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3 Reviews

Brand: Rayburn / Range Type: Wood Burner Range Cooking / Warming Oven / Domestic Hot Water Output: 35,000Btu/h - 10.5kW 12 Radiators / Hot Water System: Gravity DHW and pumped heating / Made from cast iron / Three years parts and 12 months labour guarantee.

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    3 Reviews
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      07.11.2011 19:24
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      Very efficient

      We had an old oil Aga removed and a new Rayburn 345W fitted with the eco connect management system to cook, heat the water and run a few of our radiators off. I was not sure how good this would be and if it would be man enough to heat the water and heat the 5 radiators we required. We live in an old farm house with 23 radiators, but only require 4 rooms heated most of the time. The eco connect was the best decision and the Rayburn is so easy. We have this running on wood only all the time and it uses about 4 tesco's jute bags of wood a day. If you turn it all down low it will tick over for 10 hours easily. If you have it burning full out you have to top up about every 2-4 hours. To get the most heat only fill half way up and let it burn like that. We can't believe how good and also how easy it has been. I wish we had done this earlier. The hot water is great and the radiators get very hot quickly. I would have no trouble recommending this as it works so well. I had read a couple of reviews and they both said they had to fiddle with the settings to cook, heat etc. We have found this so easy to run. The eco connect system can connect to the oil boiler to cut this in if more heat is required. We did not want this to happen in normal use, so we have it set on Rayburn only. We think that this is a very efficient, money saving system and works extremely well.

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        20.10.2009 22:12
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        I couldn't live without my Rayburn!

        Rayburns are one of those items that conjure up images of "The Good Life." Many people almost romanticize about a rayburn in the countryside, and while they are wonderful machines, they certainly have their downfalls. I have grown up with a Rayburn my whole life. I think they are wonderful, and I truly couldn't live without it! I am only used to the solid fuel version, and not the Oil or Gas range. The Rayburn has many plus sides, the main one being that the cost of wood and coal is extremely cheap compared to electricity, gas and now especially oil, with the souring prices. In order to stock up on wood though, there is a lot of hard work involved, in collecting the wood, storing it, letting it season, and then cutting it to size and bringing it in as and when it is needed. This work should not be taken on without plenty of thought. One point I mentioned was the seasoning of wood, this is where you leave wood to dry out for ideally a year to 18 months. There is no point putting in wet wood, this will not burn properly, and in turn clog up the stove. Another thing that needs to be considered is the mess. The rayburn constantly produces ash, dust and tar. These things can often put people off, but I feel they are only a small downside to what is an amazing machine. The plusses of the rayburn are in my opinion are endless! A very attractive prospect is the fact that burning wood is actually carbon neutral! In this day and age, that surely has to be a plus! The way this works is that, as the tree is growing, it breathes in CO2 and releases oxygen, then as the wood is burned, it releases exactly the same amount of CO2 as it took in while it was growing! Now that is amazing! Another plus is the fact that you are able to cook on the rayburn, using its built in oven and hot plates. This takes some getting used to because you can't just set the temperature and get going, you have to plan in advance, and manage the fire so that the oven fluctuates the way you want. With a little time and practice however, this become second nature. Our rayburn heats all of our hot water and the whole house, eliminating the need for astronomical electricity bills, and therefore giving a little leftover disposable income. I could go on about the rayburn all day long. I feel it is amazing, and the benefits certainly outweigh the disadvantages. I certainly hope I have one for the rest of my life! There really is nothing like sitting round a log fire in the evening!

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          07.10.2008 09:45
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          We love it, but it's a lifestyle choice that won't suit everyone.

          Rayburns are classic items which add style and a theme to a farmhouse style kitchen. Many come being supplied by gas or oil, but in today's rising fuel price climate - is that what you want? The Rayburn 345W runs on wood (and only wood, it's adapted so it can't take anything else due to the cheap VAT), meaning you may be able to escape the price hike. and for your wood, there's far less wasted energy - it does your heating, cooking and hot water (and you can pretend you're doing your bit for the planet since it's renewable too!) For us, it's very cost effective, as my sister-in-law has a farm which means she can pass on wood to us. We have had to buy some wood to supplement this and normally pay about £120 for 3 tonnes. It is really important that you get properly seasoned wood, or the chimney clogs really easily (as we discovered to our peril!). In summer this amount of wood would last us 3-4 months, but we expect it to last considerably less time in winter. Since it runs on wood, this has a big advantage - you get a reduced VAT rate of 5% on the Rayburn. If you get it installed at the same time, you get the reduced VAT rate on the installation too. This covers just the installation though, if you need to have your chimney lined, fireplace plastered etc then that'll still be at standard VAT. The Rayburn itself costs about £3,500, though you may be able to negotiate it down a bit with the retailer. It cost us about £7,000 in total including installation and we had a new liner in our chimey, an old electric fire removed, the fireplace knocked through and replastered and some adjustments to our heating system in with it. About £5,000 of this was at the reduced VAT rate. It is really quite a personal thing as different houses will cost different amounts to install. You also need a stone or tiled hearth infront incase you drop any burning wood on it. You may have one already, we installed a whole stone floor in the room we were going to use. Unlike cooking on electric (which is what I had come from), you can't set the Rayburn to 180 degrees and put your dinner in. It has three broad categories on the front "Simmer", "Bake" and "Roast" to guide you what temperature the main oven is at. You get it to these temperatures by adding or reducing the wood, turning a little spin wheel that affects how much air goes in, flicking a switch on the front so the hot air goes more to the cooker than the heating and adjusting how much heat goes up the chimney by pulling in and out a small tray, and even then it depends on the type and quality of wood. It takes a bit of getting used to, and while you're learning anything like a roast may be best done on a Sunday when it could be had for lunch or dinner. Similar adjustments need to be made to get your heating (8 radiators worth) right, though this does have a thermostat in it so your house doesn't get too hot if you get it wrong! The hot water has never been a problem for us. If the Rayburn is going for a two hours or so, we'll have a full tank of water at so hot our bath thermometer can't measure it. Similarly, once the Rayburn is going, the hotplate on top will be hot enough to do it's job. Again, precision isn't a feature. Slid your pans down over the firebox to get it hotter, over the cooker to get it cooler, but depending on how hot your Rayburn is, it might be impossible to get things off the boil. The Rayburn also features a warming oven. What this does, again depends on how hot you've got things going. It's great to put plates in to warm on a normal day, can be used for slow cooking over night (we haven't tried that one yet), or to keep your food warm if it's finished cooking (useful for the timings of the xmas day roast). Keeping the Rayburn going normally requires topping up with wood every 4 hours to get a reasonable output. It is possible to put it on "bank" and keep it going overnight or throughout the day by reducing the burn rate, but you'll get less output in terms of heating etc. The big downside is the mess. This item isn't for the pristeen footballer's-wives kitchen that some oil or gas Agas are. I can't remove the ash box without spilling ash over the floor. The flue needs cleaning (by sticking your arm up with a brush) every month and they reckon the chimney needs sweeping each year, but we needed ours doing after 6 months. It comes in a wipe clean enamel finish in a variety of colours.

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