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Hinari HB174 Breadmaker

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16 Reviews
  • pretty tasteless!
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      12.01.2010 23:11
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      good for that fresh bread smell in the morning.

      This is my second Hinari breadmaker. I can't remember what model number my previous one was sorry.

      Firstly it was incredibly easy to use. Wet ingredients first and then dry and you can't go wrong. Pay very close attention to requested measurements though as results vary greatly with the slightest adjustment.

      Cleaning is not too tricky as long as you aim correctly when putting in the ingredients. The baking tin and kneader remove fully to be placed in the washing up bowl but the breadmaker oven needs to be wiped in situ and can suffer from burnt flour residue if this does not happen.

      My first one worked wonderfully until all of a sudden any bread I tried to make stopped rising. I was doing nothing different with the ingredients so this was a mystery to me.
      Eventually the dreaded "EO1" flashing beeping notification started on the viewing panel. The instruction booklet does not give you any help on how to sort this particular fault just stating call manufacturer. As it was out of warranty I sent it to the garage with all my other failed electrical appliances.

      I was then given this version the 'HINARI HB174' as a gift from someone who realised how important my breadmaker was to me. It has again produced some great results from the accompanying booklet (which is a little thin) and once you have the basic recipe cracked you can throw in pretty much anything you want to flavor it with from herbs to roast garlic.
      The loaf size is pretty small, about half loaf but does tend to be a lot heavier and denser than store bought. Being vegan I never add milk so that could be a contributory factor.
      I have recently started using it as just a dough mixer and then shaping by hand and adding toppings and filling etc. This has been great.

      2 days ago the dreaded "EO1" started flashing on the screen (same as my previous model) and there was my flat but cooked loaf. Failed to rise again.

      I turned it off over night and we seem to be working again. So as far as reliability I'm a bit disappointed but when it does work I absolutely love it.

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        01.12.2008 16:31

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        To avoid stoggy or none rising bread, when putting ingredients into pan put in water then salt then all others finishing with yeast because yeast must not get wet or come into contact with salt until the mixing starts, this will make a difference to the rising of the bread which in turn will increase the "fluffiness" of the finished loaf.

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        15.11.2008 23:06

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        ive had the same problem with our bread maker, although it isnt gooey in the middle it is doey, tastes fine, lovely when hot and not too bad toast but too stodgy for sandwhichs. have been given a recipe from some one else but problem is that it needs more flour and didnt really want to risk putting in too much ingredients and having a huge mess.

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        23.10.2008 13:10

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        I have this breadmaker, My mum gave this to me as she no longer wanted it and I had been looking to buy one myself. She had mis-placed the instructions for the machine but did have the receipe book.I have made a few loaves of bread in it following the receipes exactly however it sometimes comes out a bit gooey in the middle. Does anybody have any tips on how to fix this?

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        14.11.2005 22:29
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        i cant think of any at the moment only im not happy at all.

        i own this machine hinari hb174 ive followed book to what it says had the machine like 3 months its hopeless it starts ok mixes dough but it wont go through the bake cycle it finishes on 0 on clock display and im left with a massive lump dough that dont cook why is this. i had it serviced they said im doing something wrong wiv setting as there is not fault wiv it. im really angry now and i hope that some 1 can say why this is in my opineion the machine is useless. ive tried various settings basic dough put all the stuff in pressed start it goes fair enough but it wont cook. i use pound flour teaspoon yeast and also teaspoon salt tablesppon veg oil. and 10 ounces water. please some 1 sort this out the oven is still the best option i think.

