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Have a Nice Day: A Tale of Blood and Sweatsocks

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      27.07.2010 18:27
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      A great book from WWE superstar Mick Foley

      Mick Foley is mostly known for his time as a WWF/WWE Superstar, as Mick Foley, Mankind, Dude Love and Cactus Jack. He has also worked in ROH, WCW, NWA and TNA. He has also written some childrens books and a fiction book, as well as 3 ( I know, 3!) autobiographies.

      One of these Autobiographies is entitled Have A Nice Day: A Tale Of Blood and Sweatsocks. This is the first part of his life story which he managed to spread over three books, and who knows at some point in his life there may well be a fourth, but part of me hopes not (Sorry Mick!)

      In Have a nice day, Mick tells us how he wished to be a wrestler as a child, and how he used to "play" wrestling with his friends at school and at college. He had a huge passion for it, and hoped one day to be a huge star, even making up his own wrestling characters as a teenager (the birth of Dude Love!) He also tells us how he met his wife, what life has been like with her and how it felt when his children were born.

      Mick Foley is full of stories about his life, and there is many of them in this book, inclduing stories of trips and vacations with his family, his struggles to get into the wrestling business, loosing his ear in a match against Vader in Germany and soooo much more. It is easy to see how Mick has managed to fill up 500 pages worth of book and still fill in another two books afterwards!

      I actually found this book to be a great read, very captivating and interesting with lots of information about the wrestling business and his life in general. It really does show some parts of wrestling in a different light and it shows exactly what wrestlers go through on a day to day basis just to provide entertainment for fans, sometimes at a pretty high price!

      Have a nice day is written in a good way, that makes you feel almost like Mick Foley is talking directly to you, and at no point through reading this book did I get bored or confused. It flows quite well, and everything links, there are no random tangents which can be found in some autobiographies. This is quite a large book, as I said before 500 pages, and it does take some time to read it, even for a fast reader like myself. I do think it is worth the long read though as it is good a book, and even those who are not fans of wrestling may well enjoy it. It is not all about wrestling, which does make a change from the norm in wrestling biographies. Some of the stories Mick tells us in the book will have you laughing pretty hard, I know I was laughing at most of them, but then there are ones that will make you sad as well, but you do feel every emotion as I could imagine Mick Foley would have felt them too, and I think it takes a skilled writer to be able to that to a reader, so I am impressed with the way Mick Foley has managed to do this.

      One thing I do really like about this book is that Mick Foley does not have a huge ego on him like a lot of wrestlers do in their own books, and this is so refreshing! I have read soooo many books where all the author does is tell us how wonderful he is and how much the world really loves him, when really it is sooo not true. Mick does have more than enough to have an ego over, but he doesn't have one, and this I really do appreciate, it makes the book even more readable than it already is.

      You can still buy this book on Amazon and in some Waterstones stores, even though it is quite an old book now. It will cost around £10 - £15 now depending on where exactly you buy it, which is a good price for a good book, that I think most people will enjoy. Totally recommended.

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      09.02.2008 08:12
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      Don't read the review, read the book!

      Ok I'm really annoyed, no not at the book, actually I haven't re-read the book in the last six months or so, the books wonderful. The reason for my kvetching (I can use a thesaurus) mood is the fact I've just read a couple of reviews on this book and realised anything I'm going to write pales in consideration to those reviews I've already read, damn you. You know who you are (well one of you should, I've just left a message saying as much).

      Mick Foley, the man of many names, which include "God" (very apt), Mankind (see, the big capital's near the top of the book), Cactus Jack, Dude Love (no, not a gay porno star), Super Zodiac #2 (no it's not a reference to having a brilliant and relieving dump) and of course, Michael Francis "Mick" Foley, Sr.

      Mick was born way back in time, when there was no WWF (or even WWWF for those wrestling historians), back when wrestling was run by territories, back when...erm...what the hell was going on in 1965 anyway?...well Lyndon B. Johnson became US president and Churchill died...oh and Mick was born into a family from Indiana before moving to New York when he was young.

      New York, for a young wrestling fan, is obviously home to the mecca of American professional wrestling, The Garden to many, MSG to others and argueably the most famous sporting venue in the US of A. It was this mecca and Foley's pilgrimage to it, that he saw, what would be his epiphany, and start him on his road to wrestling superstar (and all-round nice guy). This epiphany was watching "Superfly" Jimmy Snuka face off in a steel cage match with Don Muraco.

      The book has Foley's full version of events quite early on, and from then on sets out the rest of his life, from training with former pro-wrestler Dominic Denucci, to meeting his wife. From trying to get himself injured enough to walk away from WCW to being involved in a car crash. From the funny tales of Owen Heart, to talking about how much he misses Owen.

      The book covers most of the time upto his first "retirement" (wrestlers never really retire, they just...work less in the ring...and publish books...which they then advertise in the ring...>_>), and the Fatal Four Way match at Wrestlemania against The Rock, HHH and The Big Show.

      Now I'm not much of a reader (despite buying a load of books recently), the last 7 books (including this one) that I've read have been non fiction (4-Auto Biographies, 2-Biographies and a book by Michael Moore) and these have been over the space of about 3 years. But what's even more special, is I've managed to read this collosus (well over 700 pages) twice, which really shows how much the book captured me. Of course I was a Foley fan, I bought the book with my own money and at full price may I add, but this isn't the reason I read it twice, oh no. The reason I've read it twice, and why I intend to read it again in the coming months is because it's brilliant.

      The book isn't like a normal biography, where a person just talks about their life like we (the reader) are just going to read it like robots who don't care what it says. Mick actually wants us to read it as people, with brains, not sheep should looking at words and turning pages. He keeps the reader entertained, giggling or crying (at the Owen chapter in particular, one of only two times I've cried whilst reading). He doesn't treat us like fools and says "wrestling is totally real", he even goes as far as to give away a few tricks of the trade, but this in turn gives him a real edge over everyone else. The bloke is honest in his approach to us, the fans, the readers, he's not pretending to be nice to us, he really is nice.

      From the stories about him and Terry Funk to the Penis Suplex, the books just full of laugh out loud moments which will have you splitting your sides for the vast marjority of it's well written, original and some times down right perfection. Foley not only lets you see into the wrestling side of things, but also for a short while his family, he talks about his wife, and his kids (IIRC he only talks about Huey and Noelle, as the book was written before his most recent two sons were born), his mother and his fathers odd habbit of listening to christmas music in June.

