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Lindt Excellence 85% Cocoa Dark Chocolate

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    16 Reviews
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      17.11.2010 23:33

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      What has happened? Lindt 85% used to be really ful of flavour and slightly bitter and the 70% was quite special. Now both seem insipid. Have they changed the source of the chocolate? I always thought of Lindt as a bit special but no longer.

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      08.11.2010 13:27
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      The Swiss don't Alp for diets

      A time before Lindt

      Ever since those deranged days of viewing the chocolate flake TV advert, of a floral dressed girl sat down in a long boat away from the rest of civilization slowly devouring a phallic crumbly flake seductively I would stop immediately what I was constructing with Lego and gaze romantically at the hazy scene and longed for silky velvet chocolate, and the dainty girl in the advert, but I'll save that part for another review. I developed a love, hate relationship with chocolate, first my love for chocolate always descended into an orgy of grossness that'll start wiping itself around my greedy mouth and hands it was as if in my anticipation of getting a chocolate fix my body temperature would rise, especially around the hands and mouth, to make chocolate melt instantaneously at point of contact. Also the idea of having just one bar was alien to me. I simply couldn't understand the concept of just having a single bar or chunk of chocolate; you'll might as well be talking Welsh to me. My elders tried, but the new concept was greeted with a quizzical stare - I loved chocolate that much. The hate part came thereafter, usually about an hour after the scoff frenzy and it came from my derriere's annoying complaint of over indulgence. After twenty minutes of pain, I was ok; until the flake advert appeared on the TV again. She did it every-time.

      In my youth I knew dark chocolate was bitter and sour in comparison to milk chocolate so I didn't appreciate the mysterious deep brown beauty of dark chocolate till I engineered my taste-buds to liking alcohol, and grapefruit. Eventually dark chocolate was introduced onto the palate and with heed and without over indulgence I acquired taste-bud maturity. What came with the maturity stems a love of decadence an appreciation of good quality gourmet offerings. One of which is the eloquent Lindt dark chocolate range. By name it spells out expense and luxury, by touch it delivers glamour and velvet, and by taste it exhumes earthy qualities hitting on a mesmeric balance of bitter sharp and sourness.

      She is a vision of elegance

      Lindt's attire won't be out of place next to the Ferrero Roche's swirled, curvaceous, rococo styled attire. Lindt carries off a Laura Ashley Lindt script as if she has been wearing it all her shelf-life. In fact she has since 1989, when her birth was announced to the world by the Lindt family. Who'd been practicing chocolatier perfection with her ancestors for over 160 years? The emblem signifies a Lindt stamp of approval 'all gold resembling a dainty snowflake' - perhaps edging on design of a chromosome if truth to be told. Lindt's paper texture is soft on touch, and on close inspection she smells as if she's ventured into a coffee shop prior to you're engagement as the aromatic fragrance lingers around the nostrils. I knew she was Swiss and she didn't have to yodel my name either, she simply reeked of high aristocracy when I handled her. I smelt my palms; her scent of slight cinnamon was left their like a passing kiss, or a flirting gesture of what I could have. We met in a kiosk in Cheltenham on a corner of a street - she looked out of place in the array of poverty stricken confectionary wrappers that surrounded her. I wouldn't have noticed her elegance if it wasn't so obvious among the chomp bars and phallic Mars duo's that looked far too pleased to see me. Lindt doesn't aspire to be just a chocolate bar - she seemed more than that, an exotic pleasurable experience perhaps. For £2.45 I picked her up, playfully pulling at her wrapper curling up her corners. I kind've knew I'd bagged a bargain, picking her up on the street corner. She was so out of place.

      She tantalized me while sprawled out on a kitchen table

      Unaware of the time difference in the foreign land of 'Swiss Chocolate' which nevertheless is inferior to the taste-bud delights of Brussels who are premier dark chocolate gurus, Lindt 70% was a lot darker than first thought considering; her manufacturing breeding, the Swiss specializes in milk chocolate. Unraveling a corner I smelt a rich caramel and cinnamon aroma flooding the air, creating nostalgic thoughts of past endeavors. Three naughty words that sum up dark chocolate for me is: Bournemouth, bedclothes and sauce! I promised myself this time round I'll keep it a far cleaner affair as I stripped off Lindt's silky wrapper - I could see she was slightly embarrassed due to the red tinge to her dark complexion. She'd obviously been under a cocoa sun-bed for 70% longer as her sister's apparently have gone under for up to 90% longer than milk chocolate. As stated on their attire. Not that it is worth bragging about, unless you find the darker chocolate particularly tastier. Lindt's family manufacturers feel it is important and I'm not here to argue any differently. While looking down at Lindt all naked and vulnerable on the kitchen table a roasted honey scent lifted up and embraced me; I took her into my finger-tips and put some mild pressure on her neck, just enough to break a slab - I knew if I created breakages, that the session may continue longer than my first intention.

