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Morphy Richards 48221 Breadmaker

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39 Reviews

Bread making at home made possible. The Morphy Richards is surprisingly easy to use, and produces very good results. Whilst it isn't the most time effective, it's certainly easier than traditional methods.

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      18.10.2011 16:29
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      A great buy for the kitchen.

      This is a great product which makes it so easy to bake your own bread - it means you can cook at home whenever you want, and not have to worry about running out, plus it gives you the chance to save some money, as the ingredients are so cheap. The only thing you need to bear in mind is that because the bread is fresh you will have to eat it quickly - it doesn't keep for days like supermarket bread, but this is a good thing as you know it doesn't have preservatives in.

      -ooo- The Product -ooo-

      This is a very well designed, easy to use product, with two important sections. First, you have the bin on the left where you put the bread - this has a metal mould inside for the ingredients and a mixing paddle (which you must remember to remove from the bread after cooking!). Second, there is a set of buttons on the right which allow you to choose from a variety of options, such as loaf size and dough type.

      One of the best features of the breadmaker is the fact that you can set it to come on overnight and cook your bread. This means you can wake up to hot fresh bread in the morning and this lovely smell wafting around the kitchen, and fresh bread for breakfast!

      You can choose from different types of dough, and there are lots of recipes in the book that comes with this product. The machine is extremely easy to use, as you just measure out the ingredients it asks for into the metal mould and switch on the machine and it does the rest!

      -ooo- Would I recommend? -ooo-

      I think this is a brilliant product for anyone who likes their bread. It's so easy to use and produces good quality bread. I do find that it's a little bit more hard and not as fluffy and light as some breads you buy in shops, but it does have a lovely flavour, and it's fun being able to try out lots of different types of dough and loaf. For about £50, this is a good investment, as if you use it a lot, you can save some money on buying expensive breads in the shops.

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      07.09.2008 20:15
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      A great first time buy

      This bread maker is a great basic model. You can make white loaves of different sizes, you can make a wonderful fruit bread that has raisins and cherries in it. You can use it to make jams and preserves. It has a dough setting for if you want to make rolls, French sticks and pizza bases where it will mix the dough and let it rise then you take it out of the machine and make whatever you want then cook it in the oven. It has a beeper that goes off when it is time to add any extra ingredients so you do not forget. The only fault with this model is that the paddle always, and I do mean always, gets stuck in the bread so when you take the bread out of the machine you have to make a big hole in it to get the paddle out. It does make nice bread and it is far more economical to use a bread maker nowadays than to buy bread. I would recommend this to anyone looking to purchase their first bread maker.

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        08.08.2008 18:18

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        Hi, does anyone have in instructions for the Morphy Richards 48221 Breadmaker - if so could you please email it to me at louise.bradshaw1@ntlworld.com thanks louise

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        02.12.2007 12:31

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        Excellent to use.

        Fantastic. I use my breadmaker all the time and with the price of bread in the supermarket save money as well. Would recommend anyone to buy one its a doddle to use as well.
        Although it takes about 4 hours to make a loaf you can load the machine and carry on about your day and come back to a lovely bread smell and a super loaf. You can also add seeds to the loaf basic receipe to ring the changes.

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        23.07.2007 06:32

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        i purchased the breadmaker from singapore and was dreaming of having freshly baked bread everyday at home in india. however, i was very disappointed with the product as inspite of following the recipe the bread does not come out soft and fluffy. it is always hard as a rock and raw. tried diff. flours and yeast, but the end result is the same. wish i could return it, but do not have the receipt.

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        14.06.2006 12:20
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        i need the operating mauel you can send it to obasman2000@yahoo.com to enable useage

        Ever since i bought morphy richard 48221 breadmaker, i have abandoned it in my cupboard .this is because i misplaced the operating manuel. so i want to use this medium to request for another manuel to enable maxmise the benefit of this your wonderful product.you can send it to e-mail obasman2000@yahoo.com i will now review my comments after i have used it. it is necessary iyou do this for me.
        thank you.
        obah.

