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Lindt Lindor Egg

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17 Reviews

Brand: Lindt / Type: Egg

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    17 Reviews
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      15.04.2010 19:27
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      Excuse me whilst I hurl

      It's curious how, over the last few years, there has been a surge in snack-sized chocolate eggs in the run up to Easter. In years gone by, it was really only the Crème Egg from Cadbury that you could buy in this size but, spying a marketing opportunity, the big chocolatiers have now started to introduce an increasingly diverse range of these eggs. Whilst traditional boxed Easter eggs are associated primarily as children's gifts, these snack-sized eggs can appeal to a more adult audience who might try them instead of their usual bar of chocolate.

      Lindt (which is short for Lindt and Sprungli) was formed back in 1845 and is now one of the better-known Swiss chocolatiers. Lindt chocolates are targeted at the higher end of the domestic chocolate market. They don't make the most luxurious of chocolate products but they do use good quality ingredients and maintain a comparably high cocoa mass % in their chocolate products.

      The Lindor range is a popular gift product. Normally sold in a truffle-sized, wrapped sweet, the Lindor truffles are particularly popular at Christmas and this egg is essentially a larger version of one of the truffles. Weighing in at just under 30g, it's a similar size to the Crème Egg or the Galaxy chocolate eggs that are the market leaders.

      So what exactly goes into these Lindt Lindor eggs? I'm writing here specifically about the milk chocolate egg, distinctive in its red foil wrap. There is a plain chocolate variant, but this is wrapped in black foil.

      Sugar, vegetable fats (coconut, palm kernel), cocoa butter, cocoa mass, whole milk powder, skimmed milk powder, milk fat, malt extract (barley), emulsifier (soya lethicin), flavouring. Milk chocolate contains: cocoa solids 30% min. milk solids 14% min.

      The dominant ingredient here is sugar. This comprises around 41% of the total product. So a 28g egg has around 11g of sugar - that's about 10% of the RDA for a man and 12% for a woman.

      Those vegetable fats contain palm oil. I'll not go into the full details of why this is such a bad thing again but deforestation through aggressive palm oil plantation threatens one of the most diverse ecosystems in the world.

      There are 10g of saturated fat in one of these eggs. Adults should consume no more than 20g of saturated fat daily. This is 50% of that recommended allowance.

      The cocoa solids content is comparably good. It is recognised that 'good' chocolate should contain at least 30% cocoa solids so this is at that threshold (Cadbury Dairy Milk contains 20%). Milk solids should be no more than 14-25% - this is 14% so it's at the bottom of that threshold. Compared to other brand leaders in the UK, this is arguably 'better' chocolate than many others on the market.

      There's a strong, sickly, sugary smell that hits you as soon as you peel off one the foil wrapper to the egg. It's very similar to that smell you get in a chocolate factory, where the air seems thick with fat and sugar. There's nothing very natural about this smell. Indeed, whilst UK consumers have learnt to associate this smell with chocolate it has precious little to do with the smell of real/good chocolate.

      The egg comprises a solid chocolate shell, with a soft truffle centre. It's not runny soft (like a Crème Egg) and still holds its structure intact when bitten into or sliced. The chocolate surround is not particularly distinctive. It's very sweet, almost overwhelmingly so and you can almost hear your tooth enamel committing suicide as soon as it enters your mouth. It has a reasonable texture but is generally a very sickly, overpowering taste experience. The overwhelming flavours here are of sugar and fat; it's a combination that UK consumers particularly favour and it has the subtlety of a brick to the head. It's, arguably, a comforting taste though. If you like that very sweet, sickly taste that comes with milk chocolate, then this is likely to be quite satisfying.

      The truffle centre is quite the strangest thing I think I have ever tasted. Despite largely comprising more of the same, it's even richer in taste (and unbearably sickly) but also has a strange freshness to it, almost as though it contains mint or menthol. The truffle fondant is vaguely nuttier compared to the chocolate shell but it's more than I could do to eat a whole one. With nothing else for the taste buds to direct themselves at (no real nut content, for example) it shrouds the entire mouth in chocolatey 'goop' that is actually quite unpleasant. I don't find this sort of thing filling or satisfying if I am hungry in any way. Indeed, it's more likely to make me want to throw up than anything else.

      Many readers will be questioning if there are any products that are free from the scrutiny of ethical consumers. Arguably, the answer is no. As time goes on, I think it's increasingly important that consumers understand what it is that they're buying, where it came from and how it came to be. They're then free to make the choices for themselves. Directing them to corporate websites or literature, however, is folly.

      Around a decade ago, a number of journalistic exposes identified an enormous problem with the supply of chocolate (or cocoa beans) where it was clear that child slavery was being used on a significant scale to harvest cocoa beans and get them cheaply to market. The focus of a 2001 report by the BBC identified that 15,000 children were being sold annually into the slave labour market in The Ivory Coast. Unsurprisingly, working conditions were extremely poor. The children (who shouldn't have been working AT ALL) were worked very hard, often brutalised and tortured or beaten if they tried to escape. Understandably, the world was outraged and in the US, congress put the major manufacturers under scrutiny to change. An agreement known as The Cocoa Protocol was developed, which made commitments to eradicate slave labour by the year 2005. When the manufacturers failed to make this deadline, it was extended to 2008. To date, the agreements made under the Cocoa Protocol have not been fulfilled.

      The location of the worst of these slavery issues was the Ivory Coast and, in many cases, manufacturers simply tried to shift their sourcing to other locations, assuming that consumers would believe that this simply eradicated the issue. When confronted on the subject, Lindt are curiously vague about their possibilities, stressing many of the working agreements that they have in place with their suppliers, how they insist on certain working conditions and that they pay the highest prices for cocoa supplies to guarantee the quality of supply. The trouble is that they are deliberately vague - unless you really scrutinise their accounts and corporate documentation.

      A shareholder presentation made in 2008 outlines the source of their cocoa beans. Despite protestations otherwise, page 37 clearly indicates that, at that time, the largest provider of their cocoa beans was the Ivory Coast, at 38.2% of the total. You can read the report in full here http://irpages2.equitystory.com/lindt/pdf/Annual_Results_07.pdf

      If you want to be confident that your chocolate has been sourced ethically (including from slavery-free suppliers) then you should go for chocolate that displays the Fairtrade logo. Under the Fairtrade scheme, suppliers agree to pay more than the lowest market rate for cocoa, on the basis that the additional funds can be used to fund local facilities, education and infrastructure. Ideally, organic Fairtrade products are the most ethical that you can buy, purely because of the lack of synthetic/chemical treatments used in growing the beans. Also, there are no organic plantations in the areas that use child slave labour.

      Lindt chocolate does not carry the Fairtrade logo. Lindt's corporate governance policy indicates that they do support certain Fairtrade schemes but, clearly, are unwilling and/or unable to commit to a complete Fairtrade sourcing policy. I think it's fair to assume, therefore, that Lindt Lindor eggs have been produced using child slave labour, considering the overall details of their sourcing policy.

      It's not just the ethics of slave labour, of course. There are also the ethics of ripping off consumers. The Lindt Lindor Egg weights 28g and costs around 69p. That's about £2.46 per 100g. Lindor truffles normally retail at around £2.03 for a 200g pack. So you're paying 23% more because you're buying one on its own. Lindt chocolate bars come in at around £1.39 per 100g - so you're paying nearly twice as much as a standard chocolate bar, simply because it's Easter. What a con!

      So what are the alternatives?

      Firstly, just to clarify that Green and Black's chocolate is sourced ethically from organic, slave-free cocoa beans. Sadly, it is owned by Cadbury (and now Kraft Foods), which does not consistently observe these ethics and cannot therefore be considered truly ethical.

