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Nescafe Espresso

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9 Reviews

Brand: Nestlé / Type: Instant Coffee

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    9 Reviews
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      02.06.2011 11:44
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      Nescafé Espresso

      Nescafe is one of the bestselling brands of instant coffee that is made by Nestle. Beginning 1867 Henri Nestlé started his company Farine Lactee in Vevey. He produced a baby food product developed by him, based on milk and cereals. Nestlé has now grown into a large company.

      I can say I'm a big coffee drinker and love Espresso. The first thing I do when I'm up in the morning is making coffee and I drink coffee during the whole day. I really like coffee and I'm a bad grump in the morning without it. I actually like the taste of coffee and I'm just not much of a tea person. Especially in the morning I sometimes need an extra shot of energy and love to start the day with some Espresso.

      The jar comes with a black cap and the rest is transparent with a label on the front with 'Nescafe' and the name of the product 'Espresso'. We also learn that this coffee is dark and intense and that the content is enough for 60 cups of coffee. On the back you can read how you should prepare the Espresso and information about the content, date and a barcode. The cap is easy to take off and when you first used the coffee it is under the cap sealed with iron foil.

      The espresso is very easy to make and even on the back is described how you should do this. You need to use two teaspoons. You boil water and then do this in your cup. With the teaspoon, you must stir until completely dissolve and the espresso is ready to use. Very easy!

      The brand has different types of coffee including Nescafe Gold blend, Cappucino, Ice Coffee, but also this Espresso. This Espresso is a strong version of the normal coffee and you also need a small amount to drink. Regular coffee is made from Arabica and Robusta beans, but this is made from 100% Arabica beans. This just has a richer more intense flavor. You will notice therefore a rich aroma when you drink it.

      A delicious cup of espresso in the morning which is made within minutes. I am very pleased with the this Esprosse and it has a clear strong flavor that tastes delicious. I must say that it all smells wonderful when making it. Definitely my favorite.

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        02.04.2010 10:48
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        A poor attempt.......

        ****Rollin' back the years****

        The year is 1930, the radio (or wireless as I assume it was called back then) was blasting out "Pistol Packin' Papa by Jimmie Rodgers (surely everyone knows this classic?), the average house price was £590 (hmmmm.... If only my mortgage was as little as that), frozen foods go on sale to the general public for the first time (the beginning of convenience foods.....A slippery slope me thinks), Neil Armstrong, Sean Connery, Clint Eastwood and Steve McQueen make an appearance to the world (and we all know this led to the best Bond ever) and the depression is starting to get a hold.

        1930 was definitely a busy year and perhaps the best thing to happen is the Brazilian Government approaching "coffee specialist" Max Morgenthaler in a bid to make a quality cup of coffee that can be made by simply pouring hot water over some coffee beans. The instant coffee product we all take for granted (supposedly) took seven long years to get going and Nescafe coffee was distributed to the masses (well the Swiss) on 1 April 1938. After a short time the product was released worldwide and it has been a continuous search to improve the quality, taste and aroma ever since.

        Nestle's website is full of their views on fair trade and what they are doing to achieve this, as well as their environmental stance on reducing wastage and packaging, reducing energy consumption and the carbon foot print etc. etc. The facts and figures quoted and their future intentions are impressive although the information is definitely rammed down the readers' throat somewhat. All this is all well and good but are they actually achieving these results and how do they compare to what other companies are doing? Although I appreciate the ethics is a totally separate subject.

        ****So what is an Espresso?****

        An Espresso is a strong black coffee produced by forcing hot water and steam at very high pressures through finely ground coffee beans. The result is a relatively viscous, dark and strong coffee that is flavorsome and very aromatic. Whilst an Espresso can be drunk on its own it is often used as a base for many other types of coffee.

        The Espresso is made using the Arabica bean whereas 'normal' coffee is made using the Robusta bean. The Arabica is believed to be of superior quality, hence giving a fuller flavor and stronger aroma.

