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Orchard Toys Tummy Ache Game

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Manufacturer: Orchard Toys

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      03.05.2013 17:54
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      A great board game for children

      My daughter got this game for her 5th birthday. I wasn't sure if it was going to be appropriate for her because although the game says it is for ages 3-10 it seemed a very easy game to complete. However from the moment she has opened it we have been playing all the time. She really loves the simplicity of the game and is able to share it with her friends of different ages as well as her family. You basically each get a board with 5 spaces for each part of your meal (main, 2x sides, drink and dessert). You pick up a card from the pile in the middle and if it is a tummy ache card you have to shout out tummy ache! and put it on your board (if there is a space free). The tummy ache food is all rotting/mouldy with bugs, caterpillars, worms etc all over it. The idea is to complete your board with 5 healthy items - whoever completed their board first is the winner. My only criticism is that it can be over very quickly but my daughter doesn't mind that as she just wants to play again and again....(!) This is a great game and suits children (and adults!) of different ages. It also teaches children about the difference between healthy and unhealthy food. (eg, the ice cream is covered in spiders but the fruit salad is a healthy choice) Since we have been given this game we have discovered several of her little friends also have it so it must be popular amongst 5 year olds :)

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      21.11.2012 22:48
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      Another fab game from Orchard Toys!

      Whilst we own several Orchard Toys games and jigsaws, Tummy Ache is not one we have so please forgive me for being vague about some of the details (eg exact number of cards!). However, I work at the local pre-school and it is a firm favourite with the children there so this is a game I have played MANY MANY times so I am definitely qualified to review it! In the Tummy Ache box you get: 4 large place setting cards - on one side of the place setting is an empty glass, on the other side is an empty sundae glass for your pudding. In the middle is an empty plate with a knife and fork at either side. 30ish food/drink cards - the majority of these show images of nice, edible food - either a portion of vegetables, some sort of carbohydrate or a type of meat (or limited vegetarian option!), plus drinks and puddings. The remaining cards are the dreaded "TUMMY ACHE!" cards. These cards are the same as the other cards only this food is covered in bugs! Yuk! To play the game place the food cards face down in the middle of the table and give each player a place setting. The first player then takes a card from the top of the pile and places it in the correct place on their place setting. Orchard Toys have made it easy for children to work out where the card goes, the drinks are all in the same shaped glass and (I think!) they all have a straw; the vegetables have a fork with them so go where the fork is on the place setting; the carbs have a knife on them so go where the knife is; the meat doesn't have cutlery so goes in the middle of the plate and the pudding is in the sundae glass! Very young children will need a little bit of help working this out at first, but they will soon pick it up. If a player picks up a card with bugs on then all the players shout "TUMMY ACHE!" If the card corresponds with an empty space on the place setting then the player must put the card there until they can replace it with an edible meal. If the space is already filled with an edible meal then the player places the card in a new pile, face up, next to the original pile. This, face up, pile is also where rejected edible meals go - quite possibly the most time consuming part of the game can be waiting whilst children decide whether they want peas or carrot with their omlette! Should they have a jacket potato or pasta?! Players now have the choice of which pile to take a card from. The winner is the first player to fill their place setting with edible food. I have yet to come across a child that doesn't like this game. They love squirming and moaning at the yukky food, they love being able to swap their existing cards for new ones, they love hoping they're going to get their favourite food (and hate it when they don't!) and most of all they love that they get to shout everytime a tummy ache card is selected! Tummy Ache is a relatively quick game to play (unlike matching pairs games which can go on for a loooooooooooooong time if you're playing with a child who is either not quite ready for them or just not paying attention!), it takes as long as it takes to turn all the cards over, plus a bit of extra time for making meal choices! Tummy Ache provides a good opportunity to talk about healthy diets and how our body needs a variety of food from each of the different food groups. When I'm playing it with older children we'll discuss what each type of food does for us and why we need it. Like all Orchard Toys games the quality is excellent. The illustrations on the cards appeal to children (the bugs are very cute and friendly looking!) and the cards themselves are thick and durable, as is the box. The box is one piece (as opposed to a bottom and a lid) which opens at the top, much more suitable for children to carry around! Tummy Ache is marketed as suitable for children aged 3 - 10. I have played this with children under 3 and they need a lot of support, so I would agree that 3 is a good age to start. Whilst children aged 7 - 10 may still enjoy playing it, I certainly wouldn't buy this game for them as it is definitely more suitable for a younger child! It is currently available from Amazon for £8.49 which is a reasonable price for such a well made game that is sure to be popular.