      She made noises that made me hungry for more

      A satisfying hollowed clunk noise hit the silence and more scent wafted towards me, it was like every bit of her movement was destined to create aromatic pleasures, just enough for me to breathe that little bit more deeper than usual. A true sign of a decent chocolate experience; Chocolatiers' go by the sound that the chocolate makes while being broken, as it is a token of quality and product excellence. By not being an expert, nor have made a Lindt chocolate bar before, I'm uncertain whether the sound I heard was a flavourable one or not. Although Lindt didn't appear to have any complaints her end I also found the sound of the hollow clunk noise depended on what surface she was resting on. Considering she was on a wooden table her moans were slightly hollower than perhaps she was being broken into while on the floor. I'll have to do further tests to make the sound comparisons. Now if you broke slabs of her in a cave I assume the sound would come back several times and make you feel you're surrounded by cockroaches.

      She kissed my mouth like a French tart

      The chocolate glistened from the surrounding light, giving a hint of wax. While entering my mouth she wilted with the heat intensity and melted on my tongue after one second, after that I found the aromas and dark chocolate honey ness far too much for my will-power and I devoured the slab without further notice. The next five slabs went the same way, instead the chocolate melted even quicker and dissolved without a trace down into my gullet. By the time I got through half of Lindt, I found my mouth palate completely caked in Lindts chocolate tongue; just as if she was French kissing me right down to my throat, now that is a long tongue. It was very warming and pleasant, I moaned as I got to the last slabs in sadness, Lindt was nearly gone and I'd just got to know her. A passing rendez-vous to satisfy my taste-buds followed by a warming feeling that makes you over salivate with excitement. I licked the chards off her attire and then just realized what I had done. I'd eaten all of her. I didn't prolong the relationship at all. We lasted for five minutes, but it was a fine five minutes. At least I can say I was once loved, by Lindt. Well, before she absconded to the pit of my gullet and now she is with me for ten years or so, not as I first remember her, but as a bit of fat resting on my love handles.

      She had fine taste in men

      During my brief interlude Lindt, tasted of vanilla initially when she kissed my palate and then she changed her mind and became strawberry - typical lady - she couldn't even make her mind up what she tasted of. I was pleasantly surprised a twang of spice lifted off my palate - although it could be the cinnamon which in turn was hidden under the cocoa intoxication - well 70% of it. Lindt sadly did mask her sweetness capacity because I know her sugar content was pretty vast, although how she could just leave me like that after I took her off the streets - away from all the other bland common chocolate bars - I don't know. But every now and then I look down at my love handles and wonder whether she misses her sisters.

      Or I could go to the gym and leave her as she left me. Heart-breaking choices, and at present she's still part of me. Still, she had fine taste in men.

      Thank you for reading.

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        30.03.2010 20:44
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        Very Dark Choc

        "Enliven your senses with the ultimate chocolate luxury - Lindt Excellence"

        I LOVE my chocolate - although when I say chocolate, I'm generally speaking of the easy-eating milk variety. Dark chocolate has always been something that I regard as a bit nasty - milk chocolate's bitter tasting evil twin. However, I recently decided to give dark chocolate another go after many years of neglect - especially as it's supposed to be pretty good for you. In fact, the dark stuff can keep cholesterol from gathering in blood vessels, prevent blood clots, and also "slow down the immune responses that lead to clogged arteries". Of course, however good for you it is, Dark Chocolate is still going to add a significant amount of calories to your daily intake - so going overboard on a dark chocolate binge will probably negate any of the beneficial effects.

        To begin my dark chocolate renaissance, I decided to opt for a well known and quality brand, and I thought Lindt would be as good a place to start as any. In the supermarket, the Dark Lindt bars all have cocoa percentages printed on their labels - they say the higher percentage of cocoa, the better it the chocolate is for you - so following that reasoning I purchased the 'Lindt Excellence 85% Cocoa', which retailed at around £1.60 for the 100g bar.

        My initial reaction when I started eating a block of the Lindt was that I couldn't taste anything - in fact, it was like munching on a block of flavourless water - but then, slowly but surely the flavour arrived. I soon realised that a rich dark chocolate's flavour is all about the aftertaste - and in the case of the Lindt it was a rich and intense taste which my limited palate couldn't really appreciate. What I did appreciate however was the fact that the chocolate wasn't too bitter, as I have had some really evil tasting dark chocolate in the past - probably where my dislike of the stuff arose. That said, I'm pretty sure it was the cause of a bad headache (proven by the fact that the same thing happened the next day when I ate some more!).

        Ingredients: Cocoa Solids: 85% minimum, Cocoa Mass, Low Fat Cocoa Powder, Cocoa Butter, Demerera Sugar, and Natural Bourbon Vanilla Beans.

        Eating Lindt's Dark Chocolate wasn't as bad an experience as I expected (apaprt from the headache), and although I wouldn't say I really 'enjoyed' the taste, I felt it was a flavour which may well grow on me. What I did appreciate was the fact that this chocolate feels like a well made product - from the ornate looking white card outer layer, to the inner foil, and eventually down to the chocolate itself, it reeks of quality - kind of recommended!

