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Ford Granada/Scorpio

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  • Handling is poor
  • VERY EXPENSIVE
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    10 Reviews
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      14.08.2002 20:44
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      I have had 3 Ford Granada 2 litre hatchbacks - one 1989 Ghia, one 1990 GL and one 1994 Scorpio. Purchased each very cheaply (about 1150 pounds each, all bought with about 90,000 miles on). I keep them for about 2 years and then sell them for scrap! These cars are huge and give loads of value for money. However, they're not the most reliable car in the world. The last one I bought 5 months ago in March 2002 was an 'L' red Scorpio, top of the range. Fantastic condition inside and out but more unreliable than the other two. Within the last 4 months I've had the head gasket blow, which cost about 600 pounds to fix (had this on one of the other Granadas too)and now I've got a serious immobiliser problem which may mean the car being sold for scrap already. It's a very good alarm / immobiliser but once it goes wrong it's a nightmare to fix. The Scorpio is extremely quiet and is loaded with ac, CD, electric windows, electric sunroof, heated seats, nice stereo, electric seats, etc. Just don't expect everything to work though! Since I've had it, the heated seats have given up, and the electric sunroof, and part of the fan on the aircon, and the front heated windscreen comes on unannounced every now and again! Also has a strange problem where, every week or so, the engine completely cuts out for no reason whatsoever, then, once started again, drives perfectly okay for the next week or so! It's not a very fast car, as it's so heavy. When the aircon is on, it's even slower. Not a problem for most people though. I think I'm giving up on Granadas now - I'd prefer a more expensive recent car which is going to be more reliable. I will miss all the space though. Also, it's not the most expensive car to get fixed, considering it's size. Miles per gallon is excellent. All cars have given between about 29mpg and 34mpg, but the 1994 Scorpio gives up to about 36mpg on a long run with tons of weighty equipment in the back - su
      perb for a 2 litre! So, in summary - Granadas are brilliant as long as you accept that it might go wrong! Try and get it checked out before you part with your money and, most importantly, accept that you are buying the car cheaply and keep some money in the bank for the inevitable repairs!

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        26.11.2001 15:59
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        I must first state that I am no mechanical genius, I dont understand gear ratios and torque, so this opinion may be a bit light weight for those of you who really do understand the mysterious world of car mechanics. I had my Scorpio for 4 glorious years. We met first when my VW estate died following an altercation with a lamp post. I wanted a new car on the basis I can just about put fuel in the right place and new will have less problems for longer. Good thinking for me . The when we went to the showroom sitting at the back of the carpark I saw it. A Scorpio 2.9 automatic it was an H reg and my hubby suggested that it might be a little big for me. He felt I was being wooed by the heated seats and the electronic windows and thought a nice new car would be better. Needless to say I bought it and so began the happiest motoring I have ever had. Heated seats and windscreen may be frivolous but when I had to keep driving up and down the motorway to Scotland when my father was ill through very cold winters they were a God send. The handling is fantastic I had a blowout in the 3rd lane of a busy M6 and the steering hardley changed atall. I felt totally safe. Even my hubby, who has always said automatics are for lazy drivers, was won over. For 4 years I had no worries atall then hubby decided to use the car for a trip to London loaded with tools and something very major and very expensive went wrong. Sorry cant be more specific but I did say I was mechanically challenged. I thought no problem go and buy a new one......but they have stopped making the Scorpio. I have walked the length and bredth of every car showroom I can find and cannot find anything as reliable as stylish or as easy to drive as that was. Well thats my opinion any suggestions for a replacement would be gratefully recieved.