      Divine Fairtrade Chocolate always scores highly in ethical reports and (crucially of course) the chocolate is delicious. Clean, slightly nutty and just rich enough to satisfy most tastes, Divine chocolate is sold normally in bars, and at Easter, you can also get your hands on Divine chocolate eggs.

      Divine's Dubble chocolate bar is aimed more at children and is a crunchy chocolate bar with crisped rice in it. It's available all year round and there is Dubble Easter Egg too. It's also suitable for vegetarians.

      My personal favourite is the Traidcraft organic vanilla chocolate bars. The vanilla fondant filling is to die for (it actually tastes of vanilla for starters) and makes a rich, adult-friendly alternative to a Milky Bar.

      Go to www.ethicalsuperstore.com for a good selection of ethical chocolate bars and (in future) Easter/Christmas gifts.

      This isn't the least ethical manufacturer in town, by any means, and if very sickly, rich chocolate snacks are your thing then I'm quite sure that you'd enjoy one of these eggs. The lack of any real commitment to slave-free chocolate is, however, unacceptable and I'd even go as far as to suggest that the company is over-egging its ethics to deliberately lead consumers to believe one thing when the opposite is actually the case. Personally, I don't find very rich, sickly chocolate bars/eggs/snacks appetising in the slightest and it's a big thumbs down for me.

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      • More +
        12.04.2010 18:37
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        Disappointing

        I absolutely adore Lindt products. I love their chocolate bunnies and chocolate reindeers and Santas, and I can munch my way through a packet of Lindor truffles without a second thought, and without feeling sick once. So I was really pleased when I was given this Lindt Lindor truffle egg as a little pre-Easter present. But it let me down and sadly I can't bring myself to give it more than three stars, and really it's only just scraped that many!

        This little egg is about the size of a Cadbury's crème egg, and it cost around 59 pence, which makes it an expensive but not extortionately priced little Easter treat. It comes in a red and gold foil and it looks very classy and inviting.

        The egg is essentially a very large Lindor truffle. If you've never had the Lindor balls then I would describe them as smooth, thick milk chocolate balls filled with very soft, creamy, melt in the mouth filling. The egg is about twice the size as them and a more oval shape. I was expecting it to taste just like the normal truffles, but I think its altered size made it very different.

        The layer of milk chocolate around the egg was quite thin and I was surprised as I expected it to be thicker than the normal sized truffles rather than thinner. Inside was a large amount of filling, but unfortunately the ratio of filling to chocolate covering was too high, and I found that the egg was surprisingly sickly. The filling seemed creamier and had a slightly buttery taste to it that I did not enjoy and the whole egg had a slightly cheap tang to it that I would never before have associated with a Lindt product.

        Like all other Lindt products I have come across, this egg is sadly devoid of nutritional information. The ingredients are listed on the wrapper but there is no mention of calories, fat or sugar, so those of us who count those things are left in the dark. However I would hazard an educated guess and say there will be a lot of all three inside this egg!

        I would probably eat one of these again if it was given to me, but I wouldn't be thrilled to receive one and definitely wouldn't buy one for myself even if they were half price. I will stick to the Lindt bunnies!

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          12.04.2010 12:11
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          I adore these eggs! Perhaps one wasn't enough...

          Besides the Christmas season, Easter has to be regarded as the most overly indulgent time of the year for many people. I will never tire of my Christmas dinner but being a chocoholic, I am of course in love the Easter break as it guarantees many sweet treats. I am always fortunate enough to receive one or two eggs from various family members but I have to say that I don't find the larger, hollow eggs all that thrilling. To me, the regular Easter eggs lack the kind of substance that a standard sized chocolate bar can offer and I often find myself eating at least half a hollow egg in one go just to insure that I've had my chocolate fix! Being a fan of the Lindt chocolate range, I was delighted to try the little eggs that the company produce in the Spring: although I pretty much anticipated a chocolate egg that was just a festively shaped version of the regular milk chocolate truffles, I was eager to try the Lindt Lindor egg, you know, just to make sure my expectations were spot on...

          LEAD ME INTO TEMPTATION...
          When I first purchased the Lindor egg, I was surprised that it was quite heavy for quite a small egg; naturally, chocolate with some sort of filling inside is bound to be a little on the weighty side but I think one of these eggs could be used as a makeshift weapon if the situation ever presented itself and you only had one of these or a stuffed toy at hand. In comparison to the hollow eggs that are a lot taller and fatter in appearance, this Lindt egg does feel like a proper snack; although they are a heck of a lot smaller, the mini eggs are normally very sickly because they are over flowing with rich fillings and that's good in one way as - unlike the hollow eggs - I wouldn't be tempted to eat more than there is there! The Lindt egg fits comfortably into the palm of my hand and is quite similar in size to a normal chicken's egg which indicates that although the chocolate is not overtly big, it has the potential to be very, very sickly...

          The red wrapper that encases the egg adds a grand appearance to the chocolate; for each of their chocolate flavours, Lindt dress the truffles in different colours and for the milk chocolate egg that I'm reviewing today, the wrapper was a very bright and attractive red colour. Appearance-wise, although I think the red foil wrapper makes the egg look a bit regal and stands out on the shelves in any shop, it's hardly very adventurous as it is just the regular foil wrapper that you'd expect on all of these sorts of eggs. However, the packaging is rather ornate with several wispy white patterns but is suitably elegant and advertises the Lindt chocolate well.

          OK, SHUT UP ABOUT THE WRAPPER: WHAT DOES THE LINDT LINDOR EGG TASTE - AND SMELL - LIKE?
          Because I quite enjoy faffing about and smelling chocolate whilst it is still in its wrapper, my mind instantly thinks of Christmas when I sniffed this chocolate egg; it smells strikingly similar to the chocolate Cadbury decorations we used to adorn the tree with when I was very little. It's only a faint smell but it is intensified of course when I peeled back the thin foil layer. The smell then takes me even further back in time and I can't help but think of the cute little Kinder Surprise eggs I used to buy every so often as a child, the ones that had a teeny toy inside. The artwork on the egg is very pleasant too; the Lindt logo is at the centre of many lines which I actually think looks like rays of light, for some odd reason.

          Now onto the most terrible thing I've had to do in a long, long while: taste test the Lindor egg! When I attempted to bite into the egg, it sort of cracked in half and I could see that the chocolate was a couple of millimetres thick. This is a little disappointing considering how the chocolate on the normal truffles seems to be a lot thicker than that. But that doesn't deter me as the outer shell itself has a beautiful texture and a really milky flavour; the chocolate melts in my mouth quite easily and leaves almost a nutty aftertaste but that is mainly overshadowed by the creaminess of the chocolate which is very smooth.

          The truffle filling, on the other hand, is exactly like you get with the Lindt truffles: light and velvety with a freshness that makes the truffle centre almost seem like a liquid filling. The centres to all Lindt truffles normally seem quite cold in comparison to the outer chocolate which is probably why I think of it as being reminiscent to a liquid centre but both layers complement each other very well; the crispness of the outer milk chocolate case verses the softer truffle centre gives the egg a wonderful contrast that I can safely say I've never really noticed before with the regular milk chocolate Lindt truffles. Perhaps when I'm eating the normal Lindt chocolates I just shove one of them into my mouth quite easily and don't really contemplate the way the chocolate has been crafted too much. But unless you have a mouth the size of the Mersey Tunnel, you won't be able to eat the egg in one go and you'll quickly appreciate the contrast between the tremendous truffle centre and the marvellous milk chocolate case.

          When it comes to richness, I have to say that the Lindt egg is about the right size; if the egg had been too much bigger, I fear that it may have been overtly sweet and not as delicious as they are now.