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          27.12.2003 19:00
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          This breadmaker is pretty much already assembled when you purchase it - all you have to do is click the mixing 'blade' into place in the bottom of the bread tin. Then it's ready to go. The Hinari breadmaker is a combined mixer, warmer and cooker, which means that you don?t have to go through all the normal faff of breadmaking like kneading, leaving to rise and baking. It has six programmable settings: Basic, whole wheat, sweet, French, cake and dough. If you just want to make a loaf or a cake, the machine takes care of everything. And if you want to make your own rolls, naan breads, pittas, doughnuts or muffins, you use the 'dough' setting and cook the dough in your oven. The machine comes complete with measuring cup and spoon, and a user guide/recipe book. You just switch the machine on and follow the recipe book guidelines exactly. Generally, you just put the ingredients into the bread tin in the precise order given in the instruction book, and leave the machine to do its stuff. After about 3-4 hours (depending on the programme chosen) the machine will beep to let you know the bread is done. If you don't remove the bread immediately, the machine will kick into 'warming' mode for an hour. After that, however, your bread will go soggy if you don?t remove it and pop it onto a cooling rack. This machine makes the perfect amount of bread for my small family; a loaf the size of a couple of house bricks, or enough dough for six rolls. It's very easy to clean but you have to be careful when you're removing the bread pan - it's hot! Make sure you keep and treasure the instruction and recipe book that comes with the machine - it's indispensable! Practice with the recipes given before trying out your own variations (the white floury baps recipe is delicious with the addition of rosemary and sundried tomatoes). Use the types of yeast and flour recommended by the
          manufacturers - and don?t get the yeast wet! Four hours is a long time to wait for a soggy mess (take it from someone who thought they'd impress dinner party guests with home-baked bread, and then had to run to the corner shop for a loaf of white sliced!). I'm very impressed with this breadmaker as I have previously owned a Prima one which didn't give me such impressive and consistant results, although some of the features of more expensive bread makers would really come in handy. For example, if you?d like to wake up to freshly-cooked bread, you either have to invest in a timer switch (about a tenner from Argos) - or set your alarm for 2-3am, switch the bread maker on, and dive back into bed again. That said, this would be fabulous for anyone who for medical reasons has to watch the amount of salt or sugar they consume, as you have control over exactly what's going into your bread. My partner paid £49.99 for this breadmaker from Sainsburys for me and I'm glad he did. Although making your own bread doesn't save you any money as you're buying all the ingredients, it is nicer than a standard loaf of Kingsmill and you can feel like a country housewife for the day. Now all I need is the posh country kitchen.

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            07.05.2002 20:15
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            Living on my own, I never thought I could justify another piece of kitchen equipment, just to make bread. However, having tasted some of my friend's home made bread, when I saw this machine selling for just 29 quid (Tescos), I couldn't resist. So what do you get for your money? This is a fully functional breadmaker, making a 1.5lb loaf, but without the fancy features of the more expensive models. There are just two buttons - one to select the type of bread (the usual choice - basic(white), wholewheat, sweet, french, cake and dough), and one to start the machine. There is no timer, but this doesn't bother me - I put together the ingredients at breakfast time, and have a fresh baked loaf by lunch time. Much has been said about waking up to the smell of fresh bread, but as I eat toast for breakfast (for which yesterday's loaf is ideal for), and usually work from home, I have no need of this. Nor is there any real progress indicator - a flashing light by the selected bread type indicates that the machine is working, which switches to a flashing light by the Start button to indicate the loaf is ready. The usual window panel in the top lets you watch the baking without lifting the lid. Short and long beeps also indicate when the bread is baked (and also when to add fruit and such things to sweet breads) So far, I have used the machine with perfect results, which is something coming from a guy who has never baked bread in his life! The recipe book gives a selection of recipes, but I was soon making up my own, including honey bread, and bread made with olive oil and herbs. Rolls and pizza bread are next on my list. Also it is really easy to keep clean, needing just a wipeout with a damp cloth after the loaf is cooked. I really cannot fault this machine. It serves my needs perfectly, and while I can appreciate the additional features other models may have, if you're not going to use them, why
            pay for them?