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          07.02.2010 17:16
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          An Intense Chocolate for Cocoa-addicts

          A Confession....
          Before proceeding to the review, I should begin with a minor admission: I am a chocolate fiend. Some live by the mantra that if it moves- eat it; if it chews- milk it. I, on the other hand, prefer the idea that if it comes wrapped in gold foil, is fit to bursting with cocoa solids, milk and sugar, then let the eating begin. And I'm not fussy... I like the gaudily packaged, 90% sugar, 30p bars of generic chocolate as much as the heart-stoppingly expensive little nuggets of joy produced by the likes of Valrhona and co.

          I console myself with the thought that chocolate is reportedly chock full of healthy antioxidants (my grandfather was advised to eat more cocoa products after a heart attack, and thereafter consumed half a bar of dark chocolate a day. He's dead now, but I'm fairly confident it wasn't the chocolate that killed him - at least, I hope so, otherwise Bourneville are in a LOT of trouble...). But even if the health angle IS just marketing mumbo-jumbo, and if chocolate does little for our health other than speed it's decline, I'd still eat it. I say...Better to die with a smile on your face and a belly full of Cadbury's best, than to live to a 100 on rations of gruel and porridge.

          To demonstrate the extent of my chocolate addiction, we come to my second admission of the day (and, in a round-about way, to the subject of my review): I have just eaten (in a single sitting, mind you) a 100 gram bar of Lindt 90% Cocoa Chocolate. Awful, I know (by which I mean the greed, not the chocolate. The chocolate was gooooood). But enough of my problems... onward to the review (which is why we're here, after all - unless I've confused dooyoo with a meeting of Chocolatholics Anonymous).

          The Product...
          Price and Availability
          So, Lindt 90% Cocoa Chocolate... where should we begin? Probably, as I did, with the buying. Available in most good supermarkets, the chocolate can be purchased for the (quite) reasonable sum of £1.17. I appreciate it's not cheap (at least by the standards of a Mars bar), but given that it is a high quality chocolate from a respected brand, then for it's size (100g), the price is fairly sensible.

          The Packaging...
          I'm rarely concerned by packaging... it's the contents that matter, not the wrapping. But for those who appreciate such things, Lindt doesn't disappoint. As with all products in it's Excellence range, the chocolate comes encased in a thin cardboard wrapping, with a black, gold and white colour scheme. Overall, a sophisticated packaging that reflects the simplicity and elegance of it's content.

          The Chocolate...
          Having dealt with the purchasing and the packaging, we can now move on to the best bit... the chocolate. I should begin by saying that if you're used to Dairy Milk and Galaxy, this particular chocolate may come as something of a shook to the taste buds. It's neither milky nor sweet.. it contains no dairy what-so-ever , and has only 7 grams of sugar per 100g. So if it's a sugar rush you're after, this probably isn't the chocolate for you. But if you want a deep, dark, dangerous taste experience, then you've undoubtedly come to the right place. The chocolate is, without doubt, intense.. neither creamy nor sweet, the overriding taste is of cocoa - a big, mouth-puckering, bitter flavour that on first experience can be rather overwhelming, but something that, rather like olives, is well worth acquiring a taste for. After the initial flavour subsides, the chocolate develops a pleasing (albeit, slight) taste of vanilla - a nice touch that goes some way to temper the chocolate's innate bitterness.

          According to those who like to extol the benefits of chocolate in health food magazines, one of the main advantages of dark chocolate over its milkier friends is that it takes less dark chocolate to satisfy than it does milk chocolate. But for me, this just isn't the case. As I've mentioned previously, I managed to consume an entire bar of this product in one sitting... something I would prefer to attribute to the quality of the chocolate than to my own greedy nature (although, to be honest, it is probably a combination of the two). However, even those more disposed to moderation in such things may have trouble in limiting themselves to one or two squares - it is undoubtedly one of the most morish, tempting and satisfying chocolate experiences I've had since my last foray into the wonderful world of Green and Black's.

          Miscellaneous...
          If you can resist it's allure for the time it takes to turn the oven on, the product makes a great cooking ingredient. The intensity of it's flavour (derived from it's high concentration of cocoa solids), adds a deeply chocolaty addition to cookies, brownies, cakes and mousses.. something which chocolates of lower grades simply can't equal.

          For those with allergies, I should note that the product may contain traces of almonds, hazelnuts, milk and soya. I shan't go into the calorie/ fat count... ignorance, in this case, is most certainly bliss.

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            02.11.2009 20:18
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            A very high-quality dark chocolate

            As a chocoholic I've never been a fan of dark chocolate as I've always thought milk chocolate and white chocolate are miles more delicious. However I made some chocolate brownies last week and bought some of this to go in the mixture, and of course I had to taste it before it went in....and then finish off the remaining chocolate a couple of days later! I was pleasantly surprised although overall I do still prefer milk or white chocolate.

            Lindt does have a feeling of really high quality about it - from the posh packaging, to the foil containing the chocolate, and to the look of the chocolate. The chocolate bar is very thin and snaps in a really satisfying way.

