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This classic game of strategy takes a minute to learn, a lifetime to master. It's simple enough for children yet challenging for adults.

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    10 Reviews
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      02.12.2012 16:23
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      A wonderful game.

      Othello, the game, not Shakespeare's character, is great for all ages above the age of eight but there are plenty of children who have played this in my house around the age of six and enjoyed it. It's a game of strategy and mastery. However, just like the reversible counters it can flip over to be enjoyed with a simplicity and naivety of play.

      The board is made up of sixty-four squares, rather like a chess board, but the squares that hold the counters are lined with a very smart green felt. The presentation of Othello is simple yet smart and therefore, looks sophisticated. Don't worry, though, sophistication does not bring with it a game of complication. The rules are easy to follow.

      Two players compete against each other. The counters are quite thick and of round construction. They are made of hard plastic. One side of every counter is white and the other side is black. The players decide who will play with the black side and who will use the white side of the counters. The counters have their own storage space at each end of the square board with a cover that pulls down of the top, keeping the counters safe whilst also designating the position of the players at opposite ends of the board.

      Game Play:

      Set up only requires that four counters are place in the four middle squares. Two are black and two are white.

      Black starts the game.

      Each player has thirty-two counters.

      The first player will place a counter in order to flank the opposing colour. The player can then turn over the counters, that they've sandwiched in between, so their colour is facing upright. The game continues in this manner throughout. Surround the opponents counter and flip it over so the colour is yours. You can take over whole rows diagonally, horizontally and vertically. Keep going until there are no empty squares remaining on the board.

      However, just when you think the game is yours for the winning, in comes the other player with one fantastic move, and lo and behold you have to sit and watch, in growing despair, as your pieces are turned over and the board is flooded with the , now manically grinning, opponent's colour.

      Players must always take their turn, even if it hurts to go, because that square is going to aid the opposition who will clearly be able to turn all your counters over! It's just tough you have to play into that last remaining square.

      Sometimes a player can run out of counters. The opposition must supply their counters as long as the requirement is there.


      And the winner is:

      The person with their colour most dominant on the board, once all the spaces are filled with counters.


      The downside:

      The counters are fiddly to retrieve from the storage compartment and are awkward to turn over in the squares.


      It can be unfair to play someone who is beneath your level of skill and strategy. Young and novice players ought to play together and those with more experience and ability, to plan moves ahead and take steps of defence and prevention, ought to play their own skill set. Young children can enjoy this as they need only turn over the reversible counters and see the outcome emerge but this is very different to planning the moves in advance and thinking ahead to what moves your opponent might make.

      Great Game:

      This is a game of reversing successes and reversing failures. Othello is a wonderful challenge if you want to play strategically or it provides plenty of fun for those who want to have a go and see what happens, without having a plan in mind, and relying on good luck.


      The beauty of this game is that it is equally enjoyable for those who haven't acquired the strategy skills as it is for those who can apply a bit more cunning! This makes Othello a game for just about everyone.

      Our board is a good twenty plus years old. The felt has warn away inside some of the squares and the plastic covers that fold over the counters are a little scratched but it's withstood billions of games and done remarkably well. This is another fine game that I can strongly recommend to have in your own home but also to buy others as gifts. However, I have heard that more recent games are made with cheaper material which might not be as robust as my version. Look out for quality wooden versions.

      I should think this game is very good for people with hearing impairments as it is a game reliant on sight skills. It is also useful for guests that don't speak English, as we have found, a quick demonstration requires no language, and instantly the barriers are broken down through game play.

      Expect to pay around £20 for the board game but you can play for free online.

      I could give you tips on how to improve your chances of winning, but I'm not going to in case I ever play against you!

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      22.05.2012 20:43
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      As good as chess but a lot easier

      Othello

      I first was introduced to this game as a child, I was fascinated with the idea of it and even now I still enjoy playing it. The game itself is so simple and easy to play, but working out all the strategic moves in order to keep winning takes a lot longer to learn.