          THE 'NUTRITIONAL' INFORMATION YOU'VE ALL BEEN WAITING TO HEAR ABOUT...
          I was quite shocked but altogether not surprised when I couldn't find any specific information in terms of calories, sugars and fats on the wrapper for the Lindt egg. Perhaps we can be naive enough to assume that calories don't exist where Lindor are concerned or perhaps we're not meant to give too much of a damn because it's Easter.

          However, after a little bit of research, I've managed to find out that three of the smaller milk chocolate Lindt eggs, which you can also currently buy in the shops, are around 90 calories between them. Taking into consideration that this Lindor egg itself is 28g, and three of the tiny eggs come to about 15g a piece, if the website in question is correct than it's possible that the Lindor egg has in the region of 180 calories per egg. That does seem quite excessive to me; I know I said earlier that the chocolate was a bit on the heavy side, but it certainly doesn't seem to be 180 calories on the heavy side! However, I don't necessarily think that the calorie content is altogether that extreme where the Lindor eggs are concerned; as they are a little rich, I doubt that even I would want to eat more than one at a time which is supported by the fact that I can normally only eat a couple of the much smaller truffles at a given time or else I find them to be too sickly.

          If we are following that websites claims about all of the nutritional information for the Lindt tiny eggs, we can assume for the 28g Lindt Lindor egg itself that it contains roughly 14gs of fat and carbohydrates with just two grams of protein. You don't need me to tell you that these eggs aren't exactly the healthiest things on the planet; you're not going to get your five a day from eating one of these or anything remotely good for you. However, scientists are now claiming that eating chocolate every week reduces the risk of heart disease and strokes by a significant percentage and I think that it's as good an excuse as any to get one of these eggs to try!

          Of course, if you are a vegan than don't bother with this particular brand of chocolate; the Lindt Lindor egg in the red wrapper is milk chocolate which obviously contains a dairy product or two and these eggs also contain traces of peanuts, almonds and hazelnuts which explains why I could detect a slight nutty flavour in the chocolate and truffle centre. If you are allergic to nuts, please don't buy one of these and of course, if you are allergic to dairy products - of which there are plenty within this product - don't try the Lindt egg either. There is also a dark chocolate Lindt egg on the market at the moment so if you are keen on trying the brand, check the wrapper on that to see exactly what ingredients can be found inside before testing one.

          IN COMPARISON TO OTHER MINI EASTER EGGS
          It wouldn't be an honest critique without a brief nod to some of the other mini, filled Easter eggs that you can currently buy in corner shops and supermarkets. There are plenty on the market - some different to the Lindt egg, some quite similar - but which one should YOU buy in the Easter chocolate sales this year? Last year my parents gave me a Cadbury Caramel Easter egg and with it came a couple of mini Caramel Eggs for me to try. Like the Lindt eggs, the Caramel eggs are based upon the Cadbury bars of the same name and I have to say they are absolutely lovely and not in the slightest bit sickly; they are the right size with just about the right amount of caramel and they are actually quite a lot heavier than the Lindt beauties. Yet, I don't feel like I'm having a treat as such because - in all fairness - I could go to the shops any day of the week and buy a Cadbury's Caramel bar for very little money whereas I think the Lindt eggs are quite good value and offer a snippet of highly exquisite - and normally expensive - chocolate for a fraction of the price.

          The Smarties eggs that I mentioned earlier I feel are more for children than for adults; they are simply hollow milk chocolate filled with Smarties which is nice to a point but hardly groundbreaking. I know many of you are probably thinking 'what is original about chocolate with a truffle centre?' but I don't know, there is something about the Lindt eggs that seem to strike the perfect balance; I have tried the Galaxy mini filled eggs before and found them to be too sickly after eating and although that is partially true for the Lindt eggs, I seem to want to purchase more of them just to check it's not my imagination that they are a tad too rich. In comparison to the Galaxy eggs well I can't say I'd be devastated if I never had another one; as I mentioned with the Cadbury's Caramel eggs, I like them but they don't offer anything groundbreakingly different to their respective bars that you can purchase from a corner shop for a fairly meagre price.

          Oh and what about Cadbury's Creme Eggs, I hear you cry? I've never cared for them so it's a bit of an unfair contest: Lindt Lindor eggs win every time!

          WHERE CAN I BUY THE LINDT LINDOR EASTER EGG FROM?
          When I first reviewed the Lindt egg, they were available from both the Co-Op and Sainsbury's for 59p each and on offer at two for £1. Asda were also selling the eggs off fairly cheaply at 23p each but with the holiday being over by now, you might be able to find the eggs at a lot cheaper than 59p each. Asda were selling the packets of the tiny Lindt eggs for 99p the other day but I couldn't spot any of Lindt eggs at this sort of size.

          Obviously, at their normal retail price, the Lindt eggs are slightly pricier than your average mini filled egg. I often see Cadbury and Nestle eggs at the beginning of the Easter season on offer at three for £1 or roughly 43p each. I suppose in this case, you have to ask yourself whether you prefer quantity over quality or vice versa because given the choice, I know which chocolate I'd pick over the others any day of the week. The Thornton's smaller filled eggs which are quite similar to Lindt were 69p each and on offer for something like three or five for a £1 now (sorry, I can't just remember what the offer was). I think I'd still recommend the Lindt eggs over the Thornton's ones for the pure reason that the truffle centre seems to be even more indulgent and beautiful but that's not to say you'd be getting a bad deal with the Thornton's eggs if you manage to grab them at the price they're retailing at now.

          OVERALL: WHY YOU SHOULD GO OUT AND BUY ONE OF THESE LINDT EGGS, EITHER NOW OR NEXT EASTER
          I think I have made it pretty clear up until now that I love these little eggs; they're a lovely snippet of a gorgeous brand of chocolate which normally can be quite expensive; on the rare occasions when my family decide to buy a box of the mixed truffles, you are sometimes looking into paying up to £6 a box. That might not seem too excessive with regards to Thornton's chocolates which you can end up paying a hell of a lot more for in their own shops, but for chocolates you can buy in most supermarkets, I think Lindt can be a tad pricey.

          However, back to the eggs, and although I think they are quite rich in flavour, I think because they are fairly small, you wouldn't end up feeling too queasy after trying one of these. One of the Lindor eggs is just about the right size for me personally, especially in comparison to the Lindt Easter bunny that I tried last year which left me feeling like I'd eaten far too much! That is a general rule for the Lindt milk chocolate; in comparison to the dark chocolate, which you can get in egg form for a similar price and in black packaging, I find them to be very creamy but not as much so as the white chocolate truffles. The white chocolate Lindt eggs are available in a tiny mixed packet and I wouldn't hesitate to try them if they are every bit as sweet as their truffle counter parts. But, I would point out that if you are not necessarily a chocolate lover to stick to the milk chocolate eggs to start with; the dark chocolate can be very dark and the white chocolate very creamy, far creamier than brands like Milky Bar.

          So, in conclusion, I think these eggs are pretty fab really; some might say they are a bit expensive, some might say they are a bit too rich, but I happen to think of them as a pretty perfect treat for Easter. I know I have more than just the one sweet tooth but I really do find these Lint eggs to be the right size for me so it feels like I've had a treat but nothing too heavy. The Lindt Lindor eggs are a lot tastier than many hollow eggs currently on the market, and indeed a little more extravagant, but with snappy chocolate and a divine truffle centre that literally melts in the mouth, I can't think of a better thing to eat at this time of the year when I want my chocolate fix.

          WEBSITES OF INTEREST:
          For Lindt's official website, and to look up all of their current Easter treats, go to: www.lindt.com/uk

          To find out more about the calorie and other statistics for Lindt chocolates, go to: http://www.thedailyplate.com/nutrition-calories/food/lindt

          Thank you for reading - Hope ya'll had a lovely Easter!