            When you put it in your mouth at first I don't think it melts like milk or white chocolate do and there is a powdery taste about it which reminds me of drinking cocoa powder. There is quite a bitter taste to dark chocolate in general and this chocolate is also quite bitter, but in quite an intense, strong, powerful way which tastes really good quality and expensive. It also does melt in the mouth after a little while and you then taste the creaminess of it. The aftertaste is also lovely.

            I think dark chocolate is an acquired taste and although the first bite is bitter, you get used to it and start to really enjoy it. What I will say is that I don't totally think of it as chocolate in the sense that it wouldn't replace milk or white chocolate for me for the pure melty chocolateness that they offer and the craving they satisfy.

            In terms of calories, there are 540 per 100g bar (which I would probably eat quite happily in 2 or maybe 3 sittings). There are 49g fat of which 30g is saturated. Overall there's no getting around the fact that this is very fattening, but one minor point to make you feel better is that dark chocolate is supposed to be better for you than other types of chocolate. It's also supposed to release endorphines which make you feel happy, so if you want to avoid SAD (Seasonal Affectional Disorder) now the winter months are setting in, maybe you can use it as an excuse for eating dark chocolate ! Mmm, ok so I haven't even convinced myself here....

            Pricewise, Lindt is one of the more expensive chocolates and I think I paid just under £2 for this 100g bar.

            Overall, a lovely and exceptionally high-quality chocolate from Lindt - give the dark side a go!

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              14.10.2009 19:16
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              A really nice change from ordinary chocolate

              My son recently purchased a bar of Lindt Chilli version of the excellence range when the bar he actually wanted was unavailable, and this unavailability turned out to be a bit of a blessing it cost £1.45 from ASDA. ASDA. There are several different options available but it will be the chilli bar I am concentrating on.

              Most of you will have seen the advertisements for Lindt chocolate and their perhaps over ambitious effort to prove themselves the best. I say over ambitious only because of the mountain they have to climb to compete with companies such as Cadbury who although don't make such a quality chocolate do have a large percentage of the market, and their taste is probably the one all others are judged by.

              If Cadbury are to be the criteria used to judge a chocolate then this one way exceeds the claims of it's marketing department, for not only in taste but in packaging they have indeed set the stalls alight with their chilli choc. Exquisite might be the proper terminology for the packaging, being that the whole wrapping experience looks and feels very indulgent, and therefore increases the anticipation for the surprise delight that is held within.

              Once you carefully remove part of the wrapping to reveal the very dark and smooth looking chocolate, it is without doubt the smell that captures your imagination in the beginning. The whiffs of deep cocoa bean drift your mind to a secret place far from civilisation, where only Gods can sample such delights.

              The first tempting and hesitant nibble left me wondering whether my mouth was going to be burning with the oncoming onslaught of chilli. The rich dark chocolate which contains 49% minimum cocoa solids is both smooth and divine. It melts effortlessly on the tongue sending pulses of darkness through every taste bud stimulating them like never before. Then just as the last remnants of the chocolate melt and disappear from your tongue the devil chilli makes its appearance. Subtle yet very evident, noticeable yet not overpowering, in fact a perfect blend between both the Chocolate and chilli.

              Each subsequent piece, although knowing what is to come still seems to hold the same surprise as the original mouthful. Pure decadence and delight in one reasonably priced 100g bar of divinity. It is of course a dark chocolate and therefore there are many who will not even attempt to go there, but should you like your chocolate dark and are indeed in the mood for a little adventure, get on your Indy gear and delve into the pleasures of a Lindt Chilli bar.

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                11.02.2009 20:39
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                A top notch dark chocolate treat

                Growing up in the 1960s and '70s there was only really one "plain" chocolate, Cadbury's Bourneville. This had a more bitter taste than its milk chocolate counterparts but had a high milk solids and fat content. This product was not to my taste and it was one I identified with darker chocolate for the next 30 years.

                A few years ago, I decided to try Lindt Excellence with 70% cocoa. My first impression was not favourable but I persevered and soon began to love its taste.

                The large bar is good value (often in the £1 to £1.50 range although frequently on supermarket 'two for £2' or similar deals. Each bar has 10 large squares of the chocolate and is sufficient for 2 or 3 stuffings (that said, I have devoured a bar in a sitting on more than one occasion). Be careful unwrapping as there's often many small shards of choc which can make abit of a mess. For me, the taste is greatly enhanced by a chilling in the fridge.

                Its presentation is attractive (card backed, siver foil wrapped, well designed card outer) making it gift material. Certain, well-reported, medical studies have indicated that there may be positive health effects from eating a small daily quantity of higher %age cocoa content (such as Excellence) which I cannot, of course, validate but it makes me feel less guilty when chomping on a bar.

                I've tried the 85% cocoa variation but that proved somewhat too bitter for my tastebuds. The 70% variety is now my favourite choc and it would take something pretty spectacular to depose it from my number one spot.

