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Morphy Richards 48248 Compact Breadmaker

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      10.02.2012 19:01
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      Good design and delicious fresh bread

      Morphy Richards 48248 Compact Breadmaker

      comprises of:
      Breadmaker
      Loaf tin
      Paddle
      Instruction/Recipe booklet
      Plastic measuring cup and spoon

      Breadmakers are not the easiest of items to accommodate in a kitchen. The Morphy Richards Compact Breadmaker measures 35cm wide, 30cm deep and just under 30cm high (52cm high with lid open). The loaf tin is shorter than a standard size, making loaves at 1 - 1.5 kg. This size suited a spare corner on my kitchen surface and I think the dark granite colour gives an illusion of this breadmaker being smaller than it actually is.

      The control panel at the top of the machine is easy to use and there is a good size window for viewing the bread. There are 10 settings: Basic, French, Wholewheat, Cake, Sweet, Dough, Jam, Speciality, Sandwich & Extra bake. 3 Colour settings: Light, Medium & Dark. The Instruction booklet details baking times and uses for all the different settings and includes recipes for basic and speciality breads, pizza dough, cakes and jam.

      A beeper will sound as you select your chosen settings, when it is time to add certain ingredients, at the end of a program and after the 'keep warm' phase. There is a timer setting which means you can set the breadmaker to turn on whilst you are out or asleep. I have found it is better to be around at the end of a programme to remove the bread and place it on a cooling rack as leaving the bread in the breadmaker can result in a tough crust.

      I have been using this Morphy Richards Compact Breadmaker on a regular basis for just over 3 years and since purchasing it I have hardly bought bread from the supermarket or bakery. Over the last year I would say I make approximately 2 gluten free loaves and 2 wholewheat loaves each week. Occasionally it has been used for pizza dough, savoury and French style breads. During the three years I have used the breadmaker to make 2 or 3 cakes but I much prefer to make cakes in the traditional way and haven't used it at all for making jam (just can't get my head around that one).

      For gluten free bread: The recipe booklet provides a recipe for a gluten free loaf but I have developed my own recipe using gluten free flour, warm water, oil, sugar, yeast, salt and xanthan powder. I select Basic setting and Light colour. Unfortunately all the settings knock back and knead the dough twice which is not necessary for gluten free bread, however the loaves turn out very well with an even texture and are reasonably light.

      For wholewheat bread: The recipe book provides recipes for wholewheat, granary and also brown bread. I select Wholewheat setting and Light colour. The breadmaker creates a delicious crusty loaf, well risen and even in texture. Wrapped in grease-proof paper and placed in the bread bin this bread stays fresh and lasts up to 4 days ( although it is often used up much sooner in my house).

      The slight drawbacks I have discovered are firstly the paddle often remains in the bottom of the loaf so you have to pull it out whilst the bread is cooling which leaves a hole in the base of the bread. Secondly, the bread can become crusty and over-baked on both the Medium and High colour settings.

      The Morphy Richards Compact Breadmaker is a reliable machine, well designed, looks good in my kitchen and is economical in terms of space. It is straightforward to use and bread always turns out easily from the tin. The paddle and baking tin are effortless to clean (wipe with cloth and warm water as these items are not recommended for the dishwasher). The machine itself is easy to wipe clean due to the sleek, modern design of this model. After almost 3 years of regular use my Morphy Richards Compact Breadmaker is still going strong. Bread smells divine whilst baking and the loaves are delicious.

      Thank you for reading my review x

      © Lunaria 2012

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        04.07.2011 11:56
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        A compact bread maker that is easy to use.

        I have had the Morphy Richards bread maker about a year and generally use it about twice a week. Once for a basic brown loaf and once for a more fancy, special bread. I made a fantastic sun dried tomato and olive focaccia last weekend!

        It did take me quite a few goes to get recipes that I was happy with and i would say that the recipe book that comes with the bread maker does not make very good bread! The first loaf I made using the recipe book that came with the bread maker was as heavy as a brick! However I bought myself a bread recipe book which has turned out some fabulous loaves!