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          08.09.2001 22:52
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          • "Handling is poor"

          Well here I am again, yet another car opinion. This time I am venturing into the world of the Ford!, make the most of it, not often you will find me in with the likes of Ford. Now I am going to try and write this opinion and avoid being biased due to my general dislike of Fords, and give the old Scorpio a fair trial. I will spare you the long winded, and quite frankly, boring story of how I came to dislike Fords. We used to own an old Granada. It was a 2.8V6 Estate, (1985) Automatic. Beautiful car it was, had its problems, but you had to love it, and so powerful. Unfortunately, she got old, and although I took it under my care to restore her, I already had 2 cars on the go, and didn't have the time, or the money to restore her. So she was sold to the Granada Enthusiast club for 1p, yep 1p. She wasn't worth anything, but we just couldn't give her away. To show how much that car was loved, the 1pence piece is in a little box in my dads draw! So, what do we replace her with? I mean she towed the caravan, and did all the hard work and never complained about it. What car would replace that? We searched high and low, looking at almost every estate car available, and not one could match it for power and space, as well as comfort. Only thing that came close was the Volvo, but these were to expensive, and the new ones didn't match up to her. In the end we settled for a Granada Scorpio. Much smaller and only a hatchback, but was a nice car to look at and drive. It didn't have any where near the power as the old Granadas, and only being hatchback, had hardly any space in comparison, but we have given up hope of replacing her like for like (my granddad owns a Scorpio Ultima 2.9, and although it has the power, it still doesn?t tow the caravan like the old Granada) So what's with this Scorpio then? Well, first a little background information, as usual. (you love it really) The Granada was introduced b
          ack in 1972, I believe. And was the 'executive' car of its time. Sporting refined interior, powerful engines, and having the Ford badge on the front instantly made it a car to respect. The Mk1 and Mk2 were produced for a long time, in Estate and Saloon version. The popular choice being the 2.8V6, but there was a large range to choose from. The Estate version was stopped in about 1985 - 1986 (if someone knows the accurate dates, please let me know) but the saloon was carried on, and the hatchback was launched. The Scorpio was the next thing Ford brought out, it is based on the original Granada, but was much more refined and executive, offering gadgets which had only recently been intoduced on cars in the UK, such as Air conditioning, cruise control, ABS etc. And although the previous Granadas had all the electrics such as windows, seats, mirrors etc, the Scorpio was the top of the range. Ford were starting to lose their reputation, and the Scorpio helped them maintain what they had left, and even, possibly, improve it slightly. The Estate was eventually brought back in again a few years ago, in the form of the Ultima, which was a lot like the previous Estates, with big powerful engines and good interior space. However they stopped making the Granada altogether in 1998. The latest Granadas were very 'American' with typical American styling and interior. This set them apart from the competition, but didn't do them any favours. Vauxhall were really making a comeback and Ford kept losing battles to them. The Probe was short lived, before it was overtaken by the Calibra. The Fiesta lost to the Nova, which became the Corsa. Escort was lost on the release of the new Astra and Ford rapidly lost status in the UK to Vauxhall, and the ever present Japanese cars. The Granada was really their last hope, but unfortunately, the American styling (that grille for one) and Vauxhalls new foot hold in the UK market, meant the Vauxhall Omega soon sent th
          e Granada to the list of 'discontinued' cars. Even the monster Cosworth engine fitted to some, couldn't save it. Since then, Ford have failed to produce a car that can out do Vauxhall, and the Japanese cars which took the UK by storm. So history lesson over, (you still awake there?) lets get back to the Scorpio. I will concentrate mainly on the Scorpio from 1985 - 1994, as this is the range I have had experience, with. I'll see if I can take the Ultima out for a test drive and bring you the results at a later date. So, engine: The engines I know of that the Scorpio came with were, The 2.0, 2.0i, 2.5 turbo Diesel, 2.9i V6 and the 2.9iV6 24v. Power from these engines, was as follows (you love these statistics I know :op) 2.0 - 109bhp 2.0i - 125bhp 2.5TD - 92bhp, low I know, but this was upped to 112bhp in 1993 2.9i - 145bhp 2.9i 24v- 195bhp I'm sure you will agree, if its power you want, then the 2.9i is the one to go for. All but the 2.9 are straight 4 engines, nothing fancy. The 2.9 is a V6, and is probably the best one to go for out of all of them, although economy is poor. With about 25mpg achievable from the 2.9. but you get the power. The rest all claim around 35mpg, including the diesel. Diesel engines have never been Fords strong point, and most diesel engines Ford produce are poor in comparison to people like Renault, and Peugeot. Ford didn't go for the big powerful engines, like they used to, apart from the 2.9, instead they concentrated more on reliability. And fair play, ours has 145,000 on the clock, and (touch wood) had no major problems yet. Service on these earlier models is relatively easy, with the home mechanic allowed access with the spanner for a number of small jobs. But on recent models, this is lost in favour of you having to pay Ford to do most jobs. Performance? Well, it has to be said, it feels good to dr
