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Danone Bio Activia Natural

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4 Reviews

Brand: Danone / Type: Yoghurts

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    4 Reviews
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      26.10.2005 22:20
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      The Red Cherry Danone rules the kingdom of fungal desserts

      “Hi June – ohh you look as rough as a butchers dog”

      “Ohhh I dunno Janice, I feel bloated, and I’m as big as a house!”

      “Well June, you need one of these Danone yoghurts. They’ve got something in them called Bifidus Digestivum which will help all that”

      “Thanks Janice, I’ll pop them all in my handbag in a hilarious comedy moment!”

      “Don’t worry June, everyone does that. I’m constantly down the shops buying more…now please leave my house as I’ve no time for thieving gits. You’ve hurt me Janice, you really have”

      Like me, you may have seen those naff adverts for the Danone yoghurts on TV. But sub consciously they may have worked as I’ve started eating yoghurt at least five days out of seven. The Danone activia range is currently my pot of choice and mighty fine they are too.

      The Bifidus Digestivum additive is probably the most stupid name for something in yoghurt. I’d like to say it was a scientific term but I’m sure it was just some marketing exec making it up on his lunch hour. Does it work? I honestly can’t say, is bloating a women’s thing, as I can’t say I’ve ever experienced it. Perhaps the Bifidus is working its merry charms upon my internal organs without me knowing.

      So far I’ve sampled both the fat free and fat inclusive yoghurts. Both are pretty yummy so here I will run down my opinion on those flavours that have graced my taste buds.

      -Red Cherry-

      This is one of the fat free pots. It contains less than 100 calories and the fat is pretty much non-existent. Crack open that little green pot and you’re greeted with real surprise. Most yoghurt will wave fruit over the top for flavour. This yoghurt was crammed full of cherry pieces and once I tasted it I didn’t want it to stop.

      -Rhubarb-

      This is one of the 4% fat pots. The fruit pieces aren’t large but they’re in there. This is probably the creamiest Danone yoghurt I’ve had. It tastes pretty good and actually feels more naughty in the calorie count than it actually is.

      -Strawberry-

      A 4% entry but the traditional flavour is one of the blandest. There’s little in the way of fruit pieces, it tastes a little artificial and overall it’s one I’ll be steering clear of. In comparison to other strawberry youghurts it doesn’t even rival a fruit corner or even a Tesco’s cheapy in a white pot with Value splashed all over it.

      -Fig-

      This has some chunky pieces in it. Figs are only something I’ve sampled in those cake biscuit things. In yoghurt they’re an interesting experience. The taste is pretty nice but the fruit has a strange kind of rough texture to it.

      The price of the yoghurts is pretty decent. You can buy a multipack of 8 for about £2.40. I saw a BOGOF offer in Tescos the other week, which makes them a bargain. 4-packs are about £1.40. You can probably get cheaper yoghurts but they’re probably not as good.

      So next time you’re in the supermarket and see those Red Cherry Danone’s in the cooler then go ahead and treat yourself. You won’t regret it.

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        03.10.2003 13:25
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        I was looking at the special offers in my local branch of Sainsbury's the other day when I noticed a 'Buy one get one free', affectionately known as BOGOF, on the Danone Bio Activa yoghurts. I love yoghurt but had not yet tried this particular brand so I thought I'd give it a go whilst the price was right. You know what I'm like where a bargain is concerned! The offer in question was on four packs of Danone Bio Activa Yoghurt in strawberry, peach or cherry flavour. Incidentally the packs are of four yoghurts of the same flavour. I had a pack of peach and a pack of strawberry. I'm afraid don?t know if they come in any other flavours which were not part of this particular offer. The price for a pack of four x 125g pots of yoghurt was £1.39, but because of the aforementioned offer I got eight pots of yoghurt for my £1.39, so I was well pleased. The pots themselves have a pretty design, showing pictures of the fruit contained therein. All the writing on the pot is in French so, as my French was never very good, I read the information on the cardboard outer wrapper, which was in English! But of course this was not going to be a bargain if I didn't like the taste, so I have just tried them, and I was impressed. I wouldn't say that the flavour is the heavenly taste of the Onken Bio yoghurt, but then this one is 0% fat and less than half the calories of Onken's standard yoghurt. The pots contain decent sized pieces of real fruit (11.2% of the contents of the pot) and the whole things tastes very light and fruity. In fact just the sort of taste you'd expect of good low fat yoghurt. So what does it actually contain that is supposed to make it so good for you? Well it contains Bifidus Essensis Cultures - so now you know! These cultures have apparently been specially selected by Danone as they help the digestive system work regularly thus 'helping your body purify
        itself from the inside'. How true this actually is I don't know, but the yoghurt does taste good and it's a reasonable price so that'll do for me. Each 100g of yoghurt contains the following: 50 calories (as opposed to 114 per 100g in Onken) 3.8g of protein 8.4g of carbohydrates No fat 127mg of calcium They are made by Danone UK PO Box 338 Enfield Middlesex EN3 7AQ