      The Game Board

      The game board is very clever, similar to a chess board in that the board is marked out with 64 squares all of equal measurement, however unlike a chess board, the Othello board is green, all the squares are green and my particular game boasts a soft green fabric material with a felt like feel to it and the squares are marked onto this fabric in black. The clever part about the board I think is the fact that the actual Othello pieces all sit nice and neatly either side of the board in their very own compartments complete with roll over clear plastic lids to keep them all in place when the game isn't being used. I love this idea because not only does it keep the pieces from falling out all over the place but it stops dust etc. building up within the compartments and keeps the pieces clean at the same time. By sitting all the pieces in these compartments the game becomes portable and very easy to take with you if you were to be travelling.


      The Pieces

      The game pieces are two pieces of flat, smooth round plastic moulded together making the pieces black on one side and white on the other, inside of the two pieces of plastic a magnet has been placed, this makes the pieces easy to stack and tidy away as they are attracted to each other magnetically, but there are times when the pieces collect up the wrong way and forcefully pull away from each other, you do have to make sure they are the right way or it could take a while to collect them up and stack them neatly in their compartments.

      I like this game as an alternative to chess; I find it relaxing and not so intricate to play.


      Playing the Game

      To play the game you first decide which colour you both wish to be, then each opponent places 2 of their Othello pieces on the centre of the board diagonally to each other with the colour side up which they have chosen to be, so now there should be 4 Othello pieces in the middle of the board, 2 white side up and 2 black side up.

      We usually say white goes first as that seems to be the colour that goes first in similar games, although I don't suppose it really matters. For arguments sake let's say white goes first, they place their 3rd Othello piece in such a way that it will have a white at both ends of a row of blacks, so whites first piece will have to be placed next to one of the blacks, once placed, all the blacks within that row are turned over to become white and so play continues, with the rows getting bigger and bigger and more and more pieces getting turned over each time. As the game gets going there will be times when just by placing your one piece you will be able to turn many pieces on the board in your favour because wherever you place your piece, if there is one of your pieces at the other end whether straight or diagonally or both, which top a particular row, then all the pieces in between become yours and are turned in your favour.

      The game continues until one person cannot move anywhere, this happens when one player has exhausted all their possible moves by having none of their coloured pieces left at the end of any row. Then the winner is declared, the person with the majority of their colour on the board wins the game.


      What I think over all

      We used to play this game a lot back in the day so to speak. I grew up playing this game along with chess. Over time I've learned a few tips and tricks on playing Othello and not wanting to blow my own trumpet but I can and do win this game when I play the majority of the time, people won't play me, they say it's no fun because I always win. Hence the reason we haven't played it for a while. But the game itself is in very good condition considering its age. I think the way the actual board is made, like I mentioned earlier, has helped keep this game intact and in good condition.

      I personally would recommend this game because I really enjoy playing it, just as I enjoyed teaching my children to play it. The game you will find at many high street shops and plenty of places online. EBay are selling it at the moment and prices vary anything up to £10.00.


      My Secret of Success at Othello

      I aim for the corners of the board as quick as I can; if I'm struggling to get to the corners quickly I aim for the edges. Once you are at the edge there is little chance your piece is going to get turned over, but rush for those corners because they are the secret of success for this game, once you have the corners, the game is pretty much wrapped up, you are bound to win.

      Have fun and good luck playing

      Thank you for reading my review which may also appear on other sites.

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      • More +
        15.03.2010 18:48
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        It makes no odds whether or not you like Shakespeare. You will adore Othello

        ~~~~~~~~~~~
        Introduction
        ~~~~~~~~~~~

        Othello is an ingeniously simple, two player game suitable for all ages - from five upwards, yet requires concentration and focus. Championships are held annually , so although Othello is played by adults, it can also be learned and enjoyed by youngsters.

        I have divided this review into sections, so that if you are not keen to know the origins of the game, why I bought it, or the makers etc. you can easily skip the details and move to the parts of interest.

        Othello is said to be "The game that takes a minute to learn and a lifetime to master."

        I bought mine many years ago, to play with my nephews, snakes and ladders was losing its appeal, so I thought why not get a game that requires strategy and observation, like chess or draughts, rather than chance.

        My Othello game was produced and marketed by the Swindon firm 'Peter Pan Playthings.'
        When I purchased the game from WH Smiths, it was priced at £4.25, but on offer at £2.89, which might give you some idea of how long ago that was.
        Nowadays you will have to pay around £20 new, even then it is not expensive. However, I have seen them for less on Ebay from £4.99 to £10 and Amazon. I have not, I must say, seen any in WH Smiths recently.