      If you like wresting, get the book, if you like humour, get the book, if your an illiterate...get the book, if your blind, get the book (and get someone to read it to you). Yes it really is that good, you will enjoy someone else reading it and giggling as they read it to you.

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        21.11.2004 18:05
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        I’ve long been an avid reader, devouring books at a speed that has surprised friends and amazed colleagues in the past. But, no matter what I was reading, I was always able to put a book down at any point and come back to it later. I simply couldn’t understand what people meant when they call a book “unputdownable” as I’d never found my self in that situation.

        That was until I discovered “Have a Nice Day”, the autobiography of the wrestler Mankind. I’d had it on order for some time, and the bookstore called when, quite by chance, I was outside about to collect an ill friend from work. I picked up both and, like a good friend should, promptly ignored her in favour of the book when I got home. And for the rest of the day, I virtually ignored her as the book went everywhere with me – to the bathroom, to the garden for a cigarette, to the kitchen when I made dinner. Finally at 5 am the following morning after about fifteen hours solid reading, I finished it, and was able to put it down. Only to wake about six hours later, pick it up and start all over again.

        At first glance, it’s essentially just a book about wrestling. Mick Foley decided at a fairly early age that wrestling is what he wanted to do for a living and that’s exactly what he did. He had to work hard to do it, and he had to suffer for his art. He had to work for pitiful amounts of money and he had to be told time and again that he wasn’t good enough to reach the very top of his profession. Against all this, he succeeded, largely through a combination of hard work and extreme dedication to his chosen business.

        But it’s not just a book that will appeal to wrestling fans, even though this is the market it was aimed at. After all, I was a WWE fan when the book was released, which was why I bought it. I’m no longer a fan and I haven’t watched any wrestling for a while. Yes this book still has the power to fascinate me. This can be boiled down to one simple reason: passion. More than anybody’s biography I’ve read, Mick Foley has loved every minute of what he’s done. Sure, there have been some rough times and he’s been seriously hurt in doing the job he loves. Several times, in fact. But Mick Foley is a man who loves his life, loves his job and absolutely adores his family.

        It is this passion that makes “Have a Nice Day” so easy to read. Although the focus of the book is on Mick Foley’s career as a professional wrestler, this is essentially a love story. It’s a story of one man’s love for his wife, his children and his life generally. Particularly when he talks about his children, you can almost feel the love coming from the page. But he does other emotions just as well, and his words when he speaks of Owen Hart, a close personal friend and colleague who was killed whilst the book was being written, it’s enough to bring a lump to the throat.

        Generally speaking, the whole book is written in a very accessible way. He doesn’t get too technical with wrestling terms and he explains so that anyone who isn’t a wrestling fan could understand. Most importantly, he uses pretty simple language all the way through, so getting involved with the story isn’t difficult at all.

        Despite being the first and, so far, only book I’ve been unable to put down, it’s not all good news. More than in any other autobiography I’ve read, money is mentioned a lot. I realise that Foley sees several years on low earnings as a part of paying his dues, but it does get a little distracting hearing so much about it. It seems as if that was where his main focus lay, particularly before he met his wife.

        The second major problem is that the focus on wrestling makes it tough for anyone who isn’t a wrestling fan to get into, particularly the number of in-jokes he has at the expense of another wrestler, Al Snow. There’s less about Mick Foley’s younger years than is usual in an autobiography, almost as if his life only started when he began wrestling and everything that had happened up to that point was obsolete. Certainly there are some mentions of his school days, but very little about his parents, especially his mother, and it almost feels as if he wasn’t born until he was a teenager; such is the scarcity of material on that period.

        However, if you’re a wrestling fan, this is exactly the kind of book you should be reading. In terms of wrestling as a professional sport or as professional sports entertainment, however you look at it; Mick Foley has done pretty much everything there is to do. He has wrestled in small independent shows and he has held titles in all three of the major nationwide wrestling promotions that existed when the book was published in 1999.

        As far as up to date information goes, it seems horribly dated now as the world of sports entertainment has changed a great deal over the last five years. But for a recent wrestling fan, this would be a revelation, packed as it is with information and stories about how things used to be. For someone who has been a wrestling fan for a while, or even for someone like me, who was a fan 5 years back who has now lapsed, I’d be surprised if you haven’t already read this. You should – you’re missing out on so much otherwise.

        Given the age of the book, it can be fairly hard to pick up. But new copies can be found for £4.31 on Amazon. A second hand copy is far easier to track down and I have seen copies recently for sale for £3.75 from Green Metropolis and, for even better value but maybe not such good quality, from £3.19 at the Amazon Marketplace and from as little as 99p on eBay.

        Although a little dated in terms of information now, this book was ground breaking at the time, with Mick Foley being the first wrestler to release a biography. These days, you can move for them on the sports book shelves of major bookstores. But sometimes they say that the oldest ones are the best and that has never been truer than in the world of wrestling books. If you only ever buy one book about wrestling, this should be the one.

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          15.05.2004 02:22
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          • "It ends in an odd place unless you get an extended version"