        ****Nestle, it's over to you...****

        Nestle have, or so they claim, managed to replicate the authentic Espresso characteristics by pouring boiling water over some of the Espresso coffee beans, instead of blasting hot water and steam through the beans.

        ****How do I spot this Espresso over other Nestle products and other products?****

        The jar is dark coloured and includes a photo of a cup of Espresso on it, which I think compliments the product perfectly. Personally, I think the jar looks understated but stylish and without any 'in your face' graphics or colours. The jar fits in with the typical Nestle coffee branding.

        As a result of the above the Nestle Espresso is likely to take a bit of searching for on the supermarket shelf, and it isn't a product that can simply be grabbed as you walk down the supermarket aisle. In some respects the marketing team has done a great job as the understated and stylish jar is likely to attract a certain clientele, but on the other hand the marketing team have done a poor job as the whole point of marketing and advertising is to get the product out there and noticed above everything else.

        I guess this is not such a big issue as I don't consider this product to be an impulse purchase. After all, how many times have you had a craving and thought "I could really do with an Espresso" and made a special trip to get some? No, I think this product is definitely a planned purchase which the consumer is going to search for.

        ****And in this jar there is.....?****

        ....coffee beans, and Arabica to be exact. As you would expect Nestle Espresso is made from 100% Arabica bean so no surprises there then.

        Coffee beans and water, on their own aren't particularly 'bad' for you if you think in terms of calories, fat, carbohydrates etc. A single Espresso contains 1 calorie and a trace of sugar, fat, salt and saturates. Where this drink becomes a weight watchers nightmare is when you add the (obligatory) cream and sugar. Whilst I can do without the cream sugar in an Espresso is an absolute must have as I find it far too bitter without it, even though I have no problems with normal coffee.

        The concerns with Arabica beans are the high levels of kahweol, which elevates liver enzymes, and cafestol, which is said to lead to an increase in bad cholesterol (is any cholesterol actually good then?).

        Despite the above Arabica beans do have an advantage over Robusta beans in that they contain far less caffeine, up to 50% less, therefore if you drink Espressos in the same quantities and with the same regularity of normal coffee you can either take full benefit and drink the same amount as normal coffee and have less caffeine or drink twice as much as normal coffee and have the same caffeine hit. I find it strange that many people use the excuse "I need a caffeine hit" and order an Espresso over a normal coffee, but then I guess these people wrongly think that strong coffee is coffee with more caffeine.

        ****The smell and consumption test****

        Upon opening the jar there is an instant aroma of coffee, which is to be expected. I have to admit I really like the smell of coffee but this is s bit too much for me and I find it quite overpowering, and the aroma intensifies once hot water is poured over the beans. I use the term 'beans' loosely since the contents of the jar resembles a fine, chocolate brown powder rather than the normal coarse beans found in a jar of normal coffee.

        The powder dissolves easily, requiring only a small amount of stirring, although this is to be expected. The final drink is more viscous and slides down the throat which is quite satisfying. As previously mentioned an Espresso is more bitter than normal coffee and the Nestle Espresso is no different, and requires a lot of sugar to remove the bitterness and make it drinkable.

        This Espresso is strong, as you'd expect, but once loaded up with sugar and if I am in the mood for it milk or cream (these are things I can either take or leave), it is nice but not as good as an Espresso from a coffee shop. Maybe an Espresso does need to be blasted with water/steam to really let the taste out, or maybe it Is more psychological (hearing the machine, watching the water being blasted through the beans, witnessing the steam and inhaling the full aroma) that makes a shop bought Espresso that much better, but whatever it is this Nestle instant Espresso just doesn't quite cut it in my opinion.

