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Yoo Light Thing Yoghurt

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4 Reviews

Brand: Tesco / Type: Yoghurts

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    4 Reviews
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      09.01.2012 15:04
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      Don't be fooled by the name, these are not for dieters

      A few days ago whilst rushing round Tesco grabbing things off my shopping list, I arrived at the dairy section for my usual yoghurts but I balked when I saw how much Muller Lights are these days. I freely admit I was in a bit of a hurry but when I spotted Tesco's own Yoo Light Thing yoghurts right next to the Muller Lights, going by the name, I assumed they'd also be a low calorie yoghurt. They were on sale for 2 packs of 6 yoghurts for £4 as opposed to the Muller price of 4 individual pots for £2 and even a mathematical numpty like me could work out which was the better bargain. The clincher was that the Yoo Light Thing packs on offer were for Toffee and Vanilla or Raspberry and Rhubarb varieties. I'm a total rhubarb junkie so I grabbed my two packs of the Yoo Light Things and continued on my merry way. Later that day and fancying a little bit of something sweet but not too fattening, I decided to try one of my new yoghurts. What a shock. Despite the packaging being emblazed with the information that these yoghurts were fat free, contained no artificial sweeteners or preservatives, on closer inspection I discovered that although that information was true, both varieties contained around 24g of sugar amounting to over a quarter of an adult's daily allowance and each pot of yoghurt amounted to 137 calories. Bang goes the diet ... again! Having decided that if I confined my yoghurt consumption to only 1 a day it wouldn't put too much of a strain on the diet, I peeled back the lid of my favourite rhubarb flavour. The colour is a lovely delicate pink with lots of fruit pieces evident in the mix and the consistency is thick and creamy. A quick sniff confirmed that it also had an authentic rhubarb smell but would the taste test prove otherwise? I am rather fussy about my rhubarb yoghurts and for preference would eat Rachel's Organics which have just the right balance between tartness and sweetness but they are also very heavy on the calories. The best of the rest, to my mind, is the Activia rhubarb yoghurt but that one isn't suitable for strict vegetarians as the colouring used is cochineal derived from some South American insect. As a fish eater, I'm not exactly philosophically pure when it comes to vegetarianism and I've always believed that the only good insect is a dead insect unless it's something pretty like a bee or a butterfly, so this doesn't bother me too much. However, these Yoo Light Thing rhubarb yoghurts are coloured using plant extracts making them totally suitable for all you genuine vegetarians. The taste of the rhubarb variety is delicious with a very authentic rhubarb flavour, although possibly just a little too sweet and sugary for my taste. Each spoonful had plenty of fruit pulp adding to the feeling that I was actually eating food rather than drinking something from a spoon which was marginally thicker in consistency than single cream. The raspberry yoghurt has an equally authentic flavour, is just as tasty and again had plenty of fruit pulp and was more filling than a diet yoghurt. That, too, was slightly sweeter than I would have liked. Both these varieties have a very short ingredients list of skimmed milk, fruit (10% rhubarb or 8% raspberry), sugar, rice starch, pectin, colouring and flavouring and at 137 calories, one 180g pot counts as 7% of an adult's daily calorie intake. These yoghurts are sold exclusively at Tesco and are manufactured by the Nom Dairy. The yoghurts are nut free but there is an allergy warning on the pack stating that the manufacturer can't guarantee this, although it also states that the factory doesn't use nuts. My overall opinion of the raspberry and rhubarb Yoo Light Thing yoghurts is a good one. Despite the slightly misleading packaging leading me to assume these were diet yoghurts, I can't regret having bought them as they are far tastier than any diet yoghurt I've ever eaten and I feel that as they are far more substantial in consistency and satisfying to eat than a diet yoghurt, they won't adversley affect anyone's calorie counting too much. I shall certainly be buying them again even if I have to run up and down the stairs a few times to burn off the extra calories! Nutritional information: Per pot Calories: 137 (7%) Sugar: 24.1g - rhubarb/23.9g - raspberry (27%) Fat: 0.2g (<1%) Salt: Trace

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        12.08.2011 11:29
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        The first poor rating I've given in a while! Not one I will rush to buy again.