          Whether you love the wwe or not doesnt matter as Mick foley details his story to superstardom in this tale of his life. This man is refered to as the hardcore legend because he was willing to put his body through incredible amounts of pain, just to entertain people! The first chapter lets you in on one of the most asked about parts of his professional career. How he lost his ear and the interesting aftermath while sitting in the hospital in germany afterwards. From then on things quiet down as he talks about his past home life in Long Island as a teenager and talks about his own problems as a teen. If your a teen just plain unlucky with girls then trust me, read this and you'll feel a lot better. I writes it all well and sets you up for the let-down really well. As things move along he describes his experience in madison square garden while watching the jummy "super fly" snuka match and how he got there. Then the making of the video (which he hates) that was inspired by it. The one sent to WWF as a tryout video. The book goes on to talk about his road to success as he wrestled in the lower promotions and japan. Japan was where some of the most brutal matches of the time were made that involved barbed wire, C4 explosives and 9inch spikes on a board and who can forget the thumbtacks. He talks about tournaments held there while he rivaled terry funk which was in some peoples opinions one of the best rivalries ever. Next his days through the WCW and ECW. ECW was where he had most of his memorable matches and foley had his last match as cactus jack, who had been his persona since japan. And finally to the WWE where he spent until the end of his career and wrestled as mankind. In 1997 he even got to revive his dude love character from his snuka inspired home video. The book ends talking about matches he had with the Rock. It may seem though that all this book has is a lot of violence although its far from
          it. Foley is a very good writer and he conveys his thoughts and feelings on everything. It is not a behind the scenes look at wrestling, but more a look at one mans struggle to make it in wrestling and in just about every other area of his life. He talks about other wrestlers he grew to like and from the time period has over 50 Al Snow jokes. Foley definately trys to keep the book as entertaining and funny as possible, though this could not be for the whole book. It doesnt matter who you are but you will come across at least 1 tragedy in 15 years. Parts such as Owen Harts Death was dedicated its own section. And there are a few other in there. But the death of Hart seemed to upset him the most. Overall no matter whether your a wrestling fan or not it is definately worth picking up a copy of this. For teens with girl problems, your not all that unlucky. For Adults with hard jobs. You havent seen anything yet. Try being paid just enough to get food for the week then sleeping in your car everynight! And for you late commers to the world of wrestling, read it to find out just what you missed in the professional career of one of the most hardcore wrestlers in history! This is one book you will pick up and three hours later only be putting it down because you realised you are really tired or hungry.

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          15.12.2003 17:16
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          skip this first bit to be able to read the review with capital letters intact. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. a. I&#
          39;ve got one word for you right now: Wrestling........................... Now what comes into your mind when you hear that word? Men in Lycra?, Face-Paint?, Fake moves? - if you're not a fan of the product then its more than likely one of the above, yet for Calypte n Mauri's challenge I'm aiming to change your mind on Wrestling Autobiographies, which are by and large an untapped resource of good literature, but people shy away because of their subject matter, and I personally couldn't think of a better way of getting into Wrestling Autobiographies than reading 'Have a Nice Day' by Mick Foley. You look around at other autobiographies in general, i.e. not just wrestling ones a lot of the time they're dull, they talk about how a certain style of celebrity grew up (be it writer, actor, footballer or any other kind) and then how they got noticed, did a little bit of training then hit it big - almost every Wrestling Autobiography I've read have had different stories than that, The Hardy Boyz actually set up their own federation, Dynamite Kid started off by wrestling in UK towns like Cleethorpes, Brighton and Walsall, Jerry Lawler started off wrestling in front of crowds of no more than 30 people and Mick Foley got spotted by someone seeing a video which showed him jumping off his Parents Garage Roof. What all of these stories seem to have is realism - even more so than those of the other type of celebrity, and because of this I'd recommend that one day you pick one up, you may get openly surprised. Now for people like myself the words Mick Foley instantly bring the picture of a wrestling legend into my mind (when I say people like me I mean long-term wrestling fans, I've been 'into it' since just before WrestleMania 8 - they're going to do Wrestlemania 20 in March of next year, and its an annual event so you get the picture yeah?). But to give the non-wrestling fan an idea of who he is, well I'll d
          o my best - over the years hes wrestled as Cactus Jack, Mankind, Dude Love and on the odd occasion just stuck to his old Moniker of Mick Foley. Now Mick isn't an athletic wrestler, in his own words he has a huge ass, he weighs over 300 pounds and as a 'proper wrestler' (doing high-flying moves and tying peoples bodies up in knots) well he just plain sucks, but he was a huge hit with the crowd - mainly due to his kamikaze style of wrestling, putting his body on the line just so he could entertain the crowd and if possible the people back home watching on TV. But back to the book - it opens with one of if not the most gruesome night of Micks career - the night most of his ear got ripped off in the ring (still want to say that wrestlings fake and it doesn't hurt?), and it opens with the German for 'Please don't forget to bring my ear in the plastic bag' (For those of you who must know it is: Vergessen Sie nicht, bitte, mein ohr in der Plastik Tasche zu bringen) and to think Mick continued fighting that night - all because he just adores the business, go into the book further and you'll find just how much Mick really does adore the business, as a kid he disobeyed his parents and hitch-hiked across country to see his hero Jimmy 'Superfly' Snuka wrestle in a steel cage (little did Mick know that he was actually going to be shown on WWE Television nearly 2 decades later actually stood in that crowd), all he cared about not only on that night but in general is wrestling, and for a long time he actually wasn't making any money - but he didn't care, so long as he was wrestling. But what I would say is don?t worry if you think all of the book is going to be as horrifying as that first chapter so obviously is - as you get to see an insight into 'the man behind it all' You do get some other stories that sound a bit gross to the casual reader, however this is someone who was once crowned 'the king of t
          he death-match', has also wrestled on thumb tacks, been thrown off a 15 foot cage straight through a wooden announce position, taken countless shots to the head with 'Steel Chairs' (Yes they are steel - just very weak steel) and many other things that I daren't even describe for fear of ruining the book. As an actual read the main stories you're going to get to hear of here are Mick's experience of wrestling the indy's (slang for the independent wrestling organisations - the ones who are lucky to get over 100 people in the crowd), to being invited to wrestle in WCW (World Championship Wrestling), to then going to ECW (Extreme Championship Wrestling - and in there the emphasis was on Extreme!), achieving his first dream of joing the WWE (Formerly the WWF) and then his greatest moment - winning the Heavyweight Championship in the WWE. The thing that draws you to this book is that Mick wrote it all himself, he was assigned a ghost-writer but didn't like the way that ghost-writer wanted to take the book, so convinced his bosses at WWE to let him write the book himself, they eventually agreed and asked him for 6000 words - Mick set to work, then came back to those self-same bosses with a 20000 sample for them to read - and this was down to 2 things, first Mick has a lot of stories to tell - and second once he put pen to paper, he'd found another passion in his life - writing. But the book itself doesn't feel like its so long, as its a book that you can just open and instantly start reading - its by no means small - 748 pages long (if you go for Paperback) yet it took me 3 days to read it, as it doesn't seem like a book - its more like Mick's decided to write a long letter to all his fans, and he's talking to you and no-one else, add in that he doesn't fawn away from making fun of himself or his long time friend Al Snow in the book either, and its just a fun book to read. Its no surprise t
          o me that Mick has gone on to write a second book about wrestling, before moving into fiction starting on Childrens Christmas Stories and then moving onto his first 'Adult Novel' - a very gruesome tale entitled 'Tietam Brown' which is definitely not for the weak of heart, he has a talent here that was untapped for a long time, and has only just been noticed, but everyone should be glad that it has been noticed - because to me Mick is one of the greatest authors of a long time - its just a shame he's got that stigma of being a wrestler - specially as he?s such a nice guy in real life too (Yes I've met him, he did a book-signing in Leeds and anyone wants proof? talk to me on MSN - my profile picture is me and Mick at that book-signing), so go out, buy this book - then get into reading Wrestling Autobiographies too, in total I've read 9, and I've only found one bad one - but in order of favouritism - well here have a list: 1. Mick Foley: Have a Nice Day: You've just read the review! 2. Mick Foley: Foley is God: Just as good as Have a Nice Day, but its more concentrated on the present day 3. Freddie Blassie: Listen You Pencil Neck Geeks: A book by a wrestling legend, and shows what wrestling was like back when it WAS real. 4. Dynamite Kid: Pure Dynamite: How a Brit can become a huge star in Japan and America in one easy book. 5. Bobby 'The Brain' Heenan: Self-Titled: Pure Humour all the way through 6. The Hardy Boyz: Live to Inspire: And inspire it does, read it and read how 2 kids were never determined to quit. 7. Jerry 'The King' Lawler: Its good to be King: An interesting look in to when wrestling was all about 'territories' and WWE was a long way away, also an interesting look into his 'feud' with Andy Kauffman. 8. Chyna: If Only they knew: A bit upsetting at times, and a very good story to show that rags to riches can happen <
          br> 9. Hulk Hogan: Hollywood Hulk Hogan: Sorry but this one is pure pants, Hogan lies all the way through the book! "THIS OPINION IS PART OF THE BOOK CHALLENGE-AN INTRODUCTION TO....If you had to persuade someone how good an author can be which book of theirs would you recommend as a first time read? Alternatively if you had to encourage a friend to read a particular genre (Sci-fi, Fantasy, Crime fiction etc.) or style (e.g. poetry) that they had always avoided which book would you recommend. If you decide to take part please include Book Challenge- AN INTRODUCTION TO...in your title and include this explanation paragraph either at the beginning or end on the text if you want more information contact the Book category guides Mauri or Calypte"

