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Lavazza Espresso

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£66.75 Best Offer by: amazon.co.uk marketplace See more offers
5 Reviews

Type: Filter Coffee

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    5 Reviews
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      09.05.2008 16:07
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      A good blend

      This is one of the 2 Lavazza espresso blends which I regularly buy. It has a bit of a more full bodied taste than the Rossa blend, with more complex flavours such as chocolate present, and as such is less of a "session coffee". It goes nice on its own, but is perhaps more suitable to being cut with a dash of milk than the Rossa, as this helps bring out the extra flavours which you cannot perhaps appreciate fully when drunk neat. The crema produced is a similar amount to the Rossa, this is a decent amount, though I have had a bit more with Taylor's Espresso which I have been drinking most recently. This also makes a very nice long drink, for those of you who prefer to have a more milk with it, the flavour persists well and I found I could notice different flavours when I made it in a cappuccino.
      The only downside I would say is that while the aftertaste is not unpleasant, I would not say it is quite as good as some other types. It isn't that it is burnt, or harsh, but it just seems to leave my mouth tasting of coffee for hours afterwards. Maybe I should give up having 6 at a time, and this wouldn't happen.
      If you like drinking espressos then I would recommend Cafe Espresso from Lavazza.

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      04.03.2006 13:42
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      LAVAZZA coffee perfect start to the day

      I am such a fan of Lavazza coffee and instead of paying high street prices I began buying in large quantities and sell to friends. One of my friends mentioned to me why don't you offer this discount to coffee drinkers on ebay. You can see my range by searching Lavazza coffee. The prices are very reasonable, starting at £8.50 for Lavazza Rosso Beans and £9.25 for Lavazza Super Crema Beans. You are also able to buy 6 x 1kg box for £52.00, a saving of £14.00 off the manufacturers recommended retail price. How about buying a box or two and sharing between friends as I used to do.

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        26.10.2003 07:15
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        ~ ~ It’ll most likely come as a surprise to most of you that the mad cabbie doesn’t actually drink Kenco Purely Colombian coffee all the time. (Just most of the time!) Every now and again I take the time to brew up a mug of ‘real’ coffee, made out of ground coffee beans in my cracking little Russell Hobbs coffee maker. The only reason I don’t do this all the time is because I have such a busy lifestyle that it’s mostly impractical to take the time required to brew up a fresh pot of coffee, and so much easier to simply make a mug of “instant”, like my beloved Kenco Colombian. ~ ~ But it should come as no surprise to anybody that the coffee I choose when I’m making a ‘real’ brew is also made from 100% pure Arabica coffee beans, and manufactured in Italy, where they know more than most about making a decent brew. It’s called Lavazza Caffe Espresso, and in fact, I’m sitting drinking a good, strong mug of it right now as I type out this opinion, to give myself a much-needed caffeine boost, and to remind me (as if I needed reminding!) just how delicious this Italian coffee actually is. ~ ~ The company that produce Lavazza (Luiigi Lavazza from Torino in Italy) have been doing so since 1895, so they’ve had a fair few years of practice in order to discover the perfect blend. It says on the attractive black and gold packet that their espresso blend “is of the highest quality, evenly roasted and carefully ground to produce a coffee smooth in flavour with a tempting aroma.” I don’t really have any argument with that statement, and as Lavazza is the leading Italian coffee brand, it would appear that millions of dedicated coffee drinkers in Italy would be of the same opinion. Let’s face it; you don’t get to be the market leader by producing an inferior product! I first got converted to this blend way back in 1987, when I went
        out to Rome in Italy to get married, and have been drinking it ever since. What’s nice is that I can also be sure of getting a cup of my favourite “joe” anytime I re-visit Italy, which the mad cabbie family do on a fairly regular basis. (We were there again this year) ~ ~ Lavazza Espresso is suitable for use in any type of coffee maker. I personally use the ‘drip through’ type, where you add the ground coffee in a small container and then let the hot water drip through into the jug. But you can use it in any type of filter machine, and indeed, for the best results the company recommends that you brew it in the traditional Italian way, using a stovetop espresso pot. They even give you detailed instructions on the brewing method on the packet. I vary the strength of the coffee by the simple method of either adding more coffee, or by putting in less water, depending on how big a pot I want to make. My own personal preference is for very strong coffee, but after a few attempts, you’ll soon discover the perfect amount of coffee and water to add suit your own personal taste. By the way, once you’ve opened the vacuum-packed packet, the company recommend that you keep it in the fridge, in order to preserve the freshness and flavour. ~ ~ The coffee itself is rich, smooth, and slips down the old throat like pure nectar from heaven. Mind you, I have to admit to a certain amount of bias in this statement, as I am a dedicated devotee of Aribica coffee. (Which almost invariably comes from Colombia in South America) If you like weak coffee, then in all honesty, I’d have to say you probably wont like Lavazza. But the proof is in the tasting, and the only way for you to truly discover whether or not you’ll like it is to go out and buy a packet. ~ ~ Pricewise it won’t break the bank. Lavazza Café Espresso retails here in the Irish supermarkets at around the €4 mark
        for a 250g vacuum-packed bag. (8.8 ounces) It’s currently selling in Superquinn at €4.13. They also produce various other blends of coffee, but the only other I’ve tried is ‘Lavazza 100% Arabica Ground Coffee’. This is very similar to their Espresso blend, but slightly more expensive at €4.56 for 250g. ~ ~ Highly recommended by the mad cabbie. (And millions of Italians!) ~~~~~~~~~~~~ Copyright KenJ October 2003 ~~~~~~~~~~~~

