Welcome! Log in or Register
£6.95 Best Offer by: amazon.co.uk marketplace See more offers
3 Reviews

City: Cozumel / Country: Mexico / World Region: Central America

  • Sort by:

    * Prices may differ from that shown

  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    3 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      03.12.2009 14:54
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      3 Comments

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      An island off the coast of the Mayan Riviera, that's worth a visit, at least for a day

      Our trip to Mexico this year involved many excursions but for the most part on the mainland, along the Mayan Riviera from Cancun in the north to Tulum in the south. However, there was one place other than this that we wanted to visit and that was the island of Cozumel, just around a three-quarter-hour ferry trip from either Cancun or, in our case, Playa del Carmen, being the nearest town to our hotel.

      From Playa del Carmen there are two ferry companies competing for your business. I say competing but, to be honest, the competition isn't very fierce. They effectively deliver alternate sailings and at the same price, whichever company you choose. You can buy a return ticket but I would advise against it as the most convenient crossing for your return trip may not be with the same company with which you travelled out. I suggest you buy a single each way; the cost when we visited was 140 Pesos per person.

      The crossing was absolutely packed and quite interesting. We were sat inside on the upper deck, next to the side so we could see the sea. Here the sides of the boat are covered by mostly clear, plastic sheets. However, what we hadn't realised was that they weren't tied down too well and so flapped when the wind caught them, which always seemed to coincide with a burst of spray from the wake of the ship! After getting splashed once we spent the rest of the crossing hanging on the the sheet to prevent it happening again!

      A small band entertained us on the crossing. They set up their equipment right next to where we were sat but fortunately the speakers weren't pointed at us! They weren't bad and, of course, the hat went round for a collection as we approached Cozumel.

      We arrived at the jetty at the main town on Cozumel, San Miguel. Right opposite is the Plaza Principal, an open area with shops, restaurants and bars all around it. In fact, this is pretty much what San Miguel is all about. Outside of San Miguel it is mainly hotel complexes but here you come to shop, eat and be entertained. There are also a number of Mayan ruins you can visit though most are, I understand (we didn't have time to visit), not as impressive as those on the mainland such as Chichen Itza, Tulum and Coba, but probably well worth a visit if you are spending more time on the island.

      The main areas of interest appear to be south of the ferry terminal, and that's the direction we took. The main shopping area seems to extend back from the coast about 200 metres before it starts to peter out. However, it extends south around a kilometre so there should never be nothing worth investigating. Many of the shopping areas are arranged as open-air malls. Once you reach Plaza Punta Lagosta you've pretty much reached the end of most of the interesting stuff. This is where we turned around and started making our way back.

      Despite the evident competition between shops, we still found a large difference in prices for very similar goods; it pays to do a lot of browsing before deciding on a purchase. We did and came away with some interesting and attractive purchases. One in particular was exceptional. My beloved really wanted to buy some jewellery (well, no surprises there then) in Mexican silver and amber. She was really after a necklace but couldn't find just what she wanted. She did, however, find a very nice bracelet in a shop called Joyeria Viridiana in the Plaza Punta Lagosta shopping mall.

      The owner could see we were interested and we asked the price. The first offer was always going to be just that, an opener. We said, as you do, that it wasn't really what we were looking for. Anyway, after a bit of haggling he offered to split the bracelet to form three links as a pendant on a silver chain with the remainder split into two link earrings, all for 100 Dollars US (£65). I could see my beloved's eyes light up so we agreed and, to give him time to do the work, went off for lunch. When we returned the result had turned out even better than we could have hoped and this set is now one of her favourite pieces. Result!

      So, where did we go whilst we were waiting? You're not short of places to eat in San Miguel but most that we saw were noisy, packed and not offering anything that could in any way be described as "interesting". So, we asked the locals and were pointed virtually next door to the Plaza Punta Lagosta shopping mall where we were at that moment. On Calle 7 Sur, just about 50 metres up from the coast road you find a little traditional Mexican restaurant called Costa Brava.

      It's main attraction was it's clean but simple appearance and with not too many customers already occupying the tables. As usual, we checked out the loos before ordering, just to check what state they were in: clean and nothing to cause offence. The seeming lack of customers was probably because it isn't a flashy, noisy place that sticks itself in your face in order to attract your custom; just the way we like it. We had a choice of tables and, I have to be honest, none with what you would call "a view". If that's what you want then look elsewhere.

      The food was excellent. We had a large plate of mixed Mexican dishes which we shared and washed down with several bottles of Mexican lager. There was as much in this one dish as we needed for lunchtime refreshment although we did follow up with a couple of desserts; well, you have to don't you? Total came to around 400 Pesos (£20), which was a bargain. I see that in their Internet site, if you print off their webpage and present it on payment you even get a 10% discount!