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          08.08.2004 00:29

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          • "broke donw after 2 years"

          not expensive but... - Advantages: lots of functions, makes cakes, rapid and slow bake, both good - Disadvantages: Paddle get stuck in bread, spindle gets leaking, broke donw after 2 years

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          20.11.2003 02:45
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          I actually have this breadmaker and have found it really easy to use . It is a middle of the range type, basic but efficient and is a very reasonable price. It isnt very large so it doesnt take up an awful lot of room with all your other gadgets, ie microwave, processor etc. It makes really nice bread if you follow the instructions properly(always a good idea) and has got simple buttons to use for variants of bread. It also has a recipe book which has some cool recipes for other bread based items. Try chocolate bread!! It is easy to clean inside and out and it looks attractive sat on your worktop. A very nice item at a really good price.

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            29.03.2003 17:08
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            I don't know how I managed to eat all that shop bought bread with it's added bleaches, preservatives and other unmentionable chemicals. Home made bread from organic flour and natural yeast is a different thing all together. I bought my Morphy Richards Breadmaker at Index. It was on offer for thirty seven pounds, so I took the plunge. The machine itself is quite heavy as it houses an insulted baking chamber and it's own mini-computer.Using it is simplicity itself. 1. Gather together all the ingredients (as listed in recipe book) 2. Warm your bowls, jugs, etc, so that they are not too cold for the yeast. I just poured hot water over everything, there dried it with a clean tea towel. 3. You will need a kitchen roll too. It doesn't tell you that in the instruction book but you have to use the measuring cup and spoons over and over again so you need to be able to clean them any dry them quickly. A wipe with a piece of kitchen roll is fine for this. 4. Measure the ingredients precisely. It's no good just saying, 'that'll do!' It must be exact. Believe me, I have discovered that much. 5. Add ingredient to the metal bread pan in the order they are listed in the recipe book. There is a reason for this. You must not let the yeast touch the liquid before you want to start the machine. 6. Set the machine by pressing 'menu' and selecting the correct programme (you will find this in the recipe). You can set a time delay on this if you want to bake over night, or while you are at work. 7. Don't open the lid to peep. You can see what'd going on by loking through the glass window at the top. Mixing, kneeding and prooving your bread takes around three hours, depending on the type of flour and the recipe. My first loaf was excellent but I have learnt since that it is very important to be precise with measurements. There are lots of different breads to t
            ry out. The recipe book provided gives a good start but you can then create your own as long as you remember to keep the wet/dry balance the same. This Breadmaker can also make cakes. You follow the basic recipe, mixing your ingredients in two seperate bowls (as in the recipe), then combine them in the bread pan. Set it to 'cake'. In three hours you will have perfect, plain cake. You can then split the cake in two and add whatever filling you wish. There are variations on this as well. You can add coffee, or chocolate to the basic cake mixture. The machine can also make jam. I found this very easy and the results are amazing. My first attempt was strawberry and apple (the apple contains lots of pectin so it makes sure the jam sets). You don't have to make huge quantities either. The measurements given in the basic jam recipe in the handbook made about 400 mils of jam. It was gorgeous! I am not the world's greatest chef and I don't really like cooking very much but I must say that the results of my efforts with this machine are excellent. If I can make homemade jam, bread (two kinds) and cake, then anyone can. If you are thinking of buying a breadmaker this one won't disappoint you.

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              01.02.2003 04:39
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              My breadmaker is wonderful. Easy to use and with good results. You can make a variety of breads from the recipe book or even make you own recipe. You can cook the bread within a couple of hours in time for you friends coming round for lunch or set the clock to come on at an early hour and wake up to the smell of fresh bread in the morning....is there a better smell? Definatley worth every penny in my opinion. Excellent for people who can bake or for people who cannot. Go on Treat yourself.