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              17.04.2002 07:43
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              I bought my Hinari HB174SS Breadmaker from Tesco Direct for £45. Since our household now only comprises two people, I wanted to provide small (1.5lb) loaves rather cheaper than one can buy them in the local supermarket. This machine has lived up to my expectations. The results are somewhat variable but always acceptable. Wholemeal bread is always denser than white bread (even using Extra Strong flour). I suspect that we eat more bread than before and there are certainly more 'offcutts' for the ducks! I found that the recipe booklet with the machine was adequate - but only just. There doesn't seem to be any information at all about many of the settings and a general introduction to breadmaking would have been useful (though I have made bread by hand before and know the difference between strong and plain flour).

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                07.03.2002 15:03
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                Joint op by Squiggles and flclayson: Squiggles: Good of you to invite me over for the day Freddles, but what on earth is that smell wafting through the house and tickling my nostrils? Oh the smell Fred, the smell! Such a delicious, overpowering, all-embracing type of smell that you want to wake up to every morning. flclayson: Hey, just let me shower and freshen up, and you can take the peg off your nose, and come check out the bread making machine in my kitchen. I have always wanted to make you feel like a woman, and this is the time I can turn to you in my kitchen and tell you exactly what you mean to me. Eggs and chips please, plus a cup of coffee, and then some ironing, if you don't mind...meantime, let me turn the gorgeous thing on...sorry, I will cut my fingernails next time... Squiggles (getting busy with the iron and frying pan, the latter shortly to connect with a certain somebody’s head!): Ooooooh, this looks exciting Freddles, a breadmaker eh? Let me take a closer look…… It’s a beautiful pristine white is this Hinari model, the HB174 to be exact. No Fred, I said pristine white, not Christine White, and yes I know you finished with her last week! It does have a very glossy professional look to it, how much did it set you back? flclayson: It cost me just £39 at Safeways at Crimbo time. Yes, it was Crimbo; you remember me hanging my balls on the tree...? But that’s another story….. So here we go, making a normal standard white loaf. Ingredients you need for this are: Water, strong white bread flour, dried milk powder, salt, butter, dried yeast and sugar. I use marge (no, not Marge; I finished with her a long time ago) and it doesn't seem to make any difference. You can experiment if you like and see what happens. Then we can make some bread... Squiggles: Let me check out the recipe book then Freddles after I’ve finish
                ed your breakfast, ironing, wallpapering and mowing your lawn. Actually, it’s very comprehensive and easy to follow; the ingredients for each recipe (more of which later) are listed in a left hand column, and the first in the list is the first to go into the machine. It’s very important that you add the ingredients exactly in the order shown in the recipe to get perfect results. And please don’t do what the Freddles did, and measure the salt out over the machine, the top fell off and about a kilo of the stuff ended up in there, doh! As you read down the list, so you shove the ingredients in. Simple, unless you live in Australia or are called Freddles! OK, all the ingredients are in the machine, and we can now make a 1.5 lb loaf (in metric weight, this equals quite a large loaf). Switch machine on, select setting from one of ten settings (more later) and choose whether you want dark crust or light crust. Everything you select is done by one-touch digital push button and is foolproof. If Fred can manage