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Monopoly Junior

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      24.07.2013 18:54
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      a fantastic childrens version of an original game

      I remember going into Woolworths as a child and seeing this game on the shelf. My anty bought it for me to play when we got back to hers and from then on, I have loved monopoly ever since.

      Although I play the other versions more often now I still play this regularly with my cousins who are six and eight. We love playing it together and out of my huge variety of board games this is the one they always choose.

      This version of monopoly is based on a fairground which, in my experience, has attracted children to the game.

      The board is a smaller size than regular monopoly and is a lot simpler too. This helps as the children find it easier to focus on when there are less houses to keep an eye on. The board is twice the size of the box.

      Also included in the game is a pack of 25 chance cards, these are small cards with Mr monopoly on and each say things like 'free ticket booth' or 'go to see the water show.' These are always fun to pick up as you never know what your card will say.

      There are 48 ticket booths with 12 in red, yellow, green and blue. These along with the four cars are made from plastic. Whenever I play this I always end up with a red or green car as the blue and yellow which we all prefer is always taken by others first.

      There is also a regular dice which goes up to six and money in 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. This makes it easier for children to make up the right amount but it would be better if there was no 3s or 4s as you won't find that in real money.

      The aim of the game is to be the player with the most money at the end of the game. This is done by going around the board and buying (or collecting free from chance) ticket boothes. Whenever you land on one that isn't your own you have to pay the owner the stated amount. If your bankrupt you are out of the game.

      The squares you will pass on the way around can help you make or lose money. These are:

      Go, I like this square as every time you pass the square you get £2. It is also where the game begins. The money is great for saving for ticket boothes.

      Chance, as I mentioned these are good fun as it is a surprise what's on each card. Fingers crossed its a blue ticket booth (the most expensive one!)

      Railway, there are four of these and if you land on one you get another go. This is good as the railway itself is a rather boring square.

      Pay £2 to see the fireworks / water show, not such a good square as you lose money with no say in the matter. I'd rather watch the fireworks for free from a distance and what if I don't want to see the water show!

      Cafe, this square does nothing. The ice cream looks nice though.

      Mr monopoly's loose change, this is where all the money from the fireworks, water show goes. If you land on it and there is money there, it's yours. If you pass it by, better luck next time. This can build up to a lot of money so it a nice place to stop. My favourite square when it's full!

      Pay £3 to take the bus to the cafe, another payout you are forced into. No money from passing go now!

      Ticket boothes, these are all around the board with the cheapest closest to go and the most expensive furthest away. When you put houses on them you'll get money pouring in, and unfortunately out as well. We can get quite competitive with collecting ticket boothes and have been known to get in an argument because one person has taken over the board. No ruled were broken though, the others are just jealous they didn't get there first.

      Like all monopoly games you go round and round continually until all but one player is bankrupt (or more likely, everyone is bored and wants to pack it away).

      At the end of the game the one with the most money wins. This is usually the person with the most expensive ticket boothes but this may not necessarily be the case.

      The game is for two to four players but it is most fun when there are four players as with only two players you are just handing money back and forth between yourselves.

      It is aimed at children from five to nine but any school age children or adults could play. The rules are a lot simpler than original monopoly.

      It is a fantastic game to play and we always enjoy to play with family. Hopefully it will encourage children to love monopoly when they get older like it did for me.

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        05.04.2013 12:19
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        a great fun filled way to play monopoly with little ones

        Easter Holidays and the weather is very cold so long walks by the river and visits to play parks has had to be revised! My Daughter received Monopoly Junior from Father Christmas but we hadn't played it.

        What is it?
        Monopoly Junior is of course based on the original game of monopoly but unlike the original this game is a lot faster and ends as soon as the first person runs out of money!
        The version we have is based on a fun fair you have to put your ticket booth on a square and then charge admission to anyone landing on the square, it also contains the chance cards as per the original where you either get a free ticket booth or you end up being sent to a particular square.

        Cost and stockist
        From what I can see Hasbro have changed Monopoly Junior to be based on a party, you can still get this version but new it is £41.00 on Amazon so I would recommend looking in charity shops which is where I got this one for £1.00 I also purchase one from a car boot sale for my godson for 50p.
        Both versions of this game are very good we have played the party one and it is very similar and this is available for £7.99 on Amazon www.amazon.co.uk

        Why Buy
        Well Monopoly is a great game for maths skills but more importantly it is really good fun! I have two children aged 5 and 7 and often what one wants to play is too complicated or not inspiring enough this game we played as a family and all enjoyed indeed yesterday we played it 5 times and nobody was fed up.

        Recommendation
        I really recommend this it is a great game it is fast enough that interest doesn't get lost; it is good at teaching maths without being too obvious! And although it is aimed at 5-8 year olds Mummy and Daddy enjoyed this very much!

        In summary a really good unisex family game one I will be buying for my nephews and nieces.

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        23.02.2012 17:12
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        A good time-filler with some learning points.