        I could eat yogurt until it comes out of my ears. Especially toffee yogurt. Especially Tesco own brand toffee yogurt (the one that comes in the shallow wide pots). So imagine my disgust when I was last in my local Tesco (only one step down from being a 'superstore') and found that they had been taken off the shelves. I have noticed a lot of my regular bargains disappearing off their shelves lately and being replaced with considerably pricier brands, hence I usually shop in Morrisons now (and their toffee yogurts are awesome). I spotted the 6 pack of vanilla and toffee Yoo Light Thing yogurts, and having read the first product review on here previously I thought, 'Okay, fine, I'll get those' as I love vanilla as well. A quick look at the packaging tells you all you need to know really; no artificial colours, preservatives or sweeteners, fat free and made with British milk. Each pot is 180g, which is a fairly decent size, and it's fair to say that I did have reasonably high expectations of these yogurts. I had a vanilla one first and it was pretty good. Quite thick and creamy in texture, but not particularly creamy in taste. I noticed this even more with the toffee. I find the taste to be nice enough, but a bit too sweet and they have a very noticeable 'artificial' taste to them. The artificial sweet taste would be considerably offset by creaminess, if this was present and not sadly lacking as it is. I can't explain this artificial taste as we know these yogurts do not contain any artificial stuff. But 'artificial' is the best way I can think of to describe it; perhaps slightly 'chemical'? I think what it boils down to though is that they are not creamy. The yogurt itself looks shiny, which I think is adding to my feelings. When you look at the nutritional info, you can clearly see that although these may be classed as fat free, they are far from healthy. They are chock full of sugar and not a lot else! Each pot of either vanilla or toffee contains basically a third of your entire GDA of sugar. Of course, this will be even more for children, or those who are on a calorie controlled diet to lose weight. As with anything though, moderation is the key (and good dental hygiene!) Like I said, I probably did have high hopes, as the Tesco toffee yogurts I would usually buy are delightfully creamy and just wonderful tasting (as well as low fat!), so I had hoped these would be at least half as good. Unfortunately not. From reading the other reviews, the price of £1.44 is apparently an offer, but my local Tesco did not display a usual price for these. I would only buy these again if I had no other choice; they're not horrendous, but they can't hold a candle to the ones that have disappeared (forever?) off the shelves. ** Important bits ** Nutrition (per pot) Vanilla - 139 calories; protein 8.6g; carbs 24.5g (sugars 23.8g); fat 0.2g (saturates 0.1g); fibre 0.1g; salt trace. Toffee - 149 calories; protein 8.3g; carbs 27.7g (sugars 26.8g); fat 0.4g (saturates 0.2g); fibre 0.1g; salt trace. Contains - cows' milk. Cannot guarantee nut free.

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          08.08.2011 21:20
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          Delicious fat free yoghurt

          I got these since they were on offer for a pack of 6 for £1.44 (on special offer) from my local Tesco which was the same price as the standard 4 pack. When I noticed that they were fat free alarm bells started ringing in my head. Every time I try fat free yoghurt they never taste as nice as normal ones and they don't have the same creamy texture but I was pleasantly surprised with these. They have a very nice creamy texture and are full of flavour. The 6 pack I got was strawberry and raspberry mix with bits. The bits (thankfully) aren't that big and you don't tend to get a lone seed on your spoon but an actual piece of fruit. The pots (from the 6 pack) contain 180g of yoghurt which thanks to the design of the pots you can actually get out. The pots are narrower at the bottom than at the top and is round so you can use your spoon to scrape all the yummy yoghurt out. As well as the 6 pack I got you can also get packs with no bits, different flavours and different flavour combinations. I would definitely recommend this yoghurt to my friends thanks to its delicious taste and because its also fat free.

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          01.07.2011 00:28
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          A nice alternative pudding from Tesco's new range.

          I'll be honest, I am a bit of a creature of habit in the supermarket. I don't get a lot of time to browse the aisles because I am too busy stopping my youngest touching everything, and retrieving a Buzz Lightyear figure when it falls in small gaps. I want to be in and out as quick as possible. I only took my time the day I purchased the Yoo light things fat free yoghurts the first time as I had promised the kids we would build a model, and we were looking for suitable sized round containers which contained a product that we would like to eat, and these fit the bill for that. Having never seen them on the shelf before, I had not realised they are a new brand exclusive to Tesco in an attempt to muscle in on the yoghurt market which is greatly monopolised by big brands like Muller. They stood out on the shelf as they were brightly packaged in red cardboard and plastic, and better still, they were cheaper than some of the other branded pots on the shelf. Tesco claim that they will undercut the other leading brands by about 20%. Since buying them, I have noticed some Tesco staff wearing bright red Tshirts advertising them, so it is something that they are obviously trying to push in their stores. There are 21 items in the whole range, based on low fat, fat free and split pots. The yoghurts I picked up were part of the 'light thing' range, which are fat free. I got 3 toffee yoghurts and 3 vanilla yoghurts, encased in an outer cardboard sleeve. These yoghurts are available at 50p each, 5 for £2, or £2.89 for the multipack of 6, which is on a 2 for £5 offer. I bought one multipack to start off in case we didn't like it. We ended up trying the yoghurts the very same day as a pudding after our evening meal. Each yoghurt had text on the foil lid to tell you what type it was. Getting into the yoghurts was a little tricky for the kids, but when we opened the lid, the yoghurt inside looked very tasty. It was fairly thick in consistency for a yoghurt. It looked glossy. The toffee one was a light toffee colour, the vanilla one a cream colour, and both had a lovely aroma of the taste to come. Eating the yoghurt, both flavours were nice as a treat. Not too strong, and not so subtle you couldn't tell what it was. The yoghurt was smooth, and was easy to eat. After eating, I felt quite full. The kids both were able to demolish a whole pot each, which was a bit unexpected for me, as they are quite big pots containing 180mls of yoghurt, and a lot bigger than the ones I would usually buy. These yohurts nutritionally, should be quite good being fat free. The vanilla one comes in at 139 Kcals per pot, 0.2g of fat, but 23.8g of sugar. The toffee one is 149 Kcals, 0.2g of fat, but 26.8g of sugar. There are no artificial colours, sweeteners or preservatives. Overall, I didn't mind us eating them as an occasional treat, but they aren't the healthiest product around, and not that cheap either. For the kids, I think I would persuade them to share the pot and have some fruit added to it in an attempt to cut down that sugar hit. They are suitable for vegetarians to eat. Allergy sufferers who are lactose intolerant should avoid them, and they can not guarantee that they are nut free. I felt that these were as good as any of the leading brands. The packaging would certainly appeal to kids, and I would be happy, and even confident to try out other products in the range. I am not going to be buying them every week though.

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