        I have made, rolls, loaves, focaccia, pizza bases and naan breads to name but a few.

        The bread maker is easy to clean and simple to use. However the implement inside the bread maker which mixes and kneads the dough has a tendency to sometimes stay upright rather than flatten after the mixing, this means that sometimes this implement will get stuck within the bread.

        All in all though a really good and easy to use bread maker!

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        24.03.2011 21:12
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        Great if you want bread roll but be prepared to dig the paddle out if you make bread

        ***Specs**

        2 Different loaf sizes Compact design
        3 Crust settings Large viewing window
        10 Different programs Timed program

        *** Whats in the box ***

        In the box apart from the breadmaker its self is....
        The baking Pan
        Paddle
        A measuring cup and spoons
        Instruction book which doubles up as the recipe book as well.

        On a personal note, the instructions/recipe book could take some beating over the course of your breadmaking adventure, my advice would be to get yourself to the Morphy Richards site and download the PDF version of it so you will always have a copy of it.

        *** My Experience ****

        My wife nagged me for a breakmaker, so Xmas 09 i bought this one and paid £119.99 from Tescos which looking about was a tad over priced. Since then its been used numerous times but every time my wife attempts to make a loaf in it turns out like rock and the paddle is stuck in side of it. The bread was edible in thin enough slices as its only the crust which makes it over cooked even on the light setting.

        It doesnt look out of play in out smallish kitchen either and it offers an excellent choice of different bread types to make with a cute little beep when single other ingredients need to be add in fruit loafs and tea loaf. One feature we both loved about this breadmaker is the timer program. My wife put all the ingredients in the pan before bed and set the program up to have bread in the morning, There isnt many better smells to wake up to in the morning then a freshly cooked loaf of bread.

        Another good use my wife found was instead of letting the breakmaker actually cook the bread, just use it to knead and prove the dough and then use the dough for bread rolls or bake the bread herself in the oven.

        We cannot comment on the jam making part of the breadmaker as we havent tried this.

        ***Pros***

        1. Simple to follow instructions for bread, different doughs and jams
        2. very easy to clean
        3. Lots of progam setting for different types of bread and jam.

        ***Cons***

        1. Paddle get stuck about and you lose about quarter of the loaf due to cutting it back out.
        2. Often even on the right setting the bread crust is over cooked and hard.

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        23.09.2010 20:36
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        so many flavours to pick from

        There is nothing better than the smell of fresh bread as it is cooking, the smell fills the house and you cannot wait until it is cooked to have warm bread with some butter on.

        I was such a fan of fresh bread, I enjoyed making it by hand, but this was time consuming so was not something that I got to make as often as I would have liked. This is when a friend of mine recommended that I should invest in a bread maker as it was a lot easier and quicker.

        I searched around and read some reviews and I decided to purchase the Morphy Richards Compact Bread Maker. This bread maker allows you to make 2 different size loafs and it has three crust programmes, light, medium and dark so you can cook the bread to your own personal preference.

        The bread maker takes away all the hard work of mixing and kneading the dough as you simply place the ingredients into the machine and it will then mix, knead and bake the loaf.

        The bread maker comes with an instruction booklet which also has recipes in and they are straightforward and easy to use. The loaves that you make in this machine are about half the size of a standard loaf.

        All you need to do is place the ingredients in the bread maker it makes a dough, then the dough rises and then the dough is cooked to create the perfect loaf. You can have the perfect loaf in three hours. Morphy Richards also supply measuring equipment with the bread maker so that you have the right quantity of ingredients every time.

        The kneading blade drops down into the machine so that you have a perfectly shaped loaf. There is a time delay button which I regularly use as I like to make the bread overnight so that I can wake up in the morning to the smell and bread for breakfast.

        There are probably a lot better bread machines available on the market, but for the small £40 price tag that was on it, it is fantastic. The one disadvantage is that the machine can be noisy at times but if you close your bedroom door at night you will not hear it and then when you open the door in the morning the smell of the freshly cooked bread will hit you.

