Welcome! Log in or Register

Parker Trivial Pursuit Master Game Genus Edition

  • image
£9.09 Best Offer by: amazon.co.uk Marketplace See more offers
10 Reviews

Brand: Parker

  • Sort by:

    * Prices may differ from that shown

  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    10 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      23.11.2012 22:30
      Very helpful
      (Rating)

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      A popular family quiz game

      Each Christmas the board games come out in our house! One old favourite which we have been playing for over 20 years is Trivial Pursuit. We have bought DVD and game console versions of the game but I don't think the original board game can be beaten.

      There are many types of this game to be found including a junior edition, tv edition and editions focusing on certain years or decades but we have the Genus Edition in a box like the one pictured. We have bought a couple of boxes of new questions over the years. The price of the game seems to vary dramatically from £7 or £8 for a used game up to £60-70 for a collectible edition.

      The game was created in 1981 and released in 1982. Some of the original questions were a bit difficult for the younger players which is why we bought some new cards. When it's us oldies playing we still like to have a go with the original cards.

      The game can be played individually or in teams, when the kids were younger we used to play in teams to make it easier for them but these days we play individually. You can play with between 2 and 6 players or teams.
      Each player or team chooses a coloured pie. In this pie are 6 holes to place your wedges. You need to have a wedge of each colour to complete your pie, each colour represents a different category. Blue is Geography, Orange is Sport & Leisure, Brown is Art & Literature, Green is Science & Nature, Yellow is History and Pink represents Entertainment. There are thousands and thousands of questions as each card contains a question and answer from each category.

      You need to roll a die and move your empty pie the amount of spaces shown on the die, you may choose the direction so you can choose between a couple of categories to receive a question on. There are 6 large coloured spaces on the board which represent the 'wedge' questions, one for each coloured wedge. If you land on this space and correctly answer the question in that category you receive a wedge to place in your counter. When all 6 have been collected you must try and roll to reach the center of the board where the opposition can choose a category to question you on. If you answer correctly you will have won the game.
      Your turn keeps going until you answer a question incorrectly which means if somebody is really good their turn could last quite some time. Your turn ends when you collect a wedge though which means one player couldn't finish before others get a chance to answer questions.

      I think because of the varied categories this game is really good and fair because there's always one category somebody is really going to want to avoid.
      Also with having to end on the center space it could take a long time to roll the correct number to reach this space.

      The length of the game depends on how many are playing and how good they are at answering the questions. We normally get a good couple of hours out of a game when there are a few playing and we always get a good laugh out of some of the ridiculous guesses people make at the answer.

      We have found this game much better since purchasing extra question cards as the older ones were too hard for the younger bunch to know. The more recent questions makes it fairer and a better game to be enjoyed by all ages.

      Although the electronic versions for this game are good there's nothing like the satisfaction you get of physically placing your little plastic wedge into the counter! This game is definitely of my family and one I would recommend.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
    • More +
      17.02.2012 01:42
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      2 Comments

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      An excellent, challenging game for those of you who think you have great general knowledge

      Coming from a large family competitiveness is bread within each of us and sadly this extends to board games. Often, we will watch a day-time TV show such as 'Pointless', 'Perfection', or 'The Chase' and all argue over who is right, who is winning in terms of points, and then from there one person (more often than not my Dad) will argue that winning in this game makes them the most intelligent person in the room. General knowledge is key to surviving in my house without being looked upon as though you were a simpleton, and so I have never not known a time in which we haven't owned one version of Trivial Pursuit.

      The basic premise of the game is to answer a question that corresponds with the colour you landed on, so for example if you were to land on a green square you would answer a green question which would be Sport and Leisure. The answers to the questions on that card are printed on the reverse side, and so when playing with sneaky people it becomes necessary to shield this part so as to prevent cheating, something I learnt a long time a ago. You then keep rolling the dice and doing this until you have filled your gamepiece with 6 wedges, meaning you have answered questions correctly from each of the sections.

      The sections include:
      Geography (blue), Entertainment (pink), History (yellow), Arts & Literature (brown), Science & Nature (green), and Sports & Leisure (orange)
      however, the colour may range according to which version you are playing, this is based on the Genus version.

