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Orchard Toys Knickerbocker Glory

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7 Reviews
  • two games in one
  • fun to play
  • no longer available
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    7 Reviews
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      26.12.2014 20:10
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      • "two games in one"
      • "fun to play"
      • educational

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      • "no longer available"

      Who will be the first to make their knickerbocker glory?

      ABOUT: My nephews bought this game over to my parents when staying one night and I actually played it with my two nephews and sister. This game is suitable for children aged 3 years and up and you can have a minimum of 2 players for this game or a maximum of 6 players. I was surprised by this as most Orchard Toy Games are normally for 4 players or less. This is a great game which will help children to match things up and it will also help them to count as well.

      PRICE: We picked this game up from a Charity Shop for around £2.00. It’s no longer available to purchase anywhere.

      INSTRUCTIONS: The game should come with two dice, one numbered and one coloured dice. The pieces that fit inside the Knickerbocker glory board need to be laid flat on the floor/table faced up. When playing the game with the coloured dice choose one of the parts of the Knickerbocker glory pieces that match the colour of the dice. Place this inside your empty Knickerbocker glory board and then the next person has their go. If you roll a colour that you don’t need it goes onto the next player. The winner is the person who fills their Knickerbocker glory board up first. The other game uses the number dice and when the player rolls the dice they have to find the part of the Knickerbocker glory with that number of items on. For example if you roll a three you have to pick up the piece that has three pieces of fruit on. There are numbers in colours on the side of the board to help younger children. The next player has their go and so on. Again the winner is the person who has filled their Knickerbocker glory board first.

      PLAYING: When my sister purchased this game it only came with the coloured dice so we had no idea that you could play this game in two different ways. My younger nephew whom is going to be four soon recognises colours well and is able to find the colours that match the one’s rolled on the dice. He fits them into the Knickerbocker glory board quite well; although sometimes he needs help as the bits are quite hard to get in if playing the game on carpet. As my nephew rolls the dice he always says out loud what colour he rolls before finding the colour that matches. The game doesn’t take too long to play so they don’t lose interest it. I introduced the next game to my nephews using the number dice which we took out of another game. My younger nephew can count up to 10 quite well. He recognises most numbers so says the number that is on the dice out loud and then counts the pieces of fruit on the cards to try and ensure he picks the right one.

      OVERALL: Another great Orchard Toys game that is highly recommended.

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      16.01.2012 21:46
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      Fun for a time, but soon outgrown.

      We own a fair few games aimed at the young and preschool market. A number of these are from orchard games, which are fun, well made, and can withstand rough toddler behaviour. This particular game, Knickerbocker Glory, is aimed at 3-6 year olds.

      The aim of the game is to collect up pieces of fruit to put on your gamecard, jigsaw style, and the winner is the first person to collect all 6 pieces and complete the card.

      The game is differentiated to suit the younger end of the market yet still provide a challenge to older kids. The game came with 2 dice. With one dice, you can roll and get a colour from the fruit pieces, so you only need to be able to recognise colours to be able to join in. I found this meant that my youngest could join in aged 2. The second dice is a traditional number dice showing 1 to 6, so you need to count the fruit pieces and associate it with number of dots on the dice to play this way. Now aged 3 and a half, my youngest can play it both ways.

      This game is slightly unusual in that it has enough cards for 6 players to join in. In reality, we have 4 family members as most families do so we have only played with 4 cards.

      This game is a bit less sturdy in my opinion than others because the fact there is a hole in the middle to slot pieces in means that the cards are a bit weaker when no pieces are in and a couple of ours have been bent. They haven't torn though, so it is still playable.

      The game has helped with counting and naming colours when colours could be matched at the end of it, but I would say my 5 year old is not that fond of this one compared to newer games. I guess that is because it is not as fun as newer games like operation, kerplunk and guess who, which are more challenging to him at his age. It is not chosen that often anymore and we are coming to the end of its usefulness in our family.

