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Brisbane (Australia)

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City: Brisbane / Country: Australia / World Region: Australasia / Pacific

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      02.10.2012 11:44
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      Boring

      Brisbane is boring, compared to the rest of Australia. It's like Milton Keynes by the sea, but 2.15 million people living there. The glamorous surf beaches to the south of the city are far too far away to be a draw and the Great Barrier Reef too far north to be part of the reason to live or holiday there. It's on the crossroads of the tropical north and the industrious south, and as we know, there are plenty of crossroads in Milton Keynes. It's the sort of place you might emigrate to if you are older or you have a younger family and you don't want the hustle and bustle of Sydney or the beach and sports lifestyle or Perth or the charm of Melbourne. Imagine it's full of accountants, pensioners and golf courses.

      Brisbane's seafront has a rather dull harbor that spits out the Brisbane River that snakes through the city and that sea front area hardly exploited and ideal only for dog walkers and the homeless. All I remember from their promenade was looking for sea cows in the murky water, big ugly lumps of marine life that look like huge floating turd's called Manatee's. The lumbering grey beasts sort of summed up the place. Brisbane just doesn't have that Aussie buzz. The most exciting thing there is the regular and spectacular thunderstorms.

      Backpackers begin to head north around May and June to do the Great Barrier Reef and enjoy the playful sunshine coast that runs 2000 miles up to Cairns and beyond. You only stay south of Brisbane if June if you are working or looking for employment. Everyone just passes through Brisbane, like Milton Keynes station between London and Manchester. And they are in a rush these days as it has been reported that 50% of the GBR coral has died and broken off in the last 30 years alone, they say to increased acidity in the water and more tropical storms, the locals would say because tourists, especially those of South East Asia, insist on snapping bits off to take home.

      Brisbane is the capital of Queensland, of course, warm and humid for most of the year and clear and crisp in the winter, temps not really ducking under double figures in the day time although can frost at night in July to August. It has the most colorful sunsets and the strangest and iridescent wildlife for a big city, a fruit bat hanging from a palm tree never far away. I even saw a kangaroo in a public park in the suburbs. The feared Red Back spider lurks in dark and damp places and likes biting local's bottoms on the toilet. Their snakes are pretty menacing too and also likely to laze near the U-Bend and garage. The grey house spiders there that are not poisonous are much much bigger than ours girls so keep a real man handy. There are a lot of both in Queensland. Oh and forget about killing the roaches, a jackhammer not even enough to flatten these babies.

      The city itself is functional and affordable, lots of neat suburbs fanning out from the modest city center, and no discernable crime rate. Four or five areas didn't fair well through the world slump and saw an increase in gang crime and general delinquency through drugs but the rest of the city pretty safe. Even the crim's get bored here. The aboriginal and immigrant population dominates the above statistics and there are also theft issues at some of the stations. It's much safer than London and many foreign cities that Brit's would be escaping for a better life too.

      Things to do in Brisbane are probably classed as being urbane for Australian standards but for me a struggle. Some decent restaurants and waiting for Billy Connelly in concert once a year isn't that much fun. I was there for two spells of 4 weeks and we struggled to find 'a scene' that other Aussie cities like Melbourne and Sydney have. Brisbane, for some reason, just doesn't want to engage in the whole Australian thing. Even the shopping malls are rather drab.

      It celebrates sports as all Aussie cities do, top class cricket and rugby available, all housed in excellent modern stadiums. It gets a test match or two in the famous Gabba Ground every year and the crunching State of Origin rugby league matches between Queensland (the 'Cane Toads') and Victoria (the 'Roaches') take part at the Suncorp Stadium. Rugby Union is nowhere near as big but the city still the heartland of their once all-conquering rugby union side. You can forget competitive soccer in Australia although English football is sneaking on to the TV there, the Brisbane Roar their team in the A-League.