          ive them. Although they have a very low power output, they do feel powerful. The one I drive and we own is a 2.0i and being Automatic, you put your foot down and the kickdown kicks in and you do feel the power launching you. However this is more due to soft suspension and transversely mounted engine, which tends to rock the car as it revs high, giving you the feel of power, even though in reality, you not got that much. Top end speeds of the models is not up with the likes of the Omega, with max speeds of: 117mph from the basic 2.0 and 119mph from the 2.0i. The diesel will see you to a wimpy 108mph unless you get the 1993 onwards version, which will see you to a slightly more respectable 119mph. The 2.9 is again the big boy with 126mph and 138mph from the 2.9 24v. Still not your high performance car considering its size. For comparison purposes, the Omega 2.0i will see you to 130mph, and the 2.6i V6 sees a nice figure off 142mph. So you can start to see why Ford were fighting a losing battle. Off the mark, the 2.0i isn't bad. Being Automatic the one I drive, you get good grip with no wheelspin. This makes for easy acceleration. But lack of power means you only see about 10.5 seconds 0-60 across the range, with the 2.5TD (pre 93) only managing 13seconds. The 2.9 pushes 9 seconds, with the 24v squeezing 8 seconds which is a little more respectable considering the size of engine, but if you have the automatic version, expect to lose a second or 2, as you really need to work them gears to achieve those times, which the automatic wont let you do. Handling leaves a little to be desired. The rear wheel drive makes handling in the wet, shall we say, interesting, and the long wheel base and rear wheel drive do produce a loss of grip when cornering. Watch out for the backend going, cause when they go, theres no return, until you hit something of course. Soft suspension and a fairly high ride height don't help matters, bu
          t then this is an executive car, and sports set up is dropped in favour of comfort. And it achieves that well. Normal driving of the cars in comfortable, and I used to use it to travel 60 miles to London everyday, down the M1 and through London. And it was very good for this job. I used to prefer to take the Granada over the Nova, just for shear ease of drive and comfort. It will cruise at 70mph happily, with still more in it. The Automatic gearbox makes town driving easy and stress free, with the absence of a clutch making it easy to keep stopping and starting, without giving you tree trunk legs from working that clutch. When on the move, is where you get the sense of power. Especially with the Automatic. You can put your foot down to get past something, and it will go. If you find yourself running out of road, then burying the throttle will induce the kickdown (Automatics only) and the car knocks itself down a cog and really seems to fly. For a small engine, it performs well. The manuals require a little more work to get that blast of power from them, but knocking it down a gear gives you the same effect and will get you out of some tricky situations. Overall in terms of performance, it lacks the power to be a 'drivers' car, but for long distance and easy driving, it performs well, taking away handling (which is pretty poor) is favour of shear comfort. Interior? Well its status as an executive car is emphasised inside. Electrics all round, including windows, sunroof, seats, mirrors, rear seats, central locking. On most models. Nice refinements, such as heated front seats, heated front and rear windscreens and Air conditioning make it comfortable to drive all year round. The cruise control is a nice feature, and although not much use for short journeys or in heavy traffic, it proves very useful when making long trips down the M1 at 8pm. You can get up to 80mph (oops, 70mph I mean, sorry officer) and flick the cruise