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                06.10.2002 18:04
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                There's very little that can beat the smell of freshly baked bread... even more so when that smell is in your own house! You could use the traditional method of spending most of your day kneading dough, letting it rise, kneading it again - or you could purchase the fantastic invention, the breadmaker! I've been the proud owner of a Morphy Richards 48220 breadmaker for almost a year now. I received it as a birthday present, but believe it was priced at £49.99 and was purchased at Argos. Unfortunately it doesn't appear in the current Argos catalogue, however its functions are very similar to those of many other Morphy Richards (and other make) breadmakers available therefore I should hope this opinion will still be of use to you! The breadmaker itself is a white cube shape. On the top of the cube one third of the panel shows the control panel, and the other two thirds is the lid that allows you to open up the machine to add ingredients / get your bread out etc. In the middle of the lid is a small viewing window, so that if you're impatient (or just curious) you can keep going to your breadmaker and having a look through the little window at what's going on inside! The control panel is very basic and simple to use. It comprises of a small display window, which will either show you the number you have selected for a particular cycle or a minute-by-minute countdown timer. Next to the diplay window are two up and down arrows which can be used to increase or decrease the timer by 10 minutes. Beneath these are a list of all the programmes or 'cycles' that the bread machine can do. Different types of breads require a different type of cycle - if using the manufacturers recipe's it will advise you in the recipe which number cycle you chould use, but incase you are using a different recipe book, short descriptions are given for each cycle number next to the number itself so you can choose the most appropriate. The
                'select' button allows you to choose the number of the cycle you require. The only other two buttons on the control panel are start and stop... these are self-explanatory! This machine can make two different sized loaves - regular (approx 1lb) or large (approx 1.5lb). These weights are approximate, as depending on the type of loaf made the weight may differ. Very little equipment is needed to get you started making your bread - and all the equipment you will need is provided with the machine. Along with the 48220 came a measuring cup and a measuring spoon - these are all you need to make bread with this machine - no hassle of weighing ingredients. In addition the machine also comes with the baking pan and kneading blade, which are obviously required to bake the bread in! Perhaps the most important item that accompanies the breadmaker machine is the instruction manual... With most electrical items I should imagine that, if you are anything like me, you probably never read the instruction book, let alone know where it is right now! However, unless you have a knack for remembering recipes, or have enough skill to be able to make up your own, then you'll rely on the instruction book to begin with. The instruction book itself does contain all the information you'll probably never read or refer to ever again, but, in addition it contains a variety of recipes you can use with your machine - this is extremely useful if you don't really want to spend money on a special recipe book from breadmakers. The instruction book accompanying my machine includes 35 different recipes, including: 'basic white bread', '100% wholemeal bread', 'granary bread', 'cheese 'n' onion bread', 'french bread', 'peanut butter bread', 'pizza dough', 'bagels', 'apple and walnut cake' and 'jam'. For the majority of breads all you have to do with thi
                s machine is quite literally tip your ingredients into the pan, select your cycle number then leave the machine to do its thing - then when it's done, you can take out your fresh baked loaf. For other types of recipe, such as pizza dough, the machine prepares the dough for you, ready to tip out, shape and put in the oven to bake as normal. This particular model bread machine does not have a fast-bake function which is found on some breadmakers allowing a loaf to be baked within an hour. The shortest cycle for a bread loaf on this machine is 2 hours 45 minutes. This is obviously a disadvantage if you want a loaf in a hurry, but because once you've put the ingredients in you don't have to do anything else, if you remember to set the machine off in plenty of time then waiting for almost 3 hours isn't that bad... especially when you consider the time and effort you have to devote to making a traditional loaf by hand! One function of the machine that comes in useful is the delay timer. You have the ability to put in all your ingredients for your bread, but then delay the start time of the machine for up to 12 hours. If you want to wake up to the smell (and taste) of fresh baked bread then this is extremely useful! *************************************************** To conclude - my breadmaker is my most valued kitchen gadget. At just under £50 I believe it gives superb value for money as it has never let me down yet, and the fact it can be used to create dough to be used for things other than bread is great. My parents received a breadmaker as a wedding anniversary gift that cost well in excess of £150, yet it has nothing worth noting as a fantastic addition over my cheaper model, so if you're interested in getting a breadmaker, don't feel you have to pay a lot of money for the 'best' one available in order to get the best results. The smell of fresh baked bread is one of my most favourite smells, an
                d to be able to recreate that smell in my own house without having to spend my whole day baking is fantastic! Definitely recommended! ***************************************************

