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ELC Honey Bee Tree

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Brand: ELC / Type: Kids Games

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    10 Reviews
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      06.01.2012 14:51
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      Fun game for kids

      My kids got this game for Christmas, and we love games in this house so it was a welcome gift.

      ==The Game==

      Honey Bee Tree is from The Early Learning Centre and is for children aged 3 and above (perfect as my kids are 3 & 4). It is very similar to the classic game of Kerplunk but I suppose you could say it is 'jazzed' up a bit to make it more interesting for the younger participant.

      Inside the box you get a transparent honey pot, an old oak tree, a tray/tree base, 32 leaves & 30 bees. All items are plastic, and the honey pot, tree trunk and tray base fit together to form the bulk of the game. The honey pot is covered in holes, and these are where you insert your leaves (as you would insert your sticks in Kerplunk). Once the leaves are all inserted, you then chuck in all your bees, hoping than none fall through the gaps before the game has even started.

      Now you are ready to play. Up to 4 players can take part and you each take it in turns to pull a leaf out of the honey pot, trying as hard as you can not to dislodge any bees. The tree trunk is hollow and has one opening at the bottom, so if any bees come loose they will tumble down the tree trunk and into the tray at the bottom. There are 4 sections in the tray, so when it is your turn you must turn the tree so that the opening is in line with your section on the tray, so if you do happen to dislodge any bees, they will fall into your section.

      The player with the least amount of bees at the end of the game is the winner.

      ==Playing the Game==

      My kids were keen to get going with this straight away so my husband and I were on hand to assist with the set up. Slotting the separate parts of the game together was very easy, but a child would not be able to do this unaided, and for the items to fit back into the box the game has to be disassembled again.

      As with most games of this nature, the setting up takes a lot longer than playing the actual game, but this doesn't seem to bother my kids. Inserting the leaves is quite a fiddly task and my children are completely useless at it because they are too heavy handed and do not understand that if you start prodding at something it will more than likely fall over and then you have to start over. But they are both quite patient while I laboriously insert all the 32 leaves ready for play. The problem with this task is that once you have put a few leaves in, they are sometimes difficult to guide into the holes, and fortunately for me I have quite long fingers so I can poke my fingers inside the honey pot to guide the other end of the leaf into a hole, but if you are not as gifted finger-wise as me, then you may struggle to get all of the leaves in position without having some sort of adult-tantrum.

      As soon as the last leaf is inserted my children cannot wait to throw the bees into the honey pot, and to be honest I think this is their favourite part of the game! So once this is done, then we all have an argument about who's turn it is to go first, and it usually ends up being my eldest daughter because she is most persuasive and most likely to have a huge tantrum if she doesn't get her own way.

      When you start pulling the leaves out, the game is quite sturdy so you don't really need to worry about pulling the entire thing over by tugging at a leaf that won't budge - they all slide out really smoothly and we have not yet had a game fall over mid-play. The thing that worried me at first was that the trunk was really stiff to twist on each players turn and even I struggled to turn it around each time, but on recent games I have noticed it has really loosened up, and although I wouldn't trust my kids to turn it without destroying the game in progress, I am no longer straining my wrist trying to twist the trunk every 2 seconds.

      At first my children thought the object of the game was to get as many bees as possible, so the more bees that came tumbling out, the more excited they became. That was until I pointed out that they were losing! But I suppose you could play the game either way, it doesn't really matter, either way you are going to get a winner and a loser.

      The bees have usually vacated the honey pot before all the leaves have been pulled out, but there have been a couple of occasions when there is a bee left perilously balancing on one leaf, and this is usually when my husband is playing because he is very competitive. When he plays, the game lasts a lot longer, but if it's just me and the kids the game can be over in a matter of minutes; which is good in my opinion because then the kids don't get bored.

      ==Our Thoughts==

      We all enjoy playing this game; we already had Kerplunk which was difficult to set up and harder to distinguish between winners and losers. But this Honey Bee Tree makes it all a bit easier and is more visually appealing too, my kids love the bees! The quality of all the items within the game is great and I can see this being something that will be played with for the next few years to come. I would definitely recommend it for children aged 3 and above.


      Available from The Early Learning Centre (ELC) for £12, and the best thing is - it doesn't require any batteries!

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      02.12.2011 22:02
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      A great game for preschool children and their families

      This game is one we have had in our household for about a year now and is played with at least once a week meaning in my book this is a winner of a toy as we have other toys and games that gather dust in between times.

