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Nero Burning ROM 5.x in general

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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

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      14.12.2003 09:29
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      It all started when I had too much stuff on my hard disk and I didn?t want it to lose because either I love it or it was too important. So one day I asked to myself what the hec why don?t I use my RW drive? I started looking for good Software that can burn CDs for me. I found Nero and ever since I have used it, ii am the biggest fan of it and I can?t think of using another one. By the way before using Nero ii used Easy CD Creator. Don?t ask me how it was. I can?t explain how awful it was in one line I will have to write a whole review on it. With Nero you can compile CDs regardless of the format: audio, photos, video, data, games anything you name it and Nero will compile it for you. I Personally have been using it for over a year now and most of my use consists of compiling movies (that I download for free from KAZAA, See my review on KAZAA) and my java programs that I don?t want to lose. Nero is very easy to use. After installing and going through all regular stuff clicking next several times you will finally see a main window on your desktop. It is very user-friendly you just click on what you want to do and it will start performing that function for you. No tricks and no confusing steps. You just put the CD in your drive and your computer will start the Nero program for you. If it does not start the Nero application, you can always run Nero by selecting it from the Start menu or by click on the shortcut on your desktop. When the program opens and it asks you to copy the whole CD to another one or make your new CD by selecting the data from your hard drive. Copy CD to CD It is very easy you just click on it and it will start making a new CD. Making Your Own CD It is also easy but first you have to go through some steps before Nero will compile the CD for you. When you click on New CD button it will open a new window. In this window on the right it will show you the contents of your whole Hard Drive. You can
      copy and paste the content to the left side, which is the New CD side on the bottom it shows that how much space is left on the CD. You can also drag-and0drop the content which I love it is fast. After you are done selecting the content, just click on compile CD and the burning process starts and in a few minutes depending on your Drive?s writing speed you will have a new CD. Other Cool Features Nero converts basic formats of file automatically. For example from wave to mp3 and vice versa. You can also create labels for CDs though I have never use this feature simply because I don?t need it. Plus when you start compilation it gives you the option of verifying the compilation. This way you can make sure that your new CD works. You can also erase a CD if it already has some data on it. In short this is the best package for burning CDs. It has everything; the more you use it the more you will come to know about its cool features. It fits the needs of every person. I definitely recommend Nero.