it, then anybody can! Three and three quarter hours later, as the smell you would die for permeates your kitchen, your mouth salivates at the thought of fresh hot bread. The machine pings when done, and you can tap the finished loaf out on to a cooling plate, rack or whatever, or eat it straight away. Delicious, and you'll soon be doing more! flclayson: A quick run through on the machine itself: measuring 350x280x230mm (for our English friends, this equals 'medium size') and weighing in at 5.5kg (English = can carry under your arm) it runs off standard electricity and uses 600w max power. On top (no Louise, that is NOT an instruction...yet) you have a viewing window (to check on the progress of your bread) and the control panel. Ergonomically laid out (no Louise, that is not an order either), it's easy to follow, and you don't really need to read the instruction book more than once - unless
                you're blonde of course, in which case what are you doing trying to plug the Hinari into the gas fire? Squiggles (sticking out tongue and making rude gestures with two fingers): The viewing window is part of the flap that you lift in order to gain access to the breadmaking pan itself. This is where you tip the ingredients and let them get on with the process. If it's just a simple loaf you want, you can let it do its job without intervention. Some recipes call for human interaction (bad luck Freddles, rules you out for a start!) part way through the process, such as adding fruit etc. The recipe book is detailed enough, listing recipes such as basic white bread, chocolate hazelnut bread, french bread, cheese, onion and herb bread, sundried tomato bread, white bread rolls, naan bread, floury baps, apple and cinnamon doughnuts, petit breads, pizza dough, hot cross buns, chelsea buns, bagels, brown bread, granary bread, wholewheat bread, bacon and herb bread, malted tea loaf, rosemary and garlic focaccia bread, brown bread rolls, muffins, pitta bread, brown pizza dough, onion bagels, banana nut bread, nut bread...phew! And if that's not enough, you can glean more recipes by going to http://www.google.com and tapping in 'bread machine recipes'. The recipe book also lists a handy conversion table - grams, metric, imperial - and has a few blank pages at the back for you to make notes. Every recipe is fully explained and anyone can follow them unless you are as cerebrally challenged as the F word here. ;O) The User Guide explains the component parts of the machine, in simple terms, with diagrams making it easy. This takes you through the basic steps of using the machine, but once learned, you won't need to use it again, and it’s that simple. The machine has a timer on it, so you can shove your ingredients in and the machine will make bread ready - say - as you get out of bed in the morn
                ing! A great way to wake up. Also there are help and advice sections that guide you through possible mistakes, of which you'll not make many. The machine has an auto lock feature, to keep those tiny digits away from the controls while it's operating. This means little Jimmy can't reset the machine while your back is turned. flclayson: All in all, Louise, a beautiful little package - and the Hinari is to die for too! Simple and easy to use, the minimum of fuss, and if I can do it, so can you! Get one! One last thing: Hovis and other companies do ready mixed bags of flour that you simply empty into the machine. A little water (always make sure that the water you use is tepid in temperature otherwise your yeast won’t do it’s job properly!), or olive oil etc, and away you go. These 'kits' cost about 70-90p but the results are mouth-wateringly delicious every time. Highly recommended! Squiggles: It really is a brilliant little machine that makes bread making incredibly easy and the results are delicious. I’m totally convinced, I’m getting myself one of these as soon as I can! By the way Freddles, which orifice did you want this fried egg wedged in??! .