        I've recently returned from my trip to see my grandson and as I always try to do, I buy a small present for him since he has come to expect it. But knowing I would be spending money over the week and treating him to other things I scoured the charity shops for a light board game that would fit my suitcase. I'd fancied buying the children's monopoly for some time but I know that Jack is often impatient and didn't know if he would play this or get bored and waste my money. After paying £3 for a game with every piece intact, I felt I had a bargain to go with my other presents. This actually turned out to be the favourite one.

        The game is based on the adult version but instead of properties there is a board with a similar style as the adult one, but with a fairground theme instead. It's a rectangular shape board with a brightly colored background and each square has a similar value to the adult theme, so children who have heard or seen adult monopoly can relate to the children's one. The board is spaced out in this way.

        One side will have a corner with a 'Go' square or a café, Bus Ride etc. The colored squares denote equivalent fairground rides such as Merry-go-round, haunted House, Pitch & Toss, and Roller- Coaster. These are broken up by the railway lines that come in four colours and every time you land on these you get a second go. Other squares have a chance card and these are either a free go at a ticket booth or other goes, either ones that make money or lose a little.

        ***Moveable contents***

        These include cars, which replace the boot, top hat etc of the adult version, much easier for a child to remember. Then there are sets of 'chalets', which look like houses. Along with this are a dice and the all-important factor, the loose money, in denominations of £1,2,3,4 and 5 notes. The only quibble I had with these is the similar colours with some of the notes looking almost identical. There is also a rulebook, which we perused and then put to one side. With all games I find that bending rules can lengthen or shorten games or make them more interesting to younger children.

        **Game in Play***

        The rules are basically similar to the adult one; the winner is the player with the most money left after several circuits of the board. Each player starts with a set amount of money with the bank retaining enough to pay the £2 pocket money every time a player passes Go. Landing on a fairground 'ride' that has an amount of money by it means the player can purchase that 'pitch'. Since there aren't any ownership cards then we chose the same colour chalet as our car to denote ownership. It also makes the board look quite interesting and a place to avoid if one player has plenty of properties. The more people that are playing will set the speed of the game; we found that a game never actually ended.

        **A Child's Play**

        I expected Jack to enjoy some of the game but was surprised by his attitude towards finishing the game. Since it was usually just him and me playing then we both still had a fair bit of money after a half hour and with Jack getting fidgety it was time to get out of the house. He was the one who asked if the game could be left in situ to show to Mummy and Daddy, so we left it there and picked up the game the next day and so on throughout my stay. He really enjoyed playing it and was fascinated by the idea of 'owning' a property and charging people to use it. Naturally his attitude to money isn't that developed at the moment but he did like owning it and adding the amounts up to see how much he owned.

        While we were playing I discovered that Jack had little concept of money beyond knowing what coins were called. Since he's going to be seven in April I was a bit concerned since I knew far more about the prices of goods at that age, but Jack doesn't actually carry any money so I felt it was time he got a rough idea about values. The other thing I noticed was his surprise when I gave him a £2 note with a £1 note to make three pounds. This was because I had a huge pile on ones and this started a discussion on pockets full of change. Though it's not something every child would spot, I felt it led to a good discussion on money in general and therefore had more than a little educational value.

        **Conclusion**

        I feel you get what you want out of games and children respond differently, so my recommendation might not suit another. However, this does seem a popular game and appealed to Jack's interest in a positive way. On the one hand he isn't very fond of fairgrounds so I had to adapt the game a little, but counting money and owning it (even for a short time) made him feel a little more responsible and that's something I want to encourage in him.

        I like the way the game hasn't altered very much and can see him moving on to a more grown up version soon.

        The one I bought was a charity shop buy but I would now definitely buy a similar one since it's worth the money.

        Thanks for reading.

        This review may appear on other sites.

        ©Lfuller2012.

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          03.01.2012 11:32
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          A clever introduction to Monopoly in a simplified form, where children buy ticket booths at a fair.

          Do you find regular adult Monopoly tedious and a game just seems to go on and on forever? I do and this is where I find that the junior version is so much more fun to play, as it ends so much quicker. This should be strange as on my box it says that this game is specially designed for ages 5 - 8. Oh well some kids will just never grow up!

          Rather than the typical London street set up of traditional Monopoly the children's version has been cleverly developed to take children to a destination that they will enjoy and be able to relate to, the funfair. We've had our game for 15 years and so the fairground attractions that appear on each square are quite traditional ones, such as Merry Go Round, Candy Floss and Haunted house - whether these have been update to include more theme park type rides in the newer version however, I'm not sure. The boxes still have the same picture on, children on a roller coaster, after all these years though so suspect not. My children always liked this theme and never really made the transition across to the adult game.