      Employment wise it isn't really the right place to look for work on your year out as you don't feel like you are in Australia if you anchor there. If you want to do the rather cliché agricultural work students and travelers do, though, then it is the launch pad for that if you want to pick in the winter in warmer climbs, sugar cane, exotic fruits and vegetables and wineries the deal in this sub-tropical area as you head west. The catastrophic floods of 2010 destroyed 25% of Queensland crops and so work abundant and varied now as they catch up. If you fancy crop picking don't take it lightly as its hard long hours and sweaty work and you often need to wear protection to avoid bites and stings. If you pick far north you need to worry about snakes and spiders and so not for girly girls. You will get everything in your hair if you don't wear a hairnet.

      Accommodation in Brisbane is neither expensive nor cheap, all the major hotel chains indulged and some decent hostels and cheap hotels for the budget crowd. I stayed in the functional IYHA in the centre for around seventy quid a week back in the 1990s and made good friends there. It has a clean kitchen and dormitories and a nice TV room. I retreated there from Cairns to watch England in the football as they had the only live cable channel in the north showing the England World Cup games. I also took in a State of Origin game at the nearby Brisbane Broncos Lang Park rugby stadium, the year after the great Wally Lewis retired.

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        17.03.2010 01:24
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        Not the best but still worth it

        I really enjoyed staying in Brisbane for a week. I first stayed with my great auntie who I hadnt seen since I was very young. \

        I then moved into a hostel where I had some friends called Yellow Submarine, it was ok, with a pool and a bed but my room was in a basement and smelt of damp. It wasnt that cheap either and I would have walked straight out again if my friends hadnt been staying there.

        The best bit about Brisbane is the South Bank. You can walk along here for ages, taking in the art gallery, the modern art gallery, museum, loads of cafes and bars, markets and finally the fake beach.

        The beach is great on a hot day as you can go swimming there for free! It literally has sand! Although the weather wasnt the best when I was there it would be a great facility for a city.

        The modern art gallery was also another highlight, as they had an exhibition that was free taking over the whole gallery. It was interactive as well so kids would enjoy it.

        The south bank tourist office was very helpful in booking our trip to the zoo. Australia zoo was part of my brisbane trip but I shall write a seperate review about it.

        If you like a bit of culture mixed with a clean and safe city then Brisbane is a must see on a trip up the east coast.

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        02.01.2009 22:31
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        Beautiful town in the heart of Queensland

        Brisbane is a live and vibrant city that as a English backpacker I fell in love with.
        Unlike with it's rival city, Sydney, Brisbane is half it's size but has double the character.

        When you step off the plane at the airport the heat immediately hits you but you don't seem to care. There's so much to do you don't have time to complain! There's the Koala Sanctury where you can cuddle a cute koala and feed a kangaroo, there's the beautiful botanic gardens and clean streets that have plenty of shops and restaurants.

        Close by (and accessible via Central or Roma Street station) there's Surfer's Paradise which is backpacker and holiday maker central. It has some of the best waves in Queensland and is a great day out.

        If you're a footy fan there's the AFL statium in Paddington that makes for a grand day out where your stay can be finished by taking in a meal at an authentic jazz cafe.

        There's so much to this city that you can only find by visiting yourself. You'll go away very much in love.

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          12.01.2006 20:07
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          A wonderful city in eastern Australia

          I headed to Brisbane for a few days as a suitable stop over from Cairns to Sydney, and a suitable base from which to explore Fraser Island and Byron Bay. It was location more than anything that attracted me, but in the end Brisbane ended up being one of my favourite places during my time in Australia.

          Brisbane is in the middle of the east coast of Australia, just north of the Queensland / New South Wales border, and the capital of the former. The time difference between Brisbane and the UK varies, as does the time difference between Brisbane and Sydney since once adopts summer time and the other doesn’t, but currently when it’s midnight here, it’s 10am in Brisbane. Though you can fly into the international airport from most of the Asian stop over options, most people fly into Sydney or Melbourne and then jump on a domestic flight. I flew from Cairns to Brisbane for $100, booked about 8 weeks in advance. The airport is about 20 minutes from the city, and the best way into the centre is by train as it’s direct, quick and cheap.