          control on, then sit back and let the car do the work. Power steering, and being Automatic, makes driving almost effortless, with the occasional turn of the wheel needed. It holds its speed well too, very rare does it struggle to keep a set speed. The seats are comfortable, but a little short, making it get a little uncomfortable after long periods of time, you do start to get the numb bum. Full control over the seats, all electric, means you can adjust the seat in almost every way to get comfortable. Space is good, with plenty of headroom and legroom both front and back. The electric rear seats make even sitting in the back pleasant on long journeys. Making it a great family car. The boot is average for a hatchback family car, with space to carry the shopping and a large pushchair. But it isn't a work horse. The very intrusive wheel arches and low boot line waste space. The back to the boot is not too high, so loading and unloading is easier than with a lot of cars. Although the parcel shelf is hard to store out the way, if you need to remove it. Its wide too, giving you extra space, but they seemed to waste this space with lockers in the side panels, for wheel braces and jacks, which would be better stored under the sparewheel maybe. I would certainly recommend you take the Automatic version, although I know, it tends to be a granddad car, especially to someone like me, who likes to stir it with a stick, but the automatic makes it a very comfortable car. The instrument panel is informative and incorporates everything you would probably want to know, although the display that tells you about lights and doors can become unreliable after a while. Looks? It does look a nice car. Until you get to the newer models, where they started using those 'frog eye' head lamps and wide mouthed grilles, which killed the Scorpio. Ford really lost the plot in design on the newer models I feel. The older models were nice, wi
          th a long sweeping bonnet and nice font bumper. The cabin area of the car is high, and the windscreen is very vertical, ruining the sleek look, but again, really helps in terms of comfort. The rear is square and ends rather sharply, with not much attention to detail. It is like the designer started it on the Monday at the front, and by Friday was fed up and just left the back, which lets the overall styling down a bit. The wheel arches make a comfortable hole for the 15inch wheels it sits on, and depending on the model and spec you buy, sits on some fairly nice alloys for standard cars. With room to improve if you so wish. You could probably squeeze some 17inch under there, but they would not look right on a car like this. It does look an executive car, and styling on the older models was nice. The newer styling from across the pond ruined what was a nice looking car, but overall, Ford didn't do to bad. Safety? Safety is good in the Granada. ABS was fitted to most models, and some of the higher range, newer models have airbags. The brakes feel responsive but soft under light application. They stop the car well, and are perfect match for the car. The ABS is violent when it kicks in, and really throws you and your passengers about, but you only feel the ABS under very heavy breaking, and as long as it keeps your car in the same shape, and more importantly, you in the same shape, then it is a minor discomfort for a safe car. The build is strong, and makes a very tough car. Its long engine bay gives plenty of crumple zone and heavy build should keep you in one piece should the unfortunate happen. Be warned with the back end and having a towbar mind you. Ours got hit the other week from behind, in a slow shunt. And the towbar and the way it is fitted, pushed forward into the rear differential, much faster and it would have smashed the differential. Overall it is a safe car to be in, and should help keep you safe. Security?
          Standard Ford alarm isn't much to write home about. Offering door opening sensing mainly. With Ultrasonic on some of the newer models. If you want good security then ditch the standard alarm in favour of a good aftermarket system, as the standard is poor. Apart from that, that's all it offers in security really. What to look out for? Well, like I said, 145,000 and no problems really yet. But watch out for the typical faults with the Granada, mainly electrical, things like the Windscreen washer system, Drivers window, locks, boot lock being the common ones to go wrong, and seems to be a problem across the range. The engine needs a bit of TLC to maintain it. Regular service and oil checks, if done right will keep the engine ticking for a fair few miles. Overall verdict? Well for a Ford, it isn't bad. Not much in comparison to the Vauxhall Omega, but if you are a Ford fan, then the Granada will probably meet your taste. A much nicer car than the Mondeo in most aspects, and unlike the Mondeo, tends to be more a status symbol, where as the Mondeo is as common as the Fiesta! If you want a car that is comfortable, fairly economical, and a great family car then the Granada is worth putting on your list of cars to check out. If you want comfort and power, with good handling, and rapid performance, then you would do better to leave Ford and follow the crowd into the Vauxhall, or some of the Japanese cars available now. As power is what lets the Ford down. Forget the Diesel, as you won't gain any of the advantages of diesel with the Ford diesel engines and are to be avoided. Go Automatic for the ultimate driving experience, and manual if you want to stir it with a stick, if you don't mind not gaining much in performance. A car that will be around for a while, and is now fairly cheap to pick up second hand. That's probably the nicest thing I have said about a Ford. Just goes to show, they ha
          ve potential, but let them selves down by created buckets such as the Mondeo, and Probe. Make the most of the Granada while you can, then be ready to look elsewhere I think.