      This Honey bee tree game is really the Early Learning Centre's version of Kerplunk with a bit of a twist. Designed for children from 3 years and above my son got this when he was 3 so was just right for the age range for this toy. The design is fairly simple there is the main body of the game which comprises of a twisting tree trunk and base which is to resemble some grass with a section for each player for the bees to come down into. The top of the tree as it were is a clear yellowy gold plastic that is to resemble a bee hive. In the hive there are multiple holes at the bottom to place the leave sticks into, the top is nice and wide to accommodate all the yellow and black bees to rest on the top of the sticks.

      Setting up the game takes a few minutes to do as you have to put all the leaves/ sticks through the hole initially my son's hand eye co ordination meant that he found this difficult to do so this job would be mine alone. However now he is coming up to four he likes to place the leaves in the various slots and sees this as part of the game now rather than getting impatient whilst I set them up. He loves putting the bees into the top to rest on the leaves and then can't wait to get started. In the set up I have to say I find it a bit tricky at times to actually get all of the leaves into the various slots and sometimes when we are doing it we don't use all of the leaves or don't have them going fully through the hive.

      The idea is to remove the leaves/sticks and not get any bees down into your slot and the winner is the person with the least bees. However the way we play this at the moment is the person with the most bees wins as this is how my son and his friends like to play it as they all like the bees so much. I find that the slots for the bees to land in at the bottom of the trunk is a little small too accommodate all the bees especially when only two people are playing. What we do as we turn the tree trunk to take turns is to remove the bees as we go to stop them building up. This is never a problem for us as my son likes to keep a close eye on his bees as he gets them to make sure no-one pinches his bees.

      The educational benefits of this toy are about learning to take turns, hand eye co ordination and some counting when you get to the end of the game. I can definitely see how the hand eye co-ordination has helped with my son as he getting more dexterous in his playing of this.

      Fun wise it is a popular game in house and with our son and his friends when they come to play. This is in part I think down to the cuteness of the bees as they all seem to want as many of them as they can. When we play this game we generally play between 2-3 games at a time which last up to around 20-25 minutes which I find is a good amount of concentration for my son. My son and his friends are always are giggling at times when they are playing with it too which is nice to see as a parent.

      Robust wise the game seems to be holding up well the main body of the game looks as good as new and the bees still look bright and cheerful after a years worth of play. The only wear and tear we are seeing so far after a year is a bit of bending with the sticks of the leaves as they have got a bit bent out of shape with them being put into the various holes. However despite this they are still usable and are no more problematic than the others to insert into the holes on the hive.

      I would definitely recommend this game as it is fun for children to play and improves hand eye co ordination and helps them learn to take turns. The game is well made and even after a year of use shows little damage the only criticism is the small holders for when the bees go down the trunk as it can't really accommodate all the bees that drop down. The game at full price is £12 from the Early Learning Centre but it is frequently on offer for £6 and at this price is it a definite bargain for most Christmas presents and can be nice gift to give at Birthdays of friends as we have done.

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        28.11.2011 23:24
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        Good game!

        When I was younger I was really into board games, I loved everything from monopoly to scene it to this game, although I was probably a bit younger playing this than playing monopoly! This comes from the early learning centre, a shop I was in a lot when I was younger- it always seemed very appealing to children and had a lot of things that I wanted from board games to toy animals!

        There are quite a lot of small parts to this game, as there are to a lot of toys and I think over the years we may have unfortunately lost the odd bee or leaf! In the box the game contains the tree which is main piece in the game, effectively the 'board' in this game. It also contains the honey pot, the base of the game, 30 of the small bee pieces and 32 leaves. However, the good point about all of the pieces is that apart from losing the odd one they do seem to have stood the test of time and have shown themselves to be quite strong - they are all made of quite sturdy and colourful plastic.

        The concept of the game is one that has happened many times before, this is just a different take on it relating to bees! For example pop up pirate is very similar to it, this is a very popular Hasbro game. The set up is relatively simple, you connect the tree to the base and the honey pot before putting the leaves in all of the holes. After putting the leaves in place you pour all of the bees on top of them. Game play is simple; there are 2-4 players and they each choose a base bit to sit at (best to put the game on a table really) then you take it in turns to remove a leaf from your section of the tree. You need to do this carefully so that as little bees fall down as possible, because the person with the most bees at the end loses! In a way this is similar to jenga!

        I really enjoyed this game when I used to play it, and I still believe that it would be great for young children now. In addition to being fun for children it will also build up many important skills such as turn taking, conversation (when they are playing the game) and counting because at the end they will need to count up all of their bees! It is still being sold by the early learning centre so it must be a timeless product! They are charging £12.