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        10.08.2003 23:30
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        Computer software and the like isn?t really my strong point, I?ll admit. However, I feel fairly confident of my dealings with Nero to write a sufficiently helpful opinion on it. *** Prices *** Although my dad managed to acquire the program for free, which to be honest, I?m pretty sure most people would be able to, Kelkoo.com throws up the following prices for the software, postage + packaging included: - Amazon.co.uk: £30.22 - Saversoftware: £38.62 - Dabs.com: £26.43 for the basic program or £41.12 for added extras, including Nero Vision Express and Nero Express. I?m fairly sure that shopping around offline retailers would yield some lower prices. *** Getting started *** The first thing to do is to decide on what you want to copy. There are a number of things that you can use Nero to copy: · Music CDs · Data CDs · DVDs When Nero is first opened, it can be set to automatically start with a wizard to help you copy your CDs, which is immensely helpful. It begins by asking what medium you wish to copy, in my case it is CDs. Next, you can choose to either compile a new CD, using a range of formats including WAV, MP3, CDA, WMA or a M3U playlist, or to copy a ?proper? CD. After this, it asks whether you wish to create an audio CD, a data CD or other CD formats, which I think is the option that my dad uses to copy DVDs and VCDs. After going through your options, it brings up what I would call the ?creating? or ?compiling? screen. On the left of the screen you have the CD that you?re creating; on the right your file explorer where you choose the files you wish to copy. And this, ladies and gents, is where you really, really get started. The most helpful thing for me to do, rather than try and explain every single thing that the software does is to give you an example of copying a CD, then you can see how easy it is to do so. *** Making a CD *** Firstly
        , compile your list of songs in Winamp and save it as a playlist. I find this to be the easiest way of getting them in order. Open up Nero and go through the wizard choosing the options of: 1. CD 2. Compile a new CD 3. Audio CD 4. Finish You will then come to the compiling screen, with a blank ?audio? box on the left and your explorer box on the right. Find your saved playlist (M3U file). This will show on the right-hand side of the screen. You need to transfer the file into the audio box. To do this, click on the file and drag it into the box. Nero automatically changes files into the WAV format, which is good because it means you take up less space on your machine than if you had to save everything as WAV to begin with. After the program has checked the songs and converted them, you are ready to burn! To do this, click the button in the taskbar that looks like a finger pointing to a burning CD. This then brings up another screen in which you choose your recording speed and then yet another which shows you the progress of the CD. When the CD is complete, click ?Discard? and that?s it! The CD automatically ejects and your masterpiece is complete. *** Additional Information *** There are other features included on Nero, which to be honest I don?t often use. As all I want to use it for is to create and copy CDs, and make the occasional CD of photos, a lot of the extras are unnecessary for my needs. The one I tend to use the most is the Medium-Info as this tells you how many MB the CD is in size which is useful if you?ve gone over the limit. This is another feature that Nero has which is handy; it tells you how long the CD is in either MB or minutes, depending on what format you are copying. Really though, unless you are intending to use Nero for something other than copying CDs, or you like to know a bit more about the making-making process, the extras aren?t really that important. You can label the CD digit
        ally and save your creation into various databases using the menus at the top, but this is beyond what I need from the program. The help topics are fairly expansive and any questions or quibbles you might have are sure to be answered here. It covers everything from the basic CD-copying to burning over-sized CDs. The website for the software is www.nero.com and it seems to be pretty comprehensive. You can find out more about the product as well as forthcoming versions. *** Some problems *** The problems I have had when dealing with Nero have been minimal. On a few occasions, it hasn?t actually recorded onto the CD and I?ve been left with a blank CD that Nero will not allow me to try and use again, which can be frustrating. Occasionally, the software does not recognise that the blank CD is actually blank and repeatedly asks you to ?insert blank medium? which is incredibly annoying when you?re on your last blank CD. Also, sometimes when you drag your songs from the explorer file into the audio box, not all of the song transfers and you get say, 50 seconds of a 4 minute song. However, I've found that this tends to only affect specific songs e.g., I cannot record my mp3 of The Goo Goo Dolls - Iris. The program just will not have it! So, I suspect that this particular mp3 may have some problem with it that Nero detects and so refuses to use. However, these are occasional problems, which aren?t enough to stop me using the program. *** In conclusion *** Nero is a simple yet complete piece of software, for me at any rate. It does everything that I want it to, but might not be as complex as other users might like. By this, I mean that it doesn?t have all the bells and whistles that a more expensive or advanced piece of software might have. The few problems can be irritating but as I said before, they aren?t enough to make me stop using the program. It is quick and easy to
        use, though a recommendation is to close all other programs down when using it, even the Internet, as it can sometimes crash the computer. Again, as long as you remember to do this, it shouldn?t be too much of a setback. I would recommend Nero for people who want a simple piece of software that they can learn to use rapidly without wanting to be sidetracked by too many technical points. Put it this way, if I can use it without causing too much damage to the computer, then most people should be able to. Try downloading a trial version of the program first before you decide to buy it, that way if you do feel that you aren?t comfortable with it, you won?t have wasted any money. However, I don?t think there?s anyone who won?t like this program and I would almost put money on it. Hopefully, this opinion will help you to decide whether Nero is for you or not.