          (Please note: review previously displayed on Ciao.co.uk by MizzMolko. All my own work!)

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            06.04.2010 08:32
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            A small, stylish and classy chocolate egg

            For those of you interested in Lindt (as a company), the history, the ethics, the products etc. I suggest you visit the website, which is easily located via Google, as this review is going to be solely about the Lindt Lindor egg, and more specifically, the one covered in red, white and gold foil.

            Compared to other similar chocolate egg type products, I refer to Cadbury's Cream Eggs and the like, the predominantly metallic red foil wrapper with subtle white and gold graphics is understated and quite plain which is stylish sophisticated and adds a touch of class which complements the Lindt brand perfectly.

            Personally, I prefer this understated look especially over the (in my opinion) garishly in your face colours of the Cream egg, which are not only dated but also look very gimmicky and quite tacky, although I appreciate this has become the "corporate colour scheme" and branding that consumers associate with Cream eggs, so it is going to be difficult to change it without a huge marketing effort which could potentially fail, like other re-branding efforts like the Marathon/Snickers to name but one.

            With a net weight of 28g and a price tag of £0.59 the Lindor egg is not only smaller but more expensive than many of its rivals, but this is generally the case with premium products and the consumer pays more but get less, although this is to be expected. After all you wouldn't go to one of Gordon Ramsey's restaurants, pay a lot of money and get a full plate of food would you? No, you'd get a tiny dollop of something very tasty in the middle of a large plate. In my opinion the extra cost is definitely worth it and I think it is great value for money.

            Whilst many may consider the smaller size a negative I have to pose the question, "is this such a bad thing?" Consumers watching their weight or with a small appetite are likely to welcome this size reduction, and after eating one of these eggs I have to admit that I was glad it was on the small side since the filling is a bit too rich for me and I found it got quite sickly.

            Like all foil wrapped eggs the foil either comes off very quickly and easily in one, or it is rips in to hundreds of tiny pieces and takes ages to remove, which is not only frustrating but I find, makes me want to get to the chocolate even quicker. Strange how there is never any middle ground with the unwrapping, oh well C'est la vie.

            Once unwrapped there is a distinct aroma of Lindt chocolate, which is totally unique and like no other chocolate on the market. There is something about this Swiss type of chocolate that make it so distinctive, although I can't put my finger on it. It is a wonderful smell that is simply divine and really gets the taste buds going.

            Once unwrapped a small tap and this egg splits in to two halves, making it ideal for sharing or consuming one half and wrapping the other up for later, providing the foil came off in one piece that is. Each half is filled with a smooth, rich and brown coloured praline soft centre, which smells and tastes fantastic, although I find that it can get a bit too sickly. One thing I did notice is that the inside of the egg isn't completely filled with the soft centre, and whilst it is not such a big deal since I struggled as it was, I did feel a bit cheated and I'm sure other consumers who can manage a whole one of these in one sitting would feel the same.

            The chocolate outer shell is the standard Lindt chocolate, which in my opinion, is far more superior than Cadburys. In fact, Cadbury's doesn't even come close. The smooth praline inside is also nicer than the insides of a Cream egg, which I find not only sickly sweet but sticky, messy and difficult to eat without it going everywhere, which really hurts sensitive teeth if it gets on them. In addition the whole concept of a yellow yolk surrounded by a white outer is pretty tacky.

            Eating a Lindor egg is not a messy affair, there are no stringy bits of inner filling to deal with and a tissue or bib is definitely not required. It is an egg that can be eaten in a respectable manner, any time any place without ending up with food all over your face and looking like a toddler who is learning to feed itself.

            Where the Cream egg is aimed at quite a large audience, I think with its smaller size, stylish and understated packaging, praline filling and inflated price the Lindor egg is aimed at a more sophisticated consumer.

            These eggs are also available in 100g bags and retail for £2.00, which overall is not too bad. In a bag there is typically 20 small sized eggs, which are a small and perfectly formed replica of the large variety. In my opinion these smaller eggs are the best way of purchasing this product. I agree the additional packaging is not great, it isn't environmentally friendly or recyclable and it is additional rubbish to dispose of, but the packets are definitely the way to go.

            As previously mentioned I find these eggs really tasty but they are just too rich and sickly, which ruins the eating experience somewhat, especially when I feel sick three quarters of the way through a large egg. Smaller eggs overcome this and having two or three eggs, enjoying the delights and having the ability to stop, and not waste any which is great. Unlike the larger egg the mini versions don't split in half, and being little bigger than a chocolate covered peanut it is simply a case of unwrapping and popping them until they become too sickly or the bag is empty, whichever comes first.

            Nutritional information on these eggs, and exactly what goes in to them proved to be sparse, although the back of a 100g packet stated that there is sugar, vegetable fat, cocoa butter, whole milk powder, milk fat, malt extract (barley), emulsifier (soya lecithin), flavourings. May contain traces of hazel nuts and almonds, which is to be expected given it is praline, although it should be pointed out for anyone with a nut allergy. The milk chocolate contains 30% min cocoa solids and 14% min milk solids

            Overall these are excellent eggs and I would definitely recommend them. Whilst I find the praline filling gets a bit sickly I have to admit that I don't have an exceptionally sweet tooth, so whilst I struggle I'm sure there are many consumers out there that wouldn't. I agree that these eggs are expensive but Lindt is a premium product and you really do get what you pay for.

            .

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            • More +
              03.04.2010 21:28
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              A lovely Easter treat

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              THE POWER OF SUGGESTION
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              It has never really occurred to me to buy a product just so I could review it. However, I found myself milling around Waterloo Station on Wednesday night feeling a bit peckish. I was flush from the excitement of the Arsenal v Barcelona game and getting bored waiting for the next South West Trains service home, so I wandered into the Whistlestop store and my eyes alighted on the display of Lindt Lindor Eggs. Immediately, the little devil on my left shoulder started whispering conspiratorially in my ear, while the angel on my right struggled to get a look in.

              When I indulge, I'm usually a confirmed Cadbury Creme Egg man, but impressionable fellow that I am (especially when it comes to chocolate) the idea of buying a Lindt Lindor egg - solely for the "scientific" purposes of a review - was proving difficult to resist. So I stood there for a moment, pondering whether to take the plunge, and consciously contemplating whether the subsequent heavyweight hit to my calorie-consumption for the day could really be justified by the few pennies I could earn by reviewing these little babies on this site (c'mon - at least SOME of you think like that!).

              In the end, my resistance crumbled, I succumbed, and ended up buying one for immediate eating and one for later. I don't think I have ever been so ashamed of myself - I really should know better than to let the little matter of a review inform my eating habits, but having taken the decision, I was determined to make the most of it - as it happens, I don't think I have ever consumed a piece of confectionary quite so critically before.

              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              A BIT ABOUT LINDT
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

              I am much more familiar with Lindt's other excellent chocolate products. The gold wrapped Lindt bunnies with the red ribbon and little golden bell are one of my daughter's favourite Easter confections, and we indulge - every now and again - in some of the fine chocolate bars that they consistently produce (the Intense range, which includes orange and chilli flavours, is especially enticing).

              Lindt (short for Lindt & Sprungli) were founded as a family business in Zurich 1845 and have been making quality Swiss chocolate ever since. Fortunately, despite its growth over the years into a major producer of consumer chocolate across the world, the company has stayed true to its roots and has so far managed to sustain their trademark quality, whilst fighting off the predatory attentions of such multi0national global concerns like Nestle and Cadbury.