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        09.09.2011 21:50
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        A great game though with a couple of little flaws

        ELC Honeybee Tree

        I remember absolutely loving the game, Kerplunk when I was a little younger than I am now! Therefore, when we saw this Honeybee Tree game from Early Learning Centre I thought it would be a perfect present for my little one. Although not associated with Winnie the Pooh at all, one thing that appealed to me for my youngster is the honey bee tree aspect as this is something she loves about Winnie the Pooh, and true to self, she immediately said 'its Poohs tree!'.

        I was able to pick this up second hand on Ebay for £2.99 which is a great price especially considering Amazon have it there for just under £11.00 which is still a very reasonable price for a great game.

        Included in the box is the following;

        * 1 honey pot
        * 1 old oak tree
        * 1 flower tray base
        * 32 leaves
        * 30 little bees

        All the contents are made from a sturdy plastic with the exception of the leaves where the stems are rather flimsy and easily bent. On one hand, this makes it easier for young children to insert them into the honey pot, though on the other hand, once bent it can also hinder them doing so. The pot is orange and see-through, again, making it easier to fill it in with the leaves, and the holes around the edges are of good size compared to the leaf stems. The trunk slots in to the base well and turns around without any problems. It has a good sized hole to let the honey bees fall through. The base is well made though rather small. It contains four spaces to allow the bees to fall into, though if a number fall through (which especially happens on a two player game) then the bees overflow from the base.

        If you have never played Kerplunk, then firstly, where have you been!? Secondly, the rules are as follows.

        The game play is for two to four players, each choosing one base space. Insert all the leaves into the honey pot holes, making sure they go all the way through if possible, and then tip all the bees through the hole at the top so they all lay on the stems without falling. One by one, players turn the trunk so that the hole faces their chosen space and pull out a leaf. If they pull out the wrong leaf, one or many bees may fall into their space. Once all the bees have fallen, the winner is the player with the least leaves.

        My little one loves this game and I admit I do too. The only problems I find is the above stated problem with the small base, and the fact that it takes a while to set up all the leaves. Once set up, the game takes no longer than five minutes to play.

        Overall, a great game and fully recommended!

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          30.03.2011 22:01
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          A great little game for old and young alike.

          My 3 year old has just in the last few months become interested in playing games (mostly with his own rules!). We came across this game in the early learning centre and at half price (£5) it seemed like a bargain. Inside the box you get one honey pot, a base in the shape of an oak tree trunk, a green base with the tree roots dividing it into six different sections, 32 leaves on long green stalks and 30 small plastic honey bee's. To construct the game you simply place the trunk into the base and then the honey pot onto the trunk. The honey pot itself has little holes covering it and you need to slide the leaf stalks in through one hole and out through another one on the other side. The stalks need to be crisscrossed across the honeypot creating a mesh type effect that will 'trap' the bee's. The bee's are then added into the top of the honeypot and should stay on the top if the leaves have been inserted correctly. Players then take it in turns to pull out a leaf stalk (jenga style) in the hope that they don't cause any bee's to fall down the trunk into the roots. The trunk itself has a hole in the base which needs to be turned to each players own root section on their go, ensuring that any stray bee's end up with the correct player. The person who has the least amount of bee's at the end is the winner.

          The game is very easy to set up but does take alot of time as placing all the stalks is quite fiddely. I can imagine that with older children this would proabably be worth it but my three year old inevitably gets far too excited and ends up pulling them all out in quick succession! (he likes seeing the bee's fall, in his rules the person with the most bee's is the winner!) At the moment the game has to be carefully played with and put away as the bee's are a definite choking hazard and with a very nosey 6 month old in the house I need eyes in the back of my head! We've had this game for about 6 months and have probably lost about 6 bee's so far and a couple of leaf stalks. The overall quality is good and for the price, even at full price, it will definately keep little ones entertained for ages. For older children it is one to test the brain as they can try and work out which leaf being pulled will cause the least amount of damage, whereas for younger ones its just good fun.

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          09.03.2011 16:59
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          I like my Ker-plunk like I like my coffee - covered in beeeeeees!

          We've had this game for a few years: it was a Christmas present for my son from relatives.

          It's basically 'Ker-Plunk' in a bee-keeping suit.