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                  18.07.2002 20:00
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                  After always wanting a breadmaker, i got a wonderfull surprise one day after coming in from shopping my partner had bought me a special present in a big brown cardboard box. once i managed to open the box, there it was a lovely chrome breadmaker, i set to work on making my first ever loaf of bread within seconds. Following the instruction manual was easy enough, and no fancy ingredients were needed as every thing you need is available in all super markets. The good thing about the bread maker is you dont just have to make bread in it, you can make whole range of things ie :- Jam cakes muffins doughnuts ( no need for the seaside trips to get your doughnuts) The average time to make a loaf is around 3 hours depending on the size of the loaf you want to make. Theres a variety of breads you make ie :- brown white softgrain granary italian herb cheese 'n' onion french and my favorite CHOCOLATE BREAD The best things ive found about using the bread maker are a) its easy to programme b) the outer casing stays cool ( ideal for when there are children about the house) c) its very easy to clean as everything is dishwasher safe. d) it makes your house smell lovely e) its got a window in the lid so that you can monitor the progress of the loaf. f) Fresh bread whenever you want it. g) It even has a timer so that you can set it before you go to bed and wake up to fresh bread. Theres not many dissapointments with it, however its a little on the noisey side and it cost about £80. The only other problem is beating everyone else to the freshly baked loaf as it only lasts about an hour in my house!!