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          18.07.2003 03:52
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          Burn it up! I have used Nero for several years now, finding it the most easy and fast software to use for CD writing. As I make a lot of CDs the ease of using the software is important and not being very technically minded towards CDs I understand very little about transfer rates, buffer sizes and caches, much less what settings to put them at. Luckily Nero is very quick to set up and get into using - there are lots of pictures, diagrams and instructions to guide you through writing or burning your CDs and making it as painless as possible without requiring you to have written a thesis on IDE transfer channels, laser technology or recorded media standards to know how to use it. I have used it on Windows 98SE, ME, 2000 and XP without problems or the dreaded Buffer Under-runs that you seem to get with other CD writing software halfway through a disk. One advantage of Nero Burning ROM is the disk space used - it is a much smaller program than Easy CD Creator and seems to take less system resources. It needs just over 30Mb to run when installed with all the extras. Nero is very simple to use. When starting, you are presented with a set of menus with clear options and pictures on them asking you whether you want to create a new CD or copy a CD. It then asks what type of CD you want to create - whether it is a music CD or data CD or other type (VCD, mixed CD etc). It then asks if it is a new CD or whether you are continuing with a CD (multi-session CD) and adding files to it. On selecting these you are presented with two window panes - one shows what is going onto the CD and the other shows your hard disk. You then drag and drop files onto the CD pane and click on the Burn icon and away you go. This Wizard mode is so well set out that it is all you will probably need for writing CDs of various sorts and there is no need to go any further into the options - just a few clicks will be all that is needed most of the time. However if you
          want you can do away with the menus (Wizard) and simply select from many options of new compilation you want to make: these are CD Rom ISO, audio CD, Mixed Mode CD, CD Extra, CD Copy, Video CD (VCD), Super Video CD, Boot CD-Rom, Hybrid or UDF format or to burn an Image (iso, bin, cue, nrg etc). The audio CD is used to create CDs that will play on your hifi or CD player. Simply drag on MP3s or other music files and it creates the CD for you. You can easily alter the track lists and names or change the gaps between tracks. There are also a raft of other options for you to create splits in the tracks, add filters to mix and crossfade, add echo or remove hiss from them and an audio editor to alter peaks of the music (shown as a volume dB oscilloscope output for each track) to normalise the volume (useful for compilation CDs to make the tracks all the same volume). The data CD is used for backups, backups ;-) and videos. Again simply drag the files onto your new CD pane and click the burn icon. A bar along the bottom of the screen indicates how much room is available on the CD. After clicking on Burn you are asked what speed you want to write at and then the process starts. There are also various options to test the speeds of your CD drives, alter cache settings and buffer sizes and whether to use FreeDb on the internet to automatically receive song titles for your tracks when buring a CD. You also get a CD label and inlay card cover designer, wave editor and Quick Start manual. One of the best features is the ability to back up entire partitions as a Hard Disk Backup. If you are then adding a new hard disk or reformatting a disk you can then quickly re-image the drive and instantly add Windows, your programs, all your settings, documents and data back. This utility comes into its own when problems with Windows occur. I have found that Windows usually ends up falling over after a year or two of usage or becomes so slow at startup i
          t needs a spring clean to get going again. To digress for a minute this is usually down to the Windows registry. Generally as you install or re-install software the Windows Registry gets bigger and more bloated. The Registry is generally a large 'book' of settings, links and values for mainly profiles, programs and drivers that Windows reads every time it starts and runs. Over time as you install or uninstall software and drivers it gets more entries in it, usually because it fails to completely remove links when software is uninstalled or adds in more as more software is installed. Windows gets progressively slower due to this or may even not run properly if the registry gets corrupted. The only option here - save trying to fix the registry or reinstall Windows over itself to paper over the cracks - is to wipe the hard disk or partition that Windows is on, reinstall Windows and all your software and drivers and you should then be back to the fast system you had that started quickly (and usually pray that you were wise enough to back up all your documents and data or move it onto another partition beforehand). However if you make a copy of the partition or image when your system is running well you can reformat the hard disk and use this to restore the entire partition without having to go through reinstalling Windows, your software, drivers, email settings and so on (which can take up to 4 hours). Computer retailers and maintainers re-image drives to quickly set up lots of computers with all the software and operating systems on them. It will have backed up all your documents and data on the partition too, so these will be restored too, plus you will get your good fast operating system back. The backup hard disk option on Nero is easily to use, and the Help section gives lots of useful advice on how to use it. The partition is usually spanned over several CDs when you back it up, with Nero prompting you when to insert the next CD and continuing
          with the backup. The backup can then be restored from DOS mode or from a Windows boot disk or CD. After using Nero for a bit these are some tips that I have found useful: Make sure that you finalise your CDs if you are not going to add other files to them or are giving them to other people. Sometimes CDs will not work on other computers if they have not been 'closed' first. Nero can usually squeeze a large file onto a CD even if if is right up to its capacity, although it may be forced to finalise the CD to be able to write all of it onto one CD. If you are using cheap CDs you may not be able to write on them at such a fast speed and they may only be able to cope at a slower writing speed such as 20x. Try dropping the speed down to avoid disk writing errors. Similarly videos can often generate errors when burning onto CD at high speed so burn them as slow as you can go at (even down to 4x or 8x). If there is an error 'data error (cyclic redundancy check)' when accessing or playing files from a CD this is because there is a problem with reading the data written on the CD - usually because it was burned too quickly. One problem I found with Nero was that I had one CD rewriter already when I bought another which was bundled with an OEM copy of Nero. On installing this I found that I could no longer use the older CD burner any more to write to it. A lot of versions of Nero are shipped as OEM copies with new CD burners or drives. These are generally locked so that you can only use Nero with the new drive and not any existing drives. Look in the Nero Help section on how to get your Nero serial number and visit their website (www.ahead.de) for instructions on how to unlock the product or upgrade it so that it works on all your disks. There is a good article in PC Answers August 2003 about this. As mentioned Ahead have an excellent website with lots of information, FAQs and support articles about
          Nero and upgrades and drivers and utilities to download - most for free. Overall an excellent product well worth the price, the best CD writing software around with the worst name-pun, and king (or should that be emperor?) of CD writing.