          In 'Ker-Plunk', you have a chamber through which you thread straws to create a mesh, then you pour marbles on top. The idea of the game is to take turns to carefully pull out one straw at a time, without disturbing the marbles. Pull out the wrong one and marbles tumble into your tray. The winner has the least marbles at the end of the game. The 'Ker-Plunk' of my childhood has been modernised from something that looked rather like a cocktail shaker to something that looks more like a flying saucer these days, but still retains its ear-shattering clatter of marbles!

          This version replaces the futuristic chamber with a transparent orange wild beehive (reminiscent of Winnie the Pooh's temptations), which you fit onto a brown hollow tree trunk. The straws are replaced by long stemmed leaves, and the marbles are brightly coloured bees. The base is a green "flower tray" with the roots of the tree separating it into four sections.

          It's made of good quality plastic and is robust and colourful.

          Between goes, players are supposed to turn the tree trunk so that the opening aligns with their section of the tray, but ours is quite stiff and my son finds it hard to turn. It's supposed to be part of the game that the next player has to move the trunk and hopefully not send bees flying before they even draw out their leaf, but we tend to just leave it in one position and count our bees as we go. It's just that little bit too awkward and frustrates him too much if the wobble is such that he ends up with bees in his tray before he's even touched a leaf! The plastic bees are gentler on the poor old ear-drums than marbles, fortunately.

          Setting up is quite simple: threading the leaves into the holes around the hive chamber. It gets quite difficult to get them in towards the end as space gets tight, so patience (of which some of us are rather short of!) is required. It takes a couple of minutes to set up.

          It's a reasonably short game to play: 5 to 10 minutes, I'd say. There are four sections to the tray, so up to four players can play and it can get quite noisy as tension builds! Once we've played once, we usually have a couple more games, best out of three, best out of five, hang on I'm going to make tea...

          It's a toy that helps your child develop problem solving skills and requires fine motor skills, as well as being noisy fun! There's also the counting aspect as you tot up how many bees fell down for each player. Once The Boy had got the hang of counting singly, we'd do it in twos and fives and so on to challenge him further.

          The Early Learning Centre (sellers/makers of the game) recommend the Honey Bee Tree for ages between 3 and 8, and I'd pretty much go along with that. I know it's coming to the end of its life with us, although The Boy is only 6. This is because its design is a bit too close to Winnie the Pooh merchandise and he considers poor old Winnie babyish nowadays. It wouldn't be suitable for children under 3, or at least not without supervision because of "small parts" (bees).

          It has lasted well, and is fit for rehoming via charity shop or school fayre, which indicates the good quality of the toy. Its cardboard box may be slightly faded, but the contents are in good nick.

          If you don't happen to be in the charity shop I donate it to, you can buy it new from the ELC for £12.

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          17.08.2010 12:28
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          Great addition to family game night.

          Ages:
          This item is listed for ages 3-8. I would think most eight year old children would get bored with it easily. My two year old also enjoys this, and is not prone to putting small bits in his mouth, but I still would not leave him unsupervised with the toy. I would recommend this with supervision from ages 2-6.

          The game itself consist of a green plastic base, a tree, a clear plastic bee hive with holes, green branches and bees. The game plays like kerplunk. You place the branches through the trees and then add the bees. Each player takes turns pulling out a branch and trying not to make the bees fall out. The tree rotates. You face the opening at the bottom to the person whose turn it is. Each player has their own section , so you can count up how many bees they dropped out. The winner is the one with the least bees.

          Those of you who have read many of my reviews though may realise, we rarely play games the way you are meant to. We play this sitting around a table. When a player makes a bee fall out, the other players grab it and chase the player around the table making bee sounds. If he gets back to his seat without getting stung, he gets the bee or bees. If he gets stung, the person chasing gets the bees. Whoever has the most bees at the end of the game wins.

          I prefer this game to Kerplunk, as I find it easier to set up and less fiddly. My 5 year old can set this up without any adult assistance. It does still take awhile to get ready though as each branch must be threaded through the holes in the bee hive. As with most ELC toys, this is well made and after 3 years is still in mint condition. I do think it is stronger and better built than Keplunk.

          My oldest loves this game, although he does enjoy most family games. The youngest does have some trouble waiting for turns and get carried away just wanting to grab and chase, but of course that is due to our family variation of the game. Overall, I think it is a very good game for families with young children. I think any type of family game helps children learn to take turns, and is good for the family in general. This also helps develop motor skills. The main reason to play this is simple though - it's fun!

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            30.04.2009 18:29
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            Fun game

            When I was a little girl I had the game of Ker PLunk which I absolutely loved. The idea was that you had a plastic tube. Halfway down the tube you had a load of holes for which you pushed through thin plastic sticks which formed a sort of floor. On top of these sat loads of marbles which you had to try to keep there as you removed the sticks, It was very noisy but a lot of fun!