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                  27.01.2009 00:37
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                  A favourite indulgence, always cheers me up

                  If I am eating milk chocolate it has to be Cadbury's but if I want some dark chocolate? Well it has to be Lindt Excellence. How can I describe it, well for a start it is so smooth, the texture is just the way it should be. It is bitter but without being too bitter for me to enjoy. I must confess that I can't eat a whole bar in one go, that is the thing with a good dark chocolate, you really don't need to eat much of it to be satisfied.

                  Lindt Excellence also comes in several varieties, I like the mint but my favourite is Roasted Almond. The contrast of the almond pieces with the smooth chocolate is just divine.

                  Not all shops stock Lindt and certainly not the full range, I usually get it from a large supermarket, a treat when I have done the slog of the shopping.

                  I normally pay about £1.39 for a 100g bar of chocolate but the almond is a little more expensive, the last bar I bought cost £1.56p. It may not be the cheapest chocolate but it is good value because you don't eat so much of it. If you haven't tried it yet why not give it a go?

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                  20.01.2009 22:18
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                  Rich Dark Chocolate to savour

                  From the wrapping to the contents Lindt Dark Chocolate reeks of elegance and decadence. The wrapping is white with gold writing and a black background with gold reliefs of cocoa pods. The price belies the elegance - around £1.20 a bar depending on where you buy it. I seem to strike lucky in being able to get 2 for the price of 1 !

                  There are two types of Dark Chocolate 70% and 85%. Having tried both on more than one occasion my favourite is the 70%.

                  The 85% is just the wrong side of bitterness for me, although it is really good for cooking and decorating. Certainly 1 square a day is enough of this percentage chocolate.

                  Now the 70% Dark Chocolate is my all time favourite; I can eat a bar in one go (although I wouldn't recommend it !!) or limit myself to one square a day depending on the mood, time if the month etc.

                  There is nothing that beats a crisp thin square of this gorgeous dark chocolate straight from the fridge. It tastes so much better when cold; warm chocolate is fine over ice cream or puddings but I much prefer my chocolate cold and crisp.

                  Given the choice of brands of chocolate I would choose this one everytime.

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                    26.04.2008 20:26
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                    Probably not for milk chocolate lovers

                    I don't always get on well with milk chocolate. It's too sweet for me, and tastes sickly. Dark chocolate however, the stronger the better, is an addiction.

                    Lindt 85% is like heaven in bar form.

                    It's so strong that even one tiny piece is enough to beat your brain over the head and tell it that chocolate has entered the body. When you're feeling hormonally cranky it's a blessing. While it's not cheap, it lasts me much longer than milk chocolate because unlike milk chocolate I can only eat four squares or so at once.

                    That said, people who enjoy milk chocolate should probably avoid it. My mother and kid sister hate this stuff - to them apparently it tastes bitter, and not how chocolate should taste at all. If you like chocolate for the sweetness, stick to milk, or at least try Lindt 70% first.

                    I'll keep eating it (hey, I can leave it in the fridge without it being stolen!) but it's not for everyone.

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                      23.03.2005 19:51
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                      Lindt Excellence 85% Cocoa Dark Chocolate

                      70% cocoa...what's that about?

                      Well, most of your normal, everyday chocolate (in the UK at least) doesn't actually contain all that much in the way of cocoa solids, usually only 20-25%. Instead it's bulked up with less-expensive, and therefore more profitable, additions. Additions like sugar and vegetable fats and goodness knows what else.

                      Lindt Excellence 70% cocoa has a whopping...wait for it...70% cocoa solids. At least that's what it says on the wrapper, and who am I to disagree.
                      70%? Why that's around three times as much as your average milk chocolate bar. So it's pretty safe to assume that this bar isn't going to be registering a low score on the old chocometer.


                      Now, strange as it may seem, I don't go overboard for chocolate. I mean, it's nice, and I like a little nibble now and then, but there's no way I could be described as a chocoholic. However, I DO like Lindt products, and Mrs P likes to occasionally spoil me by melting a big old slab of the stuff and smothering pieces of fruit in it. Hands up who doesn't like chocolate-covered strawberries? Of course, if she really wanted to spoil me, I could think of better things to smother in chocolate.

                      Anyway...
                      Looking for something to offset the wetness of my coffee the other evening, I discovered the remains of a bar of this stuff sitting forlornly in the cupboard. It wasn't forlorn for long.

                      The bar is made up of smaller squares for easy breaking, and is quite thin. As you might deduce from the amount of cocoa and the lack of milk, it's dark. Very dark. As dark as a Chandler thriller on a moonless night during the miner's strikes of '73.
                      Hmm, as dark as that?
                      Yes.


                      But how does it taste?

                      JINGS! Thatsa darka chocolata!
                      *sigh* I like dark chocolate. I wouldn't say I prefer it, but I don't have any problem with the more grown-up flavour sensation of a less-sweet...sweet. But this stuff is strong. Really strong. It's bitter. Really bitter, but not in a nasty way, and it's incredibly rich and thick.
                      It's nice to just let it melt on your tongue a while, and allow the velvety, silky texture to slowly and softly, spread throughout your gob.

