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Bosch PSB 12 VE-2 Cordless Hammer Drill

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£39.90 Best Offer by: amazon.co.uk See more offers
3 Reviews

With a compact 12 volt rechargeable battery, powerful hammer action for drilling masonry and rotary action for metal, wood and tile

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    3 Reviews
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      03.09.2009 23:08
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      It won't help you drill for oil but it will help you put up those shelves

      I am the proud owner of several DIY tools, from your basic claw hammer to an industrial circular saw, (which, when I use it, still manages to scare the hell out of me sometimes). Anyway, the biggest boon in the Do It Yourself world has got to be the cordless/ battery powered power tool collection, such as saws, sanders, planes and especially the good old cordless power drill, with a vast range of power options. I do own a few of these type of drills, even a JML Dual Drill, which is a true genius in itself, and a few others of different power ratings, including the rather fine Bosch PSB 18VE2, which this review is going to be about. It claims to be the ultimate cordless combi drill which will bore through materials such as wood, masonry and even steel, (of course this depends on the actual drill bit), whilst still be capable of being used as a powerful, yet controllable screwdriver. Giving a two speed high performance and a 5 torque setting , which allows you to control the power for more precise positioning, plus a 'hammer drill option which is aided by the attachable side handle for that little extra stability whilst drilling. And with it weighing in at just under 2 and a half kilos it's quite easy to hold for good periods of time. The trigger itself acts like a power accelerator, ranging from a gentle touch for pilot holes, to full squeeze of the trigger, giving you full power for that fast drilling. And, to top it all, it comes with the standard 21st century invention, the good old Keyless chuck with Auto-Lock, which saves searching for that elusive chuck key which no-one can ever remember where they left it. ** What you get in the package... 1 x Bosch PSB18VE2 Cordless Hammer Drill 2 x rechargeable NiCD (nickel) 18 volt batteries 1 x 1 hour quick charger 1 x carry case Softgrip handle and attachable side grip handle Up to 8mm screw diameter, 13mm in steel, 28mm in wood and 14mm in masonary ** IN CONCLUSION... As I said earlier this is one of many cordless drills I have in my workshop, (why one person needs so many even I don't know so please don't ask, I just seem to collect them as I go through life). Anyway, this little green gem is one of my favourites and most used at the moment for its shear power and easy handling. It is pretty lightweight for what it can achieve and the power performance is second to none for its various capabilities. It looks quite pretty, if you like green and black, with a dash of red, and the torque settings and hammer option button are easy to use, giving you excellent control during use. The detachable handle really helps when drilling through stubborn material, such as stone or brick, with the Hammer option giving that extra kick. The trigger gives great control with the speed, allowing you to start slowly, making a pilot hole maybe, before squeezing the trigger more when you need to for that actually drilling through almost any material. As for using it as a cordless screwdriver, well, what a gift the speed control trigger is, combined with the 5 torque setting you should be able to get that shelf up on the wall without splitting that perfectly cut piece of wood. The battery changing process takes a matter of seconds, with the pressing of two red catches being the hardest part, it's as easy as changing your socks. The life of a fully charged battery varies depending on what job your doing, drilling or screwing, but I tend to find that I can give the drill a lot of abuse between charges. The one hour charge is so useful, plus, with this package you're actual getting two batteries so whilst one is charging you can get on with the job in hand, technically, giving you none stop action until the work is done. I know there are many many more powerful drills on the market, in fact I own a very pricey 28 volt Dewalt cordless hammer drill which I only use on very special occasions, (Why I spent nearly £250 on something I use about as often as a politician tells the truth I will never know... but hey, it looks pretty sat on the shelf), but this Bosch has lasted me quite some time and has never failed me one little bit in all the abuse I have given it. Although this drill is a nice tool to have at your side, giving you the capabilities of drilling through many materials, it is the actual drill bits which do a lot of the work for you, but having the right drill to 'spin' those bits through is a big help and this Bosch is certainly the right drill at the right price. In all, it is a handy little drill with a good weight to handle, especially for those trickier jobs, and with a name like Bosch you know you can't go wrong. So if you're a budding DIYer, or even in the trade and need a fairly cheap yet very handy cordless drill, then get hold of this little green moulded work of art, it should set you back around the £80,00 mark from the likes of Amazon, (although its full price is nearer the £160 mark)