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        07.06.2011 22:46
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        Fun game

        Orchard Toys Knickerbocker Glory is a 'fun counting and colour matching game', and this is the reason I bought it for my eldest daughter around 2 years ago. She was aged 2 at the time and I wanted to get her into playing games; learning to take turns etc. And as Orchard Toys had many simple yet attractive games available I bought this one, along with Red Dog Blue Dog; and then I let the fun begin.

        Orchard Toys are well known for their fun learning games, and there are many available with various different themes, but the basis of most of them are the same - your children get to learn their colours and numbers through playing the game, at the same time as learning to take turns; and Knickerbocker Glory is no different. It comes in a small but sturdy cardboard box, with a removable lid; packed in the box you will find 6 knickerbocker glory cards, 36 fruit cards, 1 colour spot dice, 1 number dice, and the instructions.

        ==Object of the Game==

        The object of the game is to be the first player to make a knickerbocker glory. You can have 2-6 players and each player has 1 knickerbocker glory card, and these are rectangular in shape with a knickerbocker glory shaped hole in the middle. Then you spread out all the fruit cards on the floor in front of all the players. The fruit cards consist of lemons, blueberries, limes, strawberries, blackberries and an orange, so there are 6 different fruit cards for the players to collect, and these fit into the main knickerbocker glory card. The game can be played in two different ways - you can either use the coloured dice, or the numbered dice - but both reach the same conclusion, the winner is the one who fills their knickerbocker glory first.

        ==Coloured dice==

        If you are going to play using the coloured dice, the first player throws the dice and say for instance it lands on red, then that player will be able to put the strawberries into his knickerbocker glory. Then if the next player throws green, he will be able to put the limes into his knickerbocker glory, and so on. If a player throws a colour he already has then he misses a turn. On the knickerbocker glory card there are coloured dots down one side so that your child can match the fruit piece to the dot, so it is easier for them to place it in the correct location.

        ==Number dice==

        Using the numbered dice is slightly more complex (not much but it is and my kids prefer to use the coloured dice). The play is obviously based on numbers rather than colours, and requires a bit more thought once you have rolled the dice. If you throw a 5, for example, you would then have to locate a fruit piece than contains 5 pieces of fruit (the blueberries), or if you throw a 3 you would have to locate the fruit piece that contains just 3 pieces of fruit (the strawberries). So it requires the child to be able to count, which isn't such a bad thing, but my kids (age 2 and 4) prefer the immediateness of locating a colour, rather than having to count pieces of fruit. On the knickerbocker glory card there are numbers down one side so it is easy for the child to match the fruit piece with the relevant number, so they are positioning them correctly in the card.

        ==Enjoyment==

        Both my children enjoy playing this game, but the enjoyment seems to be quite limited and they do tend to get bored (and sometimes frustrated) after a couple of games. Perhaps the fact that they are 2 & 4 says something about their attention span, but they seem to have prolonged periods of play with other games, whereas this one seems to be packed away only minutes after we have got it out. Having said that, it's my 2 year old that seems to enjoy it a lot more than her big sister, which surprises me because it's the 2 year old who has the shorter attention span! When I am playing with her it's quite funny because she'll roll the dice, and if it lands on blue she'll shout 'Boo...I need boo!' or if it's yellow she'll say 'Ello....I need Ello!' She seems to enjoy playing it when it's just the two of us, if her sister gets involved then the length of time she has to wait in between turns is longer, and this is where her mind starts to wander, her uncontrollable leg starts twitching, and before you know it she has kicked the game into oblivion with her endless fidgeting. I've actually found they both prefer to play in twos, because the less people there are, the less time they have to wait for their turn.

        Something else I noticed was that as you are collecting 6 different pieces of fruit to win, the game can go on for quite a long time, and both my children tend to get quite frustrated with this, especially if they keep rolling a colour that they already have. And this is where the cheating begins, if my 4 year old rolls red and she already has her strawberries, then she will sneakily have another roll, and more often than not she rolls another colour that she has already got; this is where the tantrums begin. I'm trying to teach her that 'it's not the winning, but the taking part that counts' but she's not convinced.