        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        History of the game and its association with Shakespeare's play:
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

        Othello was not the original name for this game, when invented in 1883; it was called Reversi and Othello is believed to be based on the original game. Even so, the boards for both games have the same layout which I shall describe later. Ravensburger produce red boarded game called Reversi, whereas Pet Pan Playthings's boards are green and called Othello.

        It was in the Early 1970s that Tsukuda Original, a Japanese games company registered the game as Othello which was, shall we say, re-invented by a Japanese chap Goro Hasegawa who was supposedly inspired by another ancient Chinese strategy game called Go, now apparently Reversi use the same or similar rules of play.

        Any Shakespearian fan (ashamedly I have to admit I am not) will know the play "Othello, The Moor of Venice," where Othello was a black African prince and General in the Venitian military and married to Desdemona who was white. Iago, the real villain of the play, was angered by Othello, for promoting a younger man over him, and knowing that Roderigo was jealous of Othello for having usurped him by marrying Desdamona, Iago then lied to Othello telling him that his wife was unfaithful. The tragedy unfolds around the jealousies, and trickery.

        The pieces of the game are in black and white, depicting Othello and Desdemona. The board is green which represents either the green battle fields, or more likely, jealousy, the main theme of the play.

        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        Description of the game.
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

        The board is made from strong, black, moulded plastic; measuring in total, 26cm x 34cm. The whole unit includes the play area and two tubular disc holding cases, one at each end.
        The 26cm x 26cm play area is covered in a thin green, baize-like material and divided into 64 x 3cm squares.

        Each tubular case holds a set of 32, double-sided discs - one side black and the other, white. The discs are about the size of a 10p coin and the thickness of a one pound coin. (2.5cm diameter, 0.5cm thick) In fact there were three spare discs in my set.

        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        How to set up and play the game
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

        Othello takes seconds to set up and anything up to an hour or more to
        play.

        Each player, having decided which colour they shall play, places two of their discs diagonally in two of the four central squares, so that at the start of play, looking horizontally and vertically, a black disc is next to a white disc.

        The rules are very simple. A player MUST, each time he places a disc on the board, trap one or more of the opposing player's disc. He then turns the 'trapped' disc(s) of the opposing player to expose his own colours. If he cannot trap a disc, then he must miss a turn or turns until such time as he is once again able to trap the other.

        For example; black always starts the game. A black disc must be placed so that it traps a white disc between the newly placed black and a black already on the board. The black disc player then turns the trapped white discs over so that all the trapped whites are black. The white disc player then places a white so that it traps a black between it and a white already on the board.
        Each player takes it in turn to place discs, trap and turn their opponent's discs. When the board is covered, each player counts the number of their own colours showing on the board. The winner is the one with the largest number of their colour exposed.

        There are some very useful, tactical moves. Black has the advantage over white because it makes the first move, so often, it is fairer to play two games, changing sides, or to total the number of own colours counted over several games.

        Let the games begin... However, when you get into the game, you will find that you will start thinking ahead, anticipating, not only your next move, but also that of your opponent.

        ~~~~~~~~~~
        My experience
        ~~~~~~~~~~

        On the box of my game, are the words;" Warning: Othello may be habit-forming. We strongly urge you to eat and sleep between games."

        Well, I can't say I lost sleep or missed out on my meals, but the game is addictive and although it is meant to be played by two players, I have actually enjoyed playing this game on my own. It is fascinating being two people - I always win:-)

        When I introduced this game to my young nephew, who had just turned six, he felt so chuffed at being able to understand and play, what is deemed, an adult board game. It took no time at all for him to learn and understand the basics, and was soon able to beat me at it:-(

        Mind you, at first I was playing my game and his, for him, telling him the good moves he might have missed (allowing him to replay a disc, if there was a better place to play it.)
        Eventually, he was telling me what moves I should have made, saying something like, "Oh no, aunty, if you put your counter there, you can trap that row AND this one." What a sport eh? Bless!

        It is a great game and one worth having, it will last a lifetime providing your dog doesn't pinch any of the counters......or chew the board.

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          17.10.2008 15:21
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          Great game for all the family

          Equipment: This game comes with a square board that is divided into 64 separate squares (8x8). There are also a large number of chips with white colouring on one side and black on the other. These can be stored in neat wells found on two sides of the board, one for you and one for your opponent.

