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Adelaide (Australia)

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City: Adelaide / Country: Australia / World Region: Australasia / Pacific

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      19.10.2012 10:50
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      The Brighton of Australia!

      If Brisbane is Australia's most boring city then Adelaide has to be the sleepiest. Tucked away in a green and cozy warm corner of South Australia it's a city that has the most Australian charm of the bunch, its rustic Victoriana architecture mixed in with modern buildings in a grid system giving it a real feel of old and new Australia, wrought iron verandas and porches a plenty to tether your horse or hang your hat. It's not the sporty metropolis of Perth or cosmopolitan Sydney or the forward thinking Melbourne but the one your mum and dad would be most happy to retire in. But you always feel its happening somewhere else when you are in Adelaide.

      There are no skyscraper canyons reaching for the heavens and catching the searing Aussie sunlight, Dallas style, and nothing remotely pretentious about the place. It's just how you would like a city to be to make you feel safe and welcome and residents never under pressure to be a city slicker. The rather colorful wildlife quickly reminds you are in Australia and your garden or hotel grounds always full of iridescent wildlife surprises, spectacularly colorful birds tweeting away to wake you for work or play. I remember in my hostel near the beach that the chirping birds would come into the room they were that happy and confident.

      The cities left flank from south to north is miles of beautiful white sandy beaches that you can rumble out to on the old Victorian tram service or local buses. Adeladians take the beaches for granted though and they are surprisingly empty. When you sit there in 90 degrees heat with a cooling sea breeze and the stunning blue sea crashing in on your toes you would never know you are so close to a modern city.

      The city centre is dominated by the unpretentious nature of the place and feels relaxed and welcoming, known as the city of churches with lots of wide open spaces and wide boulevards to amble through the city on. It as set up in the 18th century as the one city not to concentrate on convict settlement in Australia and promoted ethnic occupancy although you would never know that today. The yearly comedy Festival and River Torrens celebrations bring the place to life and there is always something going on to do that you can afford for a night out, in away like a traditional university town in England. Adelaide was made for festivals. The Economist Magazine did list it as one of the top 10 liveliest cities in the world last year although I would say they meant for economists. It's no Rio De Janiero.

      Sports wise its not so hot although the home to Don Bradman and the exquisite Adelaide Oval where the Don piled up some huge scores on his home ground. They also play Aussie Rules and A-League soccer there. It used to have the Grand Prix but Melbourne nicked it. The pubs and clubs are relaxed and they have some decent theatres and events venues to enjoy visiting acts from the rest of the world. This stuff is important in Australia as the TV is dire in the winter and Adelaide can get rainy and dull then, snow falling across the state for a once in a century October event in 2008, the surrounding Stirling Ranges seeing three inches of the white stuff, unheard of in the spring. South Australia is very hot in the summer and so they welcome any sort of meteorological strangeness.

      The nearby booming wine industry makes for a pleasant day out, or two, testing the free samples and you can also launch yourself into the outback here to see the 93% of Australia that remains uninhabited. Bush trips are fun and you can go shooting and fishing if you so choose. The countryside around the city is beautiful and the coastline sensational. The real charm of Australia is you can live in a hot country without the agro you get in the third world.

      Getting there is straightforward although direct flights from the UK are more expensive than to Perth and Sydney so maybe worth having sometime in Melbourne or Sydney first. No metro in Adelaide but decent buses and those lovely old trams. This city is also a good one to head out to the Red Centre on one of the many coach companies that growl across the desert to Ayres Rock and Alice Springs, a vapor trail of dust the only evidence you're out there. It's a long trip though and as there are no trains to the rock its best to consider flights to Alice Springs if you don't like coach travel. But it's well worth the trip to the rock and the stunning Red Centre.

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        14.09.2010 22:41
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        A pretty and quiet Aussie city

        Adelaide

        Adelaide is the capital city of the state of South Australia and is a very small city with an almost country town feel about it. There are plenty of parks and the whole city feels fresh and quiet unlike European cities. We spent a couple of days here at the end of our Australian trip and really enjoyed the calmness of the place. It is rather an elegant city known for its colonial stone architecture many large parklands which cover half the city and which give an incredible sense of space. Only about one million people live in and around the city but it felt like even fewer than this when we were walking around so it must be the clever design of the city.
        Just a bit about the state of South Australia

        South Australia amazingly borders all the other states and Territories, except the Australian Capital Territory, which is entirely within and surrounded by New South Wales and of course Tasmania is across the Tasman Sea. To the West of the State, you will find the Great Victoria Desert and the Nullarbor National Park. If you follow the Coast road you will eventually arrive in Western Australia. To the Northern part of the state, you will find the Simpson Desert and the borders of Northern Territory, and Queensland. To the east of South Australia, are the borders of New South Wales and Victoria.


        South Australian was founded in 1836 and it is very proud of the fact that it was NOT a former convict settlement. The state has a varied geography with large lakes, deserts and mountains. Adelaide city is on the coast of the Southern Ocean and the huge bay known as the Great Australian Bight.