              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              A BIT ABOUT THEIR CHOCOLATE
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

              As consumers, I like to think that we are all becoming a little more socially responsible and expecting a higher standard of ethical behaviour from the manufacturers of the products we buy. I have particularly enjoyed recent reviews that have taken the time and effort to research this aspect of a product, so why should chocolate be any different?

              Investigations carried out in the last six or seven years have uncovered some fairly unsavoury practices in the sourcing of cocoa beans by the chocolate industry, including the use by cocoa suppliers of child labour and trafficked children to harvest crops from cocoa plantations, especially in West Africa, where the trade is centred around Ghana, Ivory Coast and Burkina Faso (An exposé which aired last week on BBC's Panorama - "Chocolate: The Bitter Truth" - is a great example for anyone that's interested - see http://news.bbc.co.uk/panorama/hi/default.stm for more info)

              As a majority of the cocoa beans used in Lindt's consumer brands come from Ghana, I was very keen to learn more about their policy on ethical and sustainable sourcing. To their credit, there is a large section of their web-site (www.lindt.com) dedicated to the traceability of crops, their supplier code of conduct and the social programmes the company invest in to return some of their profit to their growers.

              That said, corporate web-sites will only show you what the company want you to see, so it should be taken with a pinch of salt. However, on a more positive note, independent third party research (for instance, see www.ethicalconsumer.org) has confirmed that of the bigger brands, Lindt are one of the better behaved companies in the industry, readily cooperating with requests for information on their cocoa supply and generally being decent corporate citizens (with one eye still firmly on profit of course - it is a business after all).

              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              GETTING DOWN TO THE EGG
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

              The egg is an "Easter-ised" version of the existing Lindor product, which is usually sold in a cardboard box as individually wrapped truffle balls. For those who want something more bite-sized, it is also available in a smaller sized mini-eggs, packaged in 160g "pouches" or 250g bags. The egg, which is wrapped in predominantly red, white and gold foil, is pointier than a Creme Egg and slightly more elegant looking. When you unwrap it, you will see a seam running vertically down the centreline.

              This is where the two halves of the egg are lightly melted together leaving a small gap in between, so if at all possible, you should try and separate the two sides before taking a bite (a tap on a hard surface normally does the rick) otherwise, the egg is likely to disintegrate into its two parts, causing a mad scramble to recover bits of chocolate and your dignity all at the same time (especially if, like me, you're trying to eat it on a crowded train).

              The first thing that hits you is the subtle smell - which is best described as cocoa with a subtle hint of sugar. First taste impressions are good - you get a nice hit of milky, smooth cocoa from the outer chocolate shell, before your taste buds are saturated and almost overwhelmed by the nutty, truffle filling. The truffle has an odd "freshness" to it which leaves you with a slightly odd "cooling" sensation as it melts away to nothingness in the mouth.

              The end result is a silky, slightly decadent experience that is delicate rather than overpowering, with just the right hint of sweetness. It would be unfair to draw any comparison with Cadbury's product, which uses a fondant centre instead of truffle, as the only similarity between them is the shape of the confectionery.

              ~~~~~~~~~~~
              VITALSTATISTIX
              ~~~~~~~~~~~

              The Lindt Lindor Egg weighs in at a svelte 28g, over ten grams lighter than its 39g competition from Cadbury, but comes in at 178 calories (125 of which come from fat!), which is actually 5 calories more than the bigger Creme Egg. There is precious little information on the foil wrapper about cocoa content, but on the basis that the greatest ingredients are listed first, they are a little eyebrow raising to read - sugar, vegetable fat, cocoa butter and cocoa mass - in that order.

              There is no animal gelatine or artificial colouring used in the product, so it is suitable for vegetarian consumption. The Lindt egg, as befits its higher quality, is also much more expensive. Allowing for the fact that I bought mine at 65p at over-inflated railway station prices, you can expect to pay between 50p to 60p at your local supermarket or newsagent. You certainly get your fill of calories for your money.

              ~~~~~~~
              VERDICT
              ~~~~~~~
              I rather enjoyed my dalliance with the Lindor egg, but given my commitment to losing more weight, am unlikely to indulge very often. It certainly left me wanting more, and it took a monumental exercise of will power to save the second egg for later - I could easily have scoffed two or three in one sitting.

              There is also the satisfaction that Lindt are prepared to do more than most of their peers to ensure the integrity of their cocoa supply. Overall, the Lindor Egg delivered the quality I expected from the Lindt brand and I am happy to have tried it, even if it was for ever so slightly mercenary purposes!

              Happy Easter to all, and to those who celebrate the resurrection, rejoice, for Christ is risen - He is risen indeed 8^)

              © Hishyeness 2010

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                03.04.2010 12:43
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                An Easter treat that's a bit egg-stra special!

                I think everyone's probably getting fed up of hearing about Easter, especially as it seems to be becoming more commercialised every year and more drawn out every year too! I think I noticed the beginnings of Easter before Valentine's Day in some shops, which is far too early in my opinion. There is, however, one upside to Easter; if you do nothing else, indulge yourself with a little Lindor treat (because 'you're worth it!')

                The Lindt manufacturer ( well known from the adverts as the the 'master Swiss chocolatier') dates back to 1845 so they've got a lot of knowledge & practice producing products to perfection. Lindor branched from this later and produced those chocolate truffle balls in red twist wraps that we love so much. Advertising for Lindor always emphasises their passion for chocolate making, and I always get the feeling that their products are that bit extra special.

                The brand, 'Lindor', is actually a combination of Lindt with 'or', which is the French equivalent for 'gold'. According to their website 'Lindt has indeed crafted the gold standard for the ultimate smooth melting chocolate experience'. As a brand, they portray themselves very much as a professional producer. I would agree that I perceive them to be a producer who know their stuff and associate them with quality and uniqueness.
                These are fairly easy to distinguish from the other Easter treats because of their classic Lindt design. Wrapped in red foil, these eggs look rather basic, but just knowing their Lindor seems to make them feel that bit more special than the similar ones crammed in next to them. The foil wrapper bares the Lindor name, but little other information.

                I love peeling back the foil wrapper, not for any perverse reason, but because it feels that bit more special than grabbing a biscuit from the biscuit tin or tearing open a plastic mass-produced wrapper on a Twix. As you unwrap it, make sure to smell it. Again, I know it sounds weird, but it has a lovely chocolate smell that you would expect from Lindt. What I'm basically trying to say is that this is an egg to be savoured, so I like to enjoy it as much as possible. That's partly because it's so small that it'll disappear within 5 seconds, and partly because those 5 seconds cost 60p!
                You can split this lengthways where the two halves were joined after being filled; this will show you the smooth, and velvety looking truffle insides. The chocolate is smooth and the shell is quite thick, so you get a satisfying bite into the egg. The truffle is very creamy, which complements the outer chocolate, which is quite dry and solid, very well. It's very much a melt-in-your-mouth type of chocolate.

                These taste like good quality, with no nasty after taste or anything I can find to complain about other than the price. Being a fan of Lindt Lindor truffles, I was excited to first try one of these, and I wasn't disappointed. It lived upto my expectations and tasted absolutely delicious.
                Whilst the chocolate is quite rich, the egg itself is small, weighing only around 28g. I think these are a tad smaller than other similar eggs, like Mars or Galaxy, but it has a superior taste. Although more than 1 may be quite sickly to stomach, the one definitely hits the spot if you want to envelope yourself in chocolate heaven for a few moments.