        ****What benefits does this drink have?****

        All different types of coffee are full of antioxidants and over the years coffee, and its effects, have been a popular subject of scientific research. There are many different schools of belief and like everything in life, some rave about this 'wonder' product making some bold claims including drinking coffee may reduce the risk of diabetes, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases as well as certain types of cancer, including colon, rectal, ovarian and liver; and drinking coffee may prevent against kidney stones, gallstones and depression; and drinking coffee may lower the risk of gout and lessen after exercise muscle soreness, and some condone it.

        Whether the above is true or not or what effect drinking coffee, or this Espresso will have will totally depend upon the individual, after all we are all different and have unique reactions to specific things. Whilst I would like to believe the above claims and would like to think that I will be more healthy and live a fuller and longer life as a result of drinking an Espresso I am not holding my breath.

        I, and I'm sure there are many like me, drink coffee products for the taste and any other benefits are a bonus. Sometimes I drink them to excess, which I am sure is detrimental to my health in the short term although I'm sure there's no long term damage, but if there is C'est la vie.

        ****How much is this Espresso going to cost?****

        A 100g jar of Nestle Espresso will currently set you back £2.00 from Tesco, although it is often on special offer. Compared to a normal jar of coffee it is very expensive and, in my opinion, not worth the extra.

        With regards to availability, Nestle is a well known and popular brand that is stocked in most retail outlets, from large national supermarkets to mini marts to convenience stores to garages, so getting a jar of this should pose no problems.

        ****So is this worth buying then?****

        Based on the definition of an Espresso I can't see any way of creating an authentic Espresso by pouring boiling water on top of instant coffee beans, no matter how hard or vigorously you stir. I'm sorry, but in my opinion the only way to replicate an Espresso is to use a specifically designed machine that is capable of squirting the water at the required pressure. In my opinion this Nestle product is not an Espresso and I think it is no more than a gimmicky marketing ploy for those people who are looking to produce a specialist drink but do not have the machinery to do it.

        Personally I see an Espresso as an after meal 'treat' or something I drink on occasions when I am out, it is not something I drink regularly, and based on the small jars of the Nestle Espresso this product is designed to be used sparingly also. I agree that this product is flavorsome, fragrant and strong, but then given it is made out of different beans to normal coffee it should be. Whilst it is an ok drink it is nothing to write home about and definitely nowhere near as good as a shop bought, or machine made Espresso, so if you're expecting a substitute I think you are going to be disappointed, and because of this I can't really recommend it.

        If you're after a quick caffeine hit in the morning, or want an instant "pick me up" then I would recommend making a strong normal coffee containing Robusta beans. I would not recommend keeping a jar of this in the cupboard for this purpose.

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          18.03.2010 20:02
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          It's shite

          Whilst I'm not an enormous drinker of coffee, I get cravings from time to time, especially when socialising with friends who are big coffee consumers. I DO love the smell of coffee brewing and find coffee shops wonderfully sociable places - I'm quite happy to just tag along and have a cold drink, absorbing all those wonderful smells and sounds around me. I'm more likely to have an Espresso when I'm on holiday or when I've just had a formal dinner. At other times, I'll have a more sociable coffee - something like a latter or a macchiato. I'm NOT normally a buyer of instant coffee.

          The Nescafe Collection is a small range of 'super premium' instant coffees (there's an oxymoron if ever I heard one) with six different products tailored to particular tastes. Alta Rica, for example, boasts an intense flavour, whereas Cap Colombie has a richer roast. Suraya is an aromatic blend and Café Parisien attempts to recreate the taste you might experience in a French café. Within this particular range, only the Partners' Blend is certified Fairtrade, but all these coffees boast the best ingredients and, not surprisingly, weight by weight they are the most expensive coffees in the range. Some are available in larger, catering sizes; some are only available in smaller, domestic jars of 200g.

          Nescafe Espresso is made entirely from 100% Arabica coffee beans. The best Espresso roasts generally use Arabica beans. It is widely believed that Arabica coffee was the first species to be cultivated, originating from Arabia more than 1000 years ago. This coffee is actually lower in caffeine than other commercially cultivated species and is renowned for its delicate but rich and clean flavour.