        On our way in to the city we stopped to admire the view from Montefiore Hill on the outskirts of the city is a great viewing point to look over the city of Adelaide. On the top of this hill is a very special statue of Colonel William Light, who designed Adelaide as a square mile of north, south, east-west streets including a central park and also surrounded by parklands. This viewing point is known as Light's vision as he stands there with an outstretched arm showing his beautiful and practical city design.


        We found the free Terrace to Terrace tram which took us from just near our hotel on South Terrace to the city end at North Terrace. We had decided to make our way to the Adelaide Cricket Ground. We hopped off the tram and we only had to cross the bridge which took us past the Adelaide Festival Centre and a park then the cricket ground was there. They offered tours but I decided to just be cheeky and walk in - nobody came and questioned us so we went right into the ground and took lots of photos as my husband is a keen cricket fan. We then moved on to find the Don Bradman statue which was in the park just nearby.


        The museum was our next stop to find the Spriggina fossils which are the first animals with heads. We had to ask quite a few people before we found this display which is quite surprising as it is a very important find from an evolutionary point of view. The story goes that in 1946 an Australian mining geologist, Reginauld Srigg was heating his billy and kicked a stone which he then saw had this fossil. He was aware this was important but when he tried to return to find them again he could not and it took years before he rediscovered these interesting fossils which are now on display in the museum in Adelaide. They were found in the range of mountains north of the city of Adelaide, Australia, known as the Ediacara Hills. These fossils are in fact late Precambrian for those interested in this sort of thing..

        It was a very good museum with lots to keep children amused. They had a huge dinosaur display this week but we didn't go for that. There was also a giant squid that went down through three floors of the museum - quite horrific. As we had only come to see the special fossil we made our way out without looking at much else really. We went looking for this as Bill Bryson mentioned this find in his book 'Down Under' and we spent some time hunting for these little gems taken from his book in various places round Australia.


        Our next stop was Rundle Street where we had planned to have a coffee but as we arrived we noticed a huge Pancake Day charity stall where for a gold coin donation you could have a pancake - so we did just that - mine with maple syrup and my husband had lemon and sugar. We drank some of our water instead of coffee and made our way back to the tram stop as we thought we would take a look at Glenelg. In this mall they have some lovely bronze life size pigs that appear to be wandering around the shopping area. One is looking in to a litter bin and others just wandering around. They proved a great attraction to young children who liked to ride on them.


        On the way to the tram we passed a fruit stall selling currants - fresh. I didn't know that was where dried currants came from - thought they were a bit like black currants - anyway we bought some. They were like very sweet tiny grapes and quite delicious.


        The tram is free between the two terraces but costs $2.60 each way to Glenelg. However the ticket machine wasn't working so we had one journey free. We walked to the end of the pier and took a couple of photos, but there was not a lot there apart from a very nice beach. It was all very clean and almost looked like a model town but there was not a lot to do apart from walk along the beach or swim but we had not brought towels and things and it was quite windy so we thought we'd have a bite of lunch.


        We found a nice Greek snack bar place just near a small fountain. While we ate our lunch we were entertained by tiny children playing in the fountain - the sort where the water pops up intermittently and they kept running from spout to spout. They were soaked by the end by had a wonderful time.

        Adelaide is a quaint sort of city and worth a visit. I am not sure I would want to live there as it is a long way away from anywhere else really. It is a great base for exploring the wonderful vineyards of the Barossa valley and there you can sample the wines in one of the 130+ different wineries including several well known vineyards such as Jacobs Creek , Cockatoo Ridge and Penfolds to name a few.


        Adelaide is a lovely open city and the people were very friendly and welcoming. It is a shame that Light did not enjoy his lovely city as he resigned his post of governor and in the end he died penniless and unappreciated of tuberculosis in Adelaide in October 1939 aged 54.He is buried in Light Square and a small monument honours his achievements on Montefiore Hill.


        Thanks for reading this and hope it has been en 'light'ening and of some interest. This review may be posted on other sites under my same user name.
        ©Catsholiday

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          17.06.2009 19:01
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          Writing this review has made me want to jump on a plane back....

          I spent five months living in Adelaide., South Australia whilst I was studying abroad in Australia. It was part of my nine months in total of staying Down Under.

          So many people miss out on Adelaide when they go travelling around, and believe me, they ARE missing out.

          Adelaide is a fantastic city. It has everything, the city skyscrapers, the shopping, the beach, the mountains. There is a large botanic gardens which is fantastic for walking and picnicking. Next to that is Adelaide Zoo which doesn't seem to be well publicised but is absolutely outstanding. According to the website, there is over 1,800 animals with around 300 different species. You can also go in and pet some of the animals like the Kangaroos and the baby chicks which were absolutely adorable. The pricing is quite competitive, with a family ticket (2 adults and 2 children) costing $60AUD. For students, which I was, the price was only $16. We spent almost a whole day there.

          Shopping is fantastic in Adelaide, Rundle Mall is the well known street, where you can view the 'Malls Balls' sculpture as it is fondly nicknamed. There are numerous shopping malls dotted around the streets. Central Market is THE place to shop for your groceries. From Antipasto, to coffee, to chinese speciality foods, exotic flowers to plain old potatoes, it is the best place to find high quality fresh food at bargain prices. Go there around 5pm for the best deals. There are also some touristy shops for cheap souvenirs. The Asian foodcourt there is brilliant where you can pick up a whole plate of buffet food for around $5. There is even a purely vegetarian buffet.