      The version with which I grew up with focused more so on questions that relate to when my parents were young. This gave them an unfair advantage and made winning even more sweet. Since then, there have been a number of other editions released, including some specialised ones such as a Juniors, Disney, 1960s/1980s/1990s and even a Star Wars version. Whilst this may not necessarily relate to this particular version of Trivial Pursuit, and I have not played any of these version, I thought it worthy of note in case you wanted to understand the huge diversity in topic and questions Trivial Pursuit exhibits.

      Trivial Pursuit is somewhat expensive to me, a lowly student, although it is well worth the money. I managed to pick myself up a modern version to replace my Family's decade old version for around £30-40 in WHSmith which was reasonable considering the amount of entertainment our family in particular has gotten from it. Two or more players can play, with a total of six wheel pieces, however we often play as 'teams' of two if there are more of us, or simply have singles vs couples and so on.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        23.01.2012 09:24
        Very helpful
        (Rating)
        1 Comment

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        Works well

        In my vast collection of Trivia and quiz related bits and bobs I have a fair amount of board games. I enjoy nothing more than sitting down together with family and friends and spending the night with the board game. My favourite series has always been Trivial Pursuit and I got two versions of the game recently, one of which I reviewed earlier in the year (Bet You Know It) but this Master Edition is by far my favourite,

        First off it is probably worth stating that I am a general knowledge buff. I love quizzing and if you have seen my quiz book reviews on here in the past you probably will have a fair idea about that. Its more than a hobby to me in many ways!

        The Master Edition is really the ultimate edition of Trivial Pursuit aimed at people with a higher average general knowledge. There are some easier questions in here which I will talk about later but generally this is aimed at the people likely to be at the higher end of pub quiz final standings.

        The concept is the same as always, two to six players can play (or teams if you decide to do it that way) and you have to move around the board based on dice rolls answering questions and collecting wedges. You keep going until you are wrong and you only earn a wedge on the wedge square. Your aim is to collect one of each coloured wedge each being a different subject....i.e. Sports and Leisure, History, Arts, Science and Nature, Entertainment and Geography and make it back to the middle for the final question.

        You get 3,000 questions here which is a good total but if you play time and time again you will soon get repetition. The cards are well written questions though and although this series has got bad press in the past for having wrong answers on the cards, this version appears to have none, or certainly none I have come across. They are all testing, well written questions.

        There is an issue of balance though. Of the 3,000 questions I would say maybe 2,500 are of the same level, master level and hard. However thrown into the mix are around 500 questions that are basic general knowledge, in other words everyone is going to know. That's where the luck comes in. You land on a wedge and get one of these you are getting a cheap wedge....have one of these as the final question and it ruins the ending to the game but this is just one minor flaw as on the whole everything works fine.

        Who is it aimed at? As I said children and teenagers may struggle with this and indeed many adults will. Its not a casual board game at all, if you want that buy the Bet You Know it Version!. This is for serious players of general knowledge titles and trivia buffs and on that front its marvellous!

        You would expect this for £30-£40 and this is how much you will pay! Its an expensive set but well worth it. As close to a tough general knowledge board game you are ever likely to get and even though its tough it can be enjoyed by all and will last hours.

        Also on CIAO

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
        • More +
          03.01.2011 18:24
          Very helpful
          (Rating)
          3 Comments

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          Old classic game, much loved in our family

          Trivial Pursuit is made by Parker, I am rating the Genus edition, however, many editions are now available for play.

          Well, Trivial Pursuit, is a game for 2 to 36 players, the Genus edition is for ages 15 to adult, and boasts a whopping 4.800 questions in the game.

          This is a quiz game, you can either play individually, or, if large numbers can make up teams, as the box states up to 36 players this would make a team of 6 players.

          There are 6 counters coloured blue, pink, yellow, orange, green and brown. Each player or team would select a counter to play with.