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                  02.10.2001 00:32
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                  About a year ago my sister Sandyd bought a brilliant Morphy Richards breadmaking machine. I thought it was an extravagant 'toy' that she would tire of after a few weeks. That was before she gave me a loaf of bread to take home and try. It was delicious. I want a bread machine too! stamp - stamp - kick -scream (sorry, just me having a jealous tantrum!) Anyway.... my sis - knowing how keen but also how strapt for cash I was kept her eye on prices. Last week she phoned to tell me that Tesco were selling HINARI HB174 breadmakers for £39.99, Yes, I kid you not, £39.99. I leapt into my trusty Seat Ibiza and tore across town to the supermarket as fast as the speed limits would allow(actually I went the next day but I like to sound enthusiastic). Sure enough, there on the shelves were 100's (ok, about 15) of boxes of breadmakers screaming for me to buy one. I went to the checkout - handed over the dough(!) not forgetting to use my Tesco points card, and hot footed it back home to put bread on the table of my family. One problem - ingredients! Open box, get recipe book out - look for ingredients, go back to shop, buy ingredients, go back home , start again! Phew! OK - so box is open - packaging removed - calm down Heather - be patient. The Hinari HB174 is a white rectangular appliance with a sloping top lid (with window) and control panel. Also supplied is the bread pan, measuring cup and measure, along with the recipe book and user guide. Keen to get my first loaf cooking I hurredly went through the getting started section, washing the pan and parts, wiping the outside of the unit - oh come on! lets make bread! Remove pan, add ingredients in order as listed in recipe book, ok, here goes.... water, flour, dried powder milk - oh bum! I forgot to buy the powder milk - ok - start again... semi skimmed milk (instead of water and powder milk) flour salt soft brown
                  sugar (I used white granulated) butter (I used margerine - I'm such a rebel!) dried yeast put pan in oven select programme 5 select bread colour (dark or light crust) press start Immediately the blade spun into action, mixing the ingredients into a ball of dough. I had no idea how long it might take to produce my loaf so I went into the lounge, had a cup of tea, watched Neighbours (I don't care - I love it!) fell asleep, woke up - oh no! It's 3 pm - the bread! I ran into the kitchen and there it was...the same ball of dough as I had left 2 hours earlier, every now and then the blade would spin around. It must have something wrong with it, I thought. Oh well, I'll leave it for a while and see what happens. Just then Katy (thescorpion) my pregnant daughter waddled in, "What's those numbers on the top? Maybe that's the time left before it's finished" she offered. She's such a bloody clever clogs! "I knew that" I lied - another hour and a half to go. Good grief! All that time for a little loaf. At 4.30 my little machine peeped at me and as I peered excitedly through the little round window (apologies to Brian Cant)I could see my loaf was now risen, and brown. Hurrah! I made bread! I grabbed the tin handle to remove the loaf - then I dropped it back in again as it was VERY HOT and I had just burned my hands. After ten minutes screaming and running cold water over them I returned to the machine and, with the aid of an oven glove, took out the pan and emptied the loaf onto a tray. Talk about proud - I felt like handing around cigars - only no-one smokes in my house and I didn't have any anyway. After it had cooled sufficiently I got my trusty (never used) bread knife out of the drawer and gripping the loaf firmly in my left hand cut a 1cm slice from the end. It was beautiful, crisp crusty shell with a soft but firm cente, and a
                  smell only associated with fresh baked bread. I simply spread real butter over it and cut it into quarter triangles for the family to sample. A triumphant success, they loved it. That loaf was a 50/50 wholemeal-white one, the next was all white and equally successful. I am now taking orders from friends and neighbours. The Hinari was very easy to use, simple to follow instructions and so far has not failed me. There are several recipes in the book that I will try eventually including... Chocolate hazelnut bread cheese, onion and herb bread apple and cinnamon doughnuts naan bread hot cross buns and pizza bread to name but a few. I would add that I think it would have been useful if they had put the cooking times on the recipe pages. It might have been a good idea to incude alternative ingredients too (real milk instead of dried/ marg instead of butter) So far I am very pleased with my purchase and considering the price of some breadmakers (over £100 in some cases) I don't see what they can offer that this one doesn't. The only real down side is the size of the loaf which is approximately a 6" cube. If you like fresh bread - I'd recommend this machine to anyone. *UPDATE* Since writing the opinion I must admit my breadmaker has sat in the kitchen gathering dust. It really is simply a case of remembering to make the stuff. Maybe I'll do another loaf soon.