        You may struggle to use this machine for the first few times, although once you have used it a number of times I guarantee that you will get used to it and will have perfect bread each and every time.

        Not only can this machine make bread of a wide range of flavours from white bread, granary, wholemeal, onion and sundried tomato you can also make cakes as well.

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          14.09.2010 12:33
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          What could have been a very good product ends up a disappointment

          I bought myself a breadmaker because a friend of mine said that baking gluten free bread was much easier to manage in a machine than by hand, and after having tried out my gluten free recipes in this breadmaker from Morphy Richards, I can see that she was absolutely right, so just as a tip, if you`re struggling with your gluten free baking, letting a machine like this one do it for you might be the sollution! I bought this machine at amazon for 40.55, and it was first and foremost the inexensive cost and the interesting and modern design that appealed to me, wanting a breadmaker with a different color than white, and I ended up spending my money on this one!

          Was it the best money spending I have ever done? Well, no! Fact is, this breadmaker hides a flaw that I couldn`t believe was even possible, I nearly had to check that I hadn`t gone bonkers and was imagining what I saw, but no, this machine hides a weird secret... All bread machines come with a kneading blade, so that the ingredients and the dough can be mixed well and thoroughly, which I assumed this machine would handle without problem... Well, I was wrong, because what I noticed to occur, was that the blade in some odd way got stuck in the loave of bread, so that when you`re ready to enjoy it, you have to act like a crazy person and rip it out, with that awarding your bread with a big hole in the midst of it, which I am sure isn`t the intention of all breadmakers...? This is the main, significant disadvantage, and it drops the overall impression and quality of the machine much lower than what it would else have been! Because all other features are very good, from the ease of use to the preparation time, which vary from 2-3 hours, not superior, but acceptable... And though your bread has a big hole in it, it still tastes great and has a lovely soft texture with a crisp exterior... But adding to the misery, I also have to say that when at its worst, this machine makes so much noise that it could wake an elephant sleeping in the midst of African wildlife... What can be done, is kneading the loave in the machine, and then letting an ordinary oven do the rest... But the point is kind of gone then, isn`t it? And a small variety of functions doesn`t weigh up for this, so I`m pretty sure I`ll be looking around to see if I can find myself a better breadmaker pretty soon...

          What I do to try and avoid the blade getting too stuck in the bread, is adding a lot of sunflower oil to the machine, making it slippery and oily, which helps a lot, but doesn`t remove the problem completely... Adding oil also helps the machine to become easier and faster to clean, and cleaning it really doesn`t take much time or energy. But as said, the fact that this machine for some reason has decided to create a hole in the bread its making, well, it`s not brilliant is it?

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            15.08.2010 22:57
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            Has a major design flaw

            THE BASICS:

            The Morphy Richards breadmaker retails for around £65 (though the RRP is £99.99) produces two loaf sizes (1lb/ 500g and 1.5lb / 750g), the latter roughly corresponding to your standard supermarket batch loaf. It operates at 600 Watts and takes around 3 hours.

            I bought this as a means of reducing my salt intake and cash flow - the salt content of supermarket-bought loaves can be rather shocking, as is the price - as I wasn't prepared to go through the time consuming (though therapeutic) process of baking a loaf every day by hand.

            THE LOOK:

            Despite being sold as their Compact Breadmaker, the only thing that's actually compact about the breadmaker are the loaves (and not in a good way, see below).

            The ovaloid machine comes in 'graphite' (black to you and eye), sits on four rubberised feet (presumably to avoid overheating) and is adorned by the Morphy Richards brand on the bottom right. Ingredients are poured in via a large opening on the top - great for avoiding flour spillages - and adjacent to the lid (which has a viewing window) is the control panel which allows you to select the crust settings and the processes you want the loaf to go through (mixing, kneading, baking)....

            FUNCTIONALITY:

            1. Time - 3 hours is quite a long time to wait for a loaf (equivalent to making it by hand really) so while it saves on mechanical action it doesn't on time - a shame as many breadmakers now have a quick loaf option.