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            23.05.2003 19:19
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            Nero is a very good at the drag and drop style for making CD-R`s. There are several other programme that are good at this but Nero has some features I?ve not seen before. The main feature is the ability to drop MP3 files and has them recorded as CD-Audio tracks on the fly. This makes Making CD`s with 18 legally downloaded tracks (form up and coming bands) very easy indeed. Other features like a very well laid out wizard and interface make the user experience very good indeed. Compared with the competing products it compared very well. Though it?s main advantage over packages like the EasyCD that came with my drive is the native MP3 compatibility. If you need a package I?d definitely recommend Nero. If you already have a package look at the feature list and shortcomings of what you have and compare that to the price tag yourself.

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              14.01.2003 17:35

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              One of the best of breed - Advantages: Simple wizards, Easy to use even without wizards - Disadvantages: none

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              16.12.2002 04:03

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              Better than any other Burning Programs - Advantages: Fast and Efficient, Easy To Use, Reliable - Disadvantages: none

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              16.11.2002 19:30

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              Nero 5.x is a superb software application used for creating and burning your own cds, obviously you must have a cd burner, but this program is perfect for new cd burners. Using a drag and drop system , just drag the file you want to put to cd then click burn, it really is that simple. Choose wether you want to create music cds, create a multi session disc and place large files to cd so they don't take up valuable hard disc space.

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              30.09.2002 05:31
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              CD burning is a wonderful invention, enabling even the most limited genius to thrust his art and his muse upon an unsuspecting world. Long gone are the days where you had to grovel to a music empire or strike it lucky with an up and coming independent label in order to bring your works, good bad or indifferent, to the attention of the world. These days, all you need is a PC, a midi keyboard, a bit of composing software, a couple of blank CD's and a burning program and you're away. Sadly that also means that there's an awful lot of crap sitting around out there ready to bore you senseless, but that's life. On the whole, I come down on favour of having a bit of dross floating around, if that's the only cost of such technological advances. I have to say I'm a great addict of burning my own CD's, whether for storage of data, ripping off overblown rock star's art, or creating my own little piece of history. And as far as CD-burning software is concerned, there is really only one name to consider, and that's the all too wonderful Nero. It comes from Ahead Software, and it's so far ahead of the competition that it's almost untrue. I cut my burning teeth on an unpleasant heap of rubbish called Adaptec Direct-CD, which is one of the most disastrous of all pieces of software, prone to bugs and wrecking your CD drives so watch out. The 5.5 version of Nero is available at between thirty and forty quid, with the best current offer being at Jungle, where you can get it complete with a pack of 10 blank CD's for just £32.99, a great bargain. The PC Pro website carries this to the point review of the software: "Nero is an excellent, user-friendly package, designed in such a way that you can be burning within three mouse-clicks. The software's wizard-based interface is organised into tasks, which means you don't need to understand the theory behind writing discs to a
              ctually do it. All you need to know is what sort of disc you want to make - music, data, mixed or video. Nero works the rest out. For more daring users, it has plenty of advanced features - MP3 and Video CD discs are supported. A very powerful package." I trust PC Pro implicitly and see no reason whatsoever to argue with their view. I was very impressed with Nero the first time I tried it, and would never now consider any other package. It operates blisteringly fast, it's effective, efficient and gloriously simple with an easy to use interface that walks you through every step in the process. When I started with Adaptec, it often took me well over an hour to burn a full CD. With Nero, that task lasts approximately five minutes, and the results are far more reliable and trustworthy. I ruined stacks of CD's using Adaptec, but Nero is just a dream. You get a neat Window Explorer type double panel - drag your tracks from the right panel across to the left, click the burn icon and you're away, and minutes later you're there with a little piece of perfection in your hot little hands. Nero also comes complete with a natty little site - http://www.nero.com/en/#root - and you can find full details of the package there, and even download a demo version of the software. They claim that the software supports all of the following formats: CD-ROM CD-ROM XA Audio CD Mixed Mode CD Video CD Super Video CD CD Exra Bootable CD HFS ISO/HFS Hybrid UDF UDF/ISO Bridge DVD ISO DVD UDF DVD ISO/UDF (Bridge) Bootable DVD DVD copy on the fly and via image DVD images Impressive eh? In fact, it looks like the only thing missing is Betamax!! I love this CD with every fibre of my being and can't do it full justice - it's truly excellent, and the most important feature is that you never have to worry about it. I used to hate
              using Adaptec and spent many a bad weekend trying to repair the damage done by that terrible software. Touch wood, I've never had a single problem with Nero, and there are pretty few packages you can say that about these days. Beg, steal, borrow, or even buy it if you have to, but GET IT!!