                      What can I say? This stuff is ridiculously chocolatey and feels quite decadent and luxurious. It doesn't have any of that grittiness you sometimes get from the BIG C products, and it doesn't have any of that greasiness you get from cheaper brands either. Obviously, that's because they don't pump it up with more fat than an overweight Sumo wrestler can safely carry.

                      Still, it's just a tottie-wee-dod on the rich side for me. Don't get me wrong, it's very nice, but any more than a square or two of this stuff would leave me in choco overdose land.

                      Apparently, mrs P plops a small dollop of cream into the mix before dipping strawbs in and that helps to smooth and sweeten it a little. I asked her why she didn't just buy cheaper gear that already had milk or what-not in it instead of wasting good money for no good reason. Since this is a family site, I can't print her reply.

                      A 100g bar of this will cost a little over a quid from any supermarket in the country. It's not cheap, but I suppose you're paying for the more expensive cocoa solids and not the far cheaper milk and vegetable fat etc. Or as I've been reliably informed, it actually works out quite cost-effective and buying this is a smart bit of housekeeping.
                      Indeed.


                      The verdict?

                      I have to say I prefer some of the other products from Lindt over this, but I'm not slating it. Not at all. It's a top quality product and beautifully crafted, but I suspect it's aimed more at the irredeemable chocoholic junkie than the casual chocomuncher.
                      Not for the part-timer, or faint-hearted!


                      ©proxam2005

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                        15.09.2002 02:32
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                        A lush dark chocolate with a smooth texture and a deep flavour.

                        Lindt dark chocolate is in my opinion one of the best quality dark chocolates out there. They do two bars in this range, one which contains 70% minimum cocoa solids, and one which contains 85% minimum cocoa solids. For choice I would rather eat the 70% version, as although I like my chocolate very dark, I tend to find the 85% version a little too bitter even for my tastes. However if I am using it as little curls (or other decoration) on a chocolate or orange dessert dish however, I will always choose the 85% version as its stronger taste will always enhance the chocolate or orange flavour of the dessert that bit better I think.

                        **Cost & Packaging**
                        A 100 gram bar of either will usually cost in the region of £1.00 to £1.25 (Tesco's sells both versions at £1.09 each). Lindt packaging is simple but effective as they use a simple black on white with gold touches which add a little of the elegance this chocolate deserves. Sporting words like 'excellence', 'Intense' and 'Refined' this is definitely a chocolate for the more refined adult palate, and not a bar I would waste on the kids who are perfectly happy with a bit of Bourneville or similar. The inner foil wrapping is delicately printed with the words 'Lindt Chocolats Fins' which translated means 'Lindt Fine Chocolate'.

                        **The Scent**
                        The smell of this chocolate is strong. It is an intense scent of powerful chocolate, there is no sweetness in this smell. I imagine that if you smelt the ground cocoa beans before they had been processed the smell they produced would be similar.

                        **The Taste**
                        When you unwrap this chocolate, you are met with large but delicately thin squares of chocolate each of which sports six diagonal lines and above them the word Lindt No bulky slabs for this chocolate. This is an elegant looking bar of chocolate even when unwrapped and naked. The taste is incredible, as you bite off a small piece, let it slow
                        ly melt on the surface of your tongue to get the benefit of its full flavour. As it melts, you get this almost powdery texture coming through because of the lack of sugar in this chocolate. Roll it across your tongue and you get an extreme intense burst of chocolate which just overpowers your mouth. Imagine an ordinary bar of dark chocolate such as Bournville compares to a regular cup of instant coffee, well then this chocolate has power of flavour similar to that of drinking a good expresso coffee!

                        **Recommendation**
                        Oh yes, if this is something you've not tried, then do so. Make a special trip out to the shops if you must, and buy yourself a bar of this velvety dreamy bar of chocolate. Oh, and guess what all you dieters out there, although this bar doesn't contain details of its fat content, or its calorie content, as a general rule, the darker the chocolate is the less horribly bad for you it is. (Check out the difference between a bar of milk chocolate and a bar of true dark chocolate which contains no milk!). So, go on indulge your senses!!!