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        22.07.2012 21:58
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        Thoroughly recommended, particularly for pre-schoolers.

        Like many other people who grew up in the 70s or later, I had fond memories of 'Tummy Ache', although the set my brother and I used to have diminished to a few cards. I was surprised and delighted to see that the game was still available from Orchard Toys and was keen to buy it, hoping that it would be as good as I remembered. And it is! Parents of impatient small children will be really happy to hear that the game is a breeze to set up - each player (you can have up to four) has a card 'dinner-plate' to be filled, and there are 30 cards with foods on, 20 of which are 'nice' foods and 10 of which are 'tummy-ache' foods, with insects on, for example. The tummy-ache foods are funny rather than nauseating, by the way, so don't worry too much about anyone's appetite being spoiled! You put all the cards in a pile, face down. Then the players take it in turn to take a card. The first player to fill their dinner-plate with a 'nice food' example of every type of food wins. It's always really clear where the food should go: main courses go in the middle, vegetables on the left with a fork, potatoes or pasta with a knife, and then there's space for a dessert and a drink too. If you take a 'tummy-ache' card, you can replace it with a proper food card when you pick one of the right type. The game doesn't take long to play at all. I would recommend this game for small children because it's sturdy and wipeable, the pieces will last and last, you can set it up in seconds and play it in minutes, although they'll probably want to play it again....and again... Also, there's lots to talk about - what's the nicest food? Would pasta go with fish fingers? (Of course!). What are those funny things in that drink? (Tadpoles....). And when the game's over, my four year-old likes to sort through the cards and make the nicest meal...or the meal she'd most dislike. You can play it the other way if you like, where the first person to get five 'tummy-ache' foods win - although because there are fewer of those cards, it's only really possible if there's two of you! It's not as cheap as a card game - it's about £7.50 on Amazon at the moment, although its RRP is £9.50. However, it's long-lasting, loads of play value and suitable for younger children.

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        04.12.2011 17:43
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        A great, fun game for young children

        Tummy ache is my three year old niece's absolute favourite game. We have to play it all the time. That's a lot of playing! As you would expect for a game that a three year old plays, it is simple and repetitive and she has lots of fun. Priced at between £8-£10 online, it has been a value for money purchase for us when you consider the amount it has been played and the enjoyment derived from it. The game is suitable for 3-10 year olds so I suspect we will get even more use from this in the future! THE GAME PIECES Inside the box, there are lots of hard, thick cardboard pieces together with a paper instruction leaflet. The game can be played by 2-4 players so there are sufficient pieces provided for 4 players. Each player receives a place setting in the form of two puzzle pieces that fit together. Each place setting has room for a drink piece, pudding, knife, fork and middle of the plate. There are also a large number of thick cardboard 'card' pieces which each contain a food item to be placed on one of the spaces on your place setting - for example a knife place card with pasta on. Some of these cards contain things that you would not like to eat, for example a frog in a glass of water for the drink place - these are 'tummy ache cards'. HOW TO PLAY This is basically a lottery game and a game of luck and chance. The aim is to be the first player to fill your place setting with an edible meal. The food (and tummy ache cards) and shuffled and placed in a pile in the centre, faced down. Each player then takes it in turns to take a card from this pile and place it on their place setting in the relevant spot. If a card is chosen and you already have a card in that spot you can either swap this for the new one or keep the old one, the unselected card is then placed in the discarded pile. The next player can then choose to take from the top of the discarded pile rather than the usual pile if they need this space on their board filled. If a 'tummy ache' card is selected, all player shout tummy ache and this is placed on your place setting unless you have already filled the slot, in which case it can be discarded. The first to complete their board with an edible meal is the winner. MY OPINION The game is really easy to understand and simple to play - perfect for young children. It is also repetitive, which is something that young children enjoy and learn from (but a little boring for the adults sucked in to playing!). The game is also quick to play so will hold their interest well without them losing concentration. That said, my niece can play this 5 or 6 times in a row! It is also a great learning toy on various levels as children learn to take turns when taking their cards. They also learn which side of their plate the knife and fork go and you can discuss manners at the table, the importance of hand washing etc. It is also great with providing a discussion point on food - you can talk about the food that they have selected, for example 'what colour are they?', 'do you like potatoes?', 'can you remember when you ate strawberries..?' etc. Thus helping to develop language skills. The pictures of the foods on the cards are really lovely and brightly coloured and the tummy ache cards are particularly well illustrated. My niece loves these and loves to declare how 'disgusting' they are every time. They add a real fun element to the game and she particularly enjoys shouting 'tummy ache' loudly when a card is uncovered - especially if it is someone else who has done the uncovering! Therefore, it can be quite a noisy game! The idea of picking up from the discarded pile is a good one as it teaches young children to think about their next move, rather than automatically just reach for the usual pile. At 3, my niece hasn't quite got the hang of this yet and just wants to take her turn quickly. With a little gentle encouragement we can help her to think through her moves though - this is another good skill that the game helps her to develop. Overall, this is a simple but fun game that we do enjoy playing and it can help fill 20 minutes of your day whilst also helping your children to learn some important skills. Recommended.