        When you are nearing the end of the game, say if you have 5 fruits in your knickerbocker glory and you only need lemons for example, then this can get quite tense because you are trying to roll a particular colour, and making a 2 year old and a 4 year old wait their turns patiently, only to be disappointed when it is their turn and they still roll the wrong colour; well, let's just say it can be quite a task. And more often than not, this game will be associated with many tantrums and screaming fits when things are not going quite the way the children expect.

        ==Age Suitability==

        The game is recommended for kids aged 3-6 and I'd say this is about right, although a keen 2 year old will be able to play too, like my youngest daughter. It all depends on whether they can count and know their colours, but this game is a definite learning tool is assisting with this development. The good thing is that there are the two ways to play, so the colours version would be suitable for the younger child, and the numbers version would be suitable for the older children. And I would also suggest that the younger children need adult supervision, whereas children of 4 and above would quite happily play the game unaided, it just depends how good they are at accepting that they have to take turns.

        ==Verdict and Recommendation==

        Despite the tantrums and frustration my children seem to have with this game, it is definitely something that they haven't grown tired of and it is a game which can they can adapt to as they grow. My eldest daughter has been playing it regularly since she was 2 (she's now 4), and she still has enthusiasm for it when we decide to play. The only downside with it all is down to her frustration at not winning every time, and also throwing the wrong colours. But that is just my daughter's determined mindset that she is going to win, and if the dice is not working in her favour then she will throw a tantrum until she gets the colour she needs. My youngest does not really have this problem, but she has not quite grasped the concept of winning and losing, and she just takes enjoyment from throwing the dice and picking her fruit.

        I think it's a good game, and I would recommend it to others. It's fun and attractive which appeals to quite a wide age range; it's a great tool in getting your kids to learn about playing games with other children and taking turns, but it also assists them with their colour recognition and numbers. I also think it involves a bit of hand eye co-ordination because they need a certain level of skill to position the pieces correctly in the card, my 2 year old is not quite up to scratch with this.

        Knickerbocker Glory is a wonderful tool for introducing your children to the concept of playing games; it's simple, colourful, and fun. (It's also made from very strong robust cardboard which has withstood the chew test from my youngest - who was just a baby when we first got the game so she has had several opportunities to chew the pieces, and they are all still intact, just a few teeth marks here and there).

        It's not my favourite game, but it's something I find myself playing quite frequently, if only to teach my daughter that patience is a virtue.

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          13.06.2010 13:54
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          Buy it if you have a child under the age of seven, if you don't, buy it for someone who does

          I love Orchard Toys games, they are generally well thought out and well made. Orchard games are made of thick cardboard, they are incredibly colourful and very appealing to children. I have used various games throughout the years at work and Orchard is one of the best games manufacturers for young children. So when I sat the knickerbockers glory game I bought it straight away to use at work and home. The little boy I worked with at the time knew his numbers and colours but didn't spontaneously ask for anything very often until he saw this game.

          It is a spin on a lotto game. Each player gets a board with a cut out knickerbockers glory in the centre, there are six strips to fill in the middle of the knickerbockers glory: one orange piece, two blackberries, three strawberries, four grapes, five blueberries and six pieces of pineapple to top it off. The game comes with two dice, a colour one and a number one. This means you can either play it targeting the colours or the numbers which ever you think your child need practice with.

          With my son we played mostly with colours as he knew his numbers for correspondence counting up to twenty but only knew blue reliably in his colours. We have now owned this game for six months and he knows all six colours that are featured in the game and his understanding of what the abstract of colour is has lead him to learn the others too. We still play it regularly because he enjoys it so much. He chooses whether we use the number or colour dice.