          The packaging for this coffee has a greater emphasis on luxury than Nescafe's mainstream coffees. The jar (now re-designed compared to the product listing shown here) is slick and slim, completely covered in a black plastic film that reveals a small hint of the contents via a sexy little 'window' on the side of the jar. The lid is fitted sleekly to the jar to create seamless styling, but it's a real pain to screw back on because the screwing mechanism is round, but the lid is square edged. The coffee is tagged as 'Delicate Crema' but given what I've already said about the importance of crema in Espresso coffee, I'm not quite sure what that's supposed to mean. Curiously, for the uninitiated, there are no instructions for preparing this coffee - I fear that it is quite likely that some may make this in the same quantity as a regular coffee, with disastrous results. A serving is around 1.8g - a levelled teaspoon, I reckon - and requires 50ml of hot water. It's worth pointing out that unless this is served in an Espresso cup, it's going to be completely lost.

          You can tell a lot about an instant coffee when you first break that foil seal on the jar. The immediate aroma that hits you is a telling clue of what is about to come. The immediate sweetness that erupts from Nescafe Espresso is appalling. It smells more like an instant cappuccino than anything else and any smell of coffee is strangulated by the sickly, sugary odour. I'm extremely suspicious of Nestle's claims that this only contains 100% pure coffee, but I can only assume, if that is the case, that the manufacturing process is intended to maximise the texture of the mix so that, when mixed with water, you get a good crema, albeit a very artificial one.

          It looks like coloured sand. No, really! The mixture is extremely fine, arguably TOO fine, if you ask me, and this doesn't bode well for the drink at all. It's a strong, bronze-like colour but not particularly the colour one might associate with a particularly strong roast. I expected this to be darker in colour and, again, it just doesn't 'feel' like pure coffee. Rubbed between the fingers, it actually develops an unpleasant, lingering smell that's rather unappetising.

          As an instant mix, the process of making this is simple, if not a little heartless. Simply put the coffee in the Espresso cup, add boiling water and stir. I noticed that, because of the nature of the mix, the powder sort of shot up the sides of the cup and made a relatively unpleasant looking streak on the inside of the porcelain as the water was poured, but was, obviously, immediately immersed. The drink required very little stirring. To be honest, the granules are so fine, you could probably get away without stirring it at all.

          There is little/no crema. Indeed, there is nothing more than a faint covering of what could easily be mistaken for that fuzzy film you get whenever you pour hot water into a drink in a hard water area. It's impossible to test the crema for the quality test as there simply isn't enough. The drink certainly doesn't look like the picture on the front of the jar that shows a relatively good crema on the top of the coffee.

          Once mixed, the drink develops a more traditional 'coffee-like' smell. It's not particularly strong, and there's still a lingeringly sweet element to it, but at least it now doesn't smell like cappuccino. The flavour of good Espresso coffee tends to develop whilst the drink is in the cup. Although you shouldn't leave it for too long, you'll tend to find that there's a strange herbal quality to the drink initially, and then the flavour of the roast starts to strengthen. The taste of the Nescafe Espresso is, however, entirely consistent from start to finish. It's reasonably strong, but in a very artificial manner and there's no subtlety to it at all. It's hard to decipher any individual flavours. It seems bitter and almost burnt, rather like the beans have been roasted for too long. In some roasts, you can clearly detect other flavours (sometimes something quite floral, sometimes something almost citrus-like). Nescafe Espresso has a wholly unremarkable flavour; as though the coffee beans have been stripped of any real character when they were dried and dumped in a jar.

          The drink DOES have the sort of immediate effect that you associate with an Espresso. There's a quick buzz and a rapid increase in alertness from the caffeine but there's also a wholly unpleasant aftertaste. I get the feeling that this isn't a particularly refined roast as it leaves an acidic, almost scratchy feeling in your mouth.