          The board is smaller than that of the main game, being a rectangle that folds in half to fit in the square box. The board measures 20 x 10" and the box is 1.5 x 10.5 x 2" and has never been a problem to stack away in the toy cupboard. The layout is much the same as you will be used to, with the same pale green background. In the four corners are some familiar sites - the 'Go' square from where all players start the game and where £2 of pocket money will be collected each time a player passes. The cafe replaces the jail (no need to miss a turn though) and in the opposite corner you have to pay £3 to take the bus to the cafe. The fourth corner, opposite go is my favourite. It's called 'Uncle Pennybags Loose Change'. Money is paid into here at various points in the game, rather than into the bank, such as when taking the bus to the cafe, or when you have to pay to see the fireworks or watershow (utility squares on monopoly). If you land on it you win everything in there - always the high point of the game and the square that on every circuit you're really hoping that you can land on.

          The railways are still there - red, green, yellow and blue lines and you get an extra turn if you land on these - I can't remember if it's the same in monopoly - it's so long since I played the real game. Chance cards crop up with great frequency: six times in all, but there is no community chest. Children get bored easily so the chance cards help to give variety and hold children's attention. They are also good because many of them entitle the player to a free ticket booth and help to speed the game along. The ticket booths take up all of the squares that streets would normally do and have the same colour coding, so the ultra expensive dark blue Mayfair and Park Lane, become Loop the Loop and Roller Coaster, which would also probably the most expensive rides. A further difference however is that where there would be three of some street colours there are just two of each colour coded ride and this helps to keep the board smaller and hence each circuit is faster and pocket money is earned much quicker. Again this is great for holding a child's attention.

          Ultimately the objective is the same - to have the most amount of money when one player runs out of all of their cash. The game includes five different denominations of paper money, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 pounds and the box has segments where the banker can neatly store all of these. By making the bank notes small figures it is easier for a child to understand and manage the simple arithmetic involved in managing their pocket money and purchasing their ticket booths. It is also far more realistic to quantities of money that they would be used to dealing with, although obviously the use of coins would making it even more realistic, but it is a game and can't be totally educational. It always seems strange to me though that the players are buying the whole ticket booth to run and not just a ride on it with these small amounts of money.

          Players travel around the board in chunky, durable plastic cars. When they land on a ticket booth and decide to buy it they pay the money shown on the board to the bank and then place a plastic ticket booth (just like houses) of their own colour onto it. There are no cards for each property and no further hotels and houses to place on the square. There is just a flat rate to pay, of the amount shown on the board or double if both the ticket booths of that colour are owned by the same player. This makes it far more straightforward and manageable for small children to play. As mentioned previously some of the chance cards entitle the player to a free ticket booth. If this has not already been brought, a player adds their colour plastic booth. If they are already brought by different players then it's fun as you can push the other player off and steal the square - fine as long as your children aren't prone to temper tantrums. If you have brought both however then they are safe and cannot be stolen, so it's always a good idea to buy both. Play continues as you'd expect with players working their way repeatedly around the board landing on each other's squares and paying money backwards and forwards until one unlucky person has spent all of their pocket money. The others then add up to find out who is the richest and the winner.

          This game in now produced by Hasbro, but you may find older versions with Waddingtons as the manufacturer. Amazon are selling this for £20 which seems a very high price for a low tech game with no complex parts, especially when regular monopoly is only £12, which would seem a much more reasonable price to pay.

          I would definitely recommend this as it has been very cleverly designed to closely resemble Monopoly and to enable children to feel that they are playing a game that they may have seen adults play. It manages to take all of the complex and long winded parts of Monopoly and simplify them. The board layout and the way that money changes hands more rapidly mean that a game can easily be over in half an hour to an hour which is definitely preferable to two or three hours that a normal game can sometimes drag on before we give up and set a time limit rather than waiting for someone to run out of money. My children are now teenagers and it is not a game that they would choose to play any more and my youngest did recently put it on the pile for selling on. I retrieved it because I think it will still have uses for us in the future and I'm sure they will be glad of it to play with their own children in years to come, rather than spending hours trekking through the long version. It is manageable for most five year olds and suitable until about ten, and then again for adults who prefer a shortened version. It can be played with just two players but will be much more fun with four which is the maximum as there are four cars and sets of houses.

          This review also appears on Ciao under my same user name, MelissaRuth.

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            09.08.2011 11:59
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            Fantastic game, definitely a must

            I have played Monopoly since I was a child but my son is just slightly too young to grasp the concept so when my mum saw Junior Monopoly at a school fayre we decided to give it a go.

            The board is rectangular rather than square, but the concept is still the same - there are different places to land on. The difference though is that in the child's version all the places are related to a theme park! There are roller coasters, fireworks displays and train rides. Rather than putting "houses" and "hotels" on places you land on, you put ticket booths.

            The whole game has been made simple by having money in denominations of £1 to £5 in £1 incriments. Rather than having two sets of cards to land on, there are only "chance" cards and these are simplified by only having a certain number of things to do.

            There aren't the traditional boot, hat, cat etc for choice of players pieces, but simply different colour cars which the children love.

            Since having this game we have played it nearly every day and it never gets boring. Even my three year old grasps the concept so it truely is a family game.

            I would definitely recommend this game to everybody!

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            12.10.2010 07:31
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            See review.

            I am pleased to say that my kids are now at an age where I can sit around a table and play a board game with them, this being the case my daughter decided she was going to sort out under her bed, and find some games we could play with hence this review!