          Brisbane is the 3rd largest city in Australia (beaten by Sydney and Melbourne) but has the best weather of the group by far – rarely lower than 20 C, or higher than 35 C, unlike northern Australia which can roast in summer. I was there in December (summer) and it was pleasantly hot.

          The BOTANIC GARDENS are free, pretty and a quiet place to enjoy the city away from the bustle of the centre They run along the bank of the river, starting up near Eagle St Pier and finishing across from Southbank Parklands, both of which offer numerous places to eat and drink if the café in the gardens doesn’t cut it. The Gardens, like those in Melbourne, offer lots of information placards and signs throughout, telling you not only what you’re looking at, but also a bit of its history, its role in the plant world and anything extra special about it.

          SOUTHBANK PARKLANDS, on the south bank of the river, has been developed into a 40 acre leisure site, which includes several roads of restaurants and shops (similar to Salamanca Market in Hobart), a cinema, an IMAX theatre and the STREETS BEACH. I realised on my first day that this is so called due to a sponsorship deal, and can now add Streets to my ever-growing list of the makers of Magnums around the world - Walls / Langnese / Frigo /Algida…and now Streets. But despite the limited ice cream choice due to their monopoly, this was a cool place. Because Brisbane doesn’t have a coastline, they built a fake beach which includes sanded and non-sanded swimming areas, sanded and grassed sunbathing areas and daily lifeguarding from tanned, toned lifesavers. Excellent. There were daily shows from street performers who even seemed to have a timetable of sorts, a market that presented me with my first Langos outside Austria or Hungary and useful Christmas presents for people, and some eateries that offered healthy fast food (very Ozzie) for prices so low you didn’t even stop to think. In fact most days my lunch there was cheaper than my pudding (from the only Cold Rock I came across after leaving Sydney). At numerous special times during the year, such as the run up to Christmas taking place while I was there, Southbank is the setting for city sponsored activities and events. In December this included fire work shows, free movies on open air screens, free concerts and shows and more. It was so cool to be outside scantily dressed in December, in a place that was buzzing until midnight and beyond, and not having to pay for a thing.

          Just along the river bank from the beach was the cultural part of time, complete with performing arts centre, library, art gallery and museums. I went to the art gallery twice as it was free and an interesting place to escape the glare of the midday sun. The gallery, I discovered on a tour, is not as old as some in Australia (which, in worldwide art terms, are still infants anyway) so the collection is small but varied, and growing yearly as nice people die, leaving behind bequests (the main way they acquire major pieces or at least minor pieces by major artists). The gallery has a lot of interactive displays – some where you learn using computers, and some where you actually contribute to the art, through Lego bricks and coloured dot stickers for example. I took a tour of the gallery and was impressed that they ran it even though I was the only person who joined. Tours run 3 times daily and, as this would suggest, do not require a minimum number to operate. The ground floor café has in and outdoor seating, reading materials (newspapers and art books) and an exemplary selection of chocolate cakes. Culture and cake all within one building. Awseome. Next door, the museum was packed with school kids who seemed to enjoy it more than I did. It was a mix of natural history, specific Australian history and some science / technology, but failed to keep my attention for more than 30 minutes. Still, it was again free, they didn’t require me to cloak by bag as the art gallery did, and the shop was good even if I couldn’t locate their café.

          Shopping at the ELIZABETH ST MALL was something else I did again and again in small bursts. This is a pedestrianised zone mainly bordered by shopping arcades and places such as the Myer Centre. Myer is an Australian department store, and their Christmas windows, at their Melbourne and Brisbane stores, are famous. Evidently no one had told the locals this, however, as unlike in Melbourne where the queue to view them sneaked around the block, the windows in Brisbane were deserted whenever I passed. The Myer Café is good – they do white chocolate caramel slices to die for – and had one of the best magazine stashes I came across, including chunkier volumes of Madison and Cleo as well as the usual Coffee shop fare of Women’s Day and NW. The centre was also home to a multiplex cinema, a food court, a supermarket and several non-chain stores.