          The object of the game is simply, roll the dice, land on a category and answer as many questions as you can (each time you answer correctly you keep rolling) and you need to aim for a wedge space, which if you answer correctly while on that space, you will earn yourself a wedge, or cheese, or piece of pie........they have been named all of these in our games. You need to answer a question on each wedge space to earn that colour wedge (wedges are available in same 6 colours as the counters and colour also relate to different categories). Once you have filled your counter with all 6 different coloured wedge pieces, you then have to aim for the centre of the board, once there, it is for your opposition to decide which category of question you will need to answer, so beware, they will be looking for your weakness. If you answer that correctly, you or your team are deemed the overall winner.

          categories are:
          Blue - Geography
          Pink - Entertainment
          Yellow - History
          Brown - Art & Literature
          Green - Science and Nature
          Orange - Sports and Leisure

          Games in my household can go on for hours, so I presume maybe we are not that bright for Genus edition, however, we always enjoy a game of this, and perfect when there are a few people round, some can get quite competitive, but, is all fun in my eyes.

          This is a classic board game but, other trivial pursuits games on offer are Family edition, annual edition, kids edition to name a couple. They seem to keep making new editions, which, all you need are the question cards as the board can be used for all editions.

          A perfect way to spend hours of fun with family and friends, love this game.

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments
          • More +
            18.06.2010 11:39
            Very helpful
            (Rating)

            Advantages

            Disadvantages

            Great game that really puts you to the test in terms of intelligence

            Trivial Pursuit is a game that has been played for years firstly when I lived in my parent's house and now in my own when I have friends round and we also have breaks at work every now and again to answer a few questions. It must be one of the most famous board games that has been invented and is fantastic for learning something new. There are different formats of the game and this particular version is the Master Game Genius edition which I think is one of the most challenging and hardest. This can be frustrating but at the same time makes things more interesting as it's not as easy to get round the board.

            So Trivial Pursuit for me is the ultimate quiz game and the one I always turn to if anyone wants to play that sort of game. I have had this version for many years now and can't remember what I paid for it back then but nowadays you should be able to pick it up for just over £10 if you shop around. I think that's quite reasonable when you compare it to other games on the market.

            For anyone who doesn't know or has been living in a cave for years, the idea of the game is move around the board and answer questions as you go along from different categories you land on. So for example, if you land on a square with a yellow piece of pie then you get asked a History question from the next card in the deck of question cards. If you get a question right you then can keep going and throw the dice again. The board is in the shape of a wheel and there is a section in the middle. You have to get round the board and pick up the different coloured segments to fill in your pie piece. There are six to get and when you have them all that can take some time, you have to get to the middle for one final question chosen at random to win the game.

            You get to answer questions on History, Entertainment, Geography Art and Literature, Science and Nature and Sport and Leisure so you need to know a fair cross-section of general knowlede to win. I used to rely on sport and leisure but at some point you have to get the other categories.

            There a huge amount of question cards too that will last a long time and you can top up with new question packs if you need extra questions. For me this is a great board game that is a classic and should be around and popular for years to come.

            Comments

            Login or register to add comments
          • More +
            17.06.2010 20:25
            Very helpful
            (Rating)
            14 Comments

            Advantages

            Disadvantages

            Favourite Quiz Game

            As someone who regularly attends pub-quizzes, I often enjoy a game of 'Trivial Pursuit' in an attempt to better my general knowledge. If you've never played the game, the rules are pretty simple, with the basic emphasis on answering questions in six different categories; Geography, Entertainment, History, Arts & Literature, Science & Nature, and Sport & Leisure. To begin, each player is given their own 'wheel', a small plastic playing piece which is divided into sections. The aim of the game is to fill the wheel with six different coloured wedges, each representing the aforementioned question categories. The player has a chance to gain a wedge when they land on a wedge space, of which there are six on the board.

            Players start in the middle of the board, and roll a dice to determine how many spaces are moved around the playing area. The game is finished when a players collects all their requited wedges for all the categories and subsequently navigates their way back to the centre space and answers a final question (of their opponents choice of category).