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                12.05.2002 19:27
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                I purchased a new advent desktop computer about three months ago. I was horribly shocked to find that the only CD burning software it had was the standard windows XP software, which is quite useless. So I hurriedly went out and bought Nero. As soon as I installed it I realised it was one of the greatest buys i have ever made. I admit that it can be a bit complicated but as soon as you put on the wizard, it?s as easy as pie. You just drag the data in that you want to put onto cd and then click burn. I would recommend this piece of handy software. I have recommended to many of my friends and have received great thanx for it, as it I believe the best burning wizard available to date.

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                  07.05.2002 03:45
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                  Nero Burning Rom is an excellent package, despite consisting of just 11 or 12 Mb for the core program. Most people usually consider the 2 options are copying a complete disc or selecting individual files or folders to create a disc, but Nero offers much more than that. Of course these 2 options are available and probably will be used more than any other. On launching Nero you are given the choice of selecting "Copy a CD" or "Compile a new CD", simply choosing your option will take you to the appropriate interface. Compiling a new CD can be done by selecting files or folders from your hard drive or by choosing tracks or files from a CD or from both sources. This is a simple matter of dragging the files from one window to another. The choice of CD type includes Data, Audio, Video CD or even a mixed compilation so whatever you wish to create Nero will oblige. One useful feature is creating an image file, which is single file copy of a disc that can be written to a CD at a later time. Another practical application is InCD, a package writing facility included with Nero. InCD will erase data from a rewritable CD, so if you are storing information which you wish to change then simply wipe the disc and re-record. InCD can also be used to format a disc so that you can send files or folders to it just like a large floppy disc. This can be very helpful if you change your archived files on a regular basis, but it can only be read in a Rewriter Drive so is not advisable if you plan to pass the disc to someone else. The one downfall with Nero is the backup facility. You can copy your hard drive to a collection of CDs and use them to restore your drive if disaster falls, but the amount of space required makes this impractical for anyone with a modern PC containing a large hard drive. Instead of copying files, Nero actually copies the sectors of the hard drive. This is a good way of ensuring an accurate duplication, but it means that all the
                  drive has to be copied irrespective of whether it is being used. As a result, copying a hard drive of 75 Gb would require about 120 CDs, which is not only a ridiculous expense but would take an absurd period of time to copy or to restore. Personally I would rather just reformat the drive and re-install everything again. All in all Nero is a very reliable and versatile piece of software, so if you are thinking of buying a CD Writer then consider using Nero.

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                    21.03.2002 03:58
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                    Ahead Software's Nero Burning ROM 5.5 (the latest version as I write) came bundled with my CD rewriter, so firstly I do not know how much it costs (I think I've seen it for about £40) and how it fares against other CD recording software. All I know is that it works well for me, and I got it for free! Unlike a few other CD recording programs (i.e. Adaptec's Easy CD Creator), Nero doesn't demand much computer power to run, requiring only a 486DX and 8mb RAM, though still an exact spec is dependent on your drive. And the whole suite only takes up about 50mb of hard disk space - worth it when you can offload a lot more to CD. The Nero 5.5 suite consists of: Nero Burning ROM - the main pre-mastering software for virtually all your CD burning needs. Nero Cover Designer - for creating artwork for your CD's (probably best recommended for use with special kit paper). NeroMediaPlayer - to play multimedia files (though in honesty this optional player is a bit lame). Nero Image Drive Installer - I haven't used this, but I assume this is for making local hard disk versions of CD's. Nero Wave Editor - for simply editing wave files, though most people will have a better one on their machine. And a Nero ToolKit folder for testing CD and drive speeds. Also you can install InCD which allows you to format CD-RW discs for use as large floppy disks, i.e. you don't need to add files via pre-mastering from Nero Burning ROM, but there are certain instances when only Nero will do. Other 'packet writing' drivers and programs can read InCD CD's too. There is an option also to make a floppy disk copy of DOS drivers (you never know if you may need it in a crisis) and a 13 page .pdf manual, and Adobe Acrobat Reader to view it. 13 pages sounds paltry, but really you don't need that much help in using Nero, and most help topics can be accessible from Nero's help menu (which has a slightly m
                    arred system that I've gotten to grips with). Nero Burning ROM is a very simple application to use. If you know how to use Windows Explorer, you know how to use this. And add to the fact that despite being simplistic anyway (all button clicks and dialogue boxes), Nero is wizard driven, so any idiot can create CD's of any supported audio, video, data, combi format (Nero supports them all, but your CD writer may not), and you can record in increments or in full - whatever your CD rewriter is capable of doing, Nero will fulfill that task on it's end (CD type dependent). InCD resides in your system tray to format CD-RW discs for it's own usage and setting properties. Once a CD-RW has been formatted in this way you can use it in pretty much the same way as a floppy disk, even 'Save As...' menu items will let you save to CD. The entire suite, especially Nero Burning ROM and InCD are invaluable tools in getting the most out of your CD rewriter. I can't say how it fares to Adaptec, but it probably wins in terms of it's aged system friendliness and possibly price, and since Nero is bundled with may CD re-writers you can't argue that manufacturers don't think the same as their customers. I've not had any bad burns, errors or faults from Nero thus far. It loads fast, and it works well, and that's all there is to it. Marvellous! You can also download purchase Nero from www.nero.com. Have a visit, and defect from other software!