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                    09.08.2001 03:44
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                    As with many other people, I was given this breadmaker as present. When I have time I do like to bake my own bread. So I thought that this would make my life a whole lot easier.This is what my Hinari present consisted of….. The model I have is HB164 and it comes with two thin booklets, nothing that can take pride of place on a shelf!! But in the case of this breadmaker they are very useful. The first book is an instruction booklet which contains all the usual Do’s and Don’ts that electrical appliances warrant. These Do's and Don’ts are then followed by a diagram of the machine and all its parts…this is clear and accurate. It names the parts of the breadmaker, although there is not too much to it. We then come to cleaning the darn thing…a job I always hate, but its definitely easier to clean than my blender or deep fat fryer. The last uninteresting part is about the operation of the machine.. these pages give an accurate description of how to turn your flour and water, yeast etc. into bread. The second half of this book is all about the ingredients and settings for the breadmaker, and I have discovered, (the hard way) that this is the most useful part of the reading material! The basic ingredients for each recipe are found here, (and without giving the plot away!), it basically recommends the freshest ingredients should be used. The ingredients covered here are: Flour, Salt, Sugar, fat, Liquid, and Yeast. I discovered that the yeast, even dried sachet yeast should be store in the fridge. There are Tips for measuring ingredients and which order to place them into the baking pan. We then have a list of 7 more “ Hints for better bread” ( ….only 7? Surely there are more!) The next part is the control panel and operation of the machine. The control panel consists of 7 sections. ( …7 again!!) The Display window, Menu programs, s
                    elect button, Bread colour, Timer buttons, Start button, Stop/Reset button. There are 10 programmes that allow you to make differing types of bread. Instead of listing them all now I will link them with the types of recipe they are used for, later in this Op. The final part of this book is trouble shooting, and this will be a much read section if you purchase this product! I do recommend that you view this section as it does help, because when your first few loaves come out as heavy as bricks, and as unedible as lump of concrete, you need to know how to rectify the problem. Well now to the recipes and using this new fangled contraption! This is the second booklet that is supplied with the aforementioned appliance. I decided that I would try and make the “Basic White Bread “ first, It is recipe No 1 so it seemed a good place to start. I carefully measured out all my ingredients, which takes, an overwhelming 2 or 3 minutes to do….. The water goes into the pan first, then the flour, milk powder, salt, Caster sugar, butter and finally the Easy blend yeast. Once the pan is in the main machine, I then selected the “basic normal” program and my preferred bread colour, a choice of light or dark. Now the first twinge of excitement came as I pressed the start button. It then took an agonising 3 hours and 45 minutes before I could see the finished result……when it finally came I was impressed, the bread looked great, it could have risen a bit more, but I was really pleased. That was until we tasted it, a bit salty and chewy…. well hard, and chewy! I did persevere with this basic recipe and found that slight adjustments to the amount of the ingredients, can have dramatic efforts of the taste, texture and height of the bread. I did eventually get the mix right and we were able to eat our freshly baked bread….the problem seemed to be that the quantity of yeast needed to
                    be increased for this recipe…but it’s a case of trial and error with each individual recipe. There are a total of 27 different recipes included in this book, there is the basic bread and buns, as well as French bread, bagels, whole-wheat, granary, and herb breads. The booklet also includes pizza base, and doughnuts, malt loaf, hot cross buns and chocolate hazelnut bread. Each recipe has to use a set programme, and not all of them are compatible with the Timer Function. The programmes are as follows: Basic Normal, used for Basic white bread, Chocolate hazelnut bread and French Bread. Basic Mix, used for Cheese and onion and sundried tomato bread. Basic Rapid used for well no assigned recipe, but the notes say that you can cook the bread more quickly using this programme, but I am still not sure which ones. Basic Dough, used for the Pizza, Nan bread and Doughnut recipes. Whole-Wheat Normal…used for Basic Brown, Granary, and Whole-Wheat Breads etc. Whole-Wheat Mix……this for the recipes in the “Whole-Wheat normal list, except that that nuts, raisins etc can be added during the cooking process. Whole-Wheat Rapid…again can bake the Whole-wheat breads at a faster pace. Whole-Wheat Dough… as it says so you can bake Whole-Wheat doughs. Quick Normal….for Nut Bread and Banana Bread Quick Dough….as it says for quick dough! The pizza base recipe has definitely been the most used out of the selection from the book. Hardly any adjusting to the ingredients was needed, and the dough is perfect everytime. The programme used for the pizza base is the “Dough Basic” The malted Tea loaf is a different matter….I am still trying to get this one right, following the amounts for each ingredient turns this loaf into a very dry cake, and we found that it was best served with custard!! This recipe uses the “Wh
                    ole-wheat mix” programme, which allows you to add sultanas when the breadmaker beeps at you. The Nan bread recipe is another that comes out virtually perfect everytime. This bread uses the “Dough Basic” programme. I have found in all recipes that dried milk is better for the mix than fresh liquid milk, there is a big difference in the end result…why I don’t have a clue, but trust me I tried both endless times! A set back with this machine is that it only allows you to bake 1lb loaves, there is no option for a bigger loaf. But once you get the hang of this breadmaker it takes no effort at all to knock out a few loaves, so it not really a big draw back. If you are stickler for following a recipe then this is a match made in heaven, there is no room for the creative cook…well not until you are time served with this appliance anyway!! So the conclusion I have drawn is that a lot of trial and error is involved with this breadmaker……but that is something that I have heard about other makes too. It can bake good bread, but only with that all important practice.

