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Einhell Rek1840 1800 Watt

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3 Reviews

Brand: Einhell / Fuel Type: Electric

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    3 Reviews
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      10.01.2012 11:43
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      a great low price home chainsaw

      I have a number of trees in my garden and need to continually cut the branches back to allow light into my garden. Previously I using an hand saw with took me a vast amount of time. I wanted to speed up the process of maintain trees and so opted for a chainsaw. I did not want to break the bank so looked at the cheaper options available. This is when I came across the Einhell Chainsaw for just £50 (I think it was reduced from £75) from DIYStores.co.uk. To me this was a great price especial as it was available at Amazon for £71.99. To be honest my purchase was based purely on price. When the chainsaw arrived I was impressed by the size of the blade. It was 40 cm which is large. The usually size for home chainsaws is 35cm. The blade was sturdy and well attached to the machine without any flexing. I plugged the machine in a got to work taking on a few small trees. The machine is very powerful and easily cut through the trees in an impressively quick time. The machine roars (like all chainsaws should do) so I would not advise using early in the morning as your neighbours may become peeved. The machine is safe to use as when you release the power the blade becomes instantly still. The chainsaw is electrically powered and comes with a cable to plug into a socket. The cable is a bit short for my garden but an extension cable easily rectifies this problem. The chainsaw is easy to use (and I am a simpleton when It comes to things like this). All you have to do us plug it in, pull down the power and press the connection button, then you are off. It is a great chainsaw that serves me well every time I take on my ever growing trees.

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        26.12.2011 14:26
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        Very pleased and I got a bargain

        We have some very large trees out the back of our house. We have a large garden but the neighbours had been moaning for some time that our conifers were blocking out their light and I agreed that the time had come to make them smaller. I had been using my old Spear and Jackson chainsaw but it had been out of use for a while as it used to be my father in law's and he gave it to me when he invested in a new one. I bought the Einhell Cahinsaw at a bargain price of £49.99 (on sale from £64.99) direct from the manufacturer. What I initially was attracted to about this chain saw is that it has got 40cm blades instead of the standard 35 cm and as I knew I was goign to have a lot of work on my hands sawing down various tresss (including trimming the oak ) and not just the conifers, I needed soemthing robust and up to the job. This machine is powerful. It cuts through wood of any girth fast and efficiently. It is loud and noisy but that's what I'd expect. The cable could also probably do with being a fair bit longer as once I had plugged it into the socket in my garage I found I needed to use an extension canble to get to the back of the garden to reach the trees furthest away. It is weasy to operate and I feel pretty confident when using it. I also think the manual could do with a nit of updating as I'd read it before hand but it was a bit on the vague side and needs more information especially when operating something as dangerous as a chainsaw. Overall I am impressed with theis fine piece of German machinery. I have since loaned it to my father in law who says it is superier to his S&J, which I knew anyway. Very pleased and certainly recommended.

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        05.02.2011 18:34
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        An excellent quality, good value chainsaw for home use