          Eating out in Brisbane is relatively cheap and easy. I breakfasted at the Hilton where they let me in despite my board shorts and thongs, and also at the Pancake parlour in one of the food courts. Coffee Club also tempted me one morning, and though they’re a chain of the Starbucks genre, they actually have a wide ranging, cheap breakfast menu as well as more varieties of hot drinks than you could ever possibly want. Pane e Vino served me a delicious dinner one night, and Australian Home Made offered up Thorntons style chocolates and ice cream for my evening hunger pangs.

          I stayed at a youth hostel but all the big chains have hotels in town, and there are several independents too. For getting around during my stay I relied entirely on my feet, but busses zoomed past constantly, most passing the junction of Elizabeth and William Streets which is the gateway to the mall on one side and Southbank on the other.

          I liked the layout of Brisbane, the weather, the attractions and the general feel of the place. In fact, if England ever gets too much and Australia beckons, Brisbane, along with Melbourne, would be the first place I’d look for a new life. Warmer and more relaxed than Sydney, with much more to do actually in town than Cairns, it’s pretty perfect.


          £1 = ~$2.20

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            15.09.2001 22:19
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            I stayed here for 2 weeks on my travels around Australia. I quite enjoyed my time here, but I was starting to get a bit bored by the 2nd week as there isn't much to do. There are some nice art galleries and they have a large selection of shops in the mall - mostly chain stores though. The most fun to be had is if you travel out of Brisbane a bit. Moreton Island is just off the coast and it was beautiful - I went Whale Watching there, a very worthwhile activity. A day trip to the gold coast is also a good day out, there are plently of theme parks to choose from. I stayed in the YHA there, which was pretty grotty, although the staff were very helpful. I'm told this hostel is the best of a very bad bunch. Take care when walking from the YHA to the mall, I met some very dodgy characters along that road! In conclusion its nice as a stopover for somewhere else but not as a holiday destination in itself.

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              24.07.2001 19:00
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              I lived in Brisbane for a year and had a brilliant time (1996/7). Originally it was only supposed to be for 3/4 weeks until I went to Melbourne. It's got a bad reputation from backpackers as they think it's boring and not as much to offer as Sydney or Melbourne. Frankly that's what's best about it. Although it's not a particularly big city it still feels like you're actually in Australia as it's still got a big town feel to it. That of course has it's disadvantages as well, and for females sexism can be rife, and if that offends you, you learn to deal with it. The standard of living is brilliant, rent is pretty cheap, wages are better for even bar work than over here, and you can still have a brilliant social life and save money for your travels. I managed to save up for my flight home in 6 weeks and still pay rent, bills and go out just about every night. Eating out is great with a huge choice. Japanese, Vietnamese, Pakistani, Chinese, Indian, Seafood, Lebanese, Italian, Greek...... There's a lot out there at good prices and great food. You can have a fantastic meal and still get change from £10 including your booze, especially if it's BYO. Nightlife ranges from some very exclusive beautiful people clubs in the city, to the Valley which is host to some pretty weird and wonderful gay clubs that are open to 5am. It can be hard finding work as backpackers before would take full-time work and leave after a couple of weeks. Having an accent can therefore work against you. Stick in there though as some will 'give you a go' and then you'll find it hard to stop working. It's probably more a place for the midish late 20's as it's not particularly a sun,sand,sea,sex kind of place, or the huge ex-pat backpacker communities that Sydney and Melbourne, or even Perth have. If you want the 4 S's however, head up to Cairns (a few thousand miles up the coast) or do
              wn to Surfer's Paradise (Blackpool with sunshine) which is only about 1 1/2hr south of Brisbane. The people are great, laidback, friendly do anything for you. The weather is gorgeous (Februrary is pretty awful though with humidity). Queensland is gorgeous and there's loads of places a day trip away, from the Sunshine Coast to the beautiful tropical hinterland that shadows over that area. The outback is also brilliant for a long weekend away camping. Personally I found living there for a year and using it as my base for travelling, one of the best decisions I made travelling in Australia. I think it all depends on what you want out of your year out when you're over there. Most backpackers that I met (although I have to admit to avoiding the beaten track as often as I could), travelled the same route, met the same people and didn't really mix with the locals. Frankly, if you want to go that far from home for a year to 'experience life' then why get drunk, sleep with people who probably live 100 miles from you at home and meet lots of people from the UK that you're unlikely to see again once you move back.