          There are also some fantastic galleries located in the city centre, it is a place where arts are in abundence. There are also plenty of street entertainment around Rundle Mall. On Sundays there is a great crafty street market on Rundle Street. Many of the attractions are free, there is a free tour around the famous 'Haigh's' Chocolate Factory with free tastings (remember to book)

          It is a great place to live as the locals are really friendly, there is always something to do and the public transport is fantastic. It is also a fantastic place to study with so many discounts for the students at the two universities.

          I lived in Magill where is was a fantastic local sports centre with a full size outdoor swimming pool which is fantastic in the summer. I also took part in kickboxing lessons where I met more friendly locals and got fit!

          Just out of Adelaide there is the beachside suburb of 'Glenelg', famous and historical, you can catch the old tram there on weekends or the normal tram during the week. There are lots of interesting places to visit there and it's great for kids. The beach is beautiful and unspoilt, and many people play beach volleyball. The pier is beautiful to walk along though don't copy all the crazy teenagers who get a thrill out of jumping off it in summer in to the beautiful clear water below. There is also 'The Beach House' which is a huge indoor amusement centre for kids, with arcade games, dodgem bars, crazy golf and water slides. I went there without any children with my friends in their 20's, and we still had a fantastic time! Glenelg is also renouned for it's dining culture and nightlife, the Grand Hotel is the most famous spot there.

          Another place just out of the city is Mount Lofty, where you can see panoramic views of the city and see it's original 'mile long square' format in which it was built around. Next to that is Clealand Wildlife Park which is absolutely fantastic. It costs about $13 to get in, and for that you get to wander around, hand feeding kangaroos, see tazmanian devils, and hopefully even get to touch a koala! (Cuddling them cost extra because they can get overheated and the park want to minimise them being handled) Don't go during the real heat of summer as you won't be able to touch a koala.

          Back in the city, the dining and nightlife is also excellent. The real dining hub is around Rundle Street. Do not miss out on 'Cocolat', Adelaide's amazing desert restaurant which is open until midnight. We spent most of our time in cheap bars such as PJ O'Brians Irish Bar. On Thursdays, ladies only pay $1 for a spirit and mixer, but don't go there if you can't handle being hassled by loads of (very forward) Australian blokes. For a more classy venue, the cocktail bar Fumo Blu on Rundle Street has amazing cocktails, on the pricey side but never the less, amazing.

          South Australia is known as 'The Festival State' and it is from Adelaide in which it gains its reputation. The best time to go to Adelaide is in February and March, when there is the huge 'Garden of Unearthly Delights' set up. This is a huge area in a city park that runs events for a month. It is usually free to get into the main area and there are bars, clubs, theatre tents, fireworks, fairground rides, acrobats and way more every evening. The Future Music dance festival also visits there sometime during that time. There are hundreds of arts events and exhibitions. The Food and Drink festival in Norwood is extremely well attended and a fantastic day out.

          Overall, Adelaide is an amazingly diverse and beautiful city. It is very much worth visiting on your trip to Australia, and a fantastic place for studying and working. Something is happening all year long, and there are so many great festivals and events to attend, the only problem is trying to attend them all!!

          Check out JetStar and Virgin Blue, Australia's budget airlines to make sure you get chance to visit whilst you're in Oz.

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          11.06.2009 18:28
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          a fantastic city with lots and lots to do! well worth a visit

          I have been to Adelaide a few time in recent years to visit family which live just outside the city in Glenelg. Adelaide is becoming more popular with tourists and is a must visit city in southern Australia. It is only about a 15minute drive from the airport, and there are regular local buses from the airport to the city centre.

          Every time i visit the city i find something new to do or a new town to explore. Glenelg is one of the most visited little towns i have been too with a beautiful beach stretching for miles as well as a river full of expensive yots. Glenelg is full of bed and breakfasts, hotels and backpackers accomodation. Personally i spent a few days in a backpackers and found it to be very clean and safe. i often left my ipod or mobile charging in the backpackers room while i went out and it was still there upon my return! If you do decide to spend the day visiting Glenelg, take the tram from Adelaide, this is a nice journey as you travel through residencil areas which seem so much more open and spacious than in the UK. This is also a quick and frequent service.

          A range of festivals happen in adelaide including:
          *Adelaide Cabaret festival (june)
          *Festival of arts (march every even number year)
          *Adelaide film festival (Feb)
          *festival of Ideas (july)
          *tasting australia (october)
          *The Christmas Parade (christmas!)
          and many more which i wont list as it'll bore you! if you want more details on the many other festivals try wikipedia or google.
          Of the festivals i have attended i have found them a mixture of good and bad, although this will depend on your personal opinion. Im not really into art but did find the festival interesting but probably not as much as an arty person!

          If you get the chance the Botanic gardens are well worth a visit, maybe even a full day if you take the family and a picnic! There is a little cafe within the gardens as well as a gift shop selling little natural trinkets and lots of nature books, as well as kiddies toys. The gardens are really easy to find, right in the centre of the city and are well sign posted! It is generally open from 7am until late.