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            08.07.2001 00:30
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            I never read books, but we have to in English and I didn't have mine, but I borrowed my friends Mick Foley book and I could not stop reading it, it is the best book ever written, it is all about his life and he is actually very clever (I know you wouldn't realise from his character) but from the story of his ear and his high school days to the more present events it is amazing. Even if you don't like wrestling you'll like this book, and he's not afraid to bad mouth other poeple like Ric Flair. The book isn't serious either, he adds in jokes and it is very funny, I would never have even considered buying it before, but don't make the same mistake, if you havent already bought it then you should now. I would recomend it to anyone. For those of you who don't know who he is Mick Foley is a wrestler, formerley of WCW and then moved to the WWF under the wrestling names of Mankind, Dude Love and Cactus Jack, he wreseltd as all three of these but was most succesful as Mankind where he won the WWF championship three times. Having retired in February after a match against HHH in 'Hell in the Cell' Foley became the commishioner of the World Wrestling Federation for a while before being fired (In the storyline), he is now happily retired and a true legend to the Wrestling ring, he occasionaly makes guest appearences on WWF Raw is War and Smackdown but now spends all day with his family, after all that is why he retired. He has done the most for Wrsetling after all he has been through, he has had hundreds of stitches, broken bones, bumps and bruizes and nearly died in the ring.

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              23.06.2001 23:50
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              From this book you will fing out why Mick is called a hardcore legand, and why the fans chant 'Foley is God'. Mick talks about his loving family of Colette his wife and his two children Dewey and Noelle. You will also get to see how a loving man like Mick drives himself to fight in death matches all over Japan and get hit from chairs to C4 exploses!! This is just a glimpse into Mick's mind, his great history and all this passions. What makes this book even more special, it is only him writing it, not someone getting told what to write so all the pain and happynees is straight from Mick Himself. You will chuckle at Mick's early backyard wrestling antics and find out what made him drive off his roof into fame! Finally, you will cheer to the work this man has done and all the great things he has done in such a short time. I have already read this book many times, i hope you choice to do the same! A true read! A true story. Everyone, this is the life of a great man!

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                18.05.2001 04:00
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                This is a book everyone should read whether you are a wrestling fan or not. I heard all the hype and reviews regarding this book but I stayed away from it for as long as I could. I'm glad I did because I wanted to make my own judgment. Have A Nice Day is an honest tale of a true working man. Mick Foley has really put his heart and soul on the line, not only in this book, but at the steps he took to get to where he is in his life. Throughout the story, you can see the determination and drive that Mick possessed to reach his goals. People always assume that the sport of professional wrestling is an easy one: everyone knows it's all contrived. What they don't understand that the pain and injuries are real. Mick Foley is a walking medical chart encountering many, many injuries along the way. In fact, the back cover shows how many times and where he has been injured. He truly lives up to his name as "The King of Hardcore." Any lesser man would have surely given up but not Mick. He did it to provide a life for his family. And how he met his wife is truly a classic beauty and the beast tale, something that anyone can inspire to. It's easy to get into the life of Mick Foley because he really invites the reader to join him for the ride. In fact, it's almost like having Mick beside you telling you his stories. And the one thing you will definitely get out of this book: he is a funny, funny man. Between his Al Snow jokes and little anecdotes about life, you will definitely be laughing beside yourself. There are also moments that are very touching as well. His time with the late Owen Hart is heartfelt and honest. They were truly two of the the same kind. Both of them are devoted family men and they would never compromise their morals if possible. Plus, Mick's look at the controversial Bret Hart/Vince McMahon incident was also an eye-opener; he was ready to quit the company because of what happened. His grueli
                ng wrestling matches are now legendary especially the infamous "Hell In The Cell" classic where he fell through the top of the cage into the ring. All in all, it's a fair assumption to say all other wrestler's autobiographies will be compared to Mick's: he has set the standard and it will be hard to even match it. If there is only one book that you're going to read, give this one a try. I don't think you'll be sorry at all.