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                15.06.2001 04:25
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                If you’re into sunshine, rugby and drinking loads of beer, then Brisbane is the place for you. Though perhaps not an obvious destination for the short-term tourist, this city is certainly a more accurate depiction of Australian culture than Sydney or the Gold Coast. Being the closest I have to a ‘home town’, I have a kind of love-hate relationship with Brisbane – when I’m there it annoys me and often bores me to tears, while when away I often miss it profoundly. Though nowhere near as exciting as London, Edinburgh or even Melbourne, it still has its merits. The City is pretty much like any other – a big mall (by the way, by mall we mean a big paved street with shops on either side, not an indoor shopping centre), loads of department stores, food courts, pubs, high rise apartments blocks and so on. There are loads of souvenir shops selling cheap and tacky boomerangs, koala toys and didgeridoos, so this is a good place to buy presents for friends bac k home. For people with mainstream music tastes, this is where you will also find the most popular nightclubs. Rugby fans should definitely check out City Rowers on the Riverside – this is where the Brisbane Broncoes tend to hang out (and also my former workplace). Other clubs worth visiting include The Gig (for techno or the downstairs pool bar), Fridays (popular and retro music) and Adrenaline (a sports bar with an enormous fishtank spanning the better part of one wall). Just across the river is Southbank, probably the closest thing Brisbane has to a ‘tourist attraction’. Built on the site of the former ‘Expo ‘88’, Southbank is basically comprised of souvenir shops, eateries, pubs, an information centre, a butterfly house, a boardwalk and a large artificial beach (i.e. an outdoor swimming pool with sand on the edges). There are also a couple of outdoor movie screens and a Nepalese pagoda (the last authentic remnant of th
                e Expo). It’s good for a visit and the ‘beach’ is free, but personally I’d go somewhere else to eat/drink/shop – it’s damned expensive. Down the road from Southbank is West End – no it’s not full of theatres, but rather is one of Brisbane’s former ‘alternative’ suburbs turned cosmopolitan. It’s a great place to go for a meal – along the main street alone there is an all-you-can-eat sushi place (£6/head), Café Babylon (which not only has delicious food but ‘treehouses’ you can sit in to eat in the backyard), a Vietnamese restaurant that serves a delicious banquet (also £6/person), a gourmet bagel place and several other bohemian cafes including ‘The Three Monkeys’ and ‘The Jazzy Cat’. This is also a great place to go for second hand bookstores, cheap clothing, exotic fruit and vegetables and bizarre little pubs. To the north of Brisbane city is Fortitude Valley, Brisbane’s excuse for a red light district. This suburb has also become rather more cosmopolitan over the years – besides the strip clubs and corner prostitutes, there is also an ever increasing number of trendy cafes and pricey boutiques. Most of Brisbane’s best alternative pubs and clubs are to be found here, for example: The Zoo - a crazy little place with wildly painted walls and oil-drums for tables. This generally costs a bit to get into but they always have the best bands (e.g. Powderfinger, Custard, Something For Kate, Jebediah) playing and the beer is relatively cheap. The Empire – a pub downstairs with pool tables, beat music and a ‘chill-out room’, while upstairs Wednesday to Saturday they have a nightclub with two different sections – one for hardcore alternative music and one to suit more mainstream tastes. The Press Club – a very upmarket little place with a décor straight out of a Humphrey