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            13.06.2001 04:53
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            Having spent too much money getting my old Capri shiny and rust free, I then got scared about having to leave the thing outside, open to the effects of vandals, the weather, and the gritting lorry that seem to enjoy pebble dashing it at least three times every night throughout the winter. So I started to keep an eye out for something else to drive while the Capri could languish in it’s warm, dry garage. The problem was that the Capri was such fun that I couldn’t really think of anything else I’d rather drive. So when my father decided it was time to buy himself a new car, and found his old Granada to be worth approximately the square root of naff all on a trade-in the problem was solved for me, and I’m rather pleased with the result. The Granada in question is a 1987 Scorpio 2.9i hatchback. It’s benefited from having some good owners – Ford themselves ran it for a while, before it’s next owner, who kept the service history stamped for the next 8 years until it came into my father’s ownership. Admittedly by this age, plenty of Granadas have had heaps of owners, and most likely have been thrashed mercilessly, but you could strike lucky. When it came to me, it had only covered 88,000 miles, which I hope should hardly be a problem for it’s gargantuan 2.9 V6 engine. It’s got all the toys – automatic gearbox (4 speed for better economy), power steering, anti-lock brakes, central locking, alarm, heated front windscreen, electric windows, sunroof and seats (even the back seats can move around at the push of a button, and the front ones heat up), cruise control, air conditioning, headlamp washers, fuel computer, and a clever clock with built an stopwatch and a sensor giving the outside temperature. About the only thing missing is leather seats, but hey, I can’t be that fussy. Probably through neglect the air conditioning no longer does it’s thing, which is a shame, but the cost o
            f fixing it is out of the question for such a luxury – besides, I’ve been told I’m saving fuel by having the pump disconnected. The fancy original Ford stereo with separate graphic equaliser refused to use the right hand speakers when playing cassettes, but the 80’s vintage hi-fi would have been first in line for replacement with a bit of Sony RDS trickery anyway. Apart from that, the only problem is an occasionally sticky rev counter – something I was a little puzzled about the usefulness of on an automatic anyway. The styling probably isn’t to everyone’s taste, but really it’s fairly middle of the road (with maybe a slight aggressive edge) and easy to live with. The liberal amounts of plastic swathed around the outside aren’t pretty, but are practical in a car park, and it has plenty of bits of chrome and alloy wheels (and even an alloy spare) to tart it up a little. So anyway, to the business end – living with the thing. Well, first impressions after driving pretty much any bread and butter motor (me having driven a succession of Fiestas and the like, but especially after driving a Capri, a design largely unchanged since 1969) are that it’s just wonderful, so big – superb for a big family and all their shopping - comfortable and full of nice features – silly things like lights in the footwells and the doors and useful things like warning lights that tell you if an exterior light bulb has failed, or if it may be frosty of icy outside. Visibility is superb all round and although the car is vast the amount of glass means that negotiating car parks and the like is no problem at all. An automatic gearbox was a new thing for me, but it’s easy to be lazy, and it soon became second nature. The size of the engine made fuel consumption a bit of a worry, so I’ve been fairly gentle with the accelerator, but I’ve obviously had to experiment, and when you wa
            nt it to go, by golly does it go. Flooring it from a junction makes it take off like a rocket, the auto box holding right back on it’s changes, the engine emitting something of a head turning roar. On the open road flooring the accelerator will make the gearbox kick down a gear giving it plenty of overtaking power. On the motorway it’ll cruise at 80mph at ridiculously low revs. Admittedly it’s not exactly nimble but it always gets around the corners in the end with a satisfying squeal of rubber. Driving this sort of car kind of changes your driving style a little anyway, it’s more of a cruiser than a racer. Giving the car a good thrashing does however bring your attention to the fuel computer. It’s a clever little box of tricks. A push of a button makes the small digital display cycle between estimated current fuel consumption, average fuel consumption, fuel used (since you last reset the counter) and miles remaining – all in your choice of metric or imperial. Useful as this is, it can be something of a distraction. Leaving it set to current fuel consumption is nothing short of comical – lurching from 0mpg with the pedal floored to 99mpg as you let off, as the computer struggles in vain to keep up with you. The range setting can be just as disturbing. The computer will knock a mile of your estimated range about every thirty seconds for the first few minutes of your journey until it settles down. A long steady journey will often see you arriving at your destination with more estimated miles in your tank than when you set off. Nevertheless, it’s a useful little tool, even it can be a bit of a distraction. Overall on a mix of town and open road driving I reckon I’m getting about 25mpg, which isn’t really any worse than my old 1.6 Capri, but with an awful lot more ‘go’, and certainly can’t be complained about with an engine of that size. It’s a pretty well p