          Another must see is the South Australian Museum, which has a fantastic display of Aboriginal arts and antiques on display. This gives a little culture and hostory to the city and is very intersting to have a look around. There area vairty of other displays in the museum to suit all as it is over 6 floors, im sure you'll easily loose a day in here! This is also easy to find, down the road from the Botanic gardens. The museum is open from 10-5 most days and best of all it is free free free!!

          Im not much of a night clubber but there are many clubs are bars to choose from in Adelaide, mostly around Rundle Street and Hindley street.

          Another of my favourite pass times in Adelaide is eating! there is plenty of choice from cheap noodles to very grand expensive meals at top class restaurants. People working in hotels are normally very wise to the best places to eat so feel free to ask! There is everything from indian to itallian!

          Adelaide is a fantastic city in Australia and a great city to visit if you've got the time! Hope this review is helpful,

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            04.01.2003 03:41
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            Let me start this by giving you all a basic guide to Adelaide. Adelaide is the capital city of the state of South Australia. Looking at a map it's right down at the bottom of the country, not quite in the middle. To the West of the City is the Gulf of St. Vincent, and to the East are the Mount Lofty Ranges (known to Adelaidians as the Adelaide Hills). Its population is around 1.5 million which makes it Australia's fifth largest city. Adelaide lies on the Torrens River, but more about that later. This area is not plagued by bush fires like Sydney, their last major fires were 20 years ago. From reports Ive seen online however, there is talk that this summer could well bring fires again. Geography lesson over so now its time for a bit of history! The city was named after Queen Adelaide, wife of William IV. Like Melbourne, Adelaide was NOT established as a penal colony but was founded by free citizens mainly from Britain. The first settlers were led by Captain John Hindmarsh and they landed from their ship the HMS Buffalo in Holdfast Bay (now known as Glenelg) in 1826. The surveyor-general, Colonel William Light, with these first settlers chose the site for the colony and it was he who planned the city. He did an excellent job, the city has wonderful wide streets (on an American style grid layout), squares and the whole city centre is surrounded by parks and gardens. Adelaide has to be the most overlooked city in the whole of Australia. I have to say that this fact is a shame, because in my opinion it is a true jewel in their crown, and deserves far more attention than it actually receives. The city centre itself is only 1 mile square which means everything is well within walking distance. This is one city where the airport isnt miles out of town, the average taxi fare from the airport to the city centre is around A$15 (£4). In fact all transport links are excellent, and most importantly cheap! 2 hour public transport tickets cost A$2.70 (85 pe
            nce), with day tickets costing $5.60 (£1.85) I think. These tickets are valid on all city area buses, the Obahn (an odd sort of bus that runs some of the way on rails), local area trains, and of course the tram to Glenelg. There are also 2 FREE buses which run set routes around the city centre. All buses in Adelaide run on natural gas which makes them very environmentally friendly. At the Interstate Train Terminal you can get one of those world famous huge trains to Melbourne, Sydney, Perth or Alice Springs. There's also a good bus terminal on Franklin St, where you can get State buses, Interstate services and also many tours leave from there. Adelaide is a very familiar city. Theres just something about it that makes you think European, but on the other hand its more than obvious you are actually a long long way from home. Its scrupulously clean and tidy which is wonderful and although it has some high rise buildings, theres not nearly as many as in say Melbourne, and the wide streets really do stop any claustrophobic and closed in feelings some cities can produce. Let me start my tour of Adelaide on KING WILLIAM STREET, the main thoroughfare through the city, and it runs on a North-South direction. Its the widest of all the streets (42m, 140ft in old money). It continues as KING WILLIAM AVENUE after crossing North Terrace and heads out over the Torrens River and into North Adelaide. All street names change as they cross King William Street, except for North and also South Terrace. I was told the reason for this; something to do with crossing the King's highway, but Im afraid I cant remember the exact reason. It was confusing to begin with for me, but I soon got the hang of things. In the centre of the city, at the intersections with Grote Street and Wakefield Street, King William Street opens out into VICTORIA SQUARE. In the centre of this square is the obligatory statue of Queen Victoria. In the northern part of the square is