                Bogart movie. Exotic lighting, plush comfy seats, a huge brass fan and expensive cocktails make this an interesting but more occasional place to visit. The Beat – Brisbane’s most famous gay nightclub but also well known for its music and its opening hours (5am every night of the week, every day of the year). Upstairs is the Cockatoo Bar with retro music, Karaoke and cheap champagne, while downstairs is all hardcore techno (with a twice-nightly break for a drag show). After the last club has closed, if you’re feeling a bit peckish just head down to Mellino’s on the mall – they serve pizza, pasta and liqueur coffees 24 hours a day! Also in The Valley, just down the road from the main mall is Chinatown – certainly not as large and impressive as its counterpart in Sydney or London, but still rife with Yum-Cha restaurants and cheap delicious eateries. A recommended place for a meal is ‘Chopstix’ in an arcade off Duncan street – you can take your pick from Chinese, Thai, Korean, Malay or Japanese food as well as drink beers, play pool or feed the jukebox. No trip to Brisbane would be complete without a night time visit to Mount Cootha. High up on a hill to the north west of the city centre, this is the perfect place to sit and look out over the lights of the city. A great place to bring that special someone… Besides being home to several TV and radio stations there is also a nice little restaurant and gift shop as well as some great picnic places. As for accommodation, there are plenty of cheap little hostels including The Palace Backpackers in the city (which also has its own pub, the DownUnder Bar, famous for cheap beer and wet T-shirt competitions) and Globetrekkers in New Farm (just down the road from Fortitude Valley). Both are priced at around £8/night for a dorm bed, with cheaper weekly rates. [For more info on hostels and other tourist info, check out w
                ww.hostelbrisbane.com] Of course you might not want to spend your whole time there in Brisbane itself – why not take a day trip? A short train trip to the south-east will bring you to Dreamworld (the closest Australia has to Disneyland), Sea world and Warner Bros.’ Movieworld (bearing a certain resemblance to Universal Studios), as well as of course the Gold Coast. To the north is the Sunshine Coast – smaller towns like Caloundra and Noosa have a lot to offer if you just feel like hanging out on the beach and relaxing for a day or two. For the nature lovers out there, the south/south-west of Brisbane is home to many areas of dense rainforest, mountains and farmlands. If you’re looking for an affordable 3-day tour led by a qualified zoologist that will introduce you to a vast array of Australia’s native animals and plants, check out the Araucaria Ecotours homepage (http://users.eis.net.au/~ecotoura/). (Oh, and tell Mum I said ‘hi!’ :) So anyway, if you’re in the area… give Brisbane a go. I’ll be back there from November onwards, so look out for me at The Zoo – I’ll be the one drinking Coopers’ and dancing like a mad thing… :)