            The game I will now review is - "Monopoly - junior game".

            I have such vivid and wonderful memories of sitting and playing the adult version of this game with my siblings, though we never played it properly as it always seemed too complicated to do the whole "buying, then setting up hotels" business, so when my daughter showed me how it was played I was pleasantly surprised!

            There is all the things needed for the game set up, the board, four car pieces to be used as counters, dice, chance cards and a whole load of money, though as my children kept cheating I decided to take the role of banker!

            The idea of the game is of course to work your way around the board, but instead of buying railway stations an pacing hotels on area's, you have to decide whether to place your stands onto a fairground event, ie candy floss or balloon stand.

            These areas range from £1.00 to £5.00 to place your stand on them and then you can regain the money by charging other people for landing on your square, which again to save confusion is the same amount as you initially paid out.

            There are many different squares on the board to liven the game up, with those being the railway station squares, which in the junior version means you can roll the dice again, the pass go square, meaning that you can collect £2.00 on passing it, there are also two random squares that would probably make sense if my daughter hadn't lost the instructions, which may I say doesn't make the game unplayable but more fun as you can make it up as you go along!

            One of these squares is "Mr Monopoly's spare change" square, which my daughter has decided means that you get one of every note from the bank, unfortunately the last time we played it she was the only one landing on it!

            The chance cards are a variation on the adult version, though I had yet to find a card awarding money to a payer, but more either taking money off them or giving away a pitch to place one of your coloured stands on, though by the time I had one of said cards, the kids had bought al those squares and refused to remove their stands.....yes they cheated the entire game! Lol!

            The aim of the game is to be the last one standing, money wise as once someone has lost al their money the game is over, though the last time we played it seemed to be a never ending game lasting around two hours, so I decided to move the goalposts shall we say, and cal the winner who had the most money....guess who lost!

            This particular game is aimed at 5-8 year olds, though my eldest is 9 and found no difficulty paying it, she really did seem to enjoy it too, though not quite so much when she realised her 5 year old brother had beaten the pair of us!

            There is a 2-4 player limit too, I find the upper limit is best else you are constantly just swopping money between you, with 3-4 people it gives more scope for more money.

            Price wise this was purchased for around the £10 mark, but is also available from www.amazon.co.uk and is probably available for a few pennies less.

            This is a lovely game, that if kept in it's box, is a durable and hard wearing board game, perfect for spending quality time together, away from the telly!

            Thanks for reading xx

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              23.01.2010 13:27
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              In review

              Junior Monopoly is for 2-4 players between the ages of 5 and 8

              Whats in the box?

              The board
              Dice
              Ticket booths in 4 colours
              4 coloured cars, 1 for each player (red,yellow,green and blue)
              money in denominations of £5, £4, £3, £2, and £1
              Chance cards
              A sheet of fairly straightforward Instructions

              I am happy to be reviewing monopoloy junior positively, I did think it would be one of those 'brought out just because there is an adult version' games and be lacking in the actual monopoly department, but I was pleasently suprised. It's easy to understand, was very easy to explain to my 7 year old, while still having the same basis of adult monopoly.

              It is based in a fair ground, ticket booths are purchased instead of houses / hotels to add to your propert portfolio and increase your income. There is still penalty's for landing on certain squares, there are chance squares to land on and pick a card, these cards can be anything from a 'free ticket booth' to 'take a bus ride to the cafe', and even loose change which can be won, the juniors equivalent to free parking.
              As always 1 person is assigned to be the banker, normally me so I can keep a beady eye on the cheats amongst us (my OH!!).
              Each person takes it in turns to roll the dice and move around the board, starting from go and don't forget to collect your £2.00 pocket money for passing go.
              There are 16 spaces that you can place a ticket booth on. Balloon Stand and Candy Floss being the cheapest at £1.00 and the price rises to £5 for Loop the Loop or the Roller Coaster.(The juniors equivalent to park lane and mayfair) and when another player lands on any of your rides with a booth they must pay you the amount on the space to you.

              Thankfully this version doesn't go on for hours and hours as I am sure your kids like mine would soon get bored.
              We have played several times now with my son and the longest it took was 40 minutes.

              Junior monopoly is also useful at helping children with there mathematical skills with the use of money.

              The winner is the person with the most money left when one of the other players has spent up.

              This board game is really good value for money I paid £6.99 from argos but that is not argos's standard price it normally retails at £12.99.

              To summarise : A great game for young children while encouraging maths skills

              Thank you for taking the time to read my review and I hope it is of some help

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              • More +
                22.01.2010 16:38

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                A great new reinvention of an old classic

                This is a version of the popular board game Monopoly aimed at Children. This game involves a similar concept as the original Monopoly, but it has been simplified to suit younger players.

                Instead of the usual street names, the spaces are based around the theme of a Funfair. Players can buy rides or stands at the funfair such as the cheapest option of the Balloon Stand or Candy Floss Stand and the most expensive which are the Loop the Loop and the Roller Coaster. The layout of the board is very similar too with the Railway Station represented by the Blue Line Railway and the Red Line Railway and so on.