            a beautiful fountain with 3 spouts representing the three rivers of South Australia which are the Murray, the Torrens and the Onkaparinga. The square is laid out with gardens, and in the Southern part of the square is the tram terminus (which runs to Glenelg). Just to the west of Victoria Square is the CENTRAL MARKET (entrances on both Grote St and Gouger St). This place is fantastic! You can get everything here you expect from a market, fresh fruit, veg, meat, poultry, fish, cheeses, flowers, plus a wide selection of household goods, books, souvenirs, clothes etc. It also houses loads of cheap little cafes and food stands and theres also a Chinese food court. Its open Tues and Thurs till 5.30pm, Fri till 9.00pm and only till 1pm on a Sat. As I was travelling as a backpacker with limited funds, this place was a godsend to me. Everything is very cheap and it certainly kept me from starvation. A few blocks north of Victoria Square is RUNDLE MALL. This is the place to come if youre even remotely interested in the art of SHOPPING. It runs eastwards from King William street to Pultney St and is pedestrianised for its entire length. The whole street is lined with shops, and there are also many little arcades to explore, with yet more shops, cafes and food courts. Across KW street from Rundle Mall (remember i said that street names change) is HINDLEY STREET. This is known as the Downtown area; there's good restaurants here as well as some pubs and a multiplex cinema (which I did visit...I saw Bridget Jones Diary). NORTH TERRACE is the home of the State Library (which was closed for re-furbishment when I was there), art galleries, and the MUSEUM OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA. This museum houses an excellent Aboriginal collection, with various artifacts, video shows and interactive displays. A short walk down King William Avenue brings you to the TORRENS LAKE, which leads into the TORRENS RIVER. The lake is complete with a small fountain, and t
            here are boat trips available either just up to the ZOO, or as a round trip (up to the zoo and back again). The trip up to the zoo costs I think A$5 (£1.70), the round trip is $7.50 (£2.50). The boat driver I had was extremely friendly and just as interested in learning about British history as I was in learning about all things Adelaidian! I made the trip up to the zoo all on my own, just me and the boat driver. It was like having my own personal taxi service. Slightly further up King William Avenue is ST. PETER'S CATHEDRAL. This has spectacular stained glass windows. The ZOO costs A$13 (£4.20ish) admittance and all the animals are houses in very natural settings. Next to the Zoo are the BOTANIC GARDENS. The main attractions here are the old Palm House and the Bi-centennial Conservatory which contains plants from he Asian area. Another excellent place to go and relax. Now back to that tram. Its Adelaides only surviving tram, and the journey down to GLENELG (Adelaide's beach area) takes approximately 30 mins. The beaches here are clean and safe; this area of the coast is quite sheltered so its no good for surfers. There is a replica of the HMS Buffalo here, but its been turned into a restaurant which kind of spoils your photos. Glenelg in general is just another over-touristy place, but if souvenir shops are you're thing, then you will be spoilt for choice! There is however a good selection of pubs, most of which have outside seating, perfect for just watching the world go by. Glenelg was my favourite place to head to when the sun was shining. The outer Adelaide area boasts way more attractions though than just Glenelg. CLELAND CONSERVATION PARK on the slopes of Mount Lofty (around 10 miles east of Adelaide) is a great place to get close ups of Koala's. Fantastic setting to learn that these pesky creatures sleep for roughly 23 hours a day, and snore at an amazing volume! The MOUNT LOFTY BOTANIC GARDENS, yes up in the Adel
            aide Hills have a higher than surrounding areas rainfall so rhododendrons thrive here as do ferns. Theres also lakes (artificial) and rock gardens. The BLACKHILLS CONSERVATION PARK 8 miles to the North of the city is a Mecca for nature lovers. Here you will find some absolutely beautiful unspoilt gorges and waterfalls, lovely to walk through/past. Roughly 20 miles to the east of Adelaide is HAHNDORF, a German settlement that dates back to 1839. It retains all of its German past perfectly with half timbered houses, tree lines streets and quaint little churches with spires. The population is still mostly German or of German decent and visiting there is like stepping back in time. In writing this I feel there is so much more I could sit here and write about Adelaide, Ive barely even scratched the surface. But, I hope Ive at least whet people's appetites and shown that there's way more to Australia than just Melbourne and Sydney. For those of you who are interested, while there I stayed at the ADELAIDE BACKPACKERS INN on Carrington Street (just south of Victoria Square) which is THE best budget place to stay at in Adelaide. For those on a better budget than I was Adelaide has loads of hotels of all star-ratings. Theres plenty of cheap places to eat, and good pubs..