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          12.10.2011 10:33
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          A fab game

          We are big fans of Orchard Toys in our house, and quite often when we are out shopping in town I will let my daughter go to the toy shop and choose something (yes, spoilt much!?) and on many occasions she has chosen a game. One particular day she chose a game called Tummy Ache, which I was sure I remembered from the past. For those of you who aren't aware, Orchard Toys specialise in educational games and puzzles for children and covers the ages 18 months to 12 years old. We now have quite a range of the games and we could soon open our own toy shop!! The game ~~~~~~~~ Tummy Ache is described as a fun food lotto game which probably isn't how I would have even thought to describe it as it doesn't really feel like a lotto game. The box has a very busy look to it, with primary colours filling the whole box. At the top of the front of the box you will see the name of the game, in smaller lettering than most of the other games we have. The rest of the box is covered with various foods which have flies, worms, frogs and spiders crawling all over. The large Orchard Toys logo is situated at the bottom of the box, and it tells us that the game is for 2-4 players with an age range of 3-10 years. The reverse of the box, as with all Orchard Toys games, shows a picture of the game in play along with an educational guide which explains this game has been designed to: * link with Early Learning Goals * develop personal and social skills * encourage observation Inside the box you will find 4 jagged place setting boards, 20 food cards, 10 tummy ache cards and the instruction leaflet. Playing the game ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ To play Tummy Ache the food and tummy ache cards must be shuffled together and placed in a pile face down in the centre of the table. Each player takes a place setting board (which fit together like a jigsaw) and the game is ready to start. The first player, in our case is always my daughter who insists on going first, takes a card from the top of the pile and places it on their place setting in the corresponding place. The idea of the game is to be the first player to complete their place setting with the real foods, five cards in total - drink, fork with food, centre of plate with food, knife with food and dessert. The place setting cards shows the spaces in which the foods will go so it is easy for the child to locate where the food should go on the setting. Each time a card is picked it must go on the place setting. If the card is a tummy ache card (which is "bad food" covered in little creatures), the player shouts "Tummy Ache" and if the corresponding place on the setting is clear it must go on there and stays there until a food card is picked to replace it. If the card that is picked up is not needed, it is placed on a discard pile so other players can choose that card if they need to do so. The winner is the player to complete their place setting first. Opinion ~~~~~~~ This is by far my little girls favourite of our Orchard Toys games and is now always the first game she will choose to play. It is so simple to set the game up that my three year old daughter tends to do it most of the time though of course she needs help in shuffling the cards. The length of the game is just about right for my daughter and really manages to hold her attention for the duration. Some games can go quicker than others, but it never goes too fast that it is no fun! We always have a laugh when we play this game, especially when my daughter gets angry when picking up a tummy ache card! There is a good range of foods within this game and it shows children what are classed as healthy foods such as broccoli, peas and pasta, to the unhealthy foods such as pizza and burgers. The cards are all really child friendly, which is a must, but it is easy to recognise which the foods are while the creatures are all drawn in a cute cartoon type way so they don't appear scary to young children (if they are anything like my daughter the spiders could have been horrifying!!)Quite often when we play this game my daughter will only keep the food cards with foods she enjoys to eat on them, so if she picks up peas she will return it to the pack and wait until she picks something she likes! This is a really simple game to play and a young child will grasp it quite quickly as my little girl did, even if you don't have the instructions it is really easy to pick up. The cards are made out of thick cardboard and are wipe clean just in case sticky fingers get hold of them! I asked my daughter to describe this game for the purpose of this review and she said it is fun but with mingy food! The price of Tummy Ache on Orchard Toys website is £9.25 but you can find it on Amazon slightly cheaper. Thank you for reading my review.