            When shoppong for my daughter's fourth birthday I spotted this honey bee tree in the Early Learning Centre and as I was reminded of Ker Plunk, I bought it for her. In many ways it is similar to my childhood game but is much more attractive to look at. Instead of the plastic tube, sticks and marbles, you have a honey tree, long leaves and bees. When you first play the game you have to assemble it which is a little time consuming but not difficult. The three main components are a base, a tree trunk and a see through honey pot. These all fit together to form a pretty sturdy playing piece. Alongside these there are thirty two leaves. They come attached to a plastic template and you have to twist them off. It was a little fiddly for us adults but my five and four year old daughters found it quite difficult. At least you only have to do this the once!

            Setting up the game also takes some time as you have to put the base together and then you have to feed all the leaf twigs through. It's quite easy at first, but the more leaves that are in place, the harder it is to thread through the remaining ones. This definitely calls for a bit of adult intervention. In the end, the first time we played the game we only managed to put in about twenty six of the thirty two leaves before we gave up. The leaf sticks are also quite flimsy which means that it's hard to push them through in a straight line. They are supposed to poke out a hole opposite where they have been pushed in but these holes are quite small, again making it almost impossible for little ones to do. This was frustrating for them as they really wanted to help with this setting up. Once all of the sticks have been inserted you can pour the cute little plastic bees on top - there are thirty of these!

            You are then ready to play the game and a fun way suggested to decide who starts is to see who is wearing the most yellow and black! Up to four players can play and they each need to have a number from one to four. The tray at the bottom is divided up into four sections with these corresponding numbers and when it is your go, you turn the part of the tree that has a gaping hole at the bottom to face your section. It's actually quite hard to move this round and this was another time when you really needed an adult to do it. Each player, on their turn, slowly and carefully pulls out a leaf hoping against hope that they are not going to dislodge any of the bees!IF they do and they are very unlucky the bees will fall into their tray section and these will count against them. The winner will be the person who has managed to capture the least number of bees!

            My daughters really enjoyed this game and it's particularly good for them to try and develop a steady hand. My five year old was much better at this than her four year old sister. There was much hilarity when the bees fell down especially when Mummy or Daddy got them! It's also a game that as you get to know it better you learn to be a bit more strategic. My youngest daughter just pulls leaves randomly but I have noticed that her sister is starting to look more carefully and think which might be the best leaves to pull out. It's also a good game to encourage turn taking and at the end it helps with counting as we need to count up how many bees each player has collected. Above all though it's just a game to really enjoy together.

            I am really pleased with this game and it seems absolutely right in its suggested age range of between three and eight years. I do wish that the set up was just slightly easier because I can't see the girls being able to do this without our help, and with the best will in the world, there's not always time to sit down and play games with them when they want. However, once set up they probably can get on on their own although I suspect there's a good chance they might make their own rules up sometimes! Anyway you could aways decide to reverse the game and say that it is the player with the most bees wins!

            Overall this is an excellent game and considering that I only paid £6 for it in ELC, I think that it is very good value for money!

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              19.03.2009 21:24
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              Ker-plunk for beginners!

              Shortly before Christmas my daughter's school held their annual Christmas Fair. My husband had given our daughter some money to spend at the fair and she wasn't leaving until she had bought something!

              Eventually on a stall selling used toys and games my Daughter found this Early Learning Centre (ELC) Honey Bee Tree game and recognising it as something similar to Ker-Plunk, which she enjoys playing with Nanny, she decided this was the thing she wanted most. We paid £1.00 for the Honey Bee Tree, a Steering Wheel and a box of six Dinosaur puzzles.

              As soon as we got home we all had to have a game of the Honey Bee Tree and my daughter excitedly emptied the contents of the box. I was really pleased to see that all the pieces where there and appeared to be in an unused condition. What a bargain!

              In the box you get a collecting tray base, an old oak tree, a bee hive, 32 leaves on long sticks and 30 little bees. Anyone who has ever played Ker-plunk will work this game out very quickly as it is just the same but just aimed at a younger audience. The recommended age range for this toy is three to eight years and I would say that is about right, any younger and it is too fiddly and difficult to understand and any older and they will think the design is childish.