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              03.06.2002 17:30
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              Ok, the third in the series, and this opinion is about Adelaide, South Australia, where I spent quite a bit of time in 1999. A Little Bit of Background -------------------------------- Adelaide is the principle town in the State of South Australia. South Australia actually borders all the other states and Territories, except the Australian Capital Territory, which is wholly contained within the New South Wales borders. To the West of the State, you will find the Great Victoria Desert and the Nullarbor National Park, and the Coast Road will eventually take you to Western Australia. To the Northern part of the state, you will find the Simpson Desert, and the borders with Northern Territory, and North East the town of Birdsville, just over the Queensland Border. East of South Australia, are the borders with New South Wales and Victoria. South Australian was founded in 1836. It was a highly planned community and the population was definitely not made up of convicts! The state contains large lakes, deserts and mountains. Adelaide is on the coastline, and just off the coast lies Kangaroo Island. The Southern Ocean laps the coastline of South Australia, and here begins the great bay known as the Great Australian Bight. Now the name of the town planner who designed Adelaide escapes me, although I have seen his statue somewhere in the city. The Central Business district is a square mile area, perfectly planned. The streets which enclose this area are North Terrace, South Terrace, East Terrace, and yes, you've guessed it, West Terrace. The city is surrounded by gardens on all sides. To the North of the City runs the River Torrens, with a Municipal Golf Course on the North Bank. I've remembered his name "Colonel Light".. How to get there --------------------- You can fly from Heathrow, and it typically takes about 24 hours. You will touch down for refuelling in Singapore normally. Ade
              laide is about two hours flying time from Sydney. British Airways and Qantas are part of the OneWorld Alliance, and you will often see flights advertised for about £700, including four stopovers in Australia. Everyone who wants to gain entry to Australia must have a Visa, unless you are a New Zealander. When you land just get a cab, if you are going to the city. This typically cost me about $30 to the CBD. Accommodation -------------------- I always used to stay at the Adelaide Hilton, and it was a bargain $100 per night. The reception area of the hotel is very nice, although the bedrooms were a bit dated. They were embarking on a major refurbishment programme though, starting with the executive levels, and assuming they have managed to complete the whole hotel by now, you will find this a comfortable place to stay. A more expensive place to say is the Hyatt Regency on North Terrace. This was practically next door to my office on the first floor of the EDS Building. However, I tended not to stay here as it was closer to $200 per night. Weather --------- Adelaide is generally much warmer than Sydney and Melbourne and the humidity often felt much drier. Time Difference ------------------- During our winter period (Oct-Mar), there is a nine hour difference, and during our Summer Period (Mar-Oct), there is a seven hour difference, with Australia being ahead of us. These are differences to the East Coast. Adelaide is a wacky half an hour behind Sydney and Melbourne! Currency ----------- The Australian Dollar. Australia only abandoned Pounds, Shilling and Pence, in 1966. There money is brightly coloured and plasticky in feel. The exchange rate is currently about $2.6 AUS to the £1 GPB. Important Dates ------------------- Australia Day - End of January. Lots of celebrations and fireworks, and you will need to practice the National
              Anthem Advance Australia Fair. Anzac Day - 25 April Commemorating Soldiers lost in the War, Australia and New Zealand Army Corps. Shopping ----------- Rundle Mall is the main pedestrianised shopping area of the town, but once again, shopping isn't that great, not by UK standards anyway. You will find the bid department stores in Adelaide although the branches are not as chic as the Sydney branches. Our Saturday morning haunt was the produce market on Grote Street. Here you will find bread, fruit, coffee, meats and stuff and apparently it is the largest market in the Southern Hemisphere! Sight Seeing in Adelaide --------------------------- 1. Adelaide has its own Festival Centre, close to North Terrace. This one is more angular in design, and a lot cheaper than its big brother, the Sydney Opera House. It can seat 2000 people. 2. Visit the petting Zoo, and pet a few kangaroos, wallabies and the like. There is also a large Australian bird collection. 3. Another common theme in every large Australian city is the Casino. This is also on North Terrace. The casino is housed in the old railway station. 4. The Art Gallery of South Australia contains art from all over the world including China and Europe. You can also find plenty of Australian art in here. 5. If it is social history you are after, then visit the Migration Museum. You can learn about the pioneers of the state of SA. 6. Take a Tramcar to the resort of Glenelg. The trams are about 70 years old now. Wining and Dining ----------------------- Gosh, I mustn't have done a lot of eating out in Adelaide, or else I always ate at the same place, as I cannot think of that many. Try the Greek restaurant on Rundle Terrace, which was one of my favourite haunts. There is a large contingent of Chinese and Vietnamese restaurants around Gouger Street, near to the Hilton. A great Irish bar on East Terrace is PJ O
              'Briens, and there was live music here each Friday evening. The Hilton has a top restaurant, although I hardly ever saw anyone in it during the week! Further Afield ----------------- Take a drive into the Adelaide Hills area, where you can take pleasant walks or visit the kangaroo park. The highest hill is Mount Lofty, and you can get a great view of the city from here. The town of Hahndorf was settled in 1840 by the Germans. The main street has been restored and is lined with souvenir shops. You can find plenty of cuckoo clocks here! Adelaide is surrounded by some famous wine making regions. These are the Barossa, McLaren Vale, and Clare Valley. You can visit large and boutique wineries here. Probably one of the largest is Orlando, who make the Jacobs Creek range. There is a huge German influence in the Barossa region too. You can take a short flight to Kangaroo Island, which is Australia's third largest Island after Tasmania and Melville Island. Kangaroo Island is about 90 miles by 20 miles across. And no prizes for guessing what kind of wildlife you might find there. You can also take a ferry. The Island has its own National Park - Flinders Chase National Park. Sea lions live on the South Coast and are not afraid of man at all. Coober Pedy attracts the tourists, although it is about 500 miles away from Adelaide. This area is an area famous for its Opal Mining. It is in the desert and therefore the temperature regularly reaches 50 degrees Celsius. The name means ?"white fellow's hole in the ground". You may have heard about this place in that many of the buildings are underground. These dugouts were to protect the miners from the heat. There is an underground church, hotel and bank!