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                          13.07.2002 22:14
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                          1.A three-legged dog walks into a saloon in the Old West. He slides up to the bar and announces: "I'm looking for the man who shot my paw." 2.A man stumbles up to the only other patron in the bar and asks if he could buy him a drink. "Why of course," comes the reply. The first man then asks, "Where are you from?" "I'm from Ireland," replies the second man. The first man responds, "You don't say. I'm from Ireland too! Let's have another round to Ireland." "Of course," replies the second man, and they both pour back their drinks. Curious, the first man then asks, "Where in Ireland are you from?" "Dublin," comes the reply. "I can't believe it says the first man. "I'm from Dublin too! Let's have another drink to Dublin!" The men both continue drinking. Curiosity strikes again and the first man asks, "What school did you go to?" St. Mary's," replied the second man. "I graduated in '62." "This is unbelievable," the first man says. "I went to St. Mary's and I graduated in '62, too!" About that time, in comes one of the regulars and sits down at the bar. "What's been going on?" he asks the bartender. "Nothing much," replies the bartender. "The O'Mally twins are getting drunk again." 3.A mangy looking guy who goes into a bar and orders a drink. The bartender says: "No way. I don't think you can pay for it." The guy says, "You're right. I don't have any money, but if I show you something you haven't seen before, will you give me a drink?" The bartender says, "Only if what you show me ain't risqué." "
                          ;Deal!" says the guy and reaches into his coat pocket and pulls out a hamster. He puts the hamster on the bar. It runs to the end of the bar, down the bar, across the room, up the piano, jumps on the keyboard and starts playing Gershwin songs. And the hamster is really good. The bartender says, "You're right. I've never seen anything like that before. That hamster is truly good on the piano." The guy downs the drink and asks the bartender for another. "Money or another miracle else no drink", says the bartender. The guy reaches into his coat again and pulls out a frog. He puts the frog on the bar, and the frog starts to sing. He has a marvelous voice and great pitch. A fine singer. A stranger from the other end of the bar runs over to the guy and offers him $300 for the frog. The guy says "It's a deal." He takes the three hundred and gives the stranger the frog. The stranger runs out of the bar. The bartender says to the guy "Are you some kind of nut? You sold a singing frog for $300? It must have been worth millions. You must be crazy." "Not so", says the guy. "The hamster is also a ventriloquist." 4.Descartes walks into a bar and sits down. The bartender asks "You wanna beer?" Descartes says "I think not." ...and disappears 5.A minister, a priest, a rabbi and a duck walk into the bar. The bartender says "what is this, some kind of a joke?" 6.A bartender is standing behind the bar when Our Hero comes stumbling in the front door. He wobbles up to the bar, stabilizes himself, and asks the bartender for a drink. The bartender, being responsible, responds "I'm sorry buddy, but you seem to have had enough to drink." The drunk, disappointed, stumbles out of the bar. Five minutes later the same m
                          an comes falling through the side entrance, zigzags up to the bar and asks the bartender again for a drink. The bartender, puzzled, says "I'm sorry, but I've already told you I can't serve anyone who is already intoxicated." The man raises his head to look at the bartender, gives a drunken sigh, and stumbles out the bar. About a half-hour later, the bartender hears a bunch of noise from the kitchen. Pots crashing, cooks yelling, and all sorts of racket. Sure enough, in slips the same drunk. Makes his way slowly to the bar. Takes a deep breath, sighs, and asks the bartender "May I Please have a stiff drink?" The bartender finally becoming annoyed with this man explains "Listen, I've already told you, there's no way I'm going to give you a drink. You're drunk!" The man raises his head and with one eye closed, focused on the bartender, says "How many bars do you work at anyway!" there you go i do some more soom by sargeogod

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                            12.07.2002 01:13
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                            • "It really does."