            ut together old thing, the odd squeak from bits of the interior, but nothing too irritating, and nothing but the odd speck of surface rush here and there. It’s solid too – three times since I’ve known it I’ve seen people attempt to part it with one of it’s door mirrors, the result being a solid ‘thunk’ as the Granada’s mirror springs back into place unscathed, and a shower of glass as the aggressors mirror disintegrates. At the moment I can’t speak for parts costs – I know my father hasn’t had to spend a fortune on it, and that’s in an ownership that’s seen new radiator, petrol tank, rear brake discs and sundry other bits and pieces. I do know that I didn’t think that £35 didn’t seem too much to ask for a new tyre. So as it stands I’m loving it. I keep finding new toys (if you’ve got the windscreen wipers on and select reverse, it thoughtfully turns on the back wiper) which adds to the fun. If something expensive (i.e. the engine or gearbox) breaks it’ll be a different story, but then I’ll probably just throw it away. I realise I’m talking from the vantage point of having got the car for nothing, but a similar (or even a newer) Granada really shouldn’t set you back more than 800 quid or a grand and to be honest I’d rather buy another one every year if need be than buy a nearly new Fiesta every three years.

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              05.06.2001 17:21
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              • "VERY EXPENSIVE"

              I bought an M Reg Scorpio in April 2000 for £5,300. Without doubt it was the worst and most expensive vehicle I have ever owned which was amazing considering I have had 27 cars previously. The following things were either wrong or never worked :- Headlights, gearbox, steering, heated seat, heated front window, cigar lighters , rear wash wipe, air conditioning, brakes, immobiliser, radio, starter motor and several other items. It had done 88,000 miles when I bought it, and broke down 30 times in the first two months. In all it was off the road in garages for 8 out of 13 months. The final straw came when after very considerable expense Ford would NOT supply the steering parts necessary for it to pass the MOT and I had to get my finance company to write the car off. What added grief to the sorry story is that it only averaged 14 mpg, which is terrible even considering the 2.9 engine. When I contacted Ford they also laughed at me, and suggested I buy a Mondeo instead, even though they have as yet after 2 months been unable to supply a brochure. However, as regards the Scorpio I must admit it was well built which one could tell by the solid feel on slamming the door shut at the scene of another breakdown, it could not possibly have required another feature (although in my case the only one not to go wrong was the trip computer ), was extremely luxurious and roomy to sit in while awaiting another recovery man whilst resting in the (unheated due to being broken) leather seats AND admiring the lovely wood finish around me. One would have had to be a millionaire to be able to fill the luggage area with duty free goods. The power steering was extremely useful for effortless parking, and the car was so powerful that a very restful and rapid acceleration to 60mph in a time of about 9 seconds required a feather on the accelerator. And the gearchange on the (leaking !! ) auto- gearbox was wonderful. The cruise control kept me cle
              ar of accidents on an unexpectedly snowy day when other cars were slewing off the motorway as well. I notice recently the Scorpio has come 5th in the league of most forgetable cars, up there with such horrors as the Allegro, and this must be due to the manufacturer not putting much effort behind it, which is a huge pity because in essence it could have been a great car spoilt perhaps by old technology such as the ageing engine. Coming back to this op about a month after writing it, and 3 months after disposing of the car I feel that there are several points on the car I do miss which are the extremely quiet ride on the motorway when the volume of the radio did not need to be touched, and the massive luggage are for my frequent trips to France to coolect lager and wine. Boy , was I unlucky with it . As, perhaps a final note to this sad story, I recently saw the unfortunate new owner of this car, and he still seemed to be having trouble with the gearbox !!