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          12.01.2003 20:40
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          ...full of life! ;-) Ah, January. The New Year. Resolutions. People trying to "be healthy". I bet there are dozens of you out there who have decided to get 2003 off to a good start by pledging to eat properly, exercise and generally look after yourselves better than you did last year. Well, I'll admit that I kind of said that too. Not a proper resolution, mind - more of a desire to shake off the ill health that had been dogging me for most of 2002. And this is where this product - Danone Bio Activia yoghurt - comes in, with a full and glowing reference from my mother (which should be sufficient recommendation in itself, but I suspect the fussy amongst you are going to want more from me than that...). Anyway, Danone, for the confused amongst you, is a French company specialising in producing dairy products. In fact, they are currently the world's largest producer of fresh dairy products. They also produce Volvic and Evian bottled waters, if you are interested. The company as a whole has the production of healthy products at the centre of its ethos, which has no doubt been one of the major factors influencing their massive growth over recent years with the boom in "healthy lifestyles". And the Bio Activia range is no exception to this - they are a selection of fat-free live (probiotic) yoghurts. I know that some of you will probably squirm at the thought of eating live yoghurt; we have all be so programmed to think of bacteria as being harmful that the notion of deliberately consuming them must seem pretty weird! But it is worth trying to get around this way of thinking if you can, as live yoghurts taste great (the bacteria gives them a very creamy taste, so fat free yoghurt tastes like you are eating something much more sinful). And there are those health benefits - but more on that in a bit. Bio Activia yoghurts come packaged in groups of four in a distinctive green cardboard sleeve that s
          creams the word "ACTIVIA" at you from the label. The range of flavours is reasonable - I have seen packs of strawberry, cherry and peach ones, and there are also natural yoghurts with a fruit sauce on the bottom that come in raspberry, prune and coconut (?), as well as tubs of the natural yoghurt. All of the yoghurts are virtually fat free (they are labelled as having 0.1% fat), so are highly virtuous! My personal favourite are the peach ones, as the creamy yoghurt blends delightfully well with the soft pieces of fruit to give a very natural flavour; in my opinion they are the best peach yoghurts money can buy - which is not bad at around £1.30 for four. The strawberry ones are not quite as nice (for some reason they don't seem as creamy as they could be), but the cherry and raspberry flavours are welcome second choices if there is no peach available. I have yet to sample the other flavours, but I?m afraid prune and coconut do not hold much appeal for me. Moving onto those health benefits I mentioned earlier, the key ingredient that makes these yoghurts so good for you is a bacterial culture that is unique to this brand, called Bifidus Essensis. This culture is one that Danone researchers have isolated and added to their products, as they believe it has greater benefits to consumers that the Lactobacillus acidophilus that is the usual addition to live dairy products. The reasons for this are quite complex, but basically it involves the Bifidus complex being more tolerant to the acid and bile of the intestines, and having greater adherence (i.e. they were able to colonize the intestine better) than the Lactobacillus bacteria. These factors mean the Danone culture can survive and stay around your digestive system for longer, so benefits are greater and last longer. Further research into these probiotic yoghurts has indicated that eating them could have the following healthy benefits: - They can restore the balance of good and
          bad bacteria in your digestive system, which is especially important if illness or medication (especially antibiotics) has disturbed this - They can help prevent and treat candida albicans (a fungal infection of the digestive system) - They have anti-microbial properties, so help your body to fight off pathogenic bacteria - They have anti-mutation properties, so may help to prevent cancer (but research on this is still in early stages) - They may help reduce cholesterol levels (although this is debateable) - They can help strengthen your immune system So, I think after all that I can recommend these yoghurts (especially the peach ones!) - they are tasty, creamy and have only trace amounts of fat, as well as being very good for you indeed. A little more expensive than non-live yoghurts maybe, but they are much better for you. - Details Each yoghurt weights 125g and contains about 10% fruit as well as sweeteners and thickeners. A pot has around 65 calories, 0.1gram fat and provides 21% RDA calcium and 25% RDA vitamin B12. These yoghurts are suitable for vegetarians. Danone UK PO BOX 32266 London W55ZF Danone Ireland Belgard Road Tallaght Dublin Company site: http://www.danonegroup.com/index.html More on the probiotic research: http://www.ift.org/publications/docshop/ft_shop/11-01/11_01_pdfs/11-01-shah.pd f