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            14.06.2011 17:33
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            A nice game that the children want to play over and over

            I bought a copy of Tummy Ache when my son was little, he's now twelve and moved on, and my two and a half year old is interested! The suggested age range on the box is three to ten, which seems like a long time to be interested in the same game, but actually, that's about right. My daughter is thirty months, and she's just started playing games, she loves this. My nephew is nine and still asks to play. How it works: there are four boards, each with space for a veg, main and starch, plus drink and pudding. Then there are cards with a variety of food stuffs; 4 of each 'nice' (milkshake, jelly and pork chops for example) and two of each 'nasty (tomatoes with maggots and potatoes with ladybirds, for example). On your turn, you take a card, and if that space on your board is free, you get to keep that item. If it's a 'nasty' item, everyone yells "tummy ache" which is many of the players' favourite part of the game in my experience. If you already have that slot filled, you get to choose. A lot of thought tends to go into whether green beans or peas are tastier, at least in my house. The winner is the first person to have an edible meal in front of them, without any 'tummy ache' (nasty food) cards. The art work is a bit hit and miss... there are a couple of items where I'm not sure what it is (is that mash or couscous? Does it matter?) and some where they look a bit weird (notably the sausages, which are covered in bees anyway) but other pictures are really inviting (such as the baked potatoes and the fruit salad). I found that some of the items were things I rarely cook (such as quiche), and my daughter has expressed interest in trying them as a result. Other than that, the range is quite small, and there are a lot of potatoes (mashed, boiled, baked, chips...) It would be nice to have one of those potato items replaced with bread, or maybe noodles.

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            04.05.2011 10:03
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            simple fun game for preschoolers