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                      16.10.2001 05:58
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                      Ahead Nero is CD writing software that is growing in popularity. But is it as good as it’s major rival Adaptec? Read on and I’ll give you my view of that. About 4 months ago I finally got round to upgrading my PC. Along with that of course went all my old hardware upgrades, which while top of the range at the time were looking somewhat dated. In particular, out went my trusty old 8x SCSI Hewlett Packard CD rewriter in favour of the brand spanking new 12 speed burnproof writer bundled with the new Evesham PC. The bundled Adaptec software that came with my old HP had become my best friend, especially the Packet writing software, DirectCD, which I used constantly, leaving a CDR in the drive permanently (or until it filled up at least) to write directly to the CD like an extra drive. Perfect for digital camera images, and MP3 writes that were quite capable of filling my 8GB hard drive in double quick time. Unfortunately, my version of the Adaptec software did not support the new CD writer, so I was left with the Ahead Nero bundle that was supplied with the new one. On loading the new software, the first thing I noticed was that Ahead’s packet writing software, InCD, only supports CDRW. This was a vast disappointment, as I generally only use CDRs, being cheap and “throwawayable”. This is a terrible omission by Ahead, for software that is in all other respects perfect. After my initial disappointment however, and on delving a little further into the features, it became apparent that the Ahead software was very powerful indeed. I realised that with the enormous capacity of my new hard drive, the very reason for using packet writing previously was not so much of an issue. I could leave all my files on the hard drive and then transfer them in bulk to CDR in one hit. As far as burning CD’s is concerned, Ahead’s software is the equal of Adaptecs in many respects, but beats it
                      hands down in terms of compiling audio CD’s. This can be done direct from MP3 format, without having to first convert them to WAV format. Just compile a list of music files direct from the CD or MP3s, and hit the burn button. The software does the rest, including prompting you to change the CD source when necessary. Another brilliant addition to the software is the Wave/MP3 editing software, which gives many options to change and enhance your music quickly and with the minimum of fuss. Examples are Dehiss, (which does exactly what it says on the tin), stereo widening enhancements, shortening tracks by increasing the speed slightly without a noticeable change in tone, and the ability to insert a fade out into the tracks, very useful if your MP3’s end abruptly or you are ripping from a Mix CD with no definable end to each track. There are so many different options to tweak the music, in fact more than you’re ever likely to need, however the result is always the same - professional sounding music at virtually no cost in terms of extra software. All the usual CD writing features you would expect, such as multi-session writing and disk at once writing are handled deftly, although as with most software of this type, it falls down when making “backups” of your CD ROM games etc. (Coz everyone makes “backups” don’t they?) The user interface is a little harder to get used to than Adaptec’s. For example the list of directories on your hard drive is on the right, with the blank CD directory placed on the left, which to my mind goes against convention (example Windows Explorer). All in all though, it’s not too difficult to get the hang of, and the use of the obligatory wizard makes it a bit simpler. Upgrades appear to be easily available too. I managed to upgrade immediately from Nero 5.0 to 5.5, just by visiting the website. The upgrade file immediately recognised the previous ve
                      rsion was valid and installed the newer version with no fuss. As for support, this appears to be very comprehensive online, although the company is based in Germany so I don’t know how that would affect matters if you had to contact them by phone. Very expensive I would imagine. Fortunately, that’s not been an issue for me as the software has performed flawlessly. I’ve only just scratched the surface of the potential of this software, which ahas a wealth of features that I do not understand or wish to! However, all in all I would definitely recommend the software to anyone that asked, particularly for the music editing package with is quite remarkable. Adaptec gets a slight edge in ease of use, but this is a minor grumble. A major grumble is of course reserved for the fact that the packet writing software is CDRW only. This is inexcusable. But in the end the benefits outweigh the problems this causes.