          How many people: This is a game for 2 players.

          How to play: The board for the game is the 8x8 square board described above. Each space is on the board will fit a chip. The game starts with the four squares in the middle being taken by two black and two white chips. They are placed alternately in the small square area. The two players share the remaining chips between them and each person is allocated a colour (black or white) and this is the way you put your chips down on the board when it is your turn. Each player takes it in turn to place a chip onto the board. Ideally this should be somewhere that allows you to turn your opponent's chips over. In order to turn over a chip to your own colour you must have one of your own chips on both ends of the line, for example, if you had black, white, white black in a line that is left to right, top to bottom or diagonal, you would be able to turn over the two white chips in the middle. The aim is to turn as many of your opponent's chips over to your own colour by strategically placing your own chips onto the board. You are able to turn more than one row at a time, for example if you had black white black going left to right and the chip you placed down also ended a line that was top to bottom, black white black, you would be able to turn over the white disc in both rows. You should also try to make it as tricky as possible for your opponent to place a chip down or to gain any of your own chips.

          Aim of the game: Apart from winning is to get as many of your coloured chips on the board, the one with the most wins the game!

          Age Range: This game is for children aged 6 years plus, still a fun game to play at 106 years. It is a strategy game and so is suitable for all ages as long as you can understand the instructions.

          This game is very addictive, once you pop, you can't stop! (So to speak).

          This game is available to purchase at many toy stores and costs about £20.

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          • More +
            29.04.2008 22:56
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            OTHELLO

            This classic strategy game for celebrates it's 25th Anniversary this year with a special edition.

            For ages 6years +

            The rules are simple. The playing area is a squared board. Each square is a space for a plastic disk, which is white on one side and black on the other. To begin with the four central squares are occupied with two disks showing white and two showing black. Each player has half of the remaining disks, taking turns to place a disk on an unoccupied square with their own colour showing, adjacent to a disk showing the opponent's colour and in a direct line with one showing the player's own color. The idea is to place the disk in such a way as to allow the player to turn over disks showing the opponent's colour to their own colour, while making the opponent's task as difficult as possible. As the game progresses, a player may be able to place a disk next to several showing the opponent's colour, opening up lines in different directions and turning a lot of disks over.

            People soon learn that being able to place disks in the four corners is often the key to winning the game. If you can get at least three of the four corners showing your colour, you will almost certainly win (but not always).

            This is a great game and i cannot stop playing it, although there is a lot of skill involved there is also a lot of luck involved too.

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              19.12.2006 11:46
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              Othello is a fun and great game to play and I recommend it to everyone.

              After my unexpected crown for my JENGA review (and many thanks everyone for that) I thought that I would continue with my theme of Games and thought that it was about time that I did a review on Othello.

              ABOUT THE GAME:

              Othello is a rather simple game to play which is suitable for most ages (official list says ages 8 and up, but I know that I was playing this at a younger age of 8). The phrase they use is that it is a game that takes minutes to learn but a lifetime to master and I do agree with this.

              BASIC RULES OF THE GAME:

              Othello is a simple board game played on a board with 64 squares (8 X 8) with A – H across the top and 1 – 8 down the side (not that it matters that much but is useful to have these labelled as such to make the explanations a little simpler). The game is played by two people, one being the white discs and one being the black discs. The aim of the game is to turn all of the discs on the board into your colour (i.e. all black or all white), but more about this in a minute as I go through the review.

              HOW TO SET UP THE BOARD:

              Now you should have with the game the basic green board (in my day this was made out of a nice felt, but later editions are much more cheaply made which is a shame) and a number of discs (black on one side and white on the other).

              You set the board up with 4 discs in the middle of the board, two of them showing white and two showing black. If you have the board labelled as I mentioned above, then you should have a white disc on D4 and E5 and a black disc on D5 and E4 (meaning that the same colour is diagonal on the board).

              You now have set up the board for the beginning of the game (simple isn’t it, not quite as complicated as chess for certain).

              BEGINNING / PLAYING THE GAME:

              OK, now I mentioned above that the aim of the game is to turn all of the discs on the board to your colour. Now in Othello black always begins first (and this can be an advantage as in all games, so we usually either toss a coin to see who starts or hold one disc in one hand behind your back and the opponent chooses a hand, if they find the disc in that hand then they are black and start).