                The differences of this game to the adult version are that you must buy any amusements that you land on and you cannot improve your properties by buying houses and hotels. You win the game by being the player with the most money when another player runs out of money.

                This is a great game for children to play and I can say that I myself really enjoyed playing it as a kid. I liked it because it was like playing Monopoly but with all the boring bits taken out and it is a great introduction to the grown-up version of Monopoly. To play it now as an adult, I would probably find it boring and unchallenging, but it is a great game for kids.

                One down-point though would be that it does not require much thought as it is mainly a chance game, but the game is fun for children. The recommended age range is 5 - 8

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                14.01.2010 13:18
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                As good as the original, in a format for kids

                My Mum bought this for my son for his fourth birthday. It is recommended for 5 to 8 years but he had really wanted to play the adult version but that was definitely too complex, so this was a good alternative.

                The game comes in a lidded cardboard box. It contains a board game, 4 different coloured car counters, colour co-ordinated stalls, money and chance cards. To start the game, you get a specified amount of money and pick your car counter. You work your way around the board by throwing the two dice. Along the way you can buy amusements stalls like the coconut shy and the rollercoaster and you pop a plastic stall onto the purchased plot in the same colour as you car, if another player lands on a square with your stall on they pay you the purchase price. There are also chance cards that add 'pay the bank £10' or 'receive £20'. The end of the game is the last one left with money. It usually takes about half an hour to play which is reasonable to keep a young child interested and not get bored.

                My son is now six so we have had this game a couple of years and he still really enjoys playing it. The contents are still in good condition, almost new looking the only thing looking a little tired is the box, the corners have splayed out a bit but nothing some sellotape wouldn't sort out. He has now upgraded himself to being The Banker, although I usually help him at the beginning with the distribution of money, this gives a feeling of responsibility. This game has aided his counting skills from using the dice, his concept of using money to pay for goods has improved and he now reads the chance cards as they are usually only a few words.

                The game has obviously been simplified for children but the concept of the game is still the same (so if you didn't like Monopoly this probably isn't for you). It is therefore still enjoyable to play as an adult with the children. It flows well, although we have only played as 2 or 3 players and perhaps with 4 they may get bored waiting for their turn.

                All in all I think this is a good family game, it is educational and most of the time can be purchased for around £15.00. A great present for any 4 to 7 year old.

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                  20.07.2009 18:19
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                  Good fun, a great addition to the Monopoly family

                  I was recently introduced to the delights of Monopoly Junior during a visit to my two nephews aged 5 and 7 - even before I'd got my coat and shoes off I was being asked if I'd like to play 'nopoly' with them. It was new, a birthday present, and nobody was going to get in or out of the house without a ride on 'The Rollercoaster Money Game' as it's dramatically described on the box.

                  History
                  ******
                  Charles B. Darrow created Monopoly, the board game, in America during the great depression. In 1935, it's first year of production, it was the best selling game in America. Now it is the best selling board game in the world, sold in 103 countries and produced in 37 languages. The basic premise of Monopoly is to work your way around the board buying up property, building houses and hotels on your property and trying not to be made bankrupt by other players.

                  Monopoly Junior, from Waddingtons/Hasbro, is a specially designed version of the board game for children that is played along the lines of traditional Monopoly but in a much simpler, more colourful and fun way.

                  What's In The Box?
                  ****************
                  1 game board - similar to the traditional monopoly board but rectangular rather than square and considerably more colourful
                  25 chance cards - smaller than the adult version, ideal for little hands
                  1 pack of monopoly money - pocket money denominations of £1, £2, £3, £4 and £5
                  4 playing pieces - plastic cars
                  48 plastic ticket booths - 12 each of 4 colours, similar to the houses in traditional monopoly
                  1 die
                  Instructions

                  What is it and how is it played?
                  *************************
                  Monopoly Junior is set in a fairground. So rather than the streets of London, the squares on the game board are amusements that you might find at the fairground such as, Big Wheel, Dodgems, Candy Floss, Puppet Show, Merry-Go-Round, Fireworks and Haunted House

                  The aim of the game is to be the player with the most money when another player runs out of cash and the game ends. To do this you set up your ticket booths on amusements and collect entrance money from players who pass by.

                  A brief instruction on playing: Each player chooses a coloured playing piece and is given 10 ticket booths in that colour and a set amount of money. As with traditional Monopoly all players start from the 'GO' space in one corner of the board and in turn you throw the die and move that number of spaces around the board. Various things can happen depending on what you land on.
                  If you land on a vacant amusement you must pay the amount indicated on the square to the bank and then place one of your ticket booths on the square. From then on if another player lands on that space they have to pay the same amount to you. If you own both booths on a set of amusements (two next to each other of the same colour) then they must pay you double.
                  Landing on a railway (there are 4 different coloured ones) just means you roll again and move on, and as with the usual Monopoly having to take a 'Chance' card can be either good or bad. The good could be moving around the board directly to a particular amusement (unless it's owned by somebody else, in which case you have to pay them money - that's bad) and passing 'GO' on the way to collect your £2 pocket money. Also good is the chance of a free ticket booth on a named amusement, and unless another player already owns both in the set, you may get the chance to kick off another player's booth and claim it as your own. The bad is having to pay £2 to go to the fireworks or the water show, or £3 to take the bus to the café without passing 'GO' (sort of an equivalent of going to jail).
                  The game ends when one player runs out of money, and the winner is the player who has the most money.