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                        08.10.2001 01:00
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                        It’s considered as the best software in the category of CD-R/CD-RW: it's true! It’s ok also for old pc: minimum system requirements are: - 486/33hz - Winaspi - 8 MB ram There are many language versions: english, francaise, spanish,deutsche,italian,portuguese,chinese,dutch, danish. It’s the most popular software of Ahead Software (Germany). The box including also InCd for Cd-Rw and exist two versions: oem version, for sale with cd-recorder only (not licensed for separate sale) and retail versions. I can say that it’s good also oem version, but there is not a manula but user’s manula is included on the cd in the form of an Acrobat document. Installation is very easy.+ However Nero is easy: it’s optimum for your backup copy of your hard disk, cd rom and cd audio. If you would like a cd-rom or cd-audio from an original cd, Nero supported mode on fly: it’s a direct copy; you can also copy your cd from an image on your hard disk: this is certainly the best alternative. For your audio tracks,you can choose the sequence of the tracks, you can modify positions and properties. It’s compatible with all trademarks of Cd-rom, Dvd and Cd/r/rw. On web there are many updates with new properties and you can download also new versions!

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                          07.09.2001 01:05
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                          Nero 5.5 offers a flexible – easy to use interface for CD writers new or old. The software offer a clear, concise and easy to use interface for burning various CD formats – whether you are backing up your album collection or business transactions, or if you are creating your own album from private MP3 files. In all cases – you have a drag and drop interface – with your CD contents on the left, and your sources on the right. In the case of creating an album from MP3 files – you have the option to drag and drop the individual files – or alternatively you can add a WinAMP play list which will load all the songs in the list automatically. From here – you can customise the artist and titles for the tracks and the album, and you can set copyright information etc. In addition to this – Nero has a built in cover editor which will produce Jewel case sleeves with the information provided by yourself and the CD track list. You can also produce audio CDs from actual audio tracks on CDs that you own. This can be done by selecting tracks of several CDs – and Nero will even try to look up the track names if you are connected to the internet. With Data CDs – it is again a case of dragging and dropping the required files, and again – you can customise folder schemes and the naming and copyright of the CD. Once you have your CD layout – you can either: - Save the list of files for future use - Save your layout to an image file which will take up the space required for the CD on your hard drive - Burn the CD Saving lists may be particularly useful for repeated backups – as Nero will detect if file have been added or modified in the folders that you back up. This would also be useful if you wanted to release your own album or possibly a tester CD for record companies as you could easily burn or alter new copies and produce new tr
                          ack lists etc. Saving to an image file can often be the more reliable option, with the image already being prepared and in effect – it is just being copied to the target drive, rather than the software having to search out the files. This is often used to prevent burning errors (such as buffer under runs) which “coaster2 (render useless) your CDs. It is also advisable if you plan on producing multiple copies of your desired CD layout. Burning the CD – this is when the CD is burnt straight from a list of files, to the file being written to the CD itself. On lower specification CDs – this may cause problems – as the system may not maintain sufficient data flow – again leading to buffer under runs. In addition – here are a few other features Nero has to offer: - Multiple CDRW drives support - Multiple CD reader drives support - Burn proof and Just Link support - 74, 80 and 90 minute media supported - Overburn supported (dependant on hardware and media) - MP3 recording from source CDs - Conversion of Wav and MP3 files to CD Audio - Customisable CD information - File encoding - HDD backup to CDR All round – this software performs superbly – and with many manufacturers now shipping it with their drives – is the perfect choice for all CDRW users. A clean easy to use interface and concise Help files will get you burning in no time. Come highly recommended – enjoy! :-)