          At work the little boy I was working with at the time knew both his numbers and colours and seemed to have no problem changing format, but working with a child with autism you have to constantly change the medium that you work in to stop the child becoming restrictive to that one medium and also to test if the child recognises the things he's learnt in other formats. So I bought this simple game thinking I would check his colours and counting skills. He proved to me first time that we played this that he knew what was what but enjoyed it so much and asked for it again and again that it became a reward for working well on other things and a tool to get him to speak more, putting it in very basic terms. Now this child is very fussy and will take or leave most things so this in itself should testify to how good this game is. I took it into his school sometimes too and all the children in his class loved to play with it too, that's in a year one class, five and six year olds in old money.

          In conclusion, this game is excellent and should get five stars plus. It is an effective educational tool and also an entertaining game. It has stood up well to my toddler stealing parts while we are playing and gumming them to death. The pieces remain bright and appealing to other children. I bought this in the sale at our local independent shop for £3.50 I think it normally sells at about £7, Orchard games tend to have a high resale value as they are such quality products, they sell out fast and it can be hard to find specific ones at times due to the high demand for them. I would heartily recommend this game to anyone who has a child under the age of seven, I think the appeal would wear off at about that age.

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          05.11.2009 15:20
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          Great game, ideal for 3 and 4 year olds

          Orchard make fantastic games for young children and the Knickerbocker Glory game is no exception.

          It is for 2-6 players, and aimed at children aged 3 to 6 years old. My 3 year old son has just discovered it and loves it!

          The aim of the game: to be the first person to build your knickerbocker glory.

          In the box you will find 6 playing cards, each with the six different contents to create your knickerbocker glory. There will also be 2 different dice as there are 2 playing modes.

          Each of the ingredient cards has a different number of fruit on, and each piece is a different colour - for example there are red strawberries, an orange orange, purple blackberries etc.

          You decide which mode you want to play - with a coloured dice or a numbered one. If you choose the coloured dice the first person rolls the dice and whichever colour he lands on, he chooses that colour of fruit for his knickerbocker glory. The game goes round the players until one person has completed their ice cream.

          If you choose the numbered version of the game, the idea is still the same but instead of choosing a coloured piece, you count the pieces of fruit so 1 orange, 2 blackberries, 3 strawberries etc.

          My 3 year old can play both modes and loves both ways of playing. It is a fast game, it takes about 5 minutes to play, so idea for this age. I believe a 6 year old would find this a bit boring so would definitely recommend it for age 3 to 4 at the most, but it depends on the child.

          Overall I love this game. The pieces are bright and easy to depict. The rules are basic enough to understand and the game is fast enough that it holds interest. Definitely a muts for any pre-schooler.

          The only downside I can see is the pieces are made out of card. They have a wipe clean surface so will definitely last a long time, but if a child is rough with them they could still bend and become unusable fairly quickly.

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          15.06.2009 15:10
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          a great first board game

          This was the first board game that both of my daughters ever played at just under age 3 for both of them. It was the first Orchard game that I ever purchased, actually at full price from a shop, though I have since acquired a largish collection of other Orchard Games, mainly from varied Fairs and Car boot sales. It is currently £5.87 from Amazon, the rrp is £7.00.

          This is a great introduction to the concept of taking turns and playing a game for little ones, and the game play is not too annoying for parents either. As with all Orchard games it is a quality and British made product. It is made from nice thick wipeable recycled cardboard.

          In the box you get 6 icecream glasses (cut out shape on a board) and then 6 different coloured layers in different colours to fit into the knickerbocker glory. There are also 2 dice and instructions. If you lose the instructions they are summed up on the box.

          Gameplay:

          This is far easier to play than explain! Basically one of the dice is a traditional one, and one is a coloured one. You can play with either dice, for younger players the coloured dot one is best. The youngest child starts, rolls the dice and picks up a piece of knickerbocker glory of the colour they rolled. This piece slots into the glass and the winner is the player to finish building their icecream first. The icecream has 6 layers and 6 colours so eg the mandarin layer is orange and has one mandarin, the blueberry layer is blue and has 5 blueberries.