          Needless to say, this is not recommended on the grounds of flavour or scent. But there's more.

          Nestle, the manufacturer of Nescafe coffee, is probably one of the least ethical companies in the world. The company history is scattered with countless incidents of unethical practice, often to a significant extent, and many consumers have boycotted their products since the 1970s. The list of offences is pretty exhaustive, but here's a flavour of the sort of practices that Nestle have undertaken.

          * Since the 1970s, Nestle has been infamous for its promotion of baby milk formula in developing countries. Encouraging mothers not to breast feed, Nestle continues to advertise its products as a risk-free alternative to breast milk. Evidence indicates that 1.5 million deaths in the developing world occur annually are attributable to a lack of breastfeeding. See www.unicef.org/programme/breastfeeding/challenge.htm

          * As a Swiss company, Nestle is not subject to any EU sanctions or regulations - a fact that the company regularly uses to deflect criticism. In 2009, it was identified that Nestle was using milk from illegally siezed farms in Zimbabwe.

          * In 2002, Nestle demanded compensation from one of the world's poorest nations (Ethiopia). The compensation demanded was $6 million - in 2008, the company's profits were $18 billion.

          * Nestle Purina pet foods are (ironically) still tested on animals, with thousands of animals destroyed annually. In 2005, the company sold thousands of tonnes of contaminated feed in Venezuela.

          * Greenpeace tests have identified genetically modified organisms in the Chinese version of Nesquik.

          Ethically, this product leaves much to be desired even IF you put the corporation's practices to one side. The beans are not from certified Fairtrade sources, meaning that the growers will not be promised a fair deal on pricing. The jar is made from glass (and can therefore be recycled) but the plastic lid can't and neither can the plastic wrap. As ever, the company over-eggs the healthy aspects of drinking coffee, boasting that Espresso contains 0.4g of antioxidants per serving, without quantifying what the recommended daily allowance is or exactly. Trying to decide whether coffee is good for you or not is entirely a personal decision, but this kind of 'newsflash' healthy eating doesn't really qualify the claims.

          No surprises here - a complete thumbs-down for me. There are some products that cannot be recreated in a packaged, ready-made format and Espresso coffee is one of them. This is an entirely soulless, uninspiring product from one of the world's least ethical manufacturers, which, despite the premium claims, cannot even be bothered to source this from Fairtrade providers. This is one to avoid, for sure.

          Not recommended. Ever. Nah

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            08.03.2010 21:19
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            Fabulous for that quick shot of energy!

            Nescafe Espresso Coffee

            == History of Nescafe ==

            Nescafe is a brand of instant coffee made by the company Nestle, who you may be more used to hearing when in relation to chocolate! Founded in 1938 by Max Morgenthaler and Vernon Chapman after 7 years taken to develop the coffee!

            Nescafe are responsible for some of the biggest names in coffee: Gold Blend and even the Dolche Gusto coffee machine is all made by Nescafe. They are one of the biggest coffee makers around today!

            == Where did you buy it, and why? ==

            I bought this coffee quite a long time ago from Asda when it was on special offer of two 250g jars for £5, this is going back probably 6 months of so now, so the offer is long gone. I bought some of this, as my husband doesn't like normal "instant" coffee, finding it far too weak for his palate, so we thought we would give this a try. I like very weak coffee, so it certainly wasn't for me, but I decided I would give it a go when we got home anyway!

            We bought it mainly because of the low price, but also because we like to have "premium" coffee in the house for when visitors come around so we have a choice to offer them to drink rather than the bog standard coffee or tea, and the fact it worked out at just £2.50 a jar, I thought this was great, we also got a jar of Carte Noir at the same time, which was on the same offer!