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                      05.08.2001 18:40
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                      • "pretty tasteless!"

                      I was given a Hinari Breadmaker for a Christmas present last year. As a former bakery worker I can make bread by hand, although I rarely do find time these days. My friends thought it would be a useful timesaving gadget. The machine made half-sized loaves by trundling a paddle through the added dry ingredients and warm water, gradually warming the bread mix to help it to rise and then cooking the mixture to form a loaf. A such, the machine worked perfectly well. However, the bread output never seemed to taste right; I tried a whole range of recipes in their book (using good ingredients) but they came out either dry or doughy. I even tried using a pre-packed bread mix where you just add water... the result was just not tasty at all. I asked my younger brother to try it out in case it was my taste buds having a wobbly. He has also worked in the catering industry. He had the same experience. We have decided it may be something to do with the quantity of bread processed. In larger batches, bread consistency holds together and you can make it moist and fluffy or grainy by feel. This machine handles such small amounts that it dries out the bread consistency, making it feel and taste a bit artificial. I gave it a fair trial and I was not impressed.

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                        09.10.2000 20:40
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                        The Hinari bread maker is brilliant. I was bought it for christmas last year and I love it, so do all my friends and neighbours. It is so easy to use. If I can use it anyone can. You are given a recipe book with it and measuring cups and spoons, so there is no need to weigh everything out. You just scoop out the required ingredients into the cups or spoons and place the ingredients into the bread pan in the order listed in the book. Then you insert the bread pan into the bread maker, select the programme required (the book tells you which programme with each recipe) and press start. You can also set the bread maker up with all the ingredients required and set the timer so that the bread will be cooked and ready for you in the morning. Imagine waking to the smell of freshly cooked bread. yum yum!! A few of the types of breads that you can cook are; Grannary bread, French bread, chocolate chip bread and many many more. You can also make bread rolls, naan bread, hot cross buns, bagels, egg pasta, jams, and marmalades, just to name a few. The machine is easy to clean. The only disadvantage with this is that once you own one you won't be able to stop eating it, and neither will friends and neighbours when they try it!!!!!!!!

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                          17.08.2000 05:15
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                          I have had my bread maker for a couple of years now and I can count the number of times I have bought a loaf of bread since on the fingers of one hand. It is fantastic to plop a few ingredients into the pan, flick a switch, push a button, then 3 hours later have lovely fresh warm bread. It is so easy to do that even my son (who is 3) can "help mummy make bread". There is also a dough programme so that you can make rolls, perfect for a dinner party or picnic. I have even made Doughnuts and Chelsea Buns. The house smells lovely and the bread is much better than the stuff you buy which is full of preservatives and goodness knows what else. I get my flour from a mill which also helps to keep down the cost, but it it no more expensive to make than to buy. Visitors liked it so much that I am responsible for 5 other machines being sold. They are different models, but none have a little window so you can see what is going on.

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                          07.08.2000 06:30
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                          I bought my Hinari breadmaker last year and it cost roughly £80. Now that may seem expensive buy, hey - this isn't just a breadmaker... It has several programmes including just dough making - take it out and make bread rolls, pizza etc. You can make cakes and even jam... If I am in a rush there is a fast programme which takes less time for the dough to rise, or if I want something a bit more traditional I take the dough out, put it in traditional bread tins and bake it in the oven. The thing that I really like about this machine is that it is so user-friendly. Place your water in the tin, add the dry ingredients, choose your programme and off you go. Once the bread is baked, let the tin cool down, give it a quick wipe out with a cloth and it's done. what my husband really likes about it is the lovely smell that lingers in the kitchen afterwards...

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                      • Product Details

                        Short name: Hinari HB174