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                    18.07.2002 19:51
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                    Nothing is lovelier that freshly baked bread…and the Morphy Richards Essentials Breadmaker certainly helps you achieve fine quality, gorgeous tasting bread! We got ours about a month ago and it has been on non-stop use ever since. It is so simple to use, and along with the instruction booklet couldn’t be more user friendly. ~~~~~ WHAT DOES IT ALLOW YOU TO DO? ~~~~~~~ Don’t be fooled into simply thinking it only makes bread…you couldn’t be far more wrong. You can make so many lovely food items (I will tell you about the one’s I’ve tried later) and they all appear to turn out successfully, no matter how lame a cook you are. As long as you measure the ingredients out exactly to the recipes instructions…you will have a food masterpiece every time. The breadmaker, on average makes a large (1 ½ lb) 680g loaf. It is slightly smaller than the average shop brought loaf, but it tastes ten times nicer. Anyway…onto the good stuff…what it allows you to make! Setting 1 – Basic White Loaf ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ It takes the breadmaker 3 hours to produce a basic white loaf, and this setting is used to make white bread (obviously) and mixed bread (such as fruit loaves). Setting 2 – Quick ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ The quick setting produces the same items that setting 1 does…but doesn’t take quite so long! The quick setting will bake your bread in 2hours 20mins, although the size of loaf produced will be slightly smaller and not as well risen. Setting 3 – French ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ This produces French white bread (not a stick!), similar to the basic white loaf. It has a much longer cooking time at 3hours 50minutes, but produces finer textured bread with a thicker crust. As it has a longer rising time, it also makes the largest size loaves. Setting 4 – Cake ~~~~~~~~~~~~ Well believe
                    it or not, this setting lets you bake cakes. You can bake any type of cake imaginable and customise the recipes to your own tastes. They take 1hour 50mins. Setting 5 – Wholemeal/wholewheat ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ This setting allows you to prepare wholemeal breads. They are lower in volume and have a dense texture in comparison to breads made with white flour, but they are also of a larger size because they are given extra rising time and the dough bakes longer, taking 3hours 40mins. Setting 6 – Dough ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ This setting simply takes out all the hard work in making dough as it automatically kneads and provides perfect rising conditions. You can use the dough in producing foods to be cooked elsewhere, such as pizzas, croissants and bread rolls. Setting 7 – Extra Bake ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ This setting gives you the option to bake your breads for longer, for example if you want an extra hard crust. You are also given the option to choose the crust colour of your breads. Either light, medium or dark. The breadmaker generally suggests that you leave the crust colour on medium, however I prefer the dark setting because it gives a better structure to the crust making it easier to slice. ~~~~~ SO WHAT HAVE I MADE? ~~~~~~ In this section I will tell you what I have had a go at baking in the breadmaker! Well of course I have tried making the simple basic white loaf. It has turned out to be very successful each time, with a lovely texture and gorgeous crust. However, one slight gripe is that the bread cannot be stored for as long as shop brought bread (unless you freeze it) as it does not contain the preservatives that shop brought bread does. Chances our however, that the bread tastes so nice…it won’t have the chance to get stale! Fruit Loaf! The fruit loaves that can be produced in the breadmaker are absolutely amazing!