            2. The kneading blade is supposed to move during baking and sit in such a position as to ensure you get regular shaped loafs (no air pockets, etc...) instead it embeds itself into the loaves. Whilst wastage as a result can be minimised by making sure it's well greased beforehand, this isn't really the ideal solutiion as you still end up with a big hole in your loaf. Not great for sandwiches....

            3. Relatively easy to clean if you grease the constituent parts in advance of use.

            4. Very very noisy during the kneading phase meaning you probably won't want to make your Pan Quotidien overnight.

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              16.07.2010 16:56
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              A good buy if you want quick and easy fresh bread in a small amount.

              I had this breadmaker for Christmas last year and considering it is a compact variety, it is pretty good.

              My main reason for getting a bread maker was to start making gluten free bread and as the brands available in the shops were disgusting, I thought I would give this a go.

              It is a nice compact size and the instructions are really straightforward to follow. It is easy to clean and easy to use.

              The aroma that fills the house when you bake your own bread is unbeatable and just the smell alone is worth it!

              As this is a compact variety, normal recipes in bread making books will not work in this machine, unless you are a mathematical genius and you can calculate how much you need to reduce each ingredient by.

              However, the instruction booklet that comes with the machine has an abundance of fantastic recipes that work really well. However, I have not yet managed to master the gluten free recipes!!

              One good option is to use a ready made bread mix in the machine. These work particularly well as there isn't as much preparation needed and the mixes are really cheap - less than 80p for a bread mix.

              There are a couple of downsides. As mentioned, the reduced capacity means that normal recipes won't work. Also, even on the light crust setting, the crust is usually really hard and crunchy, but tasty nontheless.

              Also, every time we have made a loaf, the blade does come off in the loaf and you have to fish it out, leaving a big hole in your loaf of bread!

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                05.07.2010 18:36
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                Not terrible, but there are much better breadmakers available.

                Why are we paying a pound a loaf for ten penn'orth of ingredients? That was our thought when we decided to get a breadmaker. We worked out that by buying flour in bulk (16Kg at a time from a nearby flour mill), and even accounting for the extortionate cost of electricity these days, we could make bread for around 35p a loaf. Sounds good yes?

                Why this particular model? Well, we didn't want to spend too much money on something that might turn out to be a flash in the pan, and this one fitted the bill. The fold down beater bar was the thing that really sold it though - no slices with a big hole in the middle - or so we thought.

                On first unpacking this breadmaker, I was quite impressed. The main unit looked good, there was a fairly comprehensive instruction manual, which included a variety of different recipes for all kinds of bread, dough, cakes and even jam. There was also a set of measuring spoons and a measuring cup. Uh-oh - first design flaw. The spoons are the shape of little scaled down coffee mugs, and the bottom corners are practically square. Did they not consider how hard it would be to clean oil out of something that's barely wider than your finger?

                The control panel of the breadmaker features an LCD display, and 6 buttons which allow you to vary the size and colour of your loaf, or to select different settings such as jam or dough. A nice feature is the delayed start setting, which allows you to load the pan and be greeted with fresh bread in the morning, or when you come back from work.

                In use, the machine is fairly noisy when it's kneading, but quiet as a mouse the rest of the time - except when it beeps to let you know that it's time to add extra ingredients (say fruit or nuts). The beeper is quite high pitched and ear piercing if you happen to be nearby when it goes off. The same beeper is also used to let you know the cycle is finished.

                The loaves themselves are tall and square, and tend to be harder at the bottom than at the top. The beater sometimes stays with the tin, and sometimes comes out in the loaf. It can be fun trying to prise the beater out of a hot loaf, I can tell you! We tend to turn the loaf on it's side (to get square slices) and cut from the bottom up.

                The lower crust is almost always concrete hard - not something I fancy eating to be honest. The next couple of slices will have a hole in the middle from the beater (remember I said it was supposed to fold flat? Not so much!) I've always found the bread to be very dense and filling - I'd eat 2 sandwiches made from shop bought bread, but one from this machine is usually enough. At least a loaf lasts a while! To be honest though, I've eaten bread from other domestic breadmakers that's much better than this machine seems capable of making.