                  There's a little more to it than I've described, but that's the basics. The clearly laid out instruction leaflet in the box gives full details on how to play the game and can be easily read and understood by children.

                  Who Can Play?
                  ************
                  The game is for 2 - 4 players and for ages 5 - 8, but of course, adults can also have fun playing it.

                  Opinion
                  *******
                  As I mentioned earlier, I played this with two boys aged 5 and 7 and to my surprise the 5 year old, who usually has the attention span of a gnat and can normally be found in the garden breaking something, sat and played a whole game and was utterly absorbed by it. He had a bit of trouble with the money side of things, mainly because he didn't want to part with any of it, but it proved to be quite educational for him when having to work out which notes to combine to make the required amount. A bit of adult help was needed as numbers aren't his strong point yet, unlike his 7 year old brother who's developing a rather unnerving ruthless streak where finances are concerned!

                  I enjoyed playing it with them, it was quick to learn and easy to play, there's no real strategy involved and players just need to be able to count. My two nephews definitely enjoyed it and I was surprised at how well they patiently waited their turns. The games I played with them lasted around 15-20 minutes, which was just about the right length. A fairground theme is something they can easily relate to and every amusement landed upon was met with a cry along the lines of "oh I wanted that one, it's my favourite ride". However, I did discover that children don't like losing (well I wasn't going to just let them win!) and that while losing to an adult can bring on quite a strop, losing to a brother can bring on a sulk of epic proportions and almost end in a fight.
                  After the kids had gone to bed, we adults had a game on our own, yes we're all big kids at heart, and we managed to make the game go on for 1.5 hours - not quite sure how!

                  I think that a great deal of thought has gone into making this game appeal to kids, from the colourful box with it's brightly coloured cartoon rollercoaster to the little plastic car shaped playing pieces. And of course a fairground is always going to be popular with children. Personally I liked the fact that all the playing pieces are the same (cars) but different colours, so no arguments from the start about who's going to be what piece (I've often wondered why I always end up as the old boot in the traditional game...)

                  Priced anywhere between £10 and £18 depending on where you shop, Monopoly Junior retains enough elements of traditional Monopoly to hold the interest of adults playing with children, but also serves as a good introduction to the full game for when they're older.

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                    07.07.2009 20:39
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                    A child-sized version of the big Monopoly game

                    Monopoly Junior by Hasbro is basically a simplified version of the classic Monopoly game and it's suitable for children between the ages of 5-8. This is the very first board game we bought for our son. Actually, he chose it himself as a treat for being good. Normally, it retails at around £10, but it only cost us £2 from the local charity shop in nearly new condition. I was a bit sceptical at first, thinking at four and a half my son was too young to enjoy this game, but he proved me wrong. This has become one of his favourite games and he's always ready to play a round.

                    The game comes in a square-shaped sturdy storage box, which includes 1 gameboard, 4 cars in 4 different colours as markers (red, green, blue, yellow), 48 ticket booths (12 in each colour), 25 chance cards, a die, and a pack of Monopoly money in the form of £1, £2, £3, £4, £5 banknotes. The board is designed as if it was an amusement park with various attractions along the way, for example the Merry-go-Round (£2), the Helicopter Ride (£4), and the Loop the Loop (£5). Each attraction is available to purchase if you're the first to land on it and you can mark it with your ticket booth. If you land on an attraction which is already owned by another player, you have to pay for the ride. The object of the game is to own as many attractions as you can so that you can collect the entry fees for them. If you run out of money, you're out of the game. The winner is the player with the most cash and property at the end. Along the way there are little surprises like the chance squares, where you can choose a card and follow its instructions. These can work for or against you. Each board game has a killer square, which you want to avoid at all cost - even if it takes cheating (just kidding!). The killer square in this game says "Pay three pounds to take the Bus to the Café". Not only do you have to pay, you also lose a turn waiting in the café and can't collect your £2 when you go past the GO square. On the other hand, if you land on "Mr Monopoly's loose change" you get to keep all the money accumulated there during the game.

                    This game can hold my son's attention for up to one hour. It is less interesting for us, adults, of course, but not too boring, I would say. Apart from the entertainment aspect, it is also quite educational. My son has learned simple additions, like a £1 note plus a £2 note make 3 pounds. And subtractions: if something costs 3 pounds, but he only has a £5 note, he will get a £2 note back. He's also learned to wait for his turn and follow the rules. I first thought he would rebel against the rules, but he didn't. He accepts them. Rules are rules, you can't break them. He's also learned that sometimes he loses. This was difficult for him to accept at first, but I didn't want him to believe that he can win every time. It's better if he gets used to the idea of losing sometimes, although I hate to see the disappointment on his little face. The good thing about this game is that he can easily win it as well and he has, in fact, won quite a few rounds without me letting him win. Sometimes his dad joins in too, and I love the way this game brings our small family together on a rainy day.