              The way you play Othello is to put your disc down into a position adjacent to a colour of your opponent. However the important thing to remember is that you must trap one or more your opponent’s discs in a straight line (Horizontal, vertical or diagonal) between the new disc you put on the board and an existing disc already there. So taking black as the first player to move, he can only place his disc in one of 4 places on the board (in order to be adjacent to a white disc and in a direct line to an existing black disc (for those who have labelled your board these 4 places would be C4, D3, E6 or F5). So giving that he places his piece on C4 (which is adjacent to D4 (where a white disc is sitting and in a direct line to another black disc on E4), you would then be able to claim the white disc as your disc and flip it over to a black disc. This means that as the first player you would then have 4 black discs in play and your opponent who has not played yet only 1 white disc.

              It would then be the turn of your opponent to place a white disc down (again in a position adjacent to a black disc in a direct line of sight to the only existing white disc) and claim all of the trapped discs to white and flip them over. The game continues until you have covered the entire board with all of the discs, taking turns on placing a disc onto the board.

              It is important to NOTE that you must place your disc adjacent to an existing disc of your opponent’s colour. This means that you cannot just automatically place the disc in the corner say (which would be a great advantage) but must work your way out of the board to the edges, trapping and flipping your opponents discs with each turn.

              MORE DETAILS:

              OK, you have now started playing the game and have been placing discs down on the board. It is important to remember a number of details as you are playing.

              Firstly, you are only allow to claim (and therefore flip to your colour) trapped discs that become trapped due to the disc that you place that TURN. This is important as when the board becomes filled up, you will flip a disc to black and this would mean that no doubt some further white discs would be trapped between that flipped disc and others in another direction. However you can only claim discs that are trapped by an unbroken line of sight between the new disc placed and any discs on the board.

              Secondly moving on from the first point is the issue that you can claim any trapped disc that becomes trapped as long as it is in direct sight with an existing one in all directions (so horizontal, vertical and diagonal). Therefore a good move can be placing a disc where you can turn over multiple discs in more than one direction so that you can trap and claim a maximum number of discs.

              Thirdly, as I have mentioned you continue playing the game in alternate turns until the board is filled. Should an opponent not be able to play a legal move, then the other player can continue placing discs on the board until a legal move is available. It is possible therefore for a player to have to pass a number of times. The game has then finished when all of the board has been filled (or sometimes when neither player has a legal move left to make),

              WINNING THE GAME:

              Winning the game is simple. Once all of the discs have been placed and the game has finished, you count up all of the discs of your colour and the player with the most discs wins! (For all you excellent maths people our there you will no doubt have already worked out that if the board is full, then the person with more than 33 discs in their colour will have won! And that obviously a draw is possible with this game.)

              STRATEGY OF THE GAME:

              Now as you can see, the game is obviously very easy to play and understand and allows you to get playing very quickly. However it takes some time to work out the best future strategy as you begin to play the game.

              Some quick tips for you:

              1.) Go for the corners. It is clear that anyone who has a corner can no longer be flipped as that piece cannot be trapped. Therefore the corners are very often vital to winning the game. Therefore it is very important that you do not easily give away a corner by allowing your opponent to trap one of your pieces by placing his in a corner (obviously this is not always possible, but you should try to limit their opportunities and gain them for yourself).
              2.) Try to get your pieces on the edges. The edges are usually very important as you can sometimes trap complete rows by placing your disc on an edge. This can allow you win the game in the long run, but beware that you do not lose all your edge pieces by your opponent gaining a corner piece (although if you keep control of the centre of the board this can still be OK).
              3.) Sometimes the immediate placing a disc that allows you to trap and flip a large number of your opponent’s disc is not always the best move. You should always think ahead a couple of moves (or at least at what your opponents options will be) because if by his next move he can immediately place a disc and trap all of the discs you just turned (and maybe more) then it is pointless you making the previous move unless you can get a clearer advantage in the future again. Basically like all games you need to start getting in the habit of thinking some good two or three moves ahead.
              4.) When placing your disc make certain that you flip all discs that you legally can. In other words make certain that you check horizontally, vertically and diagonally to make certain that you have not trapped other pieces then the ones that you first saw.