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        05.08.2001 06:46
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        I bought myself a new today and couldn't wait to use it. I have shelves all over the house! The Bosch 12v cordless drill is easy handle which was my main requirement! I only have small hands so I needed something that I could use around the house without too much difficulty. Main other requirements were that it should be able to cope with virtually any household task with the minimum of fuss. I also wanted a cordless drill so that I could use it in the garden or shed without having to run an extension cable. This drill is pistol shaped and has a side handle with a soft grip as well which I find useful for keeping the bit in place when starting to drill. (If you have ever marked a spot to drill and then had the drill jump and make a hole in the wrong place, you will know what I mean.) The hammer action means that it can easily drill masonry and concrete and the two gears give you maximum torque at low speed. There are 5 torque settings. This torque control means that when you use the screwdriver bit the gears will limit the drill's twisting control. This is useful when a screw is actually as tight as it will go. You won't end up chewing the screw head as you over tighten it either. Drill and screwdriver bits are held in place by a 10mm chuck which doesn't need an allen key to tighten it. This is much more convenient and its quicker to change bits or drills. It takes just one hour to fully charge this drill and it is light and easy to hold. Everything comes in a plastic carrying case which helps keep things together. This drill kit comes with its own battery pack and nickel cadmium batteries, at 12 volts it is capable of doing most jobs around the house. I find it very handy, especially since it also has a screw driver attachment. It means that my cordless drill can be used as a codless screwdriver too. Bosch is a reliable brand name when it comes to electrical tools and at £99 I think it is an excellent quality drill that will last for years.

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          14.02.2001 03:50
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          Cordless tools are both beguiling and disappointing at the same time. On the one hand, there’s the prospect of a labour-saving gadget that doesn’t need a mains lead trailing behind it to get tripped over, or worse still, cut in half! Then there is the other side. A lot of cordless tools sit there for months on end with their batteries trickle-charging constantly, awaiting the day that they will be pressed into action. This is precisely the job that Nickel Cadmium (NiCad) rechargeable batteries were NOT made for. That is why many, but not all cordless power tools seem to be past their best on even their first outing. NiCads thrive on a cycle of heavy use to the point of exhaustion, followed by a complete recharge. My Black and Decker Emergency Torch is a good case in point. Taken good care of, and discharged/recharged frequently it’s fine. Leave it unused until the actual emergency arrives and it’s useless, it’s limp orange glow being just sufficient to help find the candles and matches! Well, that’s a long preamble to an opinion on a cordless drill but I hope it helps set the scene on cordless tools in general, and the fact that you should only buy them if they are going to get regular use. (Unless they start putting better battery-types in them, that is.) My Swiss-made Bosch 12v Cordless drill comes as part of a pair with a smaller tool intended mainly as a screwdriver (although it drills wood OK), in a smart carrying case. They are both “drill-shaped”, i.e. with a pistol-grip and trigger. Screwfix are currently asking £189 for the set, but I bought mine a few months ago in Hereford for £149. Even then, I admit that’s still quite a lot to pay, compared to other offerings from B&D, Red Devil etc. So what do you get for your money? A 12v Drill with hammer action, reverse, a 2-speed gearbox for some real low-speed screw d riving power, electronic speed control in the trigger, variable torque settings when used as a screwdriver, keyless chuck with lock for easy fitting/removal of bits (just twist the rubber collar around the chuck) and a clip-on torch for those niggly little dark places requiring the mains switched off! A 12v Screwdriver is of less “beefy” construction, but it hardly disgraces itself on this score. Sure, there’s no 2-speed gearbox, but speed control in the trigger is still there. There are 5 torque settings for screw driving but you can turn it off for drilling. The reverse is easily selected with one hand. THREE batteries, admittedly still NiCads, and a rapid (1-hour) charger. Both tools take the same size of battery – very handy. Assorted driver bits. I added my own set from Screwfix, which are surfaced in diamond-grit which gives them some “bite” to help stop them popping out of cross-point screws So how useful is this package? Well, the drill is powerful enough for most plaster/brick holes for all the sizes you’re likely to need for run-of-the-mill household jobs, shelving etc. This makes it very useful for use right at the top of ladders where the mains won’t stretch without tying an extension cable to the ladder. I recently built a wooden decking patio (with optional “Dimmock”, or water feature as they used to be called). This involved the drilling for, and screwing of, 450 x 2.5” size 10 screws. The battery charge lasted long enough to do half, by which time it was flagging, but then so was I! A rapid charge of current and calories got us both back in action to do the rest. You’ve still got the smaller tool for screw driving if you want to, or you could use its battery as a spare to keep the momentum going. Whichever way, I wouldn’t have attempted this job with anything less. The torque setting is invaluable to stop you damaging your wrist – a very real problem with jobs of this magnitude and repetition because of the “kick” from the drill as the screw reaches the end of its travel. Verdict ~~~~ Expensive if you only want to put screws in, but almost as good as some mains-powered hammer-action drills I could name. Needs regular use to keep the batteries at their best. It would come into its own in a location where you are forced to work with the mains off, as long as you charge all three batteries in advance, that is.

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