                    I know it's just a "dumbed-down" version of the real thing, and I'm looking forward to playing the original game with him when he's old enough. Until then, this will do just fine.

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                      09.06.2009 23:58
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                      A good family game.

                      This is a new take on the classic board game for children between 5 and 8. It is for 2 to 4 players and we have hours of fun playing it.

                      Instead of the famous London Streets the squares are fairground attractions like, the puppet show, paddle boats, haunted house for example and instead of houses and hotels you put ticket booths on them and charge people when the land. Instead of the jail there is the cafe where you simply miss ago. There are four train stations but these are named after colours and when a p[layer lands on these they roll again. The pieces are 4 different coloured cars instead of the boot, iron , dog etc. There are chance cards and the money is between £5, £4, £3, £2 and £1 notes. The board is smaller than the standard game.

                      The game lasts until a player runs out of money and the winner is the player with the most money when that happens. The games tend to last for about half an hour when 4 people are playing, not the hours and hours that the standard game can last. Sometimes if the game doesn't look like ending and the children are getting board we say two more laps and then we see who has the most money.

                      Supervision is needed to help with the rules and the money. I would highly recommend this board game for families with children between 5 - 10 that enjoy playing board games together.

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                      12.02.2009 15:43
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                      A good introduction to a classic game

                      In the midst of the credit crunch, just imagine a world where you can be a greedy capitalist, a rapacious property developer and even (whisper it quietly) a b*a*n*k*e*r and still get away with it... Those were the days!

                      Still, if you're under about 12 and the recession/depression hasn't seriously entered your consciousness yet (your parents haven't asked you to take a voluntary 50% cut in your pocket money to bail out the Bank of Mum and Dad), you can still play Junior Monopoly with a clear conscience.

                      Joking apart, it's generally a well thought-out game. Not just a cut-down version of the adult Monopoly, this uses a much more appealing scenario for kids - an amusement park - and simplifies the system of chance cards (there's no community chest) as well as payments to other players when you land on their squares. The rules are straightforward and opportunities for tactical play are limited.

                      But there are disadvantages...

                      The Money - Yes, it's simple (just £1, £2, £3, £4 and £5 notes), but why couldn't Hasbro provide money that is closer in denominations to the real-life currency we're trying to teach young children to use?

                      The Money (again) - It's just as flimsy as the money in the adult version, and soon gets torn and grubby.

                      The Die (or dice) - Too small. It will immediately roll under the sofa or get eaten by the dog.

                      Interestingly, having observed my two daughters (12 and 5) playing it together a number of times, it seems to have been engineered so that it's easier for someone to win; so the games are shorter. Typically when we play the adult game (without the 5-year-old) it can go on for days! With 'Junior' you can often fit two 15-20 minute games in between supper and bedtime.

                      Despite being rated as suitable for 5-8 years old, my older daughter still enjoys playing it with her little sister. And because it's based much more on 'luck-of-the-dice' the older, more experienced players certainly don't always win.

                      It's helped my younger daughter with basic addition and subtraction, as she has to work out which notes her sister will have to hand over to pay that £8 rent she owes. I can definitely see her graduating to the full version within a year or two: watch out Wall Street!

                      The game seems to be available for as little as £4.50 new on eBay, which I think is excellent value. And anything that makes the girls enthusiastically switch off the television, and keeps the tradition of family board games alive, is welcome in our house.

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                        15.11.2008 17:00
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                        a great game which helps children understand about money

                        This is a board game i have played quite a few times in work with the children. As it is meant for younger children it is a much more simple version of the original board game. Unlike the original game where you buy properties that are in London, this one uses fair ground amusements as places to buy. This makes the game a lot more appealing and more on the wavelength of a younger child.

                        Monopoly Junior is aimed at children aged 5-8 years. The game can be played with 2-4 players. The object of the game is to be the person with the most amount of money at the end of the game or when another player runs out of money.

                        To set up the game you need to choose a coloured car counter each and put them on the Go spot. Next look through the ticket booths and pick out ten of each colour to match your coloured cars. There is a pack of chance cards, these need to be shuffled and placed face down on the marked box on the board. One person is chosen to be the banker, this person then gives each player including themselves some money to play the game with. Each player gets-
                        Five £1 notes
                        Four £2 notes
                        Three £3 notes
                        One £4 note and
                        One £5 note.

                        Once you have decided who will go first, the game can start.When it is your turn you must roll the dice and then move your coloured car along the board by how many you had on the dice. Whatever square you land on, you must follow what it tells you to do.

                        What do you have to do on each space?