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                04.08.2001 17:19
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                Australia is a BIG country. It has BIG cities and Adelaide is no exception. This summer I had the pleasure of being invited to stay with a very distant cousin (in-law) in her home in Adelaide. Now when I say 'in' Adelaide I should explain she lives in a suburb to the north of the city - a little place called Munno Para (on the way to Gawler - for any of you bright sparks who are familiar with the area). I expected this suburb to be maybe a 15 - 20 minute drive from the centre of Adelaide so I was rather surprised to learn that it was a 45 - 50 minute train ride. This sort of distance on a train would mean that my relatives in Poole (Dorset) would in fact be in a suburb of my home town of Southampton (Hampshire). This thought confirmed the fact that Adelaide was a great big city! With regard to the train rides - I found the transport systems in South Australia to be amazing value for money. At it's most expensive (non-concession day return train ticket) I was able to travel to the city - hop on a bus (some of which are free anyway) or a tram, the Oban (more later on that)or indeed another train, all day, using the same ticket. I had to validate the ticket on each journey (by way of a machine on each vehicle). This cost me the princely sum of A$5.60 (less than £2.30!) British Transport please take heed. The Oban is another mode of transport that anyone who goes to Adelaide must have a ride on. Included on the transport ticket described above it is a bus that at certain points along its journey travels along railway like tracks. It is somewhat perplexing to notice the bus driver counting out his takings - or even reading his schedule while we are speeding along these tracks! Nevertheless an interesting experience not to be missed. Once in the City there is an interesting mixture of old and new (as with most cities). There is a wonderful Zoo and Botanical Gardens - well worth a visit and just along
                the road is the free Art Gallery and Musuems. I went into town one Saturday and took the free bus to Chinatown where there is a huge covered market. The whole place is alive with sellers of everything you could imagine to delight the tastebuds. Samples of cheese, meats, fruit and bread are thrown at you from every direction and one cannot resist the temptation to buy some morcels to take to one of the many parks and have for lunch. If picnics are not your thing and you prefer to hit the shops then a visit to the central shopping area of Rundall Mall and Street is a must. A wide pedestrian precinct lined with all manner of shops and little arcades to amuse and persuade you to part with your credit card and cash! Myers is one of the biggest department store in the City. Entered by way of a huge shopping centre, it is along the lines of our own John Lewis stores in the UK. Travel down the lift or escalators to the basement and you will find the most amazing food court. Hundreds if not thousands of hungry shoppers come here to eat lunch. Sellers of every kind of hot or cold food imaginable vie for business. I chose a plate of nachos piled up with minced beef, cheese, salad guacamole and salsa it looked like a volcano about to erupt! That cost me A$6.50 (£2.50) including a drink!) The choices were endless - Italian, Chinese, Thai, salads, burgers - you name it, you could buy it - very cheaply. If you prefer fine cuisine there are a number of good restaurants too - have a look in the Victorian arcades - and further up Rundle Street - there are no shortage of places eager to offer you their epicurian delights. There are many places to visit via Adelaide. We took the 1920's tram from Victoria Square to Glenelg a popular seaside town. The usual touristy shops and cafes line the main road through the town until you reach the end of the tram line and the beach. Palm trees and a beautiful Victorian town hall lead you down
                to the sands. It is a fairly average sandy beach with a nice esplanade to walk along. Red legged and beaked seagulls pester people for scraps of sandwiches and while we were there a street entertainer amazed onlookers with his fire-eating skills. Another place of interest might be Port Adelaide. We hopped from one platform to another to get another train to this old maritime port. A 15 minute walk from the station brings you to the quayside. On a Sunday there is a large market in a building on the wharf or you can take a boat ride (cost us A$6.50 each) and see the very much industrial port (yawn!) the only good reason for doing this is the dolphins. There are several that live in the area and they can usually be seen cavorting alongside the ships. As you head back toward the station you might call in to the Railway Inn and partake of there hospitality - we had fish and chips. Fred - the landlord kindly provided us with complimentary coffees. Say hello to Harry and Paul while you're there - well you gotta be friendly with the locals haven't you! There are just so many places to see in and around Adelaide it would be impossible to list them all here, Tandanya - the Aboriginal art gallery, The Barossa Valley - wine making capital of South Australia, Gorge Valley Wildlife Park where you can cuddle a koala, the list is endless. Prices are low, people are friendly, and the sun shines (well most of the time). Adelaide is an often overlooked part of Australia but i felt it had a lot to offer - I can't wait to go back.