            == What was the packaging like? ==

            The packaging instantly sets the coffee aside from your everyday instant coffee, the jars come in only the one size of 250g, which tells you in an instant, this isn't for use everyday! The jar is covered in black plastic and clearly tells us that it is made by the popular coffee maker, Nescafe, a name we can all trust. Also on the front of the jar is a steaming cup of the finished product, now you may think "ohhh no way will it look like that when it is done..." but actually it is very close to how it really does look! Which I was very surprised at!

            Upon taking the black plastic lid off the jar, there is a gold foil seal which you need to break before you can get into the coffee, the coffee inside is very finely ground, and a light brown colour, it smells gorgeous when the foil breaks and very strong! Just the smell will wake you up in the morning!

            == Is it easy to make up a decent cup? ==

            To make a cup of Nescafe Espresso, it is very simple!!! Just like making a normal instant coffee really! An espresso is just 30ml, and is a shot of very strong coffee which is made to give you a big caffeine boost without making you need a long time to drink it, and needing a bathroom half an hour later! So you could do with buying yourself a set of espresso cups, or trying to measure the water as too much water will result in a very weak and bitter coffee. If you want a double espresso, you put two teaspoons in to 60ml of water. Very very simple! And it makes a lovely steaming shot of coffee which really wakes you up.

            == What did it taste like? ==
            The coffee has the perfect espresso taste, personally it is not to my taste, as I find it too strong, but my husband loved this coffee, although maybe not on par to filter coffee machines which may have gotten an even stronger espresso, but this is perfect for a quick shot of espresso in the morning, or after a meal.

            My husband gave this a great 9 out of 10 for this coffee, when made in the correct way, he said it was absolutely spot on.

            == Would you buy it again? ==

            If this was on offer again, I would definitely buy this coffee again! I don't know about paying the full price of £3.15 for a 250g jar, but when the jars were 2 for £5, I would definitely buy this again.

            == Who would you say it is "for"? ==

            I would say this coffee is more for big caffeine lovers, not necessarily people who like a very milky and quite weak coffee, but somebody who likes a black and very strong coffee! This isn't for a particular age group (though it should not be given to the under 16's due to the high caffeine content), but is more to do with taste preferences from person to person, if I lived alone, this would never grace my trolley, but my husband loves the stuff! So if you love espresso, or strong coffee, then this is definitely for you!

            == Where can I get a jar for myself? ==

            Most supermarkets stock this coffee (in the coffee and tea aisle). As well as some smaller shops like larger co-ops and Spar shops.

            == And, more importantly how much will it set me back? ==

            The RRP of Nescafe Espresso is £3.15, but you can expect the prices to vary in different shops! Shops like BnM's sell it for much cheaper when they have it in stock! I got a jar of Carte Noir from there for £1.99, which is usually around £4. The best option is to shop around (maybe looking on MySupermarket.com) to see where you can get the best price!

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            08.11.2009 12:16
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            One of the stronger instants out there.

            As an espresso this cuppa comes up a bit short. I am not a coffee snob by any means, but an essential part of the espresso experience does involve a large shiny machine with levers and buttons and steam and strange hissing noises. Pouring boiling water on some powder just doesn't cut it for me.

            Having said that it really aint too bad a drink. If you look at it as an ultra strong coffee rather than the full on espresso experience then you will not be disappointed. I like my coffee strong and I drink it neat.

            At weekends I will invest in a bean to treat myself but on work days I just want a quick hit to see me on my way. Espresso hit's the nail firmly on the head in this regard. Tip two heaped spoonfuls into a mug and then fill said mug up to just over half way with boiling water. That will set you up for the commute, I guarantee it.

            As a variant on this try pouring a spoonful into a cup of hot milk. Every now and then we all like a bit of comfort food and this beverage will give you a warm glow on a winters morn.

            Product description?

            Well its made of coffee beans and surprisingly enough it tastes of coffee, strong coffee at that.

            WARNING - Alternate this with an alternative coffee.Do not drink two jars in a row or you will be bouncing off the walls.