                        The amusements
                        If you land on one of these spaces and there are no ticket booths on them, you are able to buy it. Each one has its own price and this is shown on the board. The money is paid to the banker and you put a ticket booth on the amusement. If you land on an amusement that has somebody elses ticket booth on you will have to pay them money, it is up to them to remember to ask you for the money.

                        Go
                        When ever you pass go you collect £2, this is up to you to remember to ask the banker for your money.

                        Railways
                        When you land on a railway, you get another go straight away, so you need to roll the dice again and then follow whatever it says on the space you land on.

                        Fireworks and Watershow
                        If you land on either of these spaces you must pay £2. This money gets put on Uncle Pennybags Loose Change. If you land on the loose change space and there is any money on there, then this becomes your money.

                        Cafe
                        If you land on the cafe space you need do nothing until your next go.

                        Go to the Cafe
                        If you land on this space you must pay £3 to the loose change space and then move your car to the cafe space. If you have to pass go to get there yo must not collect £2.

                        Chance cards
                        Take the top cad and follow whatever it says to do, replace the card at the bottom of the pile.
                        Chance cards explained

                        Go to....or take aride
                        If you get one of these you must move along to the space it is showing on your card and do whatever it asks you to on that space. If you have to go past go you can collect £2.

                        Free ticket Booth
                        You do not move your car if you pick up one of these cards. You have to find the matching colours on the board to the one on the card. If one of the amusements is free you may put one of your ticket booths onto one. However if both already have ticket booths on you may remove one and place one of yours on there but this is only if they are two different coloured booths. If somebody has already put two of their booths on the spaces you cannot take one off. This rule only applies when there are two booths that are the same colour. If this happens you are allowed to take another chance card.

                        When there is a player that runs out of money, this means the game has finished. The winner is the player with the most money.

                        I prefer this version to the original one as i find it is more appealing using fairground amusements to property. Also i prefer to play a game that is straightforward and not complicated which Monopoly Junior is.

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                          06.02.2008 16:32
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                          A junior version of the adult classic.

                          As a family we enjoy playing board games especially on a wet Sunday afternoon! My youngest son is 5 and it is not always easy finding a game that he can play with his older 10-year-old brother that both will enjoy. We already have a full size monopoly but the game is just too involved for my younger son to fully grasp. Last Christmas he asked for a new board game, not too much to ask in this electronic age! Looking around the shops I spotted junior monopoly and felt this would be an idea game for all our family to play.

                          What's in the box?
                          ***************
                          There is a playing board, 4 plastic coloured cars, money in various denominations, a set of chance cards, a die and 48 plastic ticket booths in colours to match the cars. The box itself shows colourful cartoon children travelling around the board in a fair ground type car. The box certainly makes this game look appealing and attractive to children. There is an easy to follow instruction leaflet.

                          How to play.
                          ***********
                          Like its big brother the object of the game is to acquire as much money as possible. Each player selects a coloured car. Money is distributed by the banker, to each player, everyone receives the same amount. We always let the youngest player start the game.

                          Unlike adult monopoly this version is based on a fair ground. All the squares are based on this theme and instead of London streets there are rides and stalls.

                          The die is thrown and the player moves that number of squares around the board. Each square has an instruction to follow. There are squares with amusements to buy. Unlike its big brother, buying the amusement is compulsory. The amount to pay is marked on the square and ranges from £1 to £5.Once purchased the player places a plastic ticket booth on the square to match their car colour. Now if other players land on your ticket booth square they have to pay for the privilege.

                          There are squares with the chance symbol where you take a chance card from the pile. Each card has a different instruction to follow. The best ones are those that give you a free ticket booth! Unlike adult monopoly if there is another players ticket booth already on site you can knock them of and replace it with your own colour.

                          There are squares with trains a bit like the stations of the adult version, but here you get another go and don't have the option to buy. Like adult monopoly there are fees to pay usually for watching a magic or water show. All fees paid are placed on the Mr monopolys loose change square, land on this square and you win the money! Players are awarded pocket money of £2 each time they pass go.

                          The game is over when a player runs out of money. Unlike adult monopoly there is no option to borrow money to stay in the game! The winner is the player with the most money. On average the game should take about 30 minutes to play.

                          My thoughts.
                          **********
                          This is probably the best family game we have. It is a game that everyone can enjoy and it is not easy to let the youngest win either! It helps children to count as they roll the die and have to move the appropriate number of squares around the board. There is simple text to decipher and money to count. I'm not sure I mentioned that the money is in small denominations from £1-£5 so making it easier for young children to count. It is also great to help children learn to take turns and not always to win. This concept is not one that my youngest son finds easy!
                          I really like the fact this game is based on a fair ground, something most children can identify with. For older children buying ticket booths and collecting fees seems to appeal. I like the way that free ticket booths are awarded too.

                          The game normally only takes about 30 minutes to play, with each turn being completed quickly. This means no one gets fed up waiting for his or her turn.

                          Junior monopoly is recommended for children from 5 to 8 years. However my 10 year old enjoys playing. The game can be played by 2 to 4 players. Junior monopoly is made by Hasbro and is widely available .I bought mine from Tesco and paid around £10. Highly recommended!

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