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                  17.05.2001 00:30
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                  Ok so a fully grown woman, but I still get really upset now if I miss RAW on a Saturday night.Funny that a few months ago I'd never watched WWF before in my life. And its all down to Mick Foley. I was in a bookshop with my boyfriend who's been in to wrestling since he was a kid,and he mentioned that he would really like to read this book. So being the loving caring girlfriend I am I went and got it for him. A couple of days later I was supposed to be doing work for uni, and I glanced over at "have a nice day". I picked it up and flicked onto the first page, just out of curiosity. Approximatley 17hrs, no food , no water , and no sleep later, I put the book down again.Seriously. My boyfriend nearly died laughing when I told that I wanted to get married to Mick Foley. I thought it would be a real lads book, you know all beer and blood and snot.But this man is actually very funny, and extremely intelligent . The way he talks about his wife and his kids, it's hard no get a soft spot for the guy. The tales of dedication and pain are almost unbelievable, untill you go and watch a tape of his matches and you know it's all true, every last word. This is a book about a wrestler, not about wrestling. It touches every emotion, from disgust, to laughter, to tears. If you read one book this year, this lifetime, make it this one.

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                    28.04.2001 00:27
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                    When Mick Foley decided to write his autobiography, he was greeted with many laughs and jibes. If you have ever had the pleasure to watch Foley perform then you will notice that he does not look anything like an author. But then again, what is an author supposed to look like? Whatever the case, I am sure that it is not Mick Foley, a seasoned World Wrestling Federation superstar. Nobody thought that he would be capable to write a book worth reading. But, unbeknownst to all but his closest friends, he is a very intelligent man whose lifelong dream was to write a book about his life. His Mum had encouraged this from a very early age and Mick had envisioned his career to be that of a legend. When he retired from professional wrestling in February 2000 there was no denying that he had achieved the career he had always wanted. He had participated in a main-event match at WWF's "WrestleMania", the biggest show in all of the professional wrestling world. It was at about this time that his book was released. After many doubts, even by the book publishers themselves, the book was eventually released world-wide and even reached No.1 on the New York Times book list in America. Since then, Mick has paved the way for other wrestlers such as Goldberg, The Rock, Kurt Angle, Diamond Dallas Page and Chyna to all write about their lives. But the difference between the aforementioned and Foley is that he had wrote his autobiography as his career was drawing to a close. After 15 years of hard graft he finally decided to let everyone else share his terrific memories. In the case of the others (with the exception of Diamond Dallas Page), their careers have only just begun in terms of how long they will stay in the "sport". Whilst I am sure that Kurt Angle can write a very good book about his Olympic Gold Medal win in 1996, why not wait until his wrestling career is over? There is no question that many people would love to read about The Rock's life, a
                    s he is without doubt the most popular wrestler in the world, but at 27 years old, is it really worth doing? The same goes for Chyna and Goldberg, they have both had eventful lives outside of wrestling, but I feel that there is just no need for them to write now, they are just trying to cash in on Mick's success. But I am glad to say that none have achieved it to quite the same degree. Perhaps this is because none have deserved it like Mick Foley has. All the others had help from authors, the living legend wrote it all himself, amazingly over 760 hand written pages of notebook! When he took all of this into the publishing office, they immediately said that they were not prepared to publish a book of that size. After much persuasion by Foley, they finally gave in. The finished product is an astonishing 748 pages in paperback, more in hardback. I have the paperback version, and while it does not look as classy; it of course it has its benefits. Due to it being released several months after the hardback, there is an added a bonus chapter, detailing his last few months as an active wrestler. Although he has since returned acting out the "Commissioner" role occasionally, his anecdotes of how he felt before his last matches against Triple H are priceless insights into what he is all about. But then again, that is what the whole book is, a wonderful look at what really goes on, how everything works, what everyone is like... generally a wrestling fan's dream book. But thankfully, you do not have to be a wrestling fan to appreciate and enjoy this book. It is about his life as a whole, from his relationships with his wife and children to his best and worst matches inside the "squared circle". At the start of the book there is a very honest foreword by unquestionably the best wrestling play-by-play commentator in wrestling history, Jim "JR" Ross. He states that he respects Mick more than any other man alive. This feeling
                    is echoed by virtually every wrestler or promoter who has ever had the chance the work with him. On a side note, I must recommend two videos that are the defining moments of Foley's career - King Of The Ring 1998, where he is thrown off the top of a 15ft steel cage, and Royal Rumble 2000, which he describes as his best match. Both of these are detailed in the book at length. But these are by no means the only matches he recalls. From the experiences where he was wrestling in gyms, watched by just 100 people, to his highest profile matches in the World Wrestling Federation - for me the most interesting accounts of his matches are when he writes about the Japanese "Death Match" Tournament, where he "wrestled" in possibly the most violent and brutal matches in wrestling history against "Hardcore Legend" Terry Funk. This section of the book is truly fascinating as because it was in Japan, very few people have actually watched these matches where Mick Foley made his name. Mick's style of writing is very personal, and it really does seem as if he is talking to each reader individually. Although he does not have the devices used to keep you reading that distinguished authors have, you will not be able to put it down as his memories are just so very vivid. They have the ability to make you laugh, cry, and in fact both at the same time. As if you are under a trance, you just will refuse to put it down, wondering what event is to happen next in his amazing life. For a wrestler he is an incredibly gifted author and his accounts are just so detailed that you do feel as if you are going through everything with him. He builds a picture in your mind like no author I know. Don't be surprised if you too are worn out by the end of this book. Personally, I was extremely disappointed when the book finished as I realised that I had just read the best book ever. I truly did not want it to end. The stories of Mick's life bef
                    ore he got involved in wrestling are superb. The well documented "Dude Love" films of another alter-ego are included in the book, with pictures and the actual captions used. These really are hilarious and show just what lengths Foley would go for people to be impressed by his exploits. In an interview in 1998 on World Wrestling Federation flagship ratings show "Raw Is War" he said that throughout his life he just wanted to be loved, by the end of this book, you cannot fail to take him to your heart as the entertainer, the wrestler and the man that he is. On the back of the book there is a picture of Mankind (one of Mick's many alter-egos) with all of the injuries that he has ever had. During his career he has had an overwhelming 379 stitches! Not forgetting his experiences of having two thirds of his right ear being ripped off by ring ropes and all of the broken bones that he has suffered over 15 years! Most of these are detailed in the actual book, but what he describes as the worst pain he has ever felt is not even mentioned on the back cover. At extravaganza event "Summerslam" in 1997 he was in a Cage match against Triple H (then known as Hunter Hearst Helmsley) who was accompanied to the ring by Chyna. The rules are that the winner is the first wrestler to touch both feet on the floor outside of the cage, either by climbing over and out, or escaping through the door. As Mick was about to escape through the door Chyna came over and slammed the steel door into his skull. Although this is too hard for anyone to imagine, the pain he felt was so bad that he actually was holding his arm. The pain was so intense that it went through his head and down to his shoulder. It must have been absolutely unbearable. For more incredible stories about Mick's injuries, his time spent trying to find a break whilst working for pittance, his views on all of the famous wrestlers over the years plus many more fascinating tales you simply M
                    UST buy the book. Throughout the entire book Foley makes numerous jokes aimed at good friend and fellow grappler, Al Snow. They are best friends in real life but they always make jokes of each other, they treat it as a competition of sorts. They are all hilarious but my personal favourite is a case where Mick describes a phone conversation that he had in 1997 with federation official Jim Cornette. They were discussing possible storylines for Mick so that he could be a part of the "Wrestlemania" event which was coming up. Cornette proposed an angle that featured him working with Marc Mero and Sable. Now, as if you have read the book you will know, Mick is not a fan of Mero, there was just no way that he was going to work with him. The phone call was a long one and soon Mick's wife Colette walked in to the room to see what was happening. As Cornette was rambling on Colette wrote down "What's wrong?", Mick scrawled back, "They want me to work with Marc Mero!". Put into his own inimitable words, Foley writes: "Colette's face converted into a mask of disdain, as if she had smelt a fart or watched an Al Snow match". This is the type of humour used throughout this superb book, and it really will leave you laughing out loud. This is the most enthralling book I have ever read, and I doubt it will be beaten as my personal favourite. It has stories of love, hate, sorrow, joy and virtually every emotion normally found in a top novel... but this is real life. The book is dedicated to the memory of Brian Hildebrand, a close friend, and ill-fated wrestler Owen Hart, who Mick describes as the funniest person he has ever met. This book is certainly a fitting tribute. I just cannot recommend this highly enough. Please, if you are a wrestling fan, then this should be yours already, but if you are not, this is still a must read. The best book I have ever had the joy to read... bar none.