            'Tummy Ache' was a present my daughter received for Christmas 2010. It's made by Orchard toys from whom I had previously bought a good quality product and continually hear good things about, so after reading a few reviews on Amazon I suggested this game to a relative as a possible present for my little one. It's for 2-4 players and the recommended age is from 3-10 years. I'd say three is a good starting age but I'd be surprised and perhaps somewhat alarmed if my daughter was still playing this aged ten, If I had to set an age range I'd guess at between three and six or seven, but just 3+ on the box would be fine. At the time of writing it's priced £8.45 on Amazon UK, maybe a bit pricey for a game made entirely of card. This is one of my daughter's first ever games, (as opposed to toys), which she was very excited upon opening and wanted to play straight away. She picked up the rules very quickly, although, being three, she does like to improvise, (cheat), and make up her own rules too. ~In The Box~ The contents of the box are four large cards which act as dinner mats with plate, dessert dish and glass, and 30 small cards which contain pictures of food to fill the dishes. When you open the box the small cards need to be popped out of thick cardboard sheets, I did tear some paper from the back of one of the cards doing this, evidence that you need to be careful to avoid tearing the cards at this point. Happily there was no damage to the pictures on any of our cards and apart from that initial error they seem to be quite hardy and should be able to withstand enthusiastic handling from young children. The boards and cards are bright and colourful with clear well-drawn images. The food is easily recognisable whilst the bugs are rather cartoonish with huge eyes. The only slight problem is that on the tummy ache cards sometimes part of the picture is obscured by the words 'tummy ache', which makes a couple of the cards a little tricky to guess whether it's a picture of a drink or a sweet - the sweet bowl is very similar to the glass, it just has an added stem. We've worked this out now though, so it no longer causes confusion. Also in our box was an instruction sheet and a leaflet advertising other Orchard toys - I think it's worth mentioning that this brightly coloured leaflet manages to attract my daughter's attention every time we open the box and she sits and asks questions about it and wants me to make up stories with her about the characters pictured on a bus. In fact as I write this review she is sat at the table looking at this very leaflet and making up stories about it. ~How to Play~ The idea of the game is that you end up with a nice meal on your plate. You have five cards to collect in order to achieve this; three cards fill up the centre plate - it usually consists of something like meat, carbs and veg, and one each for a dessert and a drink. Each player begins with a place setting and the deck of cards is shuffled and placed face down in the centre of play. The youngest player starts by taking a card and placing it in the right place on their board, it's easy to see where everything goes on the plate as the knives and forks at the edge of each card make this clear. Play then moves to the next player. If a player picks up a 'tummy ache' card all players have to shout 'Tummy Ache!'. These cards contain pictures of food that you really wouldn't want to eat; an apple core being eaten by ants is one example, there are also beetley waffles or spiders and chips....you get the idea, there are bugs in the food. If the player already has the right space filled on their board they can discard the tummy ache card, but if not it has to go on their place mat until they can replace it with a food card. If a player picks up a food card and they already have that space filled they can choose to swap or discard the card. My daughter is very particular about which foodstuffs she will allow on her plate, we will have proper sulks if someone else gets the strawberries and cream and we usually agree to swap it with her on her turn. Tummy Ache cards on place mats can be replaced once a food card for that space is picked up. Discarded cards form a second face up pile, and players can choose to take the top card from either pile. The winner is the first player to fill their board with five food cards. Like most games it's harder to explain than to play and is really very simple to pick up. Overall there are only just enough food cards to fill the four place setting boards with 20 food cards and 10 tummy ache cards. There are enough cards but a few extra wouldn't go amiss, as it doesn't take long to become very familiar with all of the possible meal combinations. Games are quite quick, ten minutes tops I would say, but usually half that. My daughter likes the game although she only wants certain foods on her plate, and while we do bend the rules a little at times, it's all part of learning about how to co-operate. She's no longer quite so dismayed at having to have carrots on her plate now that she's learned she'll be able to swap them for broccoli later on. Once the game is over my daughter likes to play her own version of it. This can simply be asking us what we'd like to eat and filling up everyone's places with proper meals. She'll play a version with her toys too, and likes to tell us that her toy cats enjoy eating the food that contains spiders or worms. I imagine a lot of young children would like to play like this. As I recall from childhood, playing your own version of games is always much more fun than playing by the rules. ~Thoughts~ I had somewhere got the impression that this game was somehow connected to the promotion of healthy eating, but if so it's not overtly done, and in my opinion that's no bad thing. It's just a fun game. The bugs on the tummy ache cards attack all sorts of food; pizza, chips, burgers, waffles and ice cream all look unappetizing, but so do apples, lettuce and tomatoes. There is a reasonable range of food, the complete meals tend towards the healthy and should help children get used to the idea of seeing a variety of food on a plate as normal. It's a little light on the vegetarian options, although there is a mushroom and tomato omelette, but no vegan meals. I wouldn't say that healthy eating is the point of this game, but learning about food and what is considered to be normal eating does come into it. In our house it has led to a little discussion around food and why some things are better to eat than others. The box tells me that this game has been designed to; 'link with early learning goals', 'develop personal and social skills' and 'encourage observation', all just so much blah, if you want my opinion. I couldn't give a stuff about early learning goals, I'm happy for my daughter to learn at her own pace and I'm confident she will get to where she needs to be without having to follow the latest rules. I do get tired of seeing terms like 'develop social skills' on the side of toy boxes. I don't need to have these things spelled out for me, I know children learn through play. I think the toy and games industry use these goals to put pressure on parents to buy toys that help children develop 'in the right way' and I do my best to ignore it. This game is like a myriad of others in that it helps children follow simple rules and learn about things like sharing and turn taking. To sum up then, Tummy Ache is a simple game that is well liked by my three year old daughter. It has been played with probably most weeks since Christmas and while more often my daughter will play with it in her own way, she does also like to play a 'proper game' of it. It's not madly exciting for adults to join in with, but it's okay and it should last a long time as the cards are well made and chunky.

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              09.08.2010 23:07
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              good family fun

              I came across this game last christmas when my 3 year old son was bought it as a present from a friend. It seemed to be a christmas for him getting a lot of games, and this one proved to be one of his favourites. The game comes with 4 players boards which have 5 spaces on them showing a dessert cup, a plate divided into 3 sections, and a glass for a drink. There are then 40 cards showing food items, some of which have cute pictures of worms and flies on the food and the word tummy ache. It can be played with 2 to 4 players. We play it by taking turns in taking a card, and if one person gets a tummy ache card, we all start manically chanting it as loud as we can. The aim is to complete your game card by filling each of the 5 spaces on your card with a normal food. We love this game in our house. My younger son was only 20 months old when we got this, and with quite a bit of help he gets the idea of how to play it too, and we greatly enjoy it. He struggles to put the cards on his gamecard, but he loves trying. It is aimed at children between 3-10 years old. I would suggest it is better for those at the younger end of the market. I can't imagine my 10 year old nephew wanting to play it. The cards you are playing with are really thick chunky cardboard, and the pictures are well stuck on. There has been no peeling up of the images or bending of the cardboard and they have been played with quite roughly in the excitement of the game. I can heartily recommend this game. It is not too annoying as an adult to join in with, and the kids seem to get endless fun out of it.