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            21.02.2002 02:26
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            I have been buying the Bio Activia range from Danaoe for about a year, and I would not even look at another brand (well, may be the Bio range from Sainsburys). First of all they come in great flavours and they play around with yoghurts as well: sometimes there a compote at the bottom of the pot, sometimes the fruit is mixed through like a traditional one. FLAVOURS: Prunes, Raspberry ? fruit compote at bottom of pot Hint of Coconut, Cherry, Apricot ? traditional style. WHICH IS BEST? Well?..they are all! I am unable to make a decision. Safe to say, Prune is great after having salad or after having eaten pork (believe it is). Hint of Coconut is great after having had a curry or a spicy meal or Chilli. Raspberry is best at lunchtime (it?s quite sharp) after a sandwich. Cherry is great on it?s own. Apricot is great for Breakfast. Now I reckon there could be some really clever people at Danone. If you look at the flavour list I have assembled you will see every meal covered. Maybe that?s why they chose the range of flavours they did. Looking at the marketing from Danone and their Bio range I think it would be a good idea to examine their claims: ?Bio Activia from Danone are the same trusted products you have come to enjoy over the past ten years? No they are not. I have seen them in the shops for about 2 years, but not ten. Anyway, what ever happened to Chambourcey? <We have given them a new name as we think it will help you differentiate our yoghurts from other bio yoghurts, highlighting our unique culture and its proven benefits on digestion> OK, they renamed the product, everybody is doing it, and then they regret it. The words royal and mail come to mind. The thing with Danone is (and this is a generally French thing) they just know how to get their packaging right. Ok, they changed the name. Did anybody notice? No! They chose to colour the product
            green (something, thank god, they did not change) and a major departure from anything else you see in the dairy department. Think about it, Danone sticks out. I do not know about this unique culture. Does Bifidus Essensis actually exist? There is a registered trademark on the packing for this culture, but no indication if it is a patent or a registered trademark. This is important: patent means unique culture, trade mark means a name. <Our digestive system is a vital part of our body. It helps to feed us with essential nutrients, as well as helping to eliminate toxins and waste>. Yeap. I buy all that. <Bio Activia is the only yoghurt to contain the natural culture Bifidus ESSENIS (trademark symbol follows) Ok, if it is a naturally occurring culture, can you trademark it? I mean can you trademark oxygen? Or have Danone given this culture a name and then gone on to trademark the name? If anyone knows the answer to my points, please paste up a comment or put in a opinion yourself. Many thanks <and has been clinically proven to help your digestive system work optimally, helping your body to purify itself from the inside.> I think my body would repair itself faster if there were a lot less cars and pollution and stress around. <The Bifidus ESSENSIS (trademark) culture also makes Bio Activia yoghurts milder, creamier and more delicious> I don?t know about this. I thought Danone made the yoghurts milder (they are certainly mild), creamier (they are certainly very creamy and lovely) and very delicious. The culture alone does not make the product what it is. It is how it is produced, and very well it is too. ?When you are healthy on the inside, it shoes on the outside!?. Yeap, that goes without saying. So, on the whole this yoghurt range is fab. Creamy, delicious, clean your digestive system and make you feel wow! Well, not exactly, but they are certainly that go
            od. I am not buying anything else at the moment. Excuse Danone for the slightly corny marketing speech on the back of the box. But then, everything is a spin these days. That is why DooYoo is here. Usually £1,29 for a pack of four - special offer presently at Sainsbury, 99p.

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