                    They taste absolutely lovely and are just delicious when you toast slices of it. This is my favourite bread of all, which I have made in the breadmaker. You simply must give it a go! My dad made some Tomato & Basil bread and this too was lovely. The flavour was stunning and it looked lovely too. We used some pre-brought Allinson Tomato & Basil bread flavouring for it (places like Asda and Tesco’s sell it) and it made it taste absolutely perfect. Okay…one cooking disaster I did have was when I tried to make some banana bread. It went all gloopy inside and didn’t rise properly. This was not however the breadmakers fault, it was my own! Lol! I also made some Sunny Orange bread…although I thought this tasted a little weird. I guess it is an acquired taste…and I guess it wasn’t mine! Other breads you can make include: ~ Gluten Free bread (for those of you with wheat intolerance), ~ Brown bread, ~ Softgrain bread, ~ Granary bread, ~ Italian herb bread, ~ Cheese ‘n’ onion bread, ~ Olive bread, ~ Sun-dried tomato bread, ~ Peanut butter bread, ~ Chunky nut bread, ~ Malt Loaf, ~ Cranberry nut bread, ~ Chocolate bread, ~ Spicy cheddar bread, ~ 100% wholemeal bread ~ French bread ~ Raisin bread, ~ Mixed fruit bread. The above are all the types of bread that the instruction booklet gives you the recipes for. However, I’m sure it is simple enough to customise the ingredients (as long as you keep the quantities and proportions correct) to make you own flavours and styles of bread. ~~~~ WHAT I’VE MADE FROM DOUGH ~~~~ As I said earlier, the breadmaker really does take the hard work out of producing the dough for you to make other foods from. My first attempt was at making pizza…and a lovely pizza was made! Following the instruction in the instruc
                    tion book, I spread the pizza base out onto the correct sized dish and added all my toppings. When it was cooking however, the size it turned into… Sheeesh!!! It had risen so much in the oven it was f*cking gigantic and was pretty much starting to grow so big that it was near reaching the top shelf of the oven (it was placed in the middle). Anyway…the pizza tasted lovely, even though it took the term “deep-pan” to the extreme! The next time I halve the quantity of dough and the pizza was then a more normal sized thin crust/deep-pan pizza. White rolls – These turned out absolutely lovely, and with a spritz of Frylight sunflower oil (written about in another of my recent reviews) they achieved a really lovely golden crust and looked so tasty. The texture inside the rolls was gorgeous too, and probably the nicest rolls I have ever eaten. Croissants! Hahaha…. so they didn’t quite turn out like croissants…they turned out tasting like doughnuts that looked like croissants. I’m sure however, that someone taking a bit more time and putting a bit more effort into making them could manage to produce some lovely croissants. This is probably the hardest recipe of all in the instruction booklet. Those are the only dough recipes I have attempted at present, but you can also make: ~ Russian kulich, ~ Wholemeal rolls, ~ Raspberry braid, ~ Hot cross buns, ~ Doughnuts. As noted earlier the Morphy Richards Essentials Breadmaker allows you to make cakes. I haven’t yet tried making any cakes, but I have complete faith that they breadmaker would successfully make these as well. The types of cakes it has listed recipes for you to make in the instruction booklet include: ~ Gluten free mixed fruit cake, ~ Standard cake mix (whereby you add the ingredients you like) ~ Banana nut cake, ~ Apple & walnut cake. Overall the
                    breadmaker gives you the opportunity to make a massive variety of breads and cakes successfully, easily, without fuss, hard work or the mess. ~~~~ ADDITIONAL INFO ~~~~~ The breadmaker is really simple to clean and has a removable paddle in the pan (which does the mixing) so this can easily be removed and cleaned also. The baking pan also has a non-stick surface so it is fairly easy to remove the bread from the pan after it has been cooked. One slight annoyance I find is that when trying to removed the pan from the breadmaker’s main body, the handle sometimes gets stuck to the side of the pan due to the heat. Occasionally you find yourself trying to flip the handle up with a wooden spoon (never use metal utensils in it as they can damage the non-stick surface) so this can get a bit irritating when it keeps flicking from opposites sides of the pan. The breadmaker is however very sturdy and is easy to keep clean with it wipeable surface and comes with all the usual safety features, such as vents to prevent over heating. Generally a very well made, well-designed breadmaker, which I am sure will last us many many years. ~ Price ~ Okay okay…don’t kill me! We paid absolutely nothing for our breadmaker because we got it on Argos points…but I can tell you that it costs around £63.99 depending on where you buy it. I would easily recommend to you however that that price is worth paying. The following link contains the correct picture and some additional information. http://www.newelectricals.co.uk/enter.html?target=BreadmakersPrice_Compare.htm l The instruction booklet can also be viewed from this .pdf file http://www.morphyrichards.com/ib/pdf/48260.pdf