                As these are sold individually, you don't get much information regarding the nutritional values on the foil wrapper. I would estimate a guess that there's aren't a dieters dream, but I would let that put you off trying them. Lindor also do a smaller version, a bit like the mini Cadbury's Crème Eggs, in a small multipack bag. At around 90 calories & 7g of fat per 'portion' (I believe), you may find yourself eating far more of the little ones than one normal sized one (or maybe that's just me!).
                These are widely available in most supermarkets/convenience stores at Easter as they seem to be quite a popular choice. These are a bit of a delicacy, and so whilst they may be a bit pricey, they do have a special feel about them which sets them apart from the other mass-produced eggs. I get the feeling that they're actually crafted with the love & care they claim, they're consistently high quality, and they never fail to put a smile on my face.

                Would I recommend? Definitely. In fact, chocolate's good for stressful times, or so they say, so take some time out for yourself over the next few days and treat yourself to some dreamy Lindor, you wont regret it :o)
                (Also written by me, gothic_moon, on Ciao)

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                  03.04.2010 01:13
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                  Beautifully made chocolate truffle egg buy only if you love sweet rich goo .

                  My husband is the main reason for me reviewing Lindt Lindor egg in the red foil wrapping. He truely is a chocoholic and loves anything sweet, he has been raving about these lindt eggs and truffles for weeks now as he had a few from work I had to have a nibble..

                  They are 69p in work with him at present but he does work in a petrol forecourt shop so maybe a few pence cheaper elsewhere before i review these i must say i like not love chocolate ! I opened an egg and to be totally honest I wasnt that impressed the eggs seem smaller than the creme egg or caramel eggs etc but what I noticed first was the sweet sweet smell of chocolate and from that instant I knew why my hubby loves them, on biting into the egg the sweet sugar rush was unreal they are so so sweet in fact uncomfortably sweet, so sweet they made my teeth tingle and I so dont suffer with sensitive teeth, inside the egg there is a gnache ,truffly type filling which is far too rich for my liking but there again like I said im not a overly sweet loving person, there is a gap between the truffles where the eggs join together which seems a slight rip off really as it is quite noticable im sure they could add more filling.

                  They are 28g of chocolate lovers dream and I really cant imagine how many calories are in each egg if the nutritional details are on the wrapper I couldnt find them or perhaps they hide them because this is so not a dieters dream! I think you have to enjoy seriously sweet chocolate like this I seem to be out on my own here at home as they all love them but I am the one doing the review, these are two for a pound in asda at the moment so enjoy if you dare I guess these will be in my hubbys easter box lol hes certainly dropped enough hints.

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                    02.04.2010 20:16
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                    Look what the Easter bunny dropped off

                    Ok ok, so I've always professed to be a not so huge lover of chocolate so why am I participating in a review about a chocolate egg. Let's face it folks with Easter round the corner there's no avoiding them, they're everywhere, crème eggs, mini eggs, big ones, small ones - there's no escape, supermarkets have dedicated entire shopping aisles to Easter treats just to tempt us poor consumers into spending our hard earned cash on chocolate and truth be told, that's all it is, just an egg shaped piece of chocolate.

                    I think the true meaning of Easter is lost today and there's a lot of focus on the sweet sensations of the world and with so much to choose from how can you possibly differentiate the good eggs from the bad eggs.
                    As chocolate goes I have to admit, I have a soft spot for the Lindt Lindor brand and have often indulged in the occasional chocolate truffle treat from the master chocolatiers.

                    When it comes to Easter and Lindt chocolate I always think of the gold bunny - we've all seen the adverts and I'm sure indulged in the gold bunny from time to time, so I was quite surprised when my partner presented me with the Lindt Lindor chocolate egg, wrapped in shiny red foil with white embellishments (kind of reminded me of Christmas rather than Easter with the colours) and that familiar Lindt Lindor branding. Knowing that I am not a huge lover of chocolate and giant Easter eggs he had taken some time to select this very small 28g Lindt egg. Not as large as I'm sure it's biggest competitor the cadbury crème egg weighing in at 34g, but with the crème eggs seemingly suicidal tendencies I reckon the Lindt egg would totally win in the boxing ring.

                    Lindt Lindor Egg

                    So what is this little egg? Well basically it's a pocket sized milk chocolate egg with a chocolatey truffle centre. The outer shell is your typical Lindt chocolate - flawless, smooth and creamy, but the outer layer is quite thin, and although not a huge lover of large portions I have to admit that I think Lindt chocolate is a cut above the rest, so I did feel a little cheated.
                    Peeling off the red foil, you can see that there is a crease around the middle of the egg, much the same as most Easter eggs where you can split it in two to reveal the soft chocolate truffle centre. One notable point is that the egg is not completely filled with the truffle as there is what can only be described as a vacuum between both sides leaving a small lip on each side. The smell is quite intoxicating, as the rich creamy chocolate aroma surrounds your nostrils, giving a clear indication of what is coming next.


                    Eating the egg

                    As I've said, the outer layer of the egg is quite a thin layer of tasty Lindt Milk chocolate, so almost immediately into your first bite you're at the truffle centre which is delicate, creamy, smooth and just seems to melt in the mouth, blink and it's gone. Although there's not much eating to the egg, it is intensely chocolatey so I think this is guaranteed to satisfy any chocolate cravings that may manifest themselves this Easter. One egg was more than enough for me and I think the taste experience will probably last me the whole year.

                    My overall opinion

                    Not that I'm surprised by this but I found that I actually really enjoyed this egg by Lindt. The quality was the usual standard of quality I would expect from Lindt chocolate. The egg is small enough to make you feel like you're not being overly indulgent and satisfying enough so that you don't really want more than what's been provided. The price is somewhat expensive especially for someone who is not overly indulgent in chocolate but for a one off treat it's well worth the money, it's not like I'm eating 10 a day, and the fact that it was a thoughtful gift made it a lot more enjoyable.

                    What's in it?

                    This tasty little egg is made from a small number number of ingredients which are as follows

                    Sugar, Vegetable Fat. Cocoa butter, Cocoa mass, whole milk powder, lactose, skimmed milk powder, milk fat, emulsifier (soya lecithin), malt extract (barley), flavouring.
                    The egg is Gelatine free and has no artificial colourings.


                    Where can you buy it?

                    You can buy this little egg in Tesco for 0.59p which for the size of the egg is quite expensive but for the quality of the chocolate is probably a reasonable price. A lovely Easter treat for us adults that don't want to go nuts with big chocolate Easter eggs, gaining 7lbs to go along with the indulgence.

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                      01.04.2010 17:13
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                      Definitely worth a try

                      Sitting proudly on the supermarket shelf the Lindt Lindor Egg adorned in its shiny red, gold and white foil wrapper was just screaming for me to eat it! So I relented and bought.

                      Lindt have been making chocolate since 1845 when a father and his 29 year old son started to produce their mouth-watering chocolate in Zurich. Lindt is still going strong to this day and now produces chocolate in factories all over the world.
                      Anyway... enough about the company, I have a chocolate egg to enjoy.

                      Carefully and with ease I slowly peeled the foil wrapper from the egg. Quite similar in size to a real hen's egg but probably slightly narrower and of course, made from chocolate! When I took the egg from its wrapper I was immediately met by the wonderful aroma of the Lindt chocolate - quite a distinct chocolatety aroma, pleasantly sweet and very tempting. The outer chocolate shell of the egg is delicately embossed with a pretty design and the Lindt name. The egg itself is actually two halves loosely joined together, which can quite easily be broken apart, making it slightly easier to eat.
                      As I bit into the egg the crispy outer shell cracked and fell into my mouth with little splinters escaping, but not too far, as I had pre-empted this and held my hand under my chin so I wouldn't lose any of my wonderful treat. Once the outer shell had been broken, my teeth then met the soft, melting chocolate centre, a very soft and richly smooth chocolate that seemed to have a slight chilled texture to it, almost as if it had been in the fridge, my teeth slid into it with ease but there was a slight firmness to the texture, which immediately started to melt across my taste buds as it was met with the heat from my mouth.. A wonderful rich and creamy tasting chocolate with the crispy outer shell taking slightly longer to melt than the smooth centre, leaving a wonderful flavour in my mouth making me want more. I tried to take small bites, letting the chocolate melt slowly in my mouth hoping it would make the egg last longer. The smooth soft centre actually reminds me of chocolates my dad used to buy for me as a child. It was chocolate that had been poured into small brightly coloured little foil cupcake papers. This chocolate was also smooth and creamy but had that slightly firm almost chilled feel to it too and I loved these as well!