      By now it was time to make our way back to the ferry. We revisited a number of the outlets we had explored on the way down and inevitably made a few more purchases of souvenirs for friends and relatives. We finally stopped for another beer or three at a bar right on the corner of the Plaza Principal, facing the ferry terminal. Here we could sit and watch the World go by and sip our drinks until the ferry docked. Prices here are not cheap, probably because of the prime position and there are other bars all around that probably offer better deals. However, the environment and atmosphere was pleasant, so we stayed.

      Of course, there's a lot more to Cozumel than this but, if you're on holiday on the Mayan Riviera and fancy a day out to Cozumel than I can recommend it, if you objective is shopping, eating and drinking. If you want to lay out on the beach than I can't think of any reason why you would want to come all the way here to do it if you weren't planning to stay.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        03.08.2008 15:07
        Very helpful
        (Rating)
        2 Comments

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        Go for a day, the weekend or a week, just go

        Cozumel is an island about 30 mins ferry ride from Playa del Carmen. It is also a resort in itself, boasting various posh and not-so-posh hotels, and is on the stopping route for many Caribbean cruises. While staying in Playa, we spent a couple of weekends on the island, swapping our beach for theirs in an attempt to see if the grass is greener, or rather if the sand is sandier, on the other side of the bay.

        ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ----------

        Trip # 1

        At 9.30am we set off to catch the ferry to Cozumel. It's mega crowded so we sit inside instead of up on the deck in the sun. It takes half an hour to get there and then about 15 mins in a taxi to our destination - Uvas beach club. Taxis over here don't have meters, so you're supposed to haggle. We fail miserably, but then the price the driver says matches what our guide books told us to expect, so we just accept it. At the beach club we each pay 150 pesos (£7.50) for the snorkelling package, even me who has no intention of snorkelling, as it's the cheapest package. We get sun umbrellas, loungers, hammocks and 2 drinks included in that price, plus a snorkelling tour and unlimited snorkelling gear. There are some big blue mattresses stacked to one side so we bring them over to the loungers. They do not fit exactly but we squish them in.

        While we are enjoying the sun, the masseur lady comes over touting for business. The rate is $1 US per minute (min 20 minutes) but if we go now she's throw in an extra 10 mins for free, i.e. half an hour for a tenner. The girls go off snorkelling and I go off for a massage. It is the longest half hour ever, and much less stressful being massaged by a pretty Mexican girl than my last massage from weird fugly Bulgarian bloke. The cabana is a little way from the beach and there is calming music and a fan as well as a breeze from the door I've said she can leave open - I figure it's a good advert for her to have someone on the table. She finishes with a head massage which feels nice but gives me seriously big, lavender scented hair.

        After we're done I go back to our loungers and the henna tattoo man thinks I need someone to talk to. It's a really good chance to practice my Spanish as he asks sensible questions I actually know the answer to like where I'm from and what languages I speak. Just when it's starting to get a bit weird, the girls come back and I am rescued. We go for lunch in the beachfront restaurant (which is like 5m from our sun beds). We have our free drinks and enjoy the view of fugly, very burnt cruise-ship Americans gorging themselves on the all inclusive package we opted out of (an open bar and some mass produced carnivorous cuisine).

        After lunch we realise the blue sun bed mattresses are actually lilo style things so we take them out to the water and float. We "get to know each other" as Margaret puts it, though it soon turns into your standard truth-game without the usual alcohol. The sea is amazingly clear, and warm. We are the only people in it apart from an oldish man wearing a thong Speedo - nice. We talk about going for drinks when we get back to Playa this evening.

        When we start to feel a bit hot (despite being in water) we paddle to the side, dry off and hit the hammocks for a bit. It's so calming looking out at the sea, swinging in the shade that I could stay there forever, but about 4.30pm we start to make a move. In the most unlikely way there is a cab waiting outside so we get in and scoot back into Cozumel centre. We go in search of water, postcards, anti-sea-sickness medication and some more antibiotics for me since they only sold me enough for a few days on Thursday which is a bit weird since the prescription clearly said to take them for a week. Cozumel has a row of shops near the ferry port, but they are not especially interesting - exactly the same tat as Playa, except here the tequila glasses and ashtrays and t-shirts are emblazoned with "Cozumel".

        We have just missed a ferry so we go for a wander and end up in Burger King where they are out of everything except the very plainest of ice cream cones. These cost 7 pesos or about 35p. This is not the cheapest I have ever had - that summer in Vienna I used to come home from work every day and stop at McDonalds in the underground to get a 30p cone before walking back to the flat. But still, it is cheap. We sit in the sun for a bit and then get to board the ferry - this time we want to sit inside because we've had enough sun. Doing nothing on a beach all day sure is tiring. We walk back along 5th Avenue to the Residence and flop into our respective rooms. We never do go for that drink.

        ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ----------

        Trip #2: ** A Tale of Two Beach Clubs **

        Back in Cozumel we plan to go to Paradise Beach which boasts, among other things, trampolines and a climbing ice berg. We get there easily and although entrance is free, we pay 110 pesos each for the all inclusive "toy" package - snorkels, lilos, kayaks and the aforementioned bouncy things. The place is slightly more Benidorm than Uvas was a fortnight ago, and completely full of cruise ship guests in town for 6 hours. We paddle a bit but the water is murky and there are so many rocks.

        Then we have lunch - their ceasar salad comes with homemade bread sticks, parmesan and croutons, so I easily eat around the silly lettuce bits. After lunch we try to go floating but there are no floats - a few are on the sand but belong to some lardy Americans who won't let us use them. We ask the waiter for help and he tries to sell us the armbands we already bought - they're stuck round our bags to avoid tanlines. The man who took the money at reception did this, but Mr Waiter Man insists we need to wear them to go in the water. Things are not looking good, so we decide to cut our losses and leave. We are prepared to fight to get our money back but get it refunded so easily you get the feeling it is not the first time they've done it, and maybe not the first time today.

        After haggling down the price of a taxi to take us 5 mins up the road, we haul ass to Uvas where we get a different deal from last time - 100 peso entry but we can use it as bar credit. For this we can also swim in the sea and the pool, float on the floats and enjoy the beach chairs and umbrellas as well as the showers, loos etc. It is hard to believe the difference - the water here is crystal clear and there are sandbags to help you get in easily, so you don't have to walk over the few rocks. There are far fewer people too, though there are still some from a cruise ship who keep talking about who is on Ecstasy. It's not until later that we realise that this is the name of one of the Carnival ships. They drink their Pina Coladas and smoke their cigars in the water, but soon depart back to the terminal to re-board the ship.

        We order drinks and ice creams - they have the ones that come in carved out fruits, so I have a coconut one and Jenny has a lemon thing. We float out to sea, and then sit in the swimming pool for a while on the ledge, reading strategically held books. In the end they mess up our bar tab (perhaps deliberately) and claim 2 ice creams and about 7 drinks cost less than our total but they will keep the rest as a tip. This is absolutely fine since we never thought we would get change. And we like this place since they haven't made up their exchange rate like Paradise did (they said $10 or 110 Pesos, while everyone else works on 1:10).

        We head back to catch the 5pm ferry but it departs as we are queuing up to board. Luckily there is another one right behind it (despite the advertised one per hour) so we get that and are home soonish.

        ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ----------

        You can go to Cozumel for the day and not pay to enter a beach club, but everyone recommended that we take this approach since the public beaches have no facilities and are smaller than these private ones.

        Two companies currently run ferries from Playa to Cozumel and you can buy singles or returns. However, they alternate their hours (i.e. one goes at 4pm, the other goes at 5pm) so it is wiser to buy singles since you may not know what time you want to leave, and could end up waiting 1hr 55mins for a certain company if you've just missed their ferry. Tickets cost 120 pesos each way, or 240 pesos return, and therefore the only slight advantage of buying a return is that you don't have to queue up twice to buy your ticket. However I'd rather do that than risk waiting almost 2 hours.

        On board the ferries you can watch adverts for various companies in Playa and Cozumel. They also sell snacks and drinks on board.

        Ferry schedule: http://www.cozumel.net/1maps/ferry.htm

        Uvas Beach Club: http://www.playauvas.com/

        Paradise Beach: http://www.paradise-beach-cozumel.com/

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
        • More +
          04.06.2004 00:40
          Very helpful
          (Rating)
          5 Comments

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          We went to our first all inclusive resort in Mexico last year. Since then we have gone back two times and have a fourth trip scheduled. This is designed to help people who have never done the all inclusive trip by sharing what we?ve learned. My spouse was apprehensive about going to Mexico. We had gone there about 18 years ago and she got sick as a dog. We did not do an all inclusive then and eating out at various places obviously hadn?t worked well. But it also left a bad feeling about traveling there. In addition, although we have traveled extensively (both of us are million mile flyers), I generally plan the trips and we make all our own reservations. I wasn?t sure if I wanted to leave this to a travel agency. However, we were harried late last summer and needed some time off. I stumbled across an offer from Suntrips for a new resort in Cancun, the Riu Cancun. When I investigated it I found most people had a lot of good things to say about it and they had a dynamite offer for 7 days all inclusive including air, transfers, etc. for less than $800. We couldn?t pass it by so we signed up. Overall we found Mexico and the all inclusive experience to be great. The beaches and the water are fantastic (Gulf coast). The all inclusives that we have stayed at had good to great food and although they haven?t been the ?perfect? resort, I do believe the perfect resort