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                      16.05.2002 23:43
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                      • "No cheaper than buying bread"

                      My adoration of the smell of freshly baked bread has always verged on fetish. I love the blissful aroma of a batch of crusty white loaves as they are put on the shelves of the Tesco in-store bakery, still slightly warm inside their plastic bags. The taste of fluffy white bread with butter and strawberry jam. Heaven really is a place on earth. So when breadmakers became the latest "must have" kitchen gadget, I found the allure of having my own miniature bakery to be irresistible. Every sensible part of my brain knew that this large white box had a distinct whiff of "white elephant" about it, and would soon be fighting with the waffle maker, Goblin Teasmade and Soda Stream to achieve that coveted spot in the back of the kitchen cupboard which would become its home until 2015 until it took centre stage at a car boot sale. (Oh how we thought Soda Streams would open the door to a brave new world of carbonated drinks back in the eighties). But another part of me could not fight the urge to own a machine which would actually make a loaf of bread. I still can't quite remember why I felt it so difficult to actually buy a fresh loaf when I needed one - but there we go. I've always been pretty useless in the kitchen and I wouldn't have a clue about making dough. Even if I did, it sounds like too much like hard work. Which is why the breadmaker's simplicity held such an appeal for me. I must admit that the tumbling price of bread makers was another catalyst in my decision making process. When they first became widely available, in around 1997, they were still above the £100 barrier. But as their popularity soared, the wonders of mass-production in the Far East managed to squeeze the cheapest models to below £40 towards the end of last year. When I saw Argos's Cookworks breadmaker on special offer for £34.99, I knew that I could wait no longer. Like a good boy I checked the Which report
                      s to see that I wasn't getting a duff model. To my amazement, the Cookworks machine (which is Argos's own brand, I should add), was the Best Buy - beating off stiff competition from deluxe models which cost up to three times as much. When I gave my order slip to the woman at Argos, she said that the Cookworks model shown in the catalogue had been substituted for a Morphy Richards Essentials model which was identical in all but name. Apparently, they came from the same factory and had a different name printed on them. Would I be happy to accept the Morphy Richards model instead? Of course. So I bundled my breadmaker into the boot of my car, and dashed home, foaming at the mouth with the excitement of what culinary delights lay ahead. So here goes with my experiences of the Morphy Richards Essentials Breadmaker. Before buying my breadmaker I had been under the misapprehension that I just needed to throw in some cheap flour (the 11p a bag economy stuff - such was my naivety), together with water and yeast, and out would pop a mouthwatering crusty loaf which had cost me tuppence to make. This was my first mistake. I had been unaware of the cost of ingredients you need for these breadmakers. For a start, the Tesco Value flour is a big no-no - you actually need to buy strong bread flour, which is classed as a specialist flour and costs between 79p and 99p a bag. (I never since fathomed why normal flours take up so much shelf space in Tesco if they're no good for making bread). Then you need yeast, which isn't cheap either, it cost me 99p for a small tin. And skimmed milk powder which, again, is surprisingly expensive. You also need small quantities of salt, sugar and vegetable oil which have a nominal cost. Before I'd even plugged the darn thing in, it had dawned on me that there was hardly any financial saving to be made by homebaking, especially when you consider the three hours of electricity. Compare thi
                      s with the expertly-made crusty farmhouse loaf on sale for 49p in Tesco, and things are already looking a bit grim. The recipe book is vital to your breadmaker, and it stresses the importance of measuring your ingredients to the utmost precision to achieve a perfect loaf. Which is exactly what I did. They supply you with some accurate measuring cups. You literally bung the ingredients into the metal tin, although you shouldn't let the water touch the yeast until you press start, as this will throw the finely-tuned process all out of goose. For the first hour or so, you hear muted whirring noises as the machine takes care of the kneading process. Through the perspex window you can see your ingredients turning into a rather impressive lump of dough. There is a little rotating paddle at the bottom of the tin, rather like the blade on a hand blender, which does all the hard work so you don't have to. And then you just wait while the machine does the baking. The smell of baking bread which pumped through my house gave me a false sense of hope, as the final result was bitterly disappointing. The bread was square and had not risen into the "domed" top that you expect. There was a gaping hole in the underside of the loaf, caused by the detachable paddle coming loose and rising up with the dough. The presence of this large hole means that slices 8 to 12 look like an arch shape. The problem with the loose paddle seems to be an inherent design fault in many breadmakers. There is no way of preventing it from coming loose half way through the cycle. Your loaf is still edible but aesthetically it is ruined. The bread itself was nothing like the fresh bread you would buy in a shop. Although it was fully baked, and the crust was good, the inside was slightly off-white and a little stodgy in texture, rather like a sponge cake. Very hard to describe, but it just wasn't "right". Worried that I had mi
                      sread part of the recipe, I tried many times over the following days and weeks to make a decent loaf. I followed all the troubleshooting advice in the manual, but eventually I decided the breadmaker would never produce the results I had expected. I tried using wholemeal flour, which was even more expensive than white, but again I found the texture to be very rich and cake-like. The bread was suitable for making toast, but it was not the sort of bread you would use for sandwiches as it left you feeling bloated after eating just one slice. Maybe I'm just too fussy about my bread, and some people might like the end product of this breadmaker, but I can honestly say that it is an acquired taste and is nothing like you would buy in a shop. The booklet contains dozens of recipes for speciality breads and cake mixtures. I daresay that if you had the time and energy to try all these recipes, and tweak them all to your own preference, that you would find the machine was capable of producing good results. As a dough making device, the machine is superb as it cuts out all the hard work (even Delia Smith admits that). But I feel that using the machine for making dough alone, and then finishing the job in your oven, rather undermines the breadmaker's selling point as an "all in one" labour-saving device for a modern lifestyle. Somebody commented on this breadmaker: "In the event of civil unrest or war we would have a couple of weeks supply of bread, depending on our flour stocks." Of course the same can be achieved by keeping a couple of loaves in the freezer, although I doubt that any of these measures would save you in the event of modern biological warfare. I know that many people have given this breadmaker a good review, but remember that these people have had to experiment with the recipe and spend a lot of time mastering the whole process. But frankly I have got a busy lifestyle and I wanted the breadmaker to
                      save time, not cost time. If you've got plenty of patience, and are prepared to waste lots of ingredients in the name of trial and error, then you might find the perfect formula for a good loaf, and this machine might be right for you. And if you already have good baking skills you may find the machine useful purely as a dough maker. Sadly there is no escaping the unsightly "axe wound" left in every loaf by the paddle. I feel that this is an issue the designers should address as they develop new models. Maybe the paddle could somehow retract into the base after the kneading process has finished. The recipe booklet also needs to be changed as it is too scientific and wrongly implies that you should not adjust the recipes in your quest for success. People with Soda Streams eventually found out that it was easier to go out and buy a 2 litre bottle of fizzy drink. Regrettably, the same principle applies to this breadmaker, and I can now regularly be found in Tesco's bread section choosing a ready-made loaf at a very reasonable price, while my breadmaker takes up much-needed cupboard space. It would be unrealistic to say that you can take this machine home, chuck the ingredients in, and enjoy a perfect loaf, because it's not as plain sailing as that. For 35 quid I'm not complaining, but I think that this product will only have enduring appeal to those who already have a passion and natural affinity towards cooking.

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                        30.03.2002 04:02

                        Advantages

                        Disadvantages

                        why buy ready made bread when you canbake your own so easily and enjoy the aroma of fresh bread? - Advantages: Easy to use, Wonderful aromas - Disadvantages: paddle gets stuck in the bread

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                    • Product Details

                      Short name: Morphy Richards 48221