            Even though my description of the rules may sound a little long-winded, Trivial Pursuit is generally a straightforward game to play - that said, there are a few nuances which should be observed. Most importantly, if a player gives a wrong answer, the 'correct' answer shouldn't be disclosed (no matter how much the opposing player begs) and in this way, you'll get more use from the questions.

            I remember my parents owning Trivial Pursuit when I was growing up - and being quite young I couldn't answer many of the questions when I was given the chance to play. One night, I took one of the question boxes and learned all of the answers (what a naughty whipper-snapper I was!). Next time I played, it appeared like my general knowledge had magically and exponentially increased - my parents must have thought I was a question-answering-child-prodigy (although it soon became obvious as to what I had done... not many eleven year olds know that a polyorchid man has three testicles).

            Although there are many versions of Trivial Pursuit available ('Family', 'Kids', 'Music', 'Entertainment' etc) the Genus edition of the game is without doubt my favourite, due to the fact that the questions are the most difficult. That said, in more recent years, the game does seem to have been 'dumbed down', with the emphasis shifting to more celebrity-based and popular culture questions. As a result, Trivial Pursuit has undoubtedly become easier, and represents a lesser challenge that it did in the past. Similarly the latest version of the game has only 2,400 questions - and although this may sound like a lot, many of the older incarnations of the game had in the region of 6,000.

            Personally find the game is great to play with the family (especially when you've had a few drinks), although it can lead to arguments which generally relate to the amount of time certain people take to answer their questions. As a result, I would recommend introducing a time limit for answering (perhaps a minute or so), and this will all but alleviate the frustration of having to wait too long for your go! In terms of its accessibility, although the Genus edition is the adult version of the game, I would say it's suitable for ages ten and up - and it's a certainly a great way to expand ones general knowledge.

            Trivial Pursuit's Genus Edition can currently be purchased from amazon.co.uk for £10.99.

            Comments

            Login or register to add comments
              More Comments
            • More +
              14.06.2010 15:32
              Very helpful
              (Rating)
              1 Comment

              Advantages

              Disadvantages

              A great game that can be played with anyone

              Ever since I can remember trivial pursuit has been the centre of any of my family get togethers, as I'm the only one in my family who drinks it's generally play the pursuit or sit in slightly uncomfortable silence attempting to make small talk....trivial pursuit it is then.

              For anyone who has never heard of TP before, it is a game played on a board with a maximum of six different players (there are six coloured moving counters).

              You can also club together into teams, 2 lots of 3, 3 lots of 2 or if you've got one genius and five dullards you can go all Vs 1. While it is a board game you could just as easily play without it, if you've lost the board or more likely want to play it in cramped conditions (i'e a plane journey) you can just assign each category a number on the dice, when that number is rolled a question on the corresponding topic is asked.

              You can then decide what system you want to put in place for getting pie (or cheese) questions, something like rolling the same number twice in a row. These are questions that when answered correctly give the player a small plastic wedge to place in their counter, first to 6 and back into the middle of the board wins. Unless you're playing without the board then just first to 6 pie pieces would be fine.

              The board looks a bit like the spoked wheel of a wagon. A large outer circle with 'spokes' of single spaces leading to the middle. The wheel is comprised of a sequence of coloured squares with a 'pie' question dotted around every few squares.

              What makes this game great is when you split off into teams, as there are six very different categories of question: Sport, geography, Science & Nature, Arts & Literature, Entertainment and History. It's great when a question comes up that appeals to your specialised topic, for me as I am an astronomer I always pray for science and nature, and more specifically a question about space. Then again I struggle with geography which is a subject my brother is very keen on, so providing you've got a balanced team you should have no troubles beating your relatives into submission.

              This wouldn't be a very good board game if there wasn't at least a small degree of luck, while it's a lot less luck reliant than say monopoly or other such games it does use dice as a means of determining moves, so I've been involved in games where my team has actually answered more correct questions but have failed to land on the all important pie square and so have lost the game.

              There are hundreds of cards each with one question from each of the six categories on it, I have played TP roughly about a billion times over the years and have not received the same question twice (or if I have it's been so long since I got it that I've completely frorgotten it).