                After a few months (washing the pan out after each use), we found that the beater driver in the bread pan was starting to stiffen up - so much so that eventually the motor wouldn't turn the beater at all. I found that as the bearing/seal has become worn, it has become a looser fit, and small particles of bread mixture can get in, where they are be cooked solid by the breadmaker. The solution to this, as it turns out, is to turn the pan upside down and run hot water into the back of the beater assembly, whilst turning the beater drive manually until is works loose. This results in a little puddle of blackened water under the pan where the burnt stuff has worked its way through. This process can take anything between one and five minutes to do.

                For this reason, we mainly use the machine now for mixing dough, which my wife then makes into rolls and cooks in the oven, and which taste better than anything that the breadmaker could do on its own.

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                  25.02.2010 18:07
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                  Didnt work for long enough to gather dust in the kitchen.

                  I bought this Breadmaker from the Homestore and more.. It was hard to decide on which bread maker to buy as nearly every maker on the market had its fair share of poor reviews unless you paid a ridiculous amount and ventured into the mega expensive market. Anyway, bought this one in the end and it is easy to use and comes with a decent book that gives you a load of recipes for different breads like italian, fruit loaf, pizza dough, granary etc.. It was also cool that you cans set it to come on in the morning before you get up so that you can wake up to fresh bread. The point of this review is that after 3 months the breadmaker started to make a loud cluncking noise, you could see from the marks inside the machine that the kneading blade had started to rattle and was damaging the tin which the dough mix goes into to. Everything looked tight so I called morphy richards for help. They were fairly helpful but asked me to do a series of checks to narrow down the problem. In the end they agreed to refund the item as I didnt want another one. My view is that you get what you pay for and £45 pounds for a bread maker isnt alot when you look at some of the top players in the market. Its not always the case but im working on the rule that if you can afford better then buy better. (i didnt and i regret it).

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                  11.01.2010 21:13
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                  10-programme automatic breadmaker

                  WHY MAKE YOUR OWN BREAD?

                  Well, I knead the dough, don't I? Joking apart, there's no way that making your own bread is cheaper than buying from a supermarket, but:-

                  a) it's a nice thing to do,
                  b) it fills the house with a gorgeous aroma,
                  c) it's good to be able to say you made it yourself and
                  d) you remain in control of what's in the stuff!


                  We've had a Breville Breadmaker for several years now, but just lately it's been producing some real 'bricks' of loaves, so much so that it causes you to question your method - are you getting too sloppy or cavalier with quantities, is the kitchen warm enough, have you used the right flour, is your yeast past its use-by date (or is that too personal a question?), that kind of thing?

                  Unfortunately, try as we might, having 'pulled ourselves up by the boot-straps', ours still kept trying to put The London Brick Company out of business and we were forced to conclude that it had something wrong with it, maybe the oven thermostat was failing on the cool side or it wasn't being kept warm enough during the 'proving' stage.

                  This was a pity because we liked the Breville - it had a reassuringly sturdy cast-alloy baking tin and was a hot-air oven for a good overall even bake. It also had a panoramic window in the lid so you could see if anything was astray, like an incomplete mixing. Yes, it can happen, even in a machine that gives the impression that you just bung the ingredients in and wander off to Tesco. It did however cost around £120 when new, so, like most other 'white' goods, its replacement was considerably cheaper so many years down the line.

                  Our new model, the Morphy Richards 48248 was of an all-plastic metallic graphite appearance. You CAN pay more for the stainless-steel-clad version, if you really must co-ordinate it with the rest of your appliances, but for something that we normally put away when not in use, this was hardly a factor. There doesn't seem to be any technical difference as the instruction book doesn't even go into model numbers. It comes with a two year maker's warranty but we tacked on another £12-odd to top this up to 3 years including a no-quibble direct replacement clause, which is somewhat superior to just being entitled to having it repaired.