                            Oh, dear. This is a difficult one. My favourite thing. Mm, I really don't know, you see. If it's what matters most to me, then it's my family, my friends and the dogs. They're not always in that order; it depends how they've been behaving. If it's a place, then it's a field that's presently covered in clover and all sorts of other wild flowers and I'm certainly not telling anyone where it is! An object then? Well, no, nothing's that precious to me. What do I hate having to live without? Ah, now we're getting closer. Chocolate, wonderful chocolate. Not any old chocolate though. Oh, sorry, I didn't mean that to sound elitist, because I can scoff my Galaxy and Cadbury's Dairy Milk with the best of them, but somehow I always feel that they're a bit too sweet and I feel rather guilty when I've eaten them. What I want is something that's bitter-sweet in my mouth, and leaves me wanting more. What I want is Lindt Excellence. Please. What's the difference? Well, to an American it would be obvious. You see, they make a distinction between chocolate, and candy, which contains lots of other things such as sugars, fondant centres, vegetable fats and flavourings. Chocolate, the real thing, real, dark chocolate contains cocoa solids and cocoa butter with a small amount of sugar so that the bitterness isn't too bitter plus an emulsifier such as lecithin to bind it all together. I've always thought it a great pity that we don't make the same distinction in the UK. Mass-market chocolate contains a very low percentage of chocolate, strange as that may seem. With most milk chocolates the percentage will be in very small print, hidden on the back of the packet and will probably be around 20%. The product will have been bulked out with sugar (probably about 50%, yes 50%), flavourings and vegetable fats (to the permitted maximum to make it more profitable). Lind
                            t Excellence contains 70% cocoa solids. It's so proud of this fact that it says it in big print on the front of the packet. There is a warning that the chocolate may contain traces of peanuts, hazelnuts, almonds and milk, but I believe that this is because some bars of chocolate which intentionally contain these things are made on the same site. Yes, I can hear you telling me to get on with it! I'm delaying the moment, you see, when I know that I will have to open the packet that's sat here on the desk next to me. I mean I can't adequately describe it without checking the taste can I? It's well wrapped, with folded-over ends and the whole thing sealed down, so that you know it's not been handled and, yes, that's important to me. The chocolate is wrapped in silver paper and then placed on a piece of firm cardboard. Why? Well, you can always tell a good chocolate because it makes a snapping sound when it breaks and Lindt chocolate is so brittle there wouldn't be any pieces large enough to break if it wasn't on something firm. Try breaking a piece of Cadbury's Dairy Milk and all you'll hear is a clunk. There are ten squares of chocolate in a block. I like to have a square at a time. No, that doesn't mean that I eat one piece and then put the packet away! I mean, have you ever tried breaking off just one square of chocolate? It's impossible. No, you see, I eat one, feel virtuous because I've only eaten one, eat the other and because I feel I've got self-restraint licked, I allow myself some more. Taste? Well, it is a little bit of an acquired taste if you're used to Dairy Milk and Galaxy. You might have to work at it for quite a while, but you will be rewarded. The first thing that you'll notice is the absence of sweetness and then a bitter, more-chocolaty-than chocolate flavour. All the chocolate you've ever eaten has had the sweetness taken out and the
                            flavour is there in your mouth. The smell will have made your mouth water and the texture is smooth, without any of the graininess that you get with cheaper chocolates. It's crisp and you're not left with that greasy taste in your mouth that a lot of chocolates leave. It's a fresh taste. I've been known to add a square of this to a beef casserole to enrich the gravy. It produces a lovely flavour and really delicious gravy, but it's for puddings, as you would expect, that this chocolate really comes into its own. I'm going to tell you about two of my favourite recipes. One's really fiddly, but worth it for a special occasion and the other is exceedingly simple. I'll do the simple one first. Banana Boats For each person bake an unpeeled banana at 180C/Gas Mark 4 for 30 minutes. The skin will go black. Remove from the oven and open very carefully. Put the points of as many squares of chocolate into the banana as you think a boat needs sails. Serve, with ice cream if you feel piggy. This next recipe is a bit fiddly, but I tend to do it whilst I got other things on the go, even over a few days. Chocolate Orange Rind The next time you have a couple of unwaxed oranges, don't throw the peel away. It's the best bit. Remove the rind in strips. I usually do this with a potato peeler and be careful not to remove any white pith with the rind. Cut the pieces into strips about 2.5cm long by 1cm wide. Bring a smallish pan of water to the boil and pop the rind in and allow to boil for three minutes. Remove and rinse in cold water. Do this three times in all, with fresh water each time. (Easy to remember, you see. Three times at three minutes each.) Leave to dry on kitchen paper. Mix 500ml of water with 500gr of caster sugar and bring to the boil stirring until the sugar dissolves. Add the orange peel and cook gently for one hour. Remove the orange peel and l
                            eave to dry on a wire rack for at least three hours. I usually leave them overnight. Melt a block of Lindt chocolate over a bowl of gently simmering water and dip the pieces of orange peel in the chocolate and leave on greaseproof paper to set. If you like you can dust these with cocoa powder. Serve them with coffee after that perfect meal (much nicer than After Eight Mints!) or with a Whisky Syllabub as a sumptuous pudding. Lindt do other chocolate bars as well. Their white chocolate is less sickly than the Milky Bar counterpart and good for cooking as well as eating. Just imagine a white chocolate mousse with raspberries! White chocolate is notoriously difficult to cook with, but this is better than most. You?ll regularly find Lindt Special Edition chocolate bars. I?ve recently seen Apricot, Stratiacella (chocolate chip, to you and me!) and a Pistachio and Orange combination. I just know I?m going to end up making a pig of myself! Jill Murphy asked me to write about one of my favourite things to help her celebrate her fourth anniversary of cancer-free living and to remind ourselves of all the nice things in the world. It takes more muscles to make a frown than a smile you know. If you'd like to join in, whether you've only just joined dooyoo, or you've been here ages, you're more than welcome. Just write about one of YOUR favourite things, make your title "A Favourite Thing: [your choice]" and include this paragraph at the foot of your opinion. And post before Friday, 9th August. Please.

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                              06.07.2001 07:03
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                              I'm not gonna be popular for this one but this is a really hit or miss brand of chocolate for me. I've only tried it in bar form to be honest I've never even seen the boxed type. I tried the milk chocolate bar and thought "yeah this is okay chocolate but I can't really see what all the fuss is about, it's chocolate okay I like chocoate but what's so special about this one". Then a few weeks ago I was ill and a friend of mine who wanted to cheer me up got me the dark chocolate bar. YUK!! I managed to eat about 4 squares and they're damn big squares (I tried to persevere thinking it might grow on me) but after that I had to call it a day and give it to a friend. Sorry but it just tasted weird, my sister gave me chocolate truffles once they were meant to be really expensive but I didn't like them at all and this stuff reminded me of them. Sorry people but you can keep this one. Not for me at all. Maybe I need to develop more expensive tastes in chocolate but I don't think I want to if this is the stuff you get.

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