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                  01.06.2001 21:31
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                  You know Brisbane is changing fast. I lived there from 1992-1999 and the pace of change was quite breathtaking. The city centre has changed so much and the river has become a focus for new developments. The beaches of the Sunshine Coast to the north and the Gold Coast to the south have been mentioned, but don't forget the artificial beach at Southbank. You can sunbathe and swim, outdoors right in the city centre and then go for a great meal in any of the Southbank restaurants. Use the ferries called "City Cats" to tour up and down the Brisbane river from the University of Queensland upriver to Hamilton downriver. Don't forget to take the bus or drive up Mount Coo-tha for some great views of the city. There are some nice picnic spots on Mount Coo-tha too. Have a look at the traditional Queenslander houses in suburbs like Toowong and Ascot. Try the cafe's in New Farm and don't forget to visit the Powerhouse Arts Complex beside New Farm Park. The Brunswick Street Markets on Saturday morning in Fortitude Valley are worth a visit. Take the train to the bayside suburb of Cleveland and then catch a ferry over to Stradbrooke Island. The best time to visit is from April - October when it is dry and sunny and pleasantly mild to warm. The other months can be quite hot , humid and wet.

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                  07.03.2001 07:41
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                  Brisbane is like a second home to me, I have been there many times because to see family. What I like most about Brisbane is the friendly atmosphere. This is what makes it so special. I can't imagine a more relaxed city. Brisbane lacks a big name attraction to draw as many tourists in as Sydney, but there are loads of places to visit in the near vicinity. The Gold Coast is an hours drive south. There you can find miles of white sand beaches, casinos, huge theme parks and a wicked nightlife. To the north is the sunshine coast, which is a lot quieter, but has some spectacular scenery. Brisbane itself has it's own unique charm. The Queens Street Mall is great for shoping and South Bank, in the city centre is a nice area for leisure. There's always lots of sport going on in the city. The Aussie Rules at 'The Gabba' is great fun. Don't miss Brisbane!

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                    24.11.2000 02:21

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                    Wildlife is of a tropical nature here so the spiders get bigger and the snakes are out and about especially further up in the agricultural north .The Grite being especially nasty hiding in the sugar cane crops waiting for bare pommy arms. The Redback arachnid lives in the Brisbane suburbs and is highly venomous. Sorry to go on about the wildlife I’m just filling space ok. This is the only Oz City that doesn’t have the luxury of a beach and has a distinctly older residential feel to it and can be almost sleepy downtown in the week. Great shopping malls for the obligatory souvenirs, Boomerangs, leather hats and T-shirts etc. Tuesdays in Australia is cheap movie night at half price so make the most of the cities cool central The like the multiplexes. Nightlife is varied and theres something for everyone with the usual cover bands and tecno tosh to folk, old timers get a look in as well. Oh its two for one at The Red Rooster chicken franchise to. Good news for travelers is the transport interchange is smack in the center only ten minutes from the IYH hostel and not too far from others. The official hostel here isn’t too bad at $17 oz dollars a night (dorm). Not too big and all the facilities although Brisbane can get cold at night during their winter so you need to wrap up. Frosts are not uncommon although the day temps stay on and around 18(64f) keeping you feeling like you’re in the Southern Hemisphere. Sport here is patchy although theres cricket at the Gabba and some Union.Nothing gets the Queenslanders going more than the rugby league State Of Origin clash between them and New South Wales, bone crunching stuff and the ground is just behind the hostel so tickets are possible. Maybe you could catch the touring British lion’s teams. Leaving Brisbane is straightforward. To the north you have the joys of the Queensland coast and to the south the more surfey route as the Great Barrier Reef flattens out the swell. <
                    br>Trains in this country are much more deluxe than the coach, which tends to be long laborious cramped affair. Coaches are very cheap compared to British prices. Brisbane to Sydney is around 30 quid some 700 miles, you can only just get out of London for that here. Its not really worth stopping here for a look, the other cities do it much better but I’m not putting the place down, just to sleep. Pretty rich from a Northampton guy. Ah, Brisbane, not a whole lot going on here I’m afraid so if you’re heading north from Sydney or south from Cairns then keep on going. One thing the Queensland capitol has going for it is it’s the last place you can see English footy on TV before you head up the coast to warmer climes as winter sets in, note for all backpackers there.

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                    11.09.2000 03:59
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                    I was at Brisbane quite a while now, back in 1991. I was about 17 years old and working, by the time I had got to Brisbane, I was expecting a little more from the place. Since the drinking age is 18, I was still under age, but that didn't stop me! The most greatest pub, piano bar, restaurant and club is on Kingsfordsmith Drive! I didn't find the city to be nice at all, very gloomy and grey looking. The river was full up with Jellyfish and really, I couldn't wait to leave. When I was there working it was roughly about 35 degrees, I'd been walking all day and then suffered from heat exhaustion. So, for you British people, take it easy! Lots of sun block and fly spray.

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                  • Product Details

                    Brisbane is the capital and most populous city of the Australian state of Queensland, as well as the third largest city in Australia, with a greater metropolitan population of just under two million. It is set close to the Pacific Ocean, and is situated beside the Brisbane River on plains between Moreton Bay and the Great Dividing Range in south-eastern Queensland.