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          10.06.2003 14:03
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          One of the nice things about working at the National Bank is that the coffee you get in house is not too bad. As well as a generic brand you can get Lavazza coffee in the canteen, which is my tipple when working in the National Bank. I had until recently been a frequent quaffer of Illy coffee although from working in the bank I've shown how fickle I am about coffee! Whilst Lavazza make a range of products, I tend to stick to their Espresso coffee, which I have taken to for a change from Illy. The coffee is made of 100% Arabica beans, and comes in a black container. From the container I would have to say that the Illy containers still have one over the Lavazza containers, since Lavazza uses a metal jar with a plastic lid on its Espresso, whereas Illy has a screw top metal lid with plastic inside. I tend to find that this keeps the coffee fresher than Lavazza. Alternatively you can buy Lavazza in vacuum packed packs - either 250g or 500g sizes, although you do require some storage receptacle for the coffee once it is opened... The only problem I find with Lavazza (or Illy for that matter) is that by storing the coffee in the fridge - which also keeps the coffee fresh - is that there can sometimes be a slightly metallic case if the coffee is left in the fridge for too long - although with me that rarely seems to be a problem! The crema (i.e. the "head") is thick with Lavazza, as per Illy, although in both instances that is also due to the preparation of the Espresso - with the Bank's espresso machines capable of replicating this fine crema, even when canteen coffee is traditionally nothing to write home about. In my espresso machine at home, the results are nearly comparable although not quite perfect in this respect. The taste is rich yet smooth, and typical of Arabica beans, although as with any espresso coffee a lot of the taste is lost if you are not careful in the making of the espresso, and is dependent on the freshnes
          s of the ground coffee. Pricewise it works out pretty similar to Illy coffee, with a jar of Lavazza costing around EUR 5.99-6.29 for 250g, whilst Illy tends to cost EUR 6.29-6.69 for the same amount. The larger packs are harder to find, and I have not seen a price for the vacuum packed version recently in Austria, so maybe the vacuum packed variant is more common in Britain. The price tag will doubtless put off the scummers and pikey brigade out there, but then that just means I won't have any fears over its availability. All in all, I'd recommend Lavazza as an espresso coffee, with it or Illy being the best I've come across ? although if you do buy some don't leave it in the fridge too long in the metal tin, as otherwise you might be put off by the metallic taste it gains.

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            10.04.2001 16:06
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            If your body wakes up in a morning but your brain is still on auto pilot, this is the coffee for you. Never mind healthy food and fruit juice in a morning, a dose of this coffee and you will be raring to take on the world (or at least get dressed) Out of all the expresso blends that l have tried this is the one that stands head and shoulders above the rest. It is a true expresso coffee that you can make at home. The bad news is that to make it properly, you do need a decent expresso machine. Mine cost £70 (Krupps) but that was seven years ago and it is still going strong, despite being used nearly every day. If you like expresso coffee, try this one and you wont be disappointed.

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          • Product Details

            Selection of the best 100% arabica coffees, carefully ground. Soft taste and inviting aroma.