autobiography, you can't really speak about a "plot" here, but the stories and anecdotes circle around certain events in Russell Brand's life.
      A big topic is him hosting the American MTV Awards. There is also a lot of talk about Russell's first really big show in Edinburgh. The devilish phone call to Andrew Sachs is also a big topic.
      The book does not really tell these events in a linear style. There is a lot of jumping back and forth as the reader tries to follow Russell's train of thought which often collides with sexual encounters and curious ramblings. The reader gets to know about a lot of crazy projects that Russell Brand has set up in the last few years - some never made it on television.
      He explains the concept behind the radio show he used to have and you get some insider knowledge on his TV show "Leicester Square 1" which defenitely helped him up towards fame. You also get to know how Russell felt when filming "Forgetting Sarah Marshall" and "Get Him To The Greek". The stories on how he got the roles and how filming went are especially funny!
      There are also a lot of photographs on the book. There are two stacks of colour pages in the book showing snapshots Russell commented on.


      My opinion
      I really enjoyed "Booky Wook 2", but it couldn't outdo "My Booky Wook". While the first book might even be interesting for people who aren't exactly Russell Brand's fans, "Booky Wook 2" is more of a work for devotees. There are lots of Russell's typical ramblings with random, crazy jokes. I really like these but the might be boring for non-fanatics.
      The jokes are evil und intelligent as usual, so you will defenitely find yourself laughing a lot - I often snickered to myself when I was reading it on the bus. Russell is quite courageous when he slags himself off for the stupid things he did, still highlighting his own brilliance whenever possible.
      I really liked the bit where he tells the story of meeting Katy Perry and how they teased each other.
      Although "My Booky Wook" was better, I enjoyed this.
      I would recommend this to everyone above the age of 16. There's sex and drugs on it, obviously, so younger readers wouldn't be well off with it.


      The price
      In August there will be a new paperback edition which yu can pre-order on Amazon. It's only £4.69.
      I got the hardcover version which is not too expensive either - £10.99.


      Conclusion
      I really enjoyed this book and hope Russell Brand will write a third one! I love his style of speaking (and writing)! Russell never falls shorts of seeing his own brilliance while at the same time realizing how stupid he sometimes is. And that, frankly, is what I really like him for and that's why I'd recommend the book.

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        06.05.2011 11:13
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        Randy Brand's Boring Booky Wook 2

        I'm not a big reader of autobiographies in general but do have a certain interest in Russell Brand and his own distinctive style of humour. When my husband bought a copy of Russel Brand's Booky Wook 2 home from the library, I started to flick through it and ended up reading it before he did.

        Thanks to the rather unimaginative title, it is clear to see that this is a sequel to Russell Brand's first autobiography, 'My Booky Wook.' The first title was humourous enough but I think he could perhaps have come up with something slightly more original than sticking a two at the end of the title to introduce his sequel! This book clearly follows on the first (which I haven't read) and starts from the point at which Russell Brand has acknowledged his issues with drugs and alcohol and has started to clean up his act. He is also just breaking into the show business industry and this books charts his rise from obscure stand up comedian to a relatively well known presenter and now a Hollywood actor.

        The style in which the book is written is unmistakably Russell Brand with the writing mimicking his style of talking in quite a convuluted style. I find his humour works well on stage (or on television) but it made reading the book quite difficult at times, as it isn't a particularly well flowing style of writing. The 'stream of consciousness' style ramblings did give this a real sense of authenticity, however, and it certainly came across as genuinely being Brand's own words. I don't think anybody else would be able to ramble on quite so much and actually say so little!

        Most of the stuff surrounding his upbringing and much publicised problems with drugs seem to have been dealt with in the first book, which is a bit of a shame as, to be brutally honest, I would imagine that those stories would actually be far more interesting than what is left behind - a relatively dull account of Brand's career to date. There are a few bits of interest and a fair amount of name dropping as Brand gets to hang out with other celebrities, including Kate Moss at the beginning of the story. There is a certain element of kissing and telling but nothing explicit or overly personal is revealed. He does admit sleeping with her but I think that was pretty common knowledge already and there is nothing untoward or particularly shocking about his 'relationship' (such as it was) with Moss. There are certainly no saucy details to get worked up about as Brand's description of bedroom affairs and his many sexual conquests is fairly perfunctory.

        One thing I was surprised about was that, despite there being considerable references to Brand's sex addiction and the sheer number of women that Brand was bedding, there was very little specific detail about events and relationships. I can only assume that the days (and nights) all passed into a blur for him and one woman was very much like another! Brand doesn't come across as being a mysogonist at all, just a bit of a prat really. (I was tempted to substitute a stronger word here, to be honest.)

        I did find the majority of the book quite tedious and a little heavy going in places simply because the events were quite dull. I have no interest in Brand's circle of friends and his account of travelling around America for a documentary was pretty uninspiring too. There was a lot of build up towards Brand's supposedly pivotal moment when he was involved in the Andrew Sachs scandal alongside Jonathon Ross but the actual story was a bit of a non-event as it is now 'old news', having been (in my opinion) blown out of all proportion when it happened anyway.

        I am actually a fan of Brand and find him really funny - but I can understand why many people can't stand the man. Here, this does not really do his humour justice and I don't think his humour and habit of going off on random tangents really works when transferred to a written page.