                      As much as these are definitely one of my favourite chocolates I must admit that along with the wonderful taste and the way in which it melts in your mouth one of these eggs is definitely enough for me. The creamy, milky sweetness of the chocolate actually does make it quite sickly if you eat too much, but luckily this egg seems to be just the right size, leaving me quite satisfied and pleased with my treat.
                      The ingredients of the egg are printed on the foil wrapper and there may be traces of nuts, but this is all the information given, no nutritional values, which I probably like. I don't really want to know the calorie or fat content - I am quite happy to enjoy my treat without the knowledge of these facts!

                      The egg I have reviewed is the milk chocolate one but this egg is also available in dark chocolate, which comes with a black foil wrapper and a white chocolate egg, which comes in a gold wrapper. They are usually priced around 59p each but I managed to get mine from Asda where they are selling them for 23p at the moment.
                      Many thanks for reading - I hope I made your mouths water!

                      Also posted on other sites.

                      ©lel1969

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                        31.03.2010 14:06
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                        Lindt lindor Easter eggs

                        With Easter fast approaching the shops are full of all kinds of delicious chocolate eggs in all shapes, sizes and prices. The master chocolatiers at Lindt have been busy too, doing what they have been for over 150 years; making delicious, high quality chocolate!

                        Before I tell you about the Easter eggs that Lindt produce let me give you a potted history of the company as I think it helps to show what a good pedigree it has! In 1845 a small pastry shop in Zurich, Switzerland, under the ownership of confectioner David Sprungli-Schwarz and his son, started making bars of chocolate. This was a very new and different idea for most of its customers, as chocolate was really only known as a drink. The idea proved very popular and within two years the small bakery had to move to a factory to enable production to keep up with increasing demand. In 1949 the Lindt chocolatiers created the Lindor brand, with its chocolate outer shell and smooth chocolate filling using a unique chocolate recipe. Lindor was first sold in red foil wrappers with a white laced design for Christmas.

                        I don't intend to regurgitate the entire history of the company as you can read it for yourself on the Lindt website if you want to know more. However, fast forward to today and although the Lindt head office is still based in Switzerland, there are now factories and distribution centres all over the world.

                        Before I tell you about the Lindt collection of Easter eggs and I am going to have to share with you my prejudice about the Lindt Easter rabbit. For those of you who haven't spotted the rabbit in the shops, and there can't be many in this category, let me describe it. The rabbit comes in several different sizes .All are wrapped in gold foil with a red ribbon around their neck complete with a little gold bell. Sounds innocent enough so far? However next time you see one take a closer look at its eyes! To say they are menacing is an understatement! In my local supermarket there is a whole row of these evil looking creatures all with an equally evil price tag. However the smaller ones, although not to be trusted, are nothing compared to the king bunny. I'm sure that when the Lindt chocolatiers created this one they were trying to emulate Mary Shelley when she created Frankenstein's monster. This monster sits on the very top shelf, wrapped in miles of gold foil, guarding all beneath it. If you want to take home this monster, and if you do you obviously haven't seen the Dr Who stone angels episode (look it up!), it will cost you nearly £40! However I have, lucilky managed to bag several Lindt eggs without being spotted by the possessed bunny, so am able to tell you about them!

                        The Lindt Easter egg collection.
                        ****************************
                        With the exception of those bunnies, the Lindt Easter egg collection is a gorgeous affair. Lets start with the smallest first; Lindt's individually wrapped milk chocolate eggs with melt in your mouth chocolate filling. These are easy to spot with their bright red and white laced design foil wrappers. These are the original Lindt eggs and have been around for as long as I can remember. I do think the red and white wrapping is a bit too Christmassy. They are very similar in size to the Cadbury cream egg, but as different in quality as a Rolls Royce to a Ford Ka! The outer chocolate is of a very high quality, not too sweet and very smooth. The centre is a lovely soft milk chocolate that really does melt in your mouth! There is also a dark chocolate version, wrapped in black and gold foil. I am not a fan of dark chocolate so have never tried these. These eggs sell for around 59p, although several supermarkets have these on offer at two for £1.As you can tell, I love these and have already eaten my body weight; well that's a bit of an exaggeration; but I have eaten several of the milk chocolate ones and rate them highly!

                        Lindt also make 250 gram plastic packs of small treat sized Lindor eggs. These are available in several different varieties including a mini version of the red foiled wrapped eggs. I buy several packs of these to use in our family Easter egg hunt. The hunt takes the form of a treasure trail, with lots of clues, each one leading to an egg for each child. These are widely available and cost around £3.49 per bag. However they are on offer in several places at 2 bags for £6.

                        In addition to the classic red foil wrapped eggs, there is also a canister of assorted foil wrapped eggs. Each egg is beautifully wrapped in different coloured foil and each has the Lindor truffle centre.Lindt also make a white chocolate and dark chocolate version of the mini eggs but these can be hard to find The white chocolate version is wrapped in gold foil and the dark chocolate in blue foil.. I love white chocolate and the Lindt version is especially smooth and very creamy. A few years ago I was given a cardboard canister of Lindt eggs with assorted flavoured soft fillings. These were probably the nicest Easter eggs I have ever tasted. I haven't seen these in the shops, but if anyone knows where I can find them you will be responsible for my weight increase! If you prefer a solid chocolate egg, then these are also available in plastic packs and are wrapped in different coloured foil.

                        In addition to the array of mini eggs, Lindt make some gorgeous large eggs. I think these should come with an adult only sticker as they are very grown up eggs! My favourite is the Lindt Lindor 322 gram egg contained in a red cardboard box. The large egg contained behind the plastic window, is beautifully wrapped in gold foil with a red ribbon. At the feet of the egg there are lots of mini Lindor eggs all individually wrapped in red foil. I have left several hints for the Easter bunny for this one although at £9.99, he may want to go for the smaller cheaper version without the ribbon, and with truffle balls instead of mini eggs.

                        The pros.
                        ********
                        I also like to look at the positive and negatives sides of any product I review so guess this can apply to chocolate Easter eggs too! By now you will have guessed that I love Lindt chocolate in most of its forms! Receiving a Lindt Easter egg will make me very happy and there is scientific evidence to show that eating chocolate stimulates endorphins, the so called happy hormone. Chocolate also contains serotonin that acts as an anti depressant (who could feel sad when eating Lindt chocolate!) Finally it contains theobromine and caffeine both of which are stimulants and a pick you up.

                        The most important factor has to be the taste and texture. Lindt chocolate is wonderfully smooth and creamy. I love the Lindor truffle centre that melts in your mouth. It is not too sweet and has no hint of bitterness. It really is a top notch product!

                        The cons.
                        ********
                        Now this is difficult as I really can't think of any negatives except those demented bunnies and the price!

                        Overall I can highly recommend Lindt Lindor chocolate Easter eggs, they may be a bit more expensive but you really do get what you pay for!

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                          31.03.2010 13:59
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                          Beautiful eggs.