              When you add all the variations to boards and questions you can buy, such as star wars board & question sets amongst many others, you have a great experience thats perfect for family occasions, playing with some friends or any grouping of people more than just you, in fact even if you don't have any friends or family to play with (I hope theres no one who this applies to) but if you don't then you can even have a go by yourself, just invent new ways to play it, like trying to set a personal best for how many questions you can answer in a row, or trying to become master of one specific subject by answering all the questions on that subject that you can.

              When playing in large family groups things can usually get somewhat heated (in my family anyway and I'm sure I'm not the only one). As the last thing you want is to look stupid in front of distant family relatives who you hardly ever see ;^P

              Trivial Pursuit is one of those games that I always sarcastically think to myself 'oh yipee trivial pursuit, I'm so glad none of my family drinks alcohol, this should be an exciting night' only to get half way through a game and notice that I am completely embroiled in the game, eager to beat my stuck up head misstress of an aunt (her profession as well as her personality type) who generally looks down on anyone less educated than herself.

              I whole heartedly reccomend trivial pursuit as it can be such a different experience depending on who you're playing with, as mentioned earlier, if you're playing with relatives the game takes on an urgency and the atmosphere is usually tense and fraught with a competitive frustration, but if you're playing with some mates and a cold beer or several, things take on a more relaxed feel with less competition and more camaraderie, with different teams impressed at the wealth of information displayed by eachother or having a light hearted joke as you fluff it up completely and get a really simple question wrong.

              Whoever you're playing with Trivial Pursuit will appeal to you if you are into game shows, into intellectualism, into beating the snot out of your piers or just love to be a show off (come on, you know who you are 8^P).

              Five stars from me as everytime I play it I am once again suprised by just how much fun it is. The questions are tough but generally not obscure and when they are obscure and you alone know the answer you can feel even more clever with yourself.

              Once you get board (pardon the pun) of playing the regular way you can always try one of these made up variations that add a bit of life to the game and stop it getting too stale.

              Countdown: A simple twist on the formula ensures this game mode will not drag on for the whole evening, each team has only X amount of throws of the dice, the winner is not the one with the most pie pieces but the ones who have answered the most questions correctly.

              What's The Point: Similar to countdown but each question is assigned a points value, regular square is 1 point, pie square is 3 points, the winner is the one who accrues the most points before their final throw.

              Countdown, T Minus 10: This mode is identical to What's The Point but incorrect answers are penalised with a minus point, regular incorrect answer -1 point and incorrect pie answer -2 points.

              Lap It Up: This game differs only slightly from the original, a counter must do at least two laps of the board then return to the centre before it can receive any pie pieces.

              Up & Down: For those who want an epic of a game just play as usual but when all pie pieces are inserted you simply keep playing, landing on a pie square and answering correctly will remove one piece of pie, the winner is the first to both fill up and then completely empty their pie of pieces before returning to the centre square and answering one final question for the win.

              Comments

              Login or register to add comments
              • More +
                05.05.2010 15:01
                2 Comments

                Advantages

                Disadvantages

                The Game every one must have played/owned, for intellegent fun for all the family!

                Trivial Pursuit Genus edition is now considered a family heirloom, it is brought you on those occasions when slightly intelligent guests are here, when we've just finished watching university challenge and feel semi-clever or when there really isn't anything on TV.

                Trivial pursuit is a game aimed to test general knowledge in a variety of questions, a bit like a pub quiz at home.
                People may play in teams or individually.
                Each player receives a 'pie', a plastic cylinder with wedges to fit in. Each time a player answers a question right in a particular category they receive the colour for that category to place in their pie.
                A player will continue to answer questions from a designated question asker, until they get an answer wrong, in which case the questions move on to the next player.
                The Winner is the player with the first complete pie i.e. the first to answer a question correctly for all the categories.

                The Game comes in a rather large evergreen box, although this has stood the test of time it is rather heavy and cumbersombe, so not advisable for traveling/holiday. Although I think there is a travel trivial pursuit available, this may be better.