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                      22.04.2001 06:38
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                      Wrestling. Love it . Hate it. No real mid way point . Think its real? Course its not. If you saw what these people do day in and day out you would realise that had this not been choreographed , this form of entertainment would be short lived not to mention the huge lawsuits created. Enter one wrestler famed for his relentless brutality in the ring , Mick Foley , for nearly two decades hes been involved in the sport and only in the last 5 has he made it to the big time. Mick Foley's Autobiography details this mans life not really from early childhood , more from his adolescent belief that wrestling was brilliant and something to aspire to be. So thats when he set out to do it late teens . Unfortuantly its not a bed of roses as Foley somewhat sickeningly details the great highs and eventual lows of the profession. The man himself , and i quote , has ammassed over 325 stitches , eight concussions , brokenbones in various regions of his body plus a bruised kidney incurred due to a fall from the top of a 20ft steel cage into an announcers table during his most infamous match in 1998. Foley has retired of course , thats why hes written the book , "If you did this every night you'd be dead" quotes Foley after his match at the 1998 Royal Rumble with the Rock in which he was handcuffed and hit repeatedly over the head with a steel chair. Foley's humourous observational skills are also well detailed and the man has a very good sense of humour , his Al Snow jokes are hilarious. This book is very detailed but also very interesting as it provides what i consider a very important insight into an aspect of society not yet touched by the mainstream of society . Although this is me speaking from a wrestling fans point of view , I feel it can appeal to people with other interests as it is not saturated with wrestling jargon within the book and if it is some sections the author takes time to explain what hes talking about whe
                      ther it would eb the mechanics of performing a hangman manouver or the proper way to take the punishment of a powerbomb This book is not on its own , a film made recently , titled "Beyond the Mat" directed by Barry Blaustein follows the lifes of wrestlers in and out of the ring and foley appears alongside many other famous wrestlers.

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                        12.04.2001 01:06
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                        I bought Have a Nice Day back in 2000 when it was first released. I recently re-read it, because the book is a superb read. Now I'll admit to being a huge wrestling fan, but wrestling fan or not, this is a great read. Mick Foley is a professional wrestler, who has wrestled throughout all the major wrestling federations. He wrestled for WCW back in the early 90s, then wrestled in numerous smaller feds, including some Japanese wrestling, before moving to ECW in 1995. In 1996 he joined the world Wrestling Federation, a partnership which has led through to today, where Foley no longer wrestles, but still appears in numerous roles to promote the WWF. This book isn't a chance to hear one of the big men brag about how many people they've hurt and how they've slept\bought their way to the top of professional wrestling. As Foley says, he wrote this book himself, with no help from anyone. All the thoughts are his own. This is the life story of a man who entered a business through his love of it. He didn't enter it for the money, otherwise we wouldn't be hearing stories about 16 hour journeys just to pick up a few dollars, and get a chance to wrestle. Foley recalls many major events in his life, both wrestling and non-wrestling related. His childhood tales of failed romance are hugely entertaining, and coupled with the amusing songs and pictures in the book, you want to read on. Then we move on to Foley's introduction to the world of Pro Wrestling, as he begins to wrestle a few matches, and sacrifice all his spare time just to spend a few minutes wrestling. What follows next is probably the most interesting segment of the book, as we get a good insight into the world of World Championship Wrestling or WCW. We get some great biographies on some of the great men in the business, such as Ric Flair and Sting. After Foley leaves WCW, he spends his time working for some smaller promotions. The next maj
                        or part comes when Foley goes to Extreme Championship Wrestling, or ECW. Again, Foley describes some of the characters (Paul Heyman, Mikey Whipwreck) in impressive detail, and when he writes about his leaving of ECW, you actually begin to feel emotion towards him. Then we hear about his 1995 tour of Japan, culminating in his participation in the King of the Death Match tournament. Considering the amount of blood he lost, and he amount he was bumped around, he recalls events rather impressively! The final segment of the book focuses on his first three years in the federation, from 1996-1999. We get good commentaries on many of his big matches, as well as tales from the road and backstage. Overall, Have a Nice Day is a down to earth book written by a down to earth man. If you're a wrestling fan, you'll love the commentaries on the matches, and Foley's opinions on some of the top men in the business. But if you aren't a wrestling fan, Foley makes sure he doesn't leave you out, and explains everything you'd need to know about the world of pro wrestling. The paperback is now out, and for just a few pounds you can read a great story. Get it.