          As mentioned you can play by colour or by number; in either way of playing there is opportunity for re-inforcing colours and numbers in a fun way. The numbers run down the side of the glass in the colour of the piece so that the child can see where to put the piece.

          The pieces fit in well so playing is not frustrating for the child or too long lived for the parent, though you may need to teach your child to throw the dice and perhaps allow younger children to win if you can. Up to six people can play, it is a bit limited with two but still good fun.

          A good buy?

          As mentioned earlier this was the first game both my children played, and they picked up the idea fairly quickly and do enjoying playing "the icecream game", as they have christened it.

          The manufacturer's guidline of age of 3-6 is about right, so I think that the game is pretty good value. It is not the most exciting game ever but is very accesible and a good first game. If you go on to own others from Orchard you will find that some of them are pretty similar, I think this is one of the better games, and it has been much played and well loved in this house, generally making it into the bag of toys to take on holiday for a rainy day.

          This item would make a great present - for me it is right in the £5 "party budget" - I have been told that in some parts of the country £10 is the norm but in these parts £5 seems about standard. This is a good buy.

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            16.03.2007 19:17
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            good game for young children

            Knickerbocker glory

            In this game, children have to make their own knickerbockers glory as fast as they can. For some children the very name knickerbockers will cause much hilarity so they may have to get their giggles out of their system before the game can commence!!

            ~~~Who is it for?~~~

            A game for 2-4 players although I use it in the classroom as a game for only 2 players to cause fewer arguments.

            The suggested age range is 3-6, and I would tend to agree with this. I am using it at the moment with 4 and 5 year olds, and once the game is explained, they are quite able to play the game in pairs without any problems whatsoever.

            ~~~What do I get?~~~

            As with most of the games made by this manufacturer, the bits and pieces come in a nice, relatively small (and easy to store) box, with instructions on the base of the box. I do like this idea because it means that there is no scrappy bit of paper with the instructions written on it, which is bound to get lost.

            So, open the box and inside are 4 knickerbocker glory boards; these are knickerbockers glories with the insides out. There are also 24 fruit cards- 6 for each knickerbockers glory and featuring a picture with 1 orange segment, 2 grapes, 3 strawberries, 4 gooseberries, 5 blueberries, and 6 lemon segments. As well as these there is a colour spot dice, featuring the colours of the fruits shown on the fruit cards and also a number die.

            ~~~How do I play it?~~~

            Very very simple game, which, once explained, is easily grasped by even very young children.

            The object of the game is to be the first to make a complete knickerbocker glory.

            Spread the knickerbockers glory fruit cards face up in front of you and when each player has a knickerbockers glory board, then the game can commence!

            Throw the die and depending on whether the colour or number die is used, then having thrown it, the player looks for the piece to fit inside the knickerbockers glory, whether that be by number or colour. If a player throws the die and (s)he already has that piece of fruit, then play moves on.

            ~~~Who makes the game?~~~

            Orchard Toys
            Keyworth
            Nottingham

            www.orchardtoys.co.uk

            ~~~Price and Availability~~~

            Available in some toyshops, online or by requesting and then ordering from the catalogue.

            This game retails at a very reasonable £6.00

            ~~~What I Think of the Game…~~~

            Another well priced game from Orchard toys. Once again, they have produced a game which is easy to explain to young children, and easy for them to play. The pieces are sturdy enough to withstand classroom use, although for prolonged use over many years I think I would have to laminate the bits and pieces (or buy another game).

            I like the fact that there are two ways to play this game, because the pieces can be collected by number or colour, so handy in order to differentiate, and to enable me to take it at the child's pace. So, for very young children we can concentrate on colour matching, and as children progress we can use the number of dots on the die, count them and find the fruit which has the corresponding number of pieces.
            It's also good that the instructions are on the back of the box- no way can I lose them as I tend to do.

            For a good introduction to colours and numbers, I would recommend this game.

            Thanks for reading.

            Daniela x

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          • Product Details

            Make a scrumptious, fruity knickerbocker glory by colour matching and counting. Two games in one.