        To be honest, I only perserved with the book so that I could read about his relationship with Katy Perry as I find them to be a totally random match as a couple and I was intrigued to find out how and why they just clicked. I had to plough through pages of dull and rambling anecdotes to get down to the last chapter before reading about the start of their relationship and I don't think the little I uncovered was really worth the dross I had to go through to get there. Only somebody with an ego as large as Russell Brand would believe that there is sufficient content here to justify publishing this as a separate autobiography. There isn't.

        I would imagine there will be a follow up to this book, recounting the ins and outs of Brand's relationship with Perry (although not as many 'ins and outs' as I originally anticipated!) No doubt, there will be yet another autobiography to come when the couple eventually divorce! (I might sound cynical but, come on, who really sees this as a lasting marriage, given Brand's history?)

        My husband was the one who chose this book originally and he actually gave up on it after a few chapters, saying it was too difficult to read and, quite frankly, dull. I was the one who perservered and, in all honesty, for anybody other than the biggest Russell Brand fan, it really wasn't worth the time spent reading it. I'm just glad we borrowed this from the library and didn't waste any money on it.

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          13.01.2011 17:20
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          Not as good as his first book!

          I've been reading a lot of celeb books recently, but I was a little bit disappointed with this one really. I like Russell Brand (he's very funny and likeable) and I really enjoyed his first book (Booky Wook), but to me this book just didn't quite live up to the first one.

          Admittedly the first book covered about 30 years and this one only about 2 years but they were an important two years (where he was part of the Sachs-gate saga and met his future wife Katy Perry) so I expected more.

          He does go into a fair amount of depth on the Sachs-gate affair and I did learn lots about the whole thing that I hadn't previously realised, and he does seem very keen to get across how sorry he is (which is good) but it's all a bit "alright" rather than great.

          He also goes into a bit too much detail of his many conquests which was making me feel a bit nauseous!

          The bit where he meets Katy Perry (who he has since married and given up his womanising ways for) happens in about the last 3 pages of the book, so if you;re expecting to find out a lot about how he;s changed his ways, you don't. That said, the dedication to her at the front of the book does say that the book is his past and she is his future so maybe another book is in the pipeline?

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            12.01.2011 00:04
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            Highly entertaining for Brand fans

            Apart from the inclusion of some material lifted verbatim from Brand's stand-up shows (the only real negative I have about the book, and a surprising element considering Brand is one of our most endlessly inventive comedians), there's not much filler in Russell Brand's 'Booky Wook 2'. Following on from the popular 'My Booky Wook', 'Booky Wook 2' picks up at the beginning of Brand's rise to fame and is full of fascinating tales and anecdotes from one of Britain's hardest-living, most notorious lotharios.

            The book sometimes resembles an extended gossip column, or - more accurately - a collected transcript of Brand's shows and podcasts. Stories don't tend to follow a conventional pattern; they may begin in a traditional narrative, but Brand often veers off into other territories, seemingly unable to get all his thoughts down on the page fast enough. A story begun on page one may get put off until five pages later while Brand recounts other theories, musings and stories he's suddenly reminded of.

            Like Brand, 'Booky Wook 2' has a rambling, whirlwind quality to it. As one critic has observed, unlike most autobiographies, 'Booky Wook 2' is unquestionably written by Brand and the love him/hate him comedian has managed to invest his unique personality into it. That should determine whether or not the book is for you. If you're not a Brand fan then, well, there's nothing here to change your opinion on the man and 'Booky Wook 2' won't do much to impress you. If you are, you'll find this, like the man himself, shocking, eccentric, baffling and very, very funny.

            Those looking for gossip on Brand's social life get to hear everything they want to know - one of Brand's qualities (or faults?) is his willingness to tell the warts and all truth. His sexual conquests, including Kate Moss, Teresa Palmer and busloads of women seeking fame and possibly fortune, are all relayed to us. As are some of Brand's recent headline-grabbing items - his love affair with Katy Perry, the controversial hosting of the VMA's and, of course, Sachsgate. Pages and pages of the book are dedicated to the incident involving Andrew Sachs, with every part of the incident explored in detail by a regretful Brand.

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              31.10.2010 16:30
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              Not as good as Booky Wook 1

              I love Russell Brand I think he is hugely entertaining and witty. I think his standup comedy is excellent and he never fails to make me laugh with his observational humour.

              I read his first autobiography and thoroughly enjoyed reading about his life from boy to man, it was very funny and had me laughing my socks off at every turn of the page. When I saw that Russell had a second autobiography I was surprised as it had only been three years since his last release but was eager to read it. Booky Wook 2 is a biography of his more recent life and how he went from a mildly famous comic to an infamous celebrity. It tells the tales of how media shows were produced and the friendships that supported him and enabled him to become the success he is today, obviously it discusses the Andrew Sachs saga which thankfully is not dwelt upon and he talks about the many women that flow in and of his life that he is notorious for.

              However, many of the anecdotes in the book have been lifted verbatim from his stand up material, and so if you've watched some of his shows or interviews then a lot of it will feel familiar with very little insight or revelations about his life. Whereas his first book felt like there was genuinely a story to tell, this second instalment feels as though there is a lot of padding, his usual amount of linguistic flourishes, but overall pretty light on actual substance.

              At the end of the day, I'm still a fan of Russell Brand and it was interesting in parts and funny in others, so I still found it a reasonably enjoyable read.

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