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QuarkXPress 4.11

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QuarkXPress and QuarkXPress Passport are the choice for publishing software worldwide. Precise typography and layout tools give you an unparalleled design control and command over every aspect of your document, from conception to output.

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      27.11.2001 04:03
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      Quark Xpress has long been the 'industry standard' DTP software. Read any newspaper or magazine, and chances are it was designed and produced on Quark. QuarkXpress 4.11 is simply fantastic. It does everything you could possibly want in DTP, and it does it powerfully. Quark is able to handle enormous documents as if they were a sheet of A4. It's easy to set up single-page documents or even whole books, and Quark manages them very well, enabling you to get around them easily. Getting used to the Quark interface is a fairly user-friendly process as so many of the icons are self-explanatory. And there are many useful and ingenious features hidden away in your toolbar menus. You can size boxes down to a tenth of a millimetre and the 'show grid' option enables you to drag multiple items to line up exactly. At the click of a mouse you can also flip, rotate and duplicate boxes, and as Quark works with Pantone colours, as well as allowing you to 'mix' your own, you can fill them with any colour you could think of. The transparency option means that you can put layer upon layer to create great multi-faceted documents with real depth. Composite images and text/image mixes are simple to produce, arrange, and re-arrange. Quark handles images brilliantly too, allowing you to link to an original image whilst having only a low resolution replica in the actual document, making loading and saving very fast, as well as speeding up the process when you want to print proofs. In terms of images, Quark works best with TIFFs but can also handle JPEGs and Bitmaps with ease. And one extremely useful feature is that when you've created something in Quark, you can save the whole thing as an EPS image. This is extremely useful when you want to create web pages that aren't the standard box-type layouts. And talking of boxes, the Bezier option means you can make boxes absolutely any shape you
      can think of (as long as you've got a steady hand). You can convert text to boxes and fill them with imagery and colour, you can draw your own text paths so you can have your letters take all sorts of journeys around your page, and the leading option lets you dictate just the spacing you're looking for. This is only a small taster of what Quark can do. I can't recommend highly enough that - if you/your company can afford it - you try it for yourself and start producing the kind of results you always suspected you were capable of but never had the tools to prove it. Newcomers to DTP might find Quark a bit daunting, as might people coming to it from Microsoft Publisher, but the manual and tutorial that comes with Quark covers everything you need to know in a straightforward, easy to follow style. If you're thinking of a career in publishing, you'll need to know Quark inside out. So get learning now - there's a lot of ground to cover! Available for either Mac or PC, it costs around a thousand pounds, so if you want to learn you'd best go to a college and use theirs.

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