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                            18.07.2001 05:35
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                            You've been paying over the odds for music for too long now. You're sick of handing over all that cash when if your mate had it on tape instead, you could run off a copy just like that. Capitalism is bad, profit margins are even worse, and the mere thought of Eminem making a living out of his work makes you sick. So, what do you do? You get out there, install Nero 5, and start making backup copies for your own personal use. Nero has rightfully earned a reputation as the best CD mastering software on the market. With its vast support for CD drives, it now comes shipped with almost all new burners and this has given it the edge over all competitors. When I first bought my drive, I had only read about Nero and was perhaps a little sceptical - surely one product couldn't be that far ahead of the rest? Regardless, with it coming as part of my Ricoh drive, I installed away and hoped for the best. CD mastering is notoriously temperamental, even with the latest generation of drives supporting burn-proof technology and sporting large buffers. Nero 5 does its best to make creating or copying any kind of CD a relatively simple business, mainly through the wizard interfaces which are by far the easiest route into CD burning you'll find at the moment. The program is quite intelligent and will automatically detect and set up your drive, including the maximum write speed, something other software forces you to decide for yourself (resulting in my cousin trashing £140 of kit in 1.7 seconds flat). Nero scans the SCSI and IDE buses every time you start a session, meaning it is always up to date with your set-up, and the fairly extensive options menus cater for the tweaking enthusiasts who like to, for example, squeeze that extra ten seconds out of every CD. Ahead, the authors of Nero, are no fools and in this program have catered especially for the two main uses of CD burning - primarily, copying audio CDs, but also performing backups onto r
                            e-writable discs. The Copy Audio CD wizard takes you through just four steps needed to entirely copy a CD in its exact form. The process couldn't be made much simpler and even the most incompetent fool trying to burn to floppies would probably manage with some degree of success. After clicking Burn, Nero takes over and you'll be notified fifteen minutes later (in my case) by a trumpet fanfare and a sparkling new CD ejecting from your drive. For the expert, the wizard can be disabled and an audio CD copied using drag and drop. This allows one to specify, for example, the time between tracks. In all the time I have used Nero, though, I have found very little reason to use this mode over the wizard, as it merely complicates what Nero shows is a very simple process. My favourite part of the program is the ability to create CD compilations, finally giving portable CD players some real use. Using drag & drop, you simply insert each CD you wish to copy from in turn, drag the tracks across to the compilation window, and Nero will prompt you for each CD at burn-time. It's all remarkably simple and a great way to make use of your CD collection. Nero fully supports both remote and local CDDBs, as well as cdplayer.ini information, and this can be written to audio CDs using the optional CD Text ability. This is ideal for providing track listing information and again, it works very well. An excellent addition is a full copy (around 200Mb unzipped and installed) of the internet CDDB on the installation CD - although you will have to root through the CD to find it as there is no mention of it in any manuals or help texts, you can install it to your system to save costly calls to the server to find track information. Nero will then offer you the option of which track listing to use - from your cdplayer.ini file or local CDDB, for example. The other major use for CD burners - creating backups onto CD-RW media - is also amply supported by Nero. A
                            lthough it often ships with In-CD, a UDF packet writing program that allows you to write to CD-RW discs as you would a floppy, backups are best achieved using the ISO format through Nero. Again, a wizard makes it a simple process to get started, and from there you merely drag & drop files from your hard drive (or other CDs, for that matter) into the compilation window. You are then prompted to save the compilation listing, allowing you to re-open it the next time you wish to perform a backup. Nero takes over, and soon after you have one backup CD ready and waiting for the next Windows crash. Support for CD-RWs, I would suggest, lags a touch behind that of CD-Rs. As an example, it seems that Ahead would prefer you to use In-CD while using CD-RWs, as accessing the commands for using these discs in Nero is an ordeal and can take some time to figure out. It is perhaps another example of the slightly flawed interface that such important yet basic commands as "Erase CD-RW" are hidden away in a sub-menu, while rarely used commands such as selecting your recording drive (how many people have more than one?) are given a prominent button on the main menu. Without wishing to detract from Nero's power once these commands are unearthed, it does seem a trivial problem to solve and is perhaps something Nero should look at for later versions. In general terms, Nero is a very competent and professional package, with only one or two drawbacks. Personally I find moving between the standard and wizard interfaces a little confusing, as you are never left sure exactly what you have done or what is about to be done to your fifty pence worth of CD. I would recommend sticking to either interface, and avoid switching mid-compilation - it helps avoid confusion in the end. If there is any other problem, it is perhaps that the interface looks a little out-dated, although this is a very minor concern. To date, in around three months of use, I have not encountered
                            any software crashes or bugs, which is always reassuring when dealing with expensive (and permanently damaged) CD media. Compared to the competition (Adaptec Easy CD, for example), Nero does in my opinion stand head and shoulders above the rest. Its greatest achievement is in combining both basic and advanced interfaces into one product, catering for the entire market. If you just want to run off a few copies of a music CD, Nero can take care of it in a flash. Yet even should you want to overburn a mixed-mode UDF/ISO CD, you won't encounter too many problems. Nero is the ideal software for CD burning and I would recommend it to anyone.

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