                          I was queuing up in Sainsburys for my lottery ticket on Saturday when I came face to face with a giant box full of these red shiny Lindt Lindor eggs, there must have been about 500 in there looking all lovely and screaming 'buy me, buy me' !!. How could I resist ?, especially as they were on a special offer of two for £1.00.

                          The Lindor eggs are made by the famous and exquisite chocolate company Lindt. They make a wide seclection of chocolate products, you will have probably seen the adverts for the little bunny rabbits with bells around their neck. They also make bars of choclate and boxes of Lindor balls.

                          Each egg weighs 28g, they are slightly smaller than a Cadburys cream. They are wrapped in red shiny foil with white flowers and gold writing on the front.

                          Once I unwrapped the egg it was very easy to break in half, the egg is solid milk chocolate. With a creamy 'melt in your mouth' middle. I like to chip away at the outer edge until I am left with just the middle. But obviously you can eat it as however you like. I just like to savour it and take my time.
                          The chocolate is such good quality, you really can taste the difference. The middle is so creamy and delicious. I am not sure what it is, I have looked on the Lindt website and they will not reveal any secrets. I would say it is a cross between a truffle and chocolate. It just melts away in your mouth.

                          As it is Easter week, the eggs are widely availible from most supermarkets, convenience stores and some other shops such as Boots, WH Smith and Superdrug. But they disappear after Easter to make way for the Halloween sweets ;-). In Sainsburys they cost 60p each but were on a special offer at two for £1. They are quite expensive for the amount of chocolate you get, but I would say they are worth every penny for the pure enjoyment and beautiful taste they will give you. Just try not to think about the 179 calories it contains :-)

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                            26.03.2010 12:38
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                            compeditively priced lindt chocolate truffle

                            The egg is the same product as the chocolate truffles only in a different form. This is obvious from the same use of packaging. In short it basically means that if you like the truffles which are close to a fiver a box at the moment you will like these which are 2 for a £1 in Tesco and Morrisons at the moment. This makes them more expensive than the cadbury eggs at 3 for the same price of a pound yet I think they are worth the extra 33% for the quality of the chocolate.

                            What I am not soo keen on is the quality of the egg which is produced. The eggs all contain a void running along the join on the two halves which makes me feel a little short changed really and the smooth centre is always quite solid so I find the outed shell breaks feel from the chocolate centre. It has no affect on the taste or anything but the eating experience is detracted from somewhat.

                            Lastly, I will say I love them and will continue eating them over easter as should anyone else who like Lindt chocolate just for the novelty factor of being in a slightly badly made egg formfactor

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                            16.02.2010 08:59
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                            The grown up little egg

                            Well following on from last review it only seemed right and appropriate that I should sample one of these Lindt Lindor Eggs. This year more than any other there seems to be hundreds of different mini eggs on the supermarket shelves. Only a fews years ago, you only really saw Cadburys Cream Egg's but these days every different chocolate bar seems to produce their own different variation.

                            Being pregnant and allowed to eat chocolate, I have tried many of these different eggs. Somehow I don't get the same level of guilt that I would do if I bought a standard size chocolate bar, they just seem small and therefore not so sinful. Some of them have been gorgoeus but many have been quite disappointing and not lived up to expectations. I spotted the Lindor Egg in a petrol garage and immediately made the decision that I just had to try one.

                            I was strong enough not to gobble it up straight away and instead saved it for a quiet moment later on when my girls were occupied and I had a hot cup of coffee in the other hand. I peel off the distinctive red foil wrapper and took a nibble.

                            Well what can I say really, this egg shaped truffle split into two halve and each half was covered in scrummy Lindt milk chocolate which melted in the mouth and was also incredibly smooth and delicious. Beneath this layer of chocolate you find the best bit..... the lindor truffle centre. This egg is like a lindor truffle just on a larger scale which makes it perfect for me. Lindor truffles are my all time favourite chocolates - the smooth silky centre just melts in your mouth and tastes of luxury and self indulgence.

                            I would say these little eggs are the pefect choice for grown ups, I just don't think they would appreciate the fantastic flavour and texture, I would say they would prefer something gooey or chewy but for grown ups these are in my view the absolutely perfect choice.

                            |I am hoping for a giant version for my acutal Easter egg and will be dropping lots of hints to my gorgeous husband.

                            A 28g egg costs about 59p from Tescos

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                              11.01.2010 23:35
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                              Just The Right Amount Of Lindor For Me, It Means I Can't Get Sick Eating Too Many!

                              I love Xmas, Easter and all those excuses to have a good time but when I walked into the shop by me on the 3rd of January and saw a big display of these little Easter eggs even I thought it was a bit early! lol Being as I was there I thought I might as well buy a few and one I picked up was this Lindt Lindor egg.

                              It's the same as the Lindor chocolates onto on a bigger scale and it's mega delish but very sickly. It's about the same size as a Creme Egg but a bit taller and thinner, I reckon the weight would be about the same anyway.

                              The milk chocolate that makes up the egg is delish, it's mega creamy with a sweet flavour that is proper moorish. The middle is that soft chocolate that is inside a Lindor chocolate, it's nearly liquid and as soon as you put it in your mouth it starts melting and eventually you get a slightly oily puddle of chocolate in your mouth.

                              I love the taste of Lindor but always eat so many of them that I end up feeling sick, these eggs are just the right size because it's a good rich hit of chocolate but not quite enough to make you feel like you're going to puke! lol

                              The Lindor egg isn't majorly sweet, it's got more of a rich flavour than a sugary one and tastes like luxury when you're eating it. The top of the egg has got thicker chocolate than by the bottom and that's brill because it means you get a proper chunk of smooth Lindt chocolate before getting to the soft creamy centre.

                              I don't know how many calories are in this egg but if you're on a diet then you don't want to be eating one I know that! lol

                              I paid 60p for this egg and that's about the right price for this sort of individual egg, closer to Easter they'll be on special offer so look out for them then.

                              Recommended!

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                                17.04.2009 16:55
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                                Dreamy confectionary treat

                                Personally I am a massive fan of Lindt chocolate anyway and always take the opportunity after easter and christmas of grabbing any I see that happens to be reduced because despite the fact I love it I do think its overpriced for what it is.

                                Anyway, Lindor is a particular type of lindt product, they usually do the lindor range as balls which come individually wrapped in boxes of about 20 for around a fiver. For easter however they incorporate the lindor melting centre into an egg shape and today they had slashed the prices on them in my local tesco express and they were selling them for the crazy price of 20p each!

                                So what could I do? It would be rude not to partake at this bargain price wouldnt it?

                                I immediately bought 5 for a pound as I know in my house they will disappear very quickly, incidentally I know Tesco were selling them at 2 for a pound in the run up to easter so this really felt like a bargain.

                                The egg itself is about the size of a cadburys cream egg (but so much better in my opinion). It is wrapped in red foil (is it just me that struggles to get this off in one go? maybe it is my frantic hurry to eat the thing?).

                                I have noticed with all lindor products that the chocolate tends to start melting very quickly on contact with skin, I dont know why but it seems to be quicker melting than any other brand of chocolate, so I usually keep these in the fridge and eat them at below room temperature to avoid my hands getting sticky.

                                Once you bite the top off and taste the centre you will forget everything else going on in the world around you, it really is like a tiny moment of paradise. The creamy, silky centre is absolutely divine, sweet and smooth as it rolls around your mouth, if I was going to have a when-harry-met-sally moment in public it would most likely be eating one of these.

                                Not diet friendly by any means (the average egg contains very high sat fat and sugar levels although I cant make them out on the scrunched up foil now!). But as an occassional treat I honestly cannot think of anything I would rather have.

                                If you see them reduced price anywhere then treat yourself to a minute or so of pure, decadent pleasure.

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