        Recently I was walking the streets, delivering my cards through letterboxes, advertising my business. It's the way I get a lot of my business in fact, almost all of my business. It's an industry where we independents are always fighting a rear-guard battle against the national and local estate agents. Their customers are largely unaware that they aren't obliged to get their EPCs done by the estate agent marketing their home for them and are likely to save a lot of money by not doing so. So, I get my name out there and get a lot of exercise into the bargain! On one road I passed a house where a gang of guys were chopping down a number of fir trees that had clearly overstayed their welcome. The pathway was littered with logs of various sizes. I got chatting to the loggers and, as you do, commented, "That's a nice load of firewood you've got there". "Do you want it", they replied. "I couldn't fit it in the back of my Corsa", says I. "We'll drop it off to you for a round of drinks", says they. So, for a tenner I got myself a couple of tons of potential firewood occupying my driveway. Now, logs are one thing but firewood is quite a different matter. Converting one into the other is likely to take a lot of work and not a little effort. I have a bow saw which I use for keeping my unruly garden under control but using such to saw through two foot thick logs taxes my ancient bones to the limit. Those logs small enough to chop into firewood, I did, with the aid of a log splitter axe which I bought from B&Q and which works a treat. Chopping firewood is very cathartic. However, once I had dealt with all of those logs small enough to be sawn by hand I was still left with over a ton of wood. I needed some assistance in the form of a power tool, the ultimate power tool: a chainsaw. But should I buy or should I hire? I checked a few hire outlets but they were all advertising daily hire rates in the region of £50/60. I knew that to buy an electric chainsaw wouldn't cost much more than that. I checked out the usual suspects but found that only B&Q, Focus, Homebase plus, interesting, Argos, appeared actually to sell chainsaws. Argos were the cheapest, advertising a Spear & Jackson electric chainsaw for just over £50. However, they were out of stock and when I checked with them it appeared that they had no plans to sell this product again. Next was Focus, with an Einhell chainsaw, a brand of which I had never previously heard but, apparently German, so one should suppose indicative of the German quality we have come to expect. This model also had the advantage that it had the longer 40cms blade rather than the 35cms blade that seemed to be typical on other similarly priced or even more expensive brands such as Bosch. On the Focus website the price was £64.99 but when I got to the store the shelf price was £69.99. I asked them to recheck the price and they confirmed that the true price was the lower one. I also have the Focus OAP 10% discount card which, unlike B&Q's, may be used any day of the week. That brought the price down to below £60; a bargain. It wasn't until I got it home and unpacked that I discovered that the box didn't contain any chainsaw oil, a requirement for the use of this sort of equipment. I checked out the Web and discovered that engine oil, although thinner than purpose-produced chainsaw oil, would do the job but would probably be used up much faster. I had some 10W-40 so I filled the lubrication chamber with that. A certain amount of assembly is required: the blade and saw chain are not attached as delivered for sale. An instruction manual in various languages is provided but I found it not that easy to follow. A spanner is provided for taking off the chainsaw guard, which is the first step. Exposed is the drive cog for the chain and this should be pulled off so that the chain support blade can be fitted. This is the awkward bit as it has to be slotted over a guide and a hole in the blade fitted over a peg on the tension adjustment. At this point nothing holds the blade in place other than your manual dexterity! You then have to hold it all together whilst you fit the saw chain around the edge of the blade and over the drive cog. I eventually got it all assembled, chain guard refitted and the saw chain adjusted to the recommended 3-4mm of slack. Nothing should ever persuade you that a chainsaw is other than a potentially very dangerous piece of equipment. You should treat it with the highest possible respect that it deserves. The manufacturers always build in several safety measures but that should not remove the need to take the greatest care. The saw chain will instantly stop once the trigger switch is released and there is also a hand guard in front of the forward hand which must be pulled back towards that hand before the saw will operate. I always use gloves, a pair of safety glasses, in my case the sort that fit over normal glasses, and a pair of ear protectors (the chainsaw puts out up to 103db of noise, a label states). The saw is provided with a surprisingly long length of cable. This is rubber covered and fitted with a moulded on plug. Even so I had to add an extension in order to get it to reach from the power socket at the back of my garage to the wood pile on the driveway. I was surprised by the ease with which the saw sliced through the logs. I have a mixture of oak from a tree recently taken down in my garden and the fir that I had bought. In neither case did I need to apply any more pressure than simply to keep the blade in contact with the wood. Essentially it will cut its way through under its own weight. Even a two foot thick log takes little more than a minute to cut and without any signs of distress by the chainsaw other than a smell of hot engine oil. Obviously the cut is wider than would be the case using a hand saw. The blade is essentially a thin bike chain with teeth on the outside. Consequently a lot of sawdust is created. I say sawdust but it really isn't dust: it's more like shavings, a lot of shavings. Having worked my way through half of the logs I have filled an old 60ltr garden compost bag. I shall probably use this as a mulch on my flower beds. My wife commented that the cost of this chainsaw makes this a much more expensive pile of firewood; true, if this was the only use to which I ever put it. However, this is a capital expense and, now that we have an open fire to enjoy through the winter, I anticipate more purchases of firewood in future. As it is, I anticipate, like with my Black & Decker Workmate, now approaching it's 40th year, many years of useful use to come.

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      • Product Details

        Chromium chain with safety chipping teeth / Chain bar with integrated guide sprocket / Power 1800 watt.Cutting speed 13.5 m/s