              To play the game you have to put together your 'old oak tree' by fitting the trunk into the base and placing the bee hive on the top. The bee hive has lots of holes in it and you then have to thread your 'leaves' through the hive to make the whole thing look like a tree. This is quite tricky and you cannot just slot the leaves through at random. I found that if you try and fit the sticks through and thread them through the holes opposite and work up a layer at a time you can get all the leaves in. If you just shove the sticks through any old how you tend to get them jammed and they won't all fit. Once you have fitted all your sticks into the hive you can then tip your bees in on top of the sticks and you are ready to play.

              The idea of the game is to take turns to remove the sticks without dislodging any bees; the player with the least bees once they have all fallen through is the winner.

              The first time we played I just rammed as many sticks in as I could fit as quickly as possible just so we could start the game. My children aged three and four really enjoyed the game and got very excited when the bees came down the trunk. They got a lot of bees when trying to turn the trunk to face them when it was their turn and because I hadn't managed to get all the sticks in. The first game was over very quickly but caused much giggling and squealing.

              Since then I have always tried to put the sticks in properly just to make the game last a little longer. Unfortunately this does increase the setting up time which does cause some frustration. I think my children are under the impression that the aim is to get as many bees as possible and as they seem to enjoy this so much I haven't bothered to put them right!

              The game is still available (March 09) from the ELC for £8.00 and I don't feel that this is a bad price for such an entertaining game. I am obviously very pleased that I didn't pay that for our game but I don't think that £8.00 is expensive for a children's game. The toy is very good quality and all the pieces are made of hard plastic. The sticks do bend but we haven't had any break yet and we've had the game for four months. The bees are yellow with black stripes painted onto them and they are also all still intact and look like new despite my one year old frequently trying to eat them.

              I would recommend this game for any child within the age range and feel it appeals to both boys and girls alike.

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                13.11.2007 09:54
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                A good stocking filler for younger children

                Honey Bee Tree is an easy, fun game from the Early Learning Centre, designed for younger children. The best way of describing the game is a young children's version of the game Ker-plunk, using bees in a honey pot instead of marbles.

                ==== AIM OF THE GAME =====
                The aim of the game is to have fewer bees in your segment at the foot of the tree when all the branches have been removed than the other players.

                ==== PUTTING EVERYTHING TOGETHER ====

                The game comes with an oak tree in three parts - base, trunk and honey pot - 32 branches and 30 little bees. The parts are in quite sturdy plastic, the base in green, with brown tree roots dividing it into 4. The trunk is brown, fits snugly into the base by means of a rounded stump in the middle, and is hollow, being slightly broader at the top than the bottom. The honey pot sits on the rim of the trunk and is made of clear brown plastic, and I open at both ends.

                Once you've put the tree together, you thread the branches through the holes in the bottom of the honey pot, so that once all have been put in, they form a cat's cradle on which the bees can rest when tipped in. I should say that the leaves have rounded ends, and have a leaf on one end, which makes them safe for younger children (no pointy bits to go into eyes) and easy for the younger ones to get hold of. The bees are yellow and black plastic marbles, with little wing-shaped pieces on them.

                When fully assembled the game is 11 inches high (28cm), and the individual branches are just over 6 inches long (16cm). You are now ready to play.

                ==== PLAYING THE GAME ====

                Each player takes it in turns to pull out a branch from the honey pot. If any bees fall out, they fall into that player's section of the base, as the trunk is turned before each turn so the little opening faces that particular section. Once all the bees have fallen down, the one with the fewest is the winner. Average playing time is between 5 and 15 minutes depending on how impatient your children are.

                ==== OVERALL ====

                This is a very simple game, which all our children (9, 6 and 3) enjoy. It also has the advantage for us that all three of our children can quite easily play it at the same time, or just one can play with an adult, and they like the way that each of them has a good chance of winning each game. The branches are easy for the 3-year to manoeuvre, and sturdy enough so the bees don't all move when you turn the tree round between each player's game. So it is good for developing fine motor skills for the youngest children and the slightly older ones have started to think more strategically about which branches to take, so it develops some problem solving attributes.

                The only drawback is that putting all the branches in the honey pot can take almost as long as the game, with the last few being particularly tricky sometimes to put in place. Having said that, with two or three inserting them, it becomes a fun part of the game. I would recommend this as a relatively inexpensive present for children aged 3-8.

                It is available from elc.co.uk for £6.
                Recommended ages 3 -8
                No of players: 2-4
                Average game time: 10-15 minutes

                This review has also appeared on ciao

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              • Product Details

                A great game for 2-4 players, try to pull out the leaves without letting the bees fall down. Recommended for ages 3 - 8 years.