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                          13.03.2001 05:57
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                          SPLASH!! There goes my good dooyoo reputation right down the toilet even before people have read this one small review of a wrestler's autobiography. But I plead with you, wrestling fans and non-wrestling fans, to read on because if I can make this review only half as good as the book then I know I'll have done a good job. First of all I'd like to point out that I didn't actually buy the book myself - it was bought by my dooyooing mother who had won an Amazon Voucher and thought my brother would like Mike Foley's life story. When it arrived, I think that he was put off by the 748 pages in the paperback version which she had purchased, so I decided to pinch it to have a quick look. The "quick look" lasted four days as I could not put it down. Before I go on to describe what the book is about, I suppose I should explain a bit about Mick Foley who is indeed a wrestler. He has had a colourful career in the two main organisations, WWE (formerly WWF) and WCW, and has also wrestled for the brutal ECW as well as in Japan. He was popular on the independent circuit before making it really big in the WWE. Despite the title, this book is not just about Mankind (one of his wrestling personas) but it charts the life of Mick Foley from when he was a scrawny, lacrosse playing 17 year old, right up until he "retired" from professional wrestling. Why am I telling you this, you may wonder. Well, primarily to let you know that the book is about Foley's life rather than just a behind-the-scenes look at wrestling. Granted, wrestling obviously plays a big part but it would be of interest to those that don't know the first thing about the sport. For normal people (ie. non-wrestling fans) this book is an enthralling, entertaining read about a man who suffered a great deal of physical and, in some respects mental, pain to achieve his dream of becoming a wrestler. It detai
                          ls his life in and out of the ring and, while it tells of horrific injuries, is indeed very humorous. As the life story of a courageous, unpredictable man it is certainly very enjoyable. However, for the wrestling fan it is a brilliant buy. This is because as well as reading about the history and events in Mick Foley's life, it gives an insight into American Professional Wrestling. The wrestlers that he talks about which would be viewed as mere "characters" to the non-wrestling fan, have a whole new meaning for those who watch WWE TV shows on a regular basis. He speaks of the friendships that he has with the tough guys who beat him up in the ring as well as telling of the politics that went on when wrestlers were being booked and matches set up. More importantly though, it dispels the myth that Mick Foley was "off his head" as he was referred to many times during his career. Instead, Foley is indeed a clever man and managed to write this 700+ page No.1 best seller without the aid of a ghost writer. In fact, when he said he wanted to write this book, the WWE drafted in a writer to do it for him. However, he refused and instead of writing a 60,000 word middle-of-the-road wrestling autobiography, he penned a 200,000 masterpiece in just six weeks (May-June 1999). What is even more amazing is that he did it all from memory as he didn't keep any notes or diaries throughout his career. In my opinion, Foley is a good writer, perhaps not a stereotypical writer in the sense that he doesn't use classic writing techniques such as descriptive language and colourful words. But he writes from the heart and has some great events to tell of. When you have tales like he has, you do not need flowery language and complex imagery - the stories speak for themselves. In fact, his style of writing is perhaps not unlike that of some of the people who write for dooyoo as the whole book is written as he sees things and
                          uses the same simple, straight-to-the-point words that you would expect him to use in an ordinary conversation. The book itself starts off well with the opening chapter describing the events leading up to what must be one of the worst nights in Mick Foley's life - the night his ear was ripped off in a freak accident during a match. It also gives rise to my favourite line which I will talk about later. I myself remember seeing pictures of the injury at the time it happened and wondered just what kind of person Foley was to continue the match with blood pouring out of a hole in his head where his right ear used to be. After reading this book, I now understand exactly what kind of person he is and the things he had to endure during his career as a professional wrestler. For those of you with a weak stomach, you may be grateful to learn that the first chapter is not an indication of what the other 700 pages contain as the second chapter begins the story of a teenager whose only experience of wrestling was watching his idol Superfly Jimmy Snuka at Madison Square Garden. To say any more about the content would spoil it for the reader as one of the best things about the book is not knowing what Foley is going to talk about next. His style allows him to go off on a tangent at times to detail a conversation, a humorous anecdote or merely to clarify a technical wrestling term for those not in the know. Interspersed throughout, are photos taken at various times during Foley's career as well as those from his own private album. I guarantee this book will make you smile, it will certainly make you laugh and some chapters will make you glad that you don't wrestle for a living. However, there are a few serious parts, most notably the touching tribute to colleague Owen Hart who tragically died after falling sixty feet into the ring before a match in 1999. Foley describes his character, the friendship that he had with him and t
                          ales of how he used to joke around. This gives a good insight into how wrestlers are ordinary people who hide behind a persona to entertain us. Whether you are a fan of wrestling or not, this book is definitely worth a read and with the paperback being 748 pages long, it is certainly worth the £6.99 RRP. It is also available in hardback for £16.99. The paperback currently on sale has a "Bonus Chapter" not included in the original version. The extra 42 pages tell of the events which happened to Foley since the book was originally released and brings the story up to date from May 1999 to April 2000. This last part, especially the few days leading up to his final match, is written almost like a diary and ends the book perfectly. As for my favourite line, as I've said before, it is taken from the very first chapter and still makes me laugh when I read it: "...I hopped out, but not before uttering a German sentence that probably had never been used before and possibly will never be used again: "Vergessen Sie nicht, bitte, mein ohr in der Plastik Tasche zu bringen", or "Please don't forget to bring my ear in the plastic bag"..." Certainly offbeat (you really have to read it in context!) but without doubt one of the best books that I've read. A definite "must" for any wrestling fan and a strong "maybe" for everyone else.