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                30.11.2000 20:50
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                About 2 months ago I happened to be looking at the trade-ins behind a local garage and came accross a 1990 Scorpio saloon 2.0 auto, in silver. It was a very hansome looking car with black leather interior, every electric extra, superb stereo system, and only 93,000 on the clock. I'd always loved the Scorpio from when they had first been produced, and now was my chance at owning one. I wanted to be sure that I wasn't buying a dud, so went over it with a fine tooth comb. I tried every switch, checked all the fluids, ie. brake, pas, engine oil, water, etc, checked for leaks, corrosion, crash damage, tyres, etc. After I was fully satisfied, I asked for the keys to give it a spin up the road. My wife got in as well and as soon as she got into the comfortable leather seats, saw the cd player and sunroof, she said "You've got to get this car!". "Hold on!" I said,"We need to make sure everything is ok before we fork out!". I've been caught out with duff cars in the past and am in no hurry to repeat the experience! After giving it some welly up the road, making sure the auto gear change was smooth, the brakes were nice and sharp, and no problems elsewhere, I decided to buy the car. It had 6 months MOT on it and almost full service history so seemed a good buy at the asking price of £750, but to get that cracking bargain, I got the dealer down to £600. My wife and I were well pleased with our purchase of this luxurious cruiser! I knew time would tell whether there would be any trouble with the car, but up to now there hasn't been. A couple of the interior switches need a tweak, but apart from that, it drives like a dream. The brakes are incredibly sharp, the engine is so quiet, the pas is beautiful, and at gentle 50mph, I've had 38.5mpg out of it(the fuel computer on the dash tells you!)It's only group 12 insurance as well. All my friends are amazed that it only cost £6
                00, I am aswell! It's worth more than twice that. It drives so smooth, looks so good, everyone comments on it, and I've even been asked to use it for a wedding in two months time as the bridesmaids car! If anyone is wondering whether to buy a Scorpio, I would unhesitatingly recommend it, as long as a thorough check is made on it, as you would any car you're considering buying. The prices of second hand cars is dropping rapidly, and big luxurious limos are now very cheap, and I am grateful that they are! Buy one! Buy two!

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                  30.10.2000 20:32
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                  The Granada Scorpio is such a lovely car to drive .We have had it for 2 weeks and its perfect. It a K reg. so its quite old but it runs so smoothly and has lots of creature comforts. My husband as always wanted one of these since his brother got one 6 years ago and he has sold it on to us. I must admit I wasn't sure about driving it as its an estate, a big monster and I'm used to driving a Peugeot 205 diesel .But after a test drive I was really impressed. It automatic( comes in manual too) and has gears 1,2,3 ,drive, park, neutral, reverse options on the gear stick.. For people who don't know about automatics, there is no clutch pedal, but the engine moves though the necessary gears. Most of the time you drive it in "drive" mode, but you can move though the gears for town driving. When you park up you use the "park "mode," Reverse" of reserving etc. It has a cruise control for motor way driving, and when you are in this mode you just increase or decrease speed via cursors on the steering wheel. Of course you still have to use the breaks if braking sharply or slowing down pretty quick, but this mode is very handy for the overtaking. You can give your feet a rest too. I do find that when I first drive it my clutch foot was rather redundant, and I kept wanting to use it but of course there is no pedal there. Its all electric, which has its advantages. Electric windows front and rear, you can even lock the back windows if you don't want the kids to open them. It also has seat adjustment, moving outside mirrors and even has heated heats, very handy now winter is coming! It has a in built CD player, radio and an onboard "computer "which tells you how many miles to the gallon you are doing, temp outside and inside car. It has ABS braking- which means that its safer than as it automatically "pumps" the breaks which stops you sliding, reduces locked brakes and minimises skidding.It takes unl
                  eading petrol which is better for the car and the world. It has a lovely interior with black leather seats, which worries me a little as Jess, being 2.5 throws everything everywhere, but I suppose food and drink will wipe off easily!! It has lots of room everywhere, which you need for a family of four and boot space is shallow but broad, so you can get a suitcase, buggy/pram, and a few more bits in there. comforts, I'm going to become a lazy driver- now where's that clutch pedal??................. I would recommend this car to anyone, family or someone who is looking for something a little different, but smart. I'm really pleased so far with this car.