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              05.03.2009 01:18
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              Instant Coffee

              Although I can generally take or leave coffee, I am a bit of an Espresso fan - the strong and rich flavours are quite delicious, and considering it is a beverage traditionally served in such a small measure, how could I possibly get fed up with it? Therefore, I was keen to try Nescafe's 'Espresso', an instant drink which retails at £3.19 for the 100g jar from Tesco.

              Although Espresso has been available since the start of the 20th Century (Italy's Luigi Bezzera patented the first espresso machine in 1901), the drink was said to have first gained popularity in the UK in the 1950's, as the youth of the country felt more welcome in cafe's than the pubs of the time. Nowadays, espresso seems to be just as popular as the cappuccino, and appears to be a rather trendy drink. I personally find that a double blast of espresso is a good thing to consume in a service station during a motorway drive - as it seems to keep me awake far better than a coke can.

              Making a cup of the coffee is a simple process - place a heaped teaspoon of the Espresso into an Espresso cup (roughly half the size of a regular coffee cup), pour on hot (but not boiling hot) water, and stir - it's as easy as that. The powder dissolves fairly quickly and doesn't leave any nasty 'coffee-bits' at the end of the cup. So how does it taste? Well, it's surprisingly good for an instant - rich, not too bitter, and fairly smooth. Strangely enough, there's a bit of an aftertaste which consists of a sweet and sour flavour which i'm not sure is entirely pleasant - it's a little artificial to be honest and seems quite manufactured.

              In terms of the strength Nescafe's Espresso is pretty strong - of course, you can make it stronger by adding more coffee, but the suggested 'one heaped teaspoon' seems to be the perfect amount for me. As well as the taste, the smell is quite appealing - it's potent, and quickly permeated the room where the coffee is being made. Although espresso is traditionally a black coffee, I wanted to find out this Nescafe variety it tasted with milk - so I added a dash. I'm happy to report that it is actually very nice, and actually tastes very similar to the other Nescafe instants.

              In terms of its appearance, the coffee looks just like a traditionally prepared, bean based Espresso - very dark in colour with a slight froth on top (I believe this is technically known as a 'crema-layer' although don't hold me to that). To be honest, if I were to undergo a blindfold taste test between this and a machine espresso I would find it fairly difficult to tell the difference until the aftertaste - but as I mentioned in my opening paragraph, i'm certainly no coffee connoisseur.

              The jar is fairly minimalist in appearance with a black background and a depiction of a steaming cup of the drink in the centre. It's fairly classy looking piece of design without any unnecessary text or imagery.

              All in all, Nescafe Espresso is a decent coffee which replicates the non-instant espresso very nicely. Yes, the finish is less than perfect - but let's not forget that this is an instant. For £3.19 it is quite pricey, but you can probably get around forty cups worth from one jar, which is not bad at all. Having said that, for the price of buying thirty jars of this stuff, you could purchase a basic Espresso making machine, and enjoy 'real' espresso from the comfort of your own home. Recommended nevertheless as a tasty drink.