                  With hindsight, this might well have been a good move (he added ominously).

                  HOW DO YOU LIKE YOUR BRICKS?

                  Yes, you guessed it, we are still setting ourselves up as a minor builder's merchant! Even following the supplied recipe book to the exact 'letter', our first four attempts at attaining bread Nirvana came to nothing. Yes, they tasted fine, but it isn't everyone's idea of a nice piece of toast to have something of the density of a slice of 'Mum's bread pudding' with every bite.

                  In the end, we found that over-ruling the recipe's yeast requirement by chucking in a 'bit more*' produced something somewhat more 'aerated', which coincidentally, was rather akin to our mental state by now, even begging the unspoken but thought-of question as to whether the old machine was actually faulty at all.

                  Likewise, we'd experimented with moving it to a warmer room during this cold snap - our kitchen is only heated by whatever you're cooking, so one of the other rooms was tried. This is despite the fact that the recipe book calls for cool surroundings, presumably during the 'rising' stage of the bake.

                  (*That well known Imperial measure)

                  Little by little, we're getting there, but the 'rave' reviews of this machine at Amazon and Argos web-sites are hard to justify from where we're sitting.

                  We'll persevere, as "We can't make it bake a loaf" doesn't seem like a convincing argument for getting our money back when the bulk of public opinion seems stacked against us, like taking a tie back to Burton's and complaining it's too tight.

                  IN THE BEST TRADITIONS OF LUCKY COINS IN CHRISTMAS PUDDINGS...

                  There's one other major failing with this machine, which possibly stems from its advanced mixing feature. First generation bread-makers had one main flaw - the fact that the mixing paddle remained in the loaf, and had to be extracted after the loaf was removed from the tin. Sometimes if you were lucky it stayed put leaving a perfect impression of itself in the loaf, or usually, especially once the Teflon © finish was becoming a bit 'tired', it stayed resolutely imprisoned in the loaf, and had to be extracted in a manner redolent of the days of field surgery when bullets were removed with a Bowie knife and pliers, and the patient and surgeon both had a generous swig of pre-op 'Red-Eye anaesthetic'.

                  This time, it was going to be different, and it is, but not in the way Morphy-Richards intended. This machine has a 'self-removing' paddle, according to them, meaning that after a period of being kneaded in a clock-wise direction, there's a brief few seconds of reverse thrust as it were, where the paddle folds itself flat, the idea being that it leaves less of a 'scar' in the base of the loaf and hopefully is left in the baking tin as the loaf slides gracefully out.

                  If our experience is anything to go by, this does NOT work.

                  Yes, it probably folds flat creating less of a cavern inside the bread, but no, it doesn't detach from the loaf. How can it when the kneaded mixture is free to flow around and settle under the paddle, firmly setting it in place? It even has the temerity to disappear, which is a new one on us, leaving us with an even greater opportunity to practice field surgery.

                  Whilst I'm busy digging the knife in, the motor that drives the paddles sounds hardly up to the job, frequently near-stalling before speeding up again.

                  WHAT ELSE CAN IT DO?

                  Well, assuming we settle down to a routine that works for us, even if it does mean re-writing the recipe book, the machine does seem quite versatile, jam-making being another of its claims to fame.

                  In amongst its 10-programme repertoire, it can just make dough, so you can then use portions of it to make bread rolls in the oven. I've long thought that there's no point in making something more exotic like an Italian-style loaf complete with olive bits only to have it look loaf-shaped like 'a Dorset Knob with olive bits in it', or any other kind of knob for that matter.

                  CONCLUSION

                  Either we're doing something wrong or ours is slightly faulty, or.........well what else is there?

                  We'll stick at it, even if we re-write the recipe book.

                  Maybe this is one occasion where the adage 'you get what you pay for' is true. At £50-odd it really does seem cheap, but without the endorsements from Amazon and Argos sites, we'd never had bought it, and now wish we hadn't.

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                • Product Details

                  Short name: Morphy Richards 48248