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                            04.12.2000 05:51
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                            Have a Nice Day is probably the greatest book I have ever read. It tells the almost unbelievable story of Mick Foley’s life, his childhood dreaming of being a wrestler, his hardship and suffering in the wrestling business, and his extraordinary rise to fame. This incredible story and the brilliant way it is told is the real reason to buy this book, not just because you want to read about Mick because he’s in the WWF. However, because he is world famous, it has meant every wrestling fan wanted his book, and so it was a No. 1 best seller in the states for several months, and was even No. 1 over here for a while. Sadly, because Mick is, or was, a wrestler, people immediately assume this book is about wrestling, and so as wrestling is childish and fake, this book is not worth reading. This is a terrible misconception, and proves there is still an outdated and stereotypical attitude towards the WWF, and it is still treated, in this country at least, as second rate to ‘real’ things like Star Trek and Van Damme films. I believe it is this type of narrow-minded attitude that stops this book from being recognized for its merits, instead of just being judged by its cover, emblazoned with a WWF logo. I’m sorry if I’ve offended anyone in saying that, but well, the amount of criticism and abuse I get from non believers about wrestling being a bunch of big sweaty men acting and such… it’s time they got some thrown back at em! And I hope that these ‘non-believers’ are still reading this, as you are the people I want to read this the most. Any self respecting WWF fan should already have this book sitting pride of place on their shelves, so it is really people who don’t like wrestling who need to be convinced of this books greatness. Now then, how to convince you that this book is worth reading, and isn’t just for the brainwashed fans? Firstly, r
                            emember, truth is stranger than fiction. Mick Foley has had a staggering life. He has managed to live his dreams, going from making home movies of himself wrestling in his back-yard to being idolized by millions of people worldwide, doing what he loves the most, entertaining. It is hard to show how great this story without giving too much away! He came from a normal family, had a normal childhood, and lived a normal life. He was a big fan of wrestling, and dreamed of competing in the WWF from a young age. He started wrestling in college, driving hundreds of miles every week to a wrestling school where he learnt the basics. Here, he discovered that his talent wasn’t exceptional speed, overwhelming power, or supreme technical skills; it was an uncanny ability for taking a beating and getting back up. “But wrestling is fake” I hear you cry? This is true, punch someone in the face ten times and they won’t get back up, and throw them over your head to the floor and they would probably have a broken back. This doesn’t mean that being hit round the head with a chair, solid steel or not, doesn’t hurt, and it doesn’t mean being thrown around day in day out doesn’t take it’s toll. Mick capitalized on his ability to absorb punishment and began wrestling in small local shows for as little as $20 a night. These were nothing like the professional wrestling you see on TV today, they were 50 people getting drunk in a barn while the wrestlers sweat and bled (real blood) for a pittance. Times were increasingly hard and he thought of packing it up almost every night when he was alone, sore, and deeply unhappy. He eventually got his break into one of the major leagues where he quickly became a success. Combined with this he toured Japan, whose people are renowned for their love of sickness and other people’s suffering. His matches there earn his status as a hardcore legend, fighti
                            ng with barbed wire, thumbtacks, and even C4 left right and centre. This left its toll on him, but at least it made him famous. These matches paved the way for greater things, and he soon entered the second largest wrestling company, WCW. Things were on the up, but he was still unhappy with things in the company and was eventually sacked for being talentless and unmarketable. When all seemed lost, he was hired by the big daddy of them all, the WWF. Here his career wasn’t all peaches and cream, he still had a long and rocky road to the top. This less than fairytale success story ended up with him being one of the most popular wrestlers in history, having legions of fans with signs declaring ‘Foley is God’, and bringing home million dollar pay checks to his loving wife and two children. Ok, I realize I have done the story little justice by running through the framework leaving the best bits out! Just writing that short précis brought back so many memories. Mick’s hopeless quests for romance, some of the horrific injuries he suffered in his crazy matches, and even the story where fellow wrestler Stone Cold Steve Austin asked Mick to walk on the beach with him and another wrestler because “two blonde, muscley blokes walking round together on a California beach is just screaming out gay! If there’s a hairy, ugly guy with us, people won’t get the wrong idea” And it is that, rather than the amazing story, that makes this book what it is. Mick is one of the greatest authors I have ever had the pleasure of reading. For a guy who has suffered several (8?) concussions he sure can write. His writing is hugely entertaining, both utterly gripping and wonderfully humorous. His book is filled to the brim with comical little side stories (like that one on the beach) and witty comments, interpretations, and side notes. It conjures up truly memorable images that will leave you in h
                            ysterics, the number of times I was caught laughing out loud at something or other is a testament to this. It is not just Mick’s sense of humour that flows freely, his innate storytelling ability shines through to create utterly gripping and tense stories that no scriptwriter for the WWF could ever envisage. This creative genius is used aplenty to make an already exciting story totally unforgettable. I’m not usually one for books, being raised on such pap as the WWF, yet this book had me totally hooked. To further wear out the term, I really couldn’t put this one down. Strangely though, although it was a totally captivating story and I read it at any chance I could, it took me nearly six months to finish. This can partly be attributed to its beefy stature, 600+ pages, but also I found that it had to be read slowly for it to really take full effect and make sense. This might sound like the story is baffling and over-complex, but that is not what I’m getting at. Most of the stories contained in this book provoked a lot of thought. I would find myself reading it, and after a while the words would make no sense, as I was still busy contemplating the many things I had read from the previous page. It’s hard to explain, and maybe this only happened to me, which could account for why I am so emphatically praising this book. To put it bluntly, there were several points in the book where I just had to stop reading, put it down, and think to myself “Holy sh*t” Probably the strongest part of this book for me was the deeply moving tribute to Mick’s and everbodies sorely missed friend, Owen Hart, who lost his life entertaining the fans he loved so much. If that doesn’t bring tears to your eyes, you aren’t a living human being. So to summarise, this is a book about hard work, a passionate struggle, and personal sacrifice. It is a genuinely heart-warming love story
                            , with side splitting comedy moments, and genuinely astounding thought provokers. It is a feel good story that you will absolutely love and will always remember fondly. Oh, and did I mention, it is about wrestling.

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                              18.10.2000 00:58

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                              Could you ever have dreamt this 5 or so years ago the most battered and bruised wrestler writing his own book . He has had countless injuries , stitches , bumps and bruises yet he has put together a really enjoyable book . Even the highschool bit is exciting . His life is very similar to many boys of that age so he can relate to them very well . The wrestling parts as you would expect are very exciting being a fan of wrestling myself it was very interesting but after this book I'd say pretty much anyone would be interested ! It really is a joy to read !

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                          • Product Details

                            Mick Foley, better known as WWF wrestler 'Mankind', tells his story.