                It contains 2 packs of question cards, the board, 2 die and the plastic coloured pies in a sealed plastic bag.
                The catergories are:
                Geography (blue)
                Entertainment (pink)
                History (yellow)
                Arts and Literature (brown)
                Science and Nature(green)
                Sport and Leisure (orange)

                However a player can only receive 1 peice of pie for each category, therefore can not collect 2 sports pie wedges. When a correct answer is given, the player rolls the die and then gets to move left or right (Or up/down depending where they are on the board).
                The board is split into tiles, one for each category. It is set out in a circular fashion with radials of tiles also into the middle. This provides added interest as its not the simple start to finish boardgame design.

                The cards are cased in cardboard box type things with a base and then a pull off lid. This means even after 30 years of use ours are still in good condition. There are 2 such cases of cards, which is great if playing in two teams, as each team can have a case of cards to ask the other team (no question of cheating then!) The questions are displayed on one side of the card and answers on the other. Each card contains one question from each category.

                This is an exciting, intellectual game which we always enjoy playing.
                The game is desribed as for age +15 and up. This is about right as the questions are quite difficult, however if an adult and child are playing in a team, (much more sociable!) this may not be applied.

                One noticeable downside is that this game was published about 30 years ago and so the questions are quite outdated for the younger generation, although rather nostalgic for the older!

                I think at £11.45 this is rather expensive for an outdated game. I love the game for the memories, but I think if buying one now, I would advise buying a more up to date version

                Comments

                Login or register to add comments
                • More +
                  22.09.2009 11:43
                  Very helpful
                  (Rating)

                  Advantages

                  Disadvantages

                  Trivial Pursuit never goes out of fashion and is a game that almost anyone can play.

                  A game of general knowledge, I play Trivial Pursuit at least once a month. This version was released in 1981, I think, and it's fair to say that the questions, as a result, can sometimes be very out-of-date.

                  The game can be played with any number of players (minimum of two) which you can split into a maximum of six teams. The idea of the game is to win all six "cheeses" (or "slices of cake"!) for your counter by answering questions on a variety of topics, and then getting your counter into the centre of the board to correctly answer one final question in order to win the game.

                  This game is great for killing an hour or two during a slow evening or weekend. It is good for exercising your brain and will bring out the most competitive side of you. It also good as a learning tool, as I often retain the information I glean from it.

                  There are loads of different versions of Trivial Pursuit but this is the original and probably least complex. There are hundreds of question cards, with each card having six questions (one from each of the six main topics), so you can play this game quite a bit before coming across the same question twice. You can also buy updated question card packs which is a every good idea now that the questions are about 27 years old! It's not so relevant for the Literature questions but would definitely be a help for the History and Geography questions.

                  Comments

                  Login or register to add comments
                • More +
                  14.04.2009 13:27
                  Very helpful
                  (Rating)

                  Advantages

                  Disadvantages

                  The original and the best!!

                  This is a game that yone should have - its the sort of game that comes out on a sauturday evening often with friends especially when someone makes a comment about knowing more than someone else.

                  Most people like a quiz and this is the ultimate quiz game. There are lots of different versions out there now but this is the first, the original and in my opinion still the best.

                  I have had my version for over 20 years now so some of the questions are a little bit dated but there is still lots of value in it. When this game first came out it was a craze that swept the nation and for a boardgame it was really expensive - I'm sure I paid over £20 which at the time was a considerable chunk of my pocket money at the time.

                  The aim of the game is to move around the board answering questions, the board is set out in the shape of a wheel and at each spoke intersection, if you land on it then you get to answer a "wedge" question. If you get this right then you get to put the wedge of the corresponding colour in your wheel.

                  The colours relate to the section of the questions.
                  Yellow - History
                  Pink - Entertainment
                  Blue - Geography
                  Brown - Art and Literature
                  Green - Science and nature
                  Orange - Sport and Leisure

                  Once you have filled your wheel up with all the colours you can try to land in the centre. When you do the other players choose the category for you to answer questions on - if you get it right then you are the WINNER!! and you have the bragging rights for the next few days anyway!!

                  Great fun and a game that will last forever

                  Comments

                  Login or register to add comments