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                    22.10.2000 03:03
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                    Well what can I say, Having just lost my beloved Volvo to that great car park in the sky I had to find some new wheels. A friend of mine was getting rid of a 1990 Granada 2Ltr Ghia i as his father in law had just given him his old car. I wasn't sure that I wanted a Ford ( Fix Or Repair Daily ), but after a short test drive I was hooked. Slight rust on the wheel arches and a broken drivers door handle were the only things wrong with the car. The 2 litre engine provides more than enough power to enrage Nova boy racers and with the automatic gearbox and superb suspension it is like driving an armchair. Fuel ecomony is not that much worse that the old Volvo at around 28 - 35 mpg depending on town or motorway driving. But as a gadget freak I am like a pig in the brown sticky stuff with this car. Overhead disply shows the time, date, outside temperature and it even has a built in stopwatch which is accurate to 1/10 of a second. Next to the dashboard the on-board computer gives you the current mpg, the average mpg, the fuel used and the number of miles left in the tank. All of these can be set to imperial or metric and they can also be reset whenever you want, ie just filled up with petrol. Talking of petrol the tank is huge, at todays UK prices it costs around £45 to fill the tank. The dashboard itself has a little line drawing of the car which does a thest of the lights so that you can tell if you have abrake light out before you drive away. All in all a great car to drive and the only car I have had yet that actually makes me want to drive slowly because it is so smooth.

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                    17.08.2000 22:09
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                    2.8i Engine, now that's what I call an engine. Granada's are the last great grunt cars from UK Ford. The Granada's I'm referring to are pre C reg. These cars are huge and not as aerodynamic as the newer Granadas but for some reason they were more powerful. The car might be very heavy but the grunt of an 2.8i soon gets the car cruising at a speed that makes you grin. With a flick of your foot on the pedal the kick-down occurs and with a surge of power you feel yourself being pushed back into the seat. This model is definitely a car to motor in with it's seats that are just like your favourite arm chair with the added bonus of them being heated. This model maybe old but it also came with a computer built into the dash, displaying information such as distance travelled, how many miles you can go before it needs refilling etc. I won't talk much about fuel consumption as it's not very nice, it's sufficient to say that if you drive hard, your wallet is hit hard.

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                    05.07.2000 05:12
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                    We are a 2 Granada family now, we got our first about 3 years ago at an auction and it has served us so well we got another recently. No other car compares for sheer size, comfort and boot space! The automatic gear box is so easy to use, it kicks down fast giving that extra oompf when you need to overtake. Little has gone wrong other than normal wear and tear items. There is lots of legroom in the back so is very comfy for adult rear passengers. We have 2 young children so 2 car seats at the moment. It can comfortably take both kids in car seats plus 3 (slim) adults, the 2 in 1 pushchair fits in the boot without having to take it apart, and our double pushchair also fits in no trouble. I find it easy to steer, and being a short person (5'3") I also find the all round visibility much better than on many cars. Which doesn't really excuse the odd prang I've had in the car park - oops! The bodywork is sound (mine is a 1991 H) with no problems at all. At well over 125,000 miles this car seems to be going on and on and on, will I ever find an excuse to get a new one? Will I ever want to? If you need a second hand family car you could do far worse than a Granada.

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