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                22.07.2010 19:30
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                see review

                I remembered this game from my childhood with great affection so decided to purchase this for my Eldest last Christmas and since then this has become the gift to all my friends children in a nutshell it's a fantastic game. What is the game? The game consists of a variety of food playing cards and 4 Dinner mats. The idea of the game is that you create a healthy good for you dinner which will not make you ill. All the bad food contains creepy crawlies! Age range according to the box this game is suitable from 3 years however my 2 year old loves this game particularly shouting out tummy ache and my friend's daughter always requests this and she is 8! Educational Bit Supposedly this game teaches personal, social and emotional development and helps with communication skills which in my house consist of it's my go no it's my go! I always thought this game was to prevent obesity in children! Cost and stockists Orchard toy are a very well known respected manufacturer and are stocked in all leading independent toy shops as well as available from John Lewis and Amazon the price of this game does vary between £6.50 and £9.00 and can often be bought as a set with the fantastic shopping list game. Recommend I would defiantly recommend this it has become a firm favourite with my children and is still remembered fondly by my Brothers and Sisters a family classic and its educational The game is also very quick which means that the little ones do not get bored.

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                  26.06.2010 15:58
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                  Highly Recommended

                  Orchard Toys Tummy Ache Game is a good way to play along with a young child, rather than against them. There is a winner in a way, but the game is more about trying to wind up with the nicest possible dinner, as opposed to trying to get a better dinner than the people you're playing with. I think it's a nice way to promote playing together, rather than just plain competing. Orchard Toys are quite popularly used as educational games, so you can often buy these from school supplies stores, or from those catalogues which often get sent home in school bags. Alternatively you can sometimes find these games on places like Amazon, and at the moment they are selling this for £6.46 which I think is a very reasonable price. The full RRP is £9 so Amazon are offering a good discount at present. Inside the box, the contents is quite basic but also sturdy and well constructed. You get four game boards which map out where four players should put their meal tokens. This game can be played with two, three or four players, and you could make up variations to play it independantly as well. There are also a range of food tokens which fit into the five slots on the game board. These include ones which show different drinks, one which show a knife, ones which show dessert etc. There are five different sorts of tokens to fill up the five different sections on your dinner plate game board. The cards are all thick, glossy and super-sturdy. They will easily survive plenty of years worth of play before wearing and tearing. The aim of the game is to take it in turns to pick a random card from the pile of food tokens, and see if you can make up a nice meal on your plate. Some of the cards have nice foods on them, and some have nasty foods covered in slime or bugs etc. If you wind up with lots of nasty food cards on your board, you'll have tummy ache at the end! If you wind up with all nice foods on your board, you'll have a tasty meal to eat. Part of the appeal of this game is that it's an opportunity to discuss food with youngsters. Each time you draw a different card, you have to place it on your board if the space is empty, but if it's already occupied, you can choose to switch it. Obviously you will always switch if you pick up a nice food and you presently have a tummy ache card there! But it's also about making choices, as sometimes you'll pick up a nice card but already have a nice card. So the idea then is to decide if you'd rather have peas with your dinner, or some cauliflower perhaps. You can switch your orange juice for milkshake, or your yoghurt for strawberries and cream. It encourages children to have a think about food while they play, which is particularly helpful if you've got a resistant eater on your hands I think! This is a fun game that's very simple but highly enjoyable and relaxed to play. It's easy for kids as young as three to understand (recommended age range is three to ten years) and it's interesting for older kids who are starting to have a think about which foods go together, which are the healthiest and which are their favourites. It can be played competively, but mostly it's an opportunity to just spend time together and have a laugh at who has to drink rotten apple juice with spiders in it and who gets to have a big chunk of chocolate cake. Five stars from me and the grandson, highly recommended

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