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                07.10.2002 05:47
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                I’d never tried an Espresso before I tried this. I suppose I was a bit scared of the ‘short and very strong’ type flavours that surrounds the coffee. I’m someone who likes a creamy coffee, with quite a bit of milk, and I’m a sucker for a cappuccino. But after giving Nescafe Espresso a go, I was pleasantly surprised and will probably be drinking a lot more of Espressos from now on! Nescafe host a wide range of different coffee’s, from their Original to coffees such as Costa Rican and others. Espresso is just one of their ‘Black Jar’ range. The coffee in the black jars are the ‘better’ coffee’s. or another way to put it, the more specialist coffees which are drunk less than the normal instant coffees. So what’s it like? Well as any coffee lover will tell you, all coffees taste different. I was expecting a watery black coffee, but instead, I got a quite creamy coffee, considering I used no milk. It is short, dark and intense like it says on the jar and tastes really very nice. I have 1 sugar with mine, which takes the bitterness of the coffee away, as without it really is a bit to bitter for the likes of myself. On tasting, you will be welcomed with the strong coffee smell, which really does invite you into the coffee itself. The you will be taken in by the very nice, strong coffee flavour, which does not taste cheap in any way whatsoever. After that, you will be hit by how strong the coffee really is. Once devoured, the coffee taste stays in your mouth, making you want another sip. That’s the best way I can describe it really. Making the coffee is even easier than making a normal coffee with milk, afterall, you don’t have to use any milk, well you shouldn’t anyway, as that really does go against the point of the coffee. It is mean to be drunk black. You simply take a heaped teaspoon, or however much you like of the fine coffee powder and plac
                e it into an espresso cup. If like me your common and don’t have such things, just take a mug and put it in that, and fill the mug half way up, or less if you like. It will give the same effect, just not in the right china so to speak! Add to that coffee powder hot, but not boiling water and stir. After that you can add a sugar or two if you like, depending on your tastes, though I recommend it as it really does take your gums away otherwise and give you an ‘Esther’ look. (You’ll get that if you can picture that mature Esther lady who has her own chat show!!) Once you have done the preparation bit, you will be presented with a very black coffee with a froth on top, which does look pretty inviting to the hardened coffee addicts out there. It’s so black it leaves nice stains on your mug, but don’t worry, they don’t last long when they hit the sink! Overall, it’s a good coffee, though you really do have to like your coffee to begin with to enjoy this. For those of you who like a good load of milk in your coffee, don’t shy away from this, it really is quite nice and I never thought I would like it, but now do, and would probably go out and buy my own jar (yes, I have been drinking someone elses!). It retails for around £2.70 for a 100g jar, which does sound expensive, but is quite a nice treat for yourself, and you would probably be able to get around 30 cups of the stuff out of the jar. Put it that way and it don’t sound to bad, especially when you think you will pay anything from £1.30 upwards in a café for it! Excellent for those of us who find it extremely hard to get up in the morning, even after 3 coffees and 2 fags! Go ahead and treat yourself. Stay away if your one of those woosie tea people! (Don’t start on me you tea drinkers, I drink tea too!!)

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                  27.03.2001 22:02
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                  Nescafe Espresso I am a coffee connoisseur, I don’t mind bragging about it either, I love trying out different types especially when I travel abroad, the dark Turkish Coffee is one of my favourites. I bought a jar of the Nescafe Espresso and I was pleasantly surprised. It is a strong dark coffee, slightly bitter taste, but I like that. It should be drunk black; milk in it would spoil the taste I think. It is supposed to be an Italian Espresso coffee but to me it was too strong and bitter for that. Five out of ten if you are wanting the Italian taste but a big nine out of ten if you like strong black coffee. I will be purchasing it again.

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                    25.03.2001 06:35
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                    This strong coffee is made from a special blend of Latin American arabica coffee beans. The beans are full roasted and the colour is deep and dark. The taste is strong and very slightly bitter. You need to be a real coffee drinker to appreciate this taste. This is an instant coffee which is designed to be drunk strong and black. You don't need a lot either. This is not the same as real Italian Espresso coffee, although it seeks to deliver the same taste instantly. The smell is not so strong and tangey and the taste is slightly on the bitter side. If you appreciate a good espresso coffee you will probably be disappointed by this. You can't make a good double espresso with this either as it goes really bitter and undrinkable (a double Espresso is a single small cup of coffee with two two shots of coffee in it, making it very strong). Nescafe have such a good name for producing instant coffee that I had expected a better taste from their Espresso but I was disappointed. It doesn't compare well with the real thing.

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                • Product Details

                  Made from a blend of Latin American arabica beans, fully roasted for a dark and intense flavour, to bring you the authentic Italian espresso experience.