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                  03.06.2001 09:56
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                  Hi there music lovers, If you have a love for world music then this is the ultimate world music experience. I have been to the last 3 events as I live here, and I have to say that for 4 days every 2 years we have enjoyed the best the world has to offer when it comes to world music. The best news is that now it happens annually each and every February. We have bands and solos from all over the world for eg: Africa, Asia, Europe, South America, China and India just to name a few. The weather is perfect at that time of year in Adelaide, dust tends to be a minor problem but overall its a fantastic time and I will miss it when I move back to UK. Music is not all there is, there is also a huge variety of foods available and cultural events along with stalls that are presented by other world cultures and it does take a day or three to experience it all. I am so glad the local government and the organizers have decided to turn it annual. So do yourself a cultural favour and next time your in OZ, check out Womadelaide. Book well in advance as accommodation fills at that time of the year but then again a lot of people just camp in the grounds.

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                  05.02.2001 00:25

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                  Whilst staying in Adelaide, I went on a day tour to the Barossa Valley, where lots of beutiful wine is produced, on the "Groovy Grapes" tour bus. The Barossa valley is only about an hours drive away and I had a fantastic day out. We went to loads of different wineries and drank till we were merry (and much more after that). The tour took us to 5 different wineries, which were really interesting (and gave free samples!!), had a traditional Aussie BBQ with emu and kangeroo, and visited a couple of other tourist sites on the way. The day helped me appreciate wine a lot more, and all involved had a really good laugh! (It would be hard not to!!) The day trip was booked in the Adelaide tourist office and cost only $70 which is less then £30, what a bargain!

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                  24.11.2000 00:17

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                  South Australia has its own character so its no surprise that Adelaide is the most Australian of the country cities with more of a colonial influence and less of the new influx of Oriental migrants. Lots of wrought iron Victorian verandas and wooden houses raised from the snakes and spiders scurrying about their business 0n the hot scorched terracotta. Temps here can hit the 40s(112f) in high summer so splash on the cream and silly hats folks. Adelaide by night is not as sexy as Sydney or to some extent Melbourne but there are some cool bars and great festivals including the excellent comedy one in late March with all the top circuit performers zipping up The Great Ocean Road from the Melbourne festival shows are cheap and the beer and food deals fair. By day it’s a sleepier affair although its nice not to be rushing around in the mid day burn. The city center has pleasant shopping arcades, no dramatic skyline, with the Murray River sweeping through and ending its long journey from the East Coast. If you’re the more studious traveler you can see the old road markings from the once used streets and curves in the original Australian Grandprix now up sticks to Melbs. Beaches here are beautiful and spacious with fine white sand to dose the day away befitting the ambience of the cities lifestyle. You can take Adelaide’s last remaining tram that you can alarmingly hear all the nuts and bolts clinging together for dear life to Barosa bay for a dollar with boat trips out to Kangaroo island for a more back to nature experience. The beaches though are strangely deserted and you get the feeling you are missing out on everything when in reality you’re in paradise. The sea front here is the start of The Great Australian Bite that stretches over a thousand miles of coastline famous more recently for shark attacks and sneakers washing up with severed feet tucked in. The official IYH hostel is pretty grim with all the rules obeyed a
                  nd a lockout from 1-5pm so only stay their if you wear your bum bag on the outside of the clothing and you believe in Gods and no sex stayed out at the beach in an old rambling Victorian affair with a similar host who never smiled. Sadly I cant recommend a good hostel there but I’m sure there is one somewhere Most people are passing through to Alice springs up north or perhaps the train to Perth so they don’t stay long enough to care. Adelaide is Australia’s crossroads with the Glamour of Sydney to the East .The magnificent cross Australian train journey to Perth on the West Coast. They say if you get of the train out in the many deserts it rolls over and walk for a bit you can stand somewhere no one has ever stood before. It’s that baron folks. The wildlife here is truly stunning with multi colored birds and bigger squawking ones hanging in Mango trees waiting to shat on you. The Brown snake is out there and is considered the worlds most dangerous one. Also a pest are the spiders who can lurk in dark and damp places, i.e. the bog (Dunny in OZ) But there have only been two known deaths to tourist from arachnid nips in two hundred years so don’t worry.

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                  11.09.2000 04:05

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                  Adelaide is quite a drive if you don't fly there. If you do drive there, you will be relieved and excited to see civilisation in the middle of nowhere! The town centre really centres on the mall, where you can have the experience of coming fact to face with the Koala, see jugglers and unicyclists. Lots of fun and enjoyment on the weekends in this place. There are amazing tropical gardens in this place. It sites on the edge of the town centre and it's a big greenhouse worth a wide selection of tropical plants and the feeling of tropical heat as well. The parks here are lovely, picnic material. It's a really lovely little sanctuary.

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                  30.06.2000 02:57
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                  If travelling to Australia don't over look the beautiful city of Adelaide in South Australia. The city is very easy to navigate on foot - set out on a grid system it's easy to find your way around and even if you manage to get lost you'll find the locals very friendly and helpful. Adelaide's streets are very wide and airy so it doesn't have that claustrophobic feeling many cities have. If you're a cricket fan don't miss the chance to visit the Adelaide CC and hopefully catch a match - I saw Adelaide vs Pakistan for the grand sum of $2 (£1!!!) The botanic gardens and zoo are well worth a visit. The city often hosts arts and performance festivals so check to see what's on at the local theatre - you might just find some top stars coincide with your trip. A short tram ride from Adelaide is the seaside resort of Glenelg - well worth a visit for a break from city life. But the highlight of Adelaide for me is a tour into the wine producing region of the Barossa Valley. Look in hotel lobbies and the tourist information offices for details of tours - much the easiest way to do it. I went on a tour which visited six vineyards ,*hic* , as well as stopping at some of the local beauty spots and German style villages, included morning coffee and a gourmet lunch for £12 - one of the best days of my life. Famous vineyards you can visit include Penfolds and Jacobs Creek. There's plenty of wine to taste but make sure to try some of the local Shiraz's - gorgeous!

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                Adelaide is the capital and most populous city of the Australian state of South Australia, and is the fifth largest city in Australia, with a population of over 1.1 million. It is a coastal city beside the Southern Ocean, and is situated on the Adelaide Plains, north of the Fleurieu Peninsula, between the Gulf St. Vincent and the low-lying Mount Lofty Ranges.