              There are so many things that are important to learn but you will pick these up as you go along. All in all Othello is a very easy game to play and very enjoyable.

              MY OPINION OF THE GAME:

              As you will no doubt of realised by the attention that I have given above is that I absolutely love this game. I have been playing it from quite a young age (definitely from before the recommended age barrier) and have loved it ever since. It is such an easy game to learn and fun to play that I recommend it to all parents as you can spend some quality time with your children while having fun and they have a chance to actually beat you (unlike chess where an absolute beginning should never beat an experienced player, with Othello there is a chance). One of the things that I always enjoyed when I was growing up was that my parents always had time for me and played games with me and my brother and sister. I think this helped us as a family grow together and certainly allowed my parents to teach me good behaviour and good sportsmanship. Don’t take me wrong, I am very competitive, I love to win and hate to lose, but try to do both while staying a good sport, but I am slowly moving away from the point of this review so will stop there!

              Othello is quite a fast game to play as it does not take long to either set it up or actually play it and therefore can be good to fill in some time when you need something to do.

              As there are a number of discs and they need to stay on the squares where they are placed, this is not a game to play when travelling. I do not know whether there is a travel version, but would not recommend playing the normal version when in a car as the discs would just slide everywhere and make playing it very hard.

              Over the years I have enjoyed this game and become reasonably good at it because I think a number of moves ahead, I still enjoy playing it with anyone as you still do get beaten. So there is always a level of competition within Othello that does not matter as much as to how experienced you are.

              All in all Othello is a fun and great game to play and I recommend it to everyone. Hope you enjoyed this rather long review in the end and I look forward to reading any of your comments.

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                21.04.2003 06:37
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                ~0~ OTHELLO ~0~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Othello is a board game , that has just turned 31 years old . I actually learnt to play this game when doing a computer course way back in 1981 . In those days , when we had some spare time , we would load up an early version of this game and enjoy many a game or two . Them days we had the latest in computers to learn and play on , just imagine , a Commodore Pet , c/w built-in 8" black and white screen , 8 k ( not meg ) of RAM , and a processor with a speed of 1 htz ( a year later we had 16k RAM and a colour screen ! ) - however with even such rudiments by todays standards , the game was playable . Since then I have continued to play Othello on both Macinosh and Oric computers on a regular basis ( Oric - 16 colours , 48 k , 1 htz cpu ) , and now I've found a PC ( Windows ) version . ~0~ The History bit ~0~ It was invented by a Japanese game enthusiast by the name of Goro Hasegawa in 1971 , inspired by the classic board game of Reversi , which itself is based on the ancient Japanese game of GO. Hasegawa designed the game keeping the element of statergy , but allowing for a novice to quickly understand the game in principle . He named the game after Shakespears classic play , and during the year of 1971 released the game , organized the Japan Othello Association and held the first national tournament in April of that year. However it was not until 1976 that Othello was introduced to the rest of the world . ~0~ Did you know that .... ~0~ ( stats from the web site - see later ) 1) Othello is the only licensed game in the World to host 23 consecutive World Championship tournaments. 2) In 1979, during the Third World Othello Championship in Rome, a private audience with the Pope was arranged, where a custom-made Othello was presented to the Pope who is a big fan of Othello and plays the game frequently for mental stimulation and relaxation. 3
                ) Othello is the best-selling licensed strategy game in the World , having sold over 30 million units worldwide , since its release . 4) Today, there are over 15 national Othello Associations throughout the World ~0~ Enough of the history ~0~ Okay , enough remenisining , while doing a little shopping at Tesco's the other day , imagine my surprise to find the Mattel boxed version for sale , and at a stupid price of just £5.00 . I just had to snap one up . I have since perused the caalogues of Index and Argos , yet sadly they no longer seem to sell this game. ~0~ The Game ~0~ One sentence ( emblazoned on the box lid ) says it all , " A minute to learn , a lifetime to master " . In proof of the initial statement , I sat down with my two boys ( aged 9 and 13 ) and taught them how to play in less than 10 minutes , and now it seems they want to play every five minutes of the day . ~0~ Inside The Box ~0~ 1 * playing board comprising of 2 counter holders and 8 * 8 velour covered contoured board , 64 reversable black/white counters , 8 rubber feet ( you have to attach these to the board yourself ( 30 seconds ) ) , instructions c/w examples . ~0~ Object ~0~ To trap your opponents counters between yours , from a set starting point, either horizontally , diagonally , vertically or a combination of these . Once caught they are flipped and become your counters . Counters continually change throughout a game , and at the end , the person with the most counters wins . It really is that simple . ~0~ Stratergies ~0~ This is where the ' lifetime to master ' bit comes in . Taking the most is not always a good thing . Corners are highly desirable , and give you a strong taking position ( you can however hold all four corners , yet still lose a game ) . Forcing a apponent to take can win you many a game . The more you play , the more you learn . ~0~ Number of
                players / age suggestions / game length ~0~ A two player game , that on average will last between 10 and twenty minutes - the time depends on each players ability to stratergise / think ahead . An age of 8+ is recommended . ~0~ Other uses ~0~ Want a change , then use the board and half the counters to play draughts ( it will be necessary to to mark some counters with for example small round cloured stickers , to provide the King counters ) . Alternatively , use all the counters and play a game of 4/5 in a row , or even noughts and crosses ( white = 0 , black = X ) . ~0~ The Web Address ~0~ www.mattelothello.com . Type this into your browser and you are taken to the official site , which is well designed , pleasing to the eye and even animated for your pleasure .From here you can..... 1) Play a game . Three levels are available , Beginner , Intermediate , Advanced , and each play a strong game for that level . I have managed to beat it a advanced . The game is Macromedia shockwave based , and is fully animated - well worth playing . 2) Enter the site . From here you have the following choices : a) Introduction b) Animated help ( useful for beginners ) c) Product range ( details of the various games available to buy ) d) Getting serious ( the list of worldwide Othello associations ) e) Did you Know ( the history of the game ) f) E-mail challenge ( yep you can play by email , after a simple registration ( username , password , email address ) ) . ~0~ Overview ~0~ So there you have it , checkout the web site , learn to play then play a game , if you see what you like , go buy the game . Othello is a great game to play , simple to learn and a game you can play with family and friends alike .

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                  14.03.2002 01:42
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                  There`s not many board games that can keep me interested for long, and apart from scrabble, othello is the only one I`ll play regularly without getting bored. Othello is a strategic board game and is played on a green felt covered board that is divided into a grid of 64 squares. To play the game you use reversible counters, the counters are black one side, and white on the other side. When not in use, the counters are stored in two little wells at the side of the board, these wells have a flip over cover that clicks into place to stop you from losing them. Unlike chess it only takes a minute to learn how to play othello, but it takes a lifetime to master the game properly. Othello was invented by a Japanese games enthusiast called Goro Hasegawa in 1971 and is also sometimes known as Reversi. It is the best-selling licensed strategy game in the world and you can play on the proper board or you can log onto the internet and play online or by e-mail. The Pope is a big fan of othello and plays for mental stimulation. The game is for two players, and to start each player chooses whether they want to be black or white. The aim of the game is to turn over counters on the board so most of them are your colour. The Rules Once you have chosen your colour, you each place two of your counters on the board. The counters are placed on the central four squares on the grid, black diagonal to black, and white diagonal to white. Black always goes first. You place another counter on the board so that you trap your opponent`s counters. This means that if you are the black counter you have to place it on the board next to a white one, but there must already be another black counter on the board opposite the one you have just placed. When you have trapped an opponent`s counter, you then turn it over so that it is the same colour as your own. Try and trap as many counters in one go as you can. For example, if there is a black cou
                  nter down with four white ones next to it, you then place another black one down opposite the black one already down to be able to trap all four. You can play a move either sideways, lengthways or diagonally. If it comes to a point in the game where you can`t trap any of your opponent`s counters, then you have to miss a turn. The game finishes when neither player can make any more moves.The player with the most counters of their colour on the board is the winner. If you can get a lot of your counters along the edges and in the four corners, then you will have an advantage over your opponent. Never play your turn hastily without thinking it over properly, always try to think ahead. Look at all the places where you can play your counter and work out whether your opponent can gain from you putting it in a certain place. This is a very hard game to describe to someone who hasn`t seen it without actually having a board in front of you, so I hope all this made sense. The more you play othello the more you will learn. As you get better at playing you will discover more new tactics to use. Nobody could ever be an expert at this game because even the best of players will always find some new tactic whenever they play. I`m not too sure how much this game is new because I paid £1 for mine at a car boot sale. It`s a very enjoyable game to play if you like strategy games, but you`ll need peace and quiet because it requires a lot of concentration. My best ever game was when I managed to turn the entire board into my colour before the board was fully used up, I bet I`ll never manage that again. The only disadvantage I can really find to othello, is that it`s too easy to knock the counters out of the way because the outline of the grid isn`t raised like it is on a deluxe scrabble board. It doesn`t matter if you are new to the game and you are playing against somebody more experienced because it`s more do
                  wn to luck than judgement, know matter how good you are you`ll never be able to spot every available move on the board, so it`s so easy for your opponent to suddenly take control of the game. Othello is made by Mattel and is available from most toy shops, but because it`s been around for quite a while you`ll often find it second hand in charity shops and car boot sales like I did.

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                    13.06.2001 03:32
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                    Othello is a board game which is striking in its simplicity but difficult to master. It started life in the late 19th century under the name Reversi but was resurrected in its more commercial format and name in the 1970s. The game is for two players and the equipment consists of a 64 space board, all squares the same colour, and 64 reversible pieces, black one side and white on the other. The game starts with each player laying two pieces in the centre four squares and from then the game begins in earnest. After the first four are played the next piece must be laid in such a way that it captures one or more of the opponent's pieces in a straight line between that piece and another of the player's own. Any such pieces caught between these two are then turned over to become the laying player's colour. Play continues like this in alternate turns. It is fairly obvious that at the beginning of the game the first few plays are only like to "convert" one or two pieces at a time, but of course as the game continues the numbers increase. This is where you get to what I think is one of the few downsides to this game, turning the pieces. Remember, you have to turn over all pieces "captured", so later in the game, if you play a new piece near a corner you could be turning over four or five on a horizontal file, four or five on a vertical file and four or five on the diagonal. Next turn your opponent might end up turning most of them back again! Very fiddly. That said, it's a great game for kids. Although expert players at this are obviously going to wipe the floor with kids, us lesser mortals are almost as likely to have the the dirty done to us. Children are very quick on the uptake and they have a refreshing way of looking at their strategy. I think one of the things about Othello which appeals to them is the element of surpise. It is perfectly possible for one person to be miles ahead until a few plays f
                    rom the end and then lose the whole game on a couple of turns. I have never picked up a great deal of the strategy, the only advice that I give newcomers is to try to avoid the four squares one space diagonally in from each corner. Place a piece there and your opponent is likely to gain the corner. A piece in the corner cannot be converted as nobody can get to the other side of it, so these are four key squares. Othello is an enjoyable game to play and there are also travel versions of it available. I bought one but would not recommend it. If you can imagine trying to play a game involving 64 fiddly plastic pieces, each about the size of a 5p coin, on a board about 4 or 5 inches square, on the table of a train travelling at speed; you get the idea? Don't let that put you off the full size version however, played with the right size set it is an absorbing game and fun for all the family.

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                      22.04.2001 06:32
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                      The premise behind the game of Othello is a simple one, but one which hides a much deeper, more strategic game beneath it. As a game Othello has been around for ages, coming by other names such as Reversi, so you may have played it, or a version of it without ever realising it, although 'Othello' is the generally accepted name of the game. How To Play Othello is a game for 2 players with simple rules. At the start of the game you are presented with a blank board upon which there are spaces for coloured discs. Each player must lay down a disc which will enclose the disc of the opponent between that and another of his/her discs either in a horizontal, vertical or diagonal direction. The enclosed opponent discs are then flipped over to reveal the alternative colour - thus becoming your disc. This continues until the board is full. The idea is that the player must turn all of the pieces to his own colour - or at least more than his opponent does. So Is It Fun? This sounds simple and more suited to children than to adults but there you would be wrong. This is one of the most strategic games there are, standing comfortably alongside chess and kicking checkers into touch with ease. Its incredibly simple to pick up and play, yet to be good at the game, you'll need to learn some of the tricks and strategies to use - and that will take some time. Its great fun, and suitable for children as well as adults due to the simplicity of the rules although in a world of video games and television its appealt o children is probably quite limited. Conclusion Yes its fun, heavy on the strategy and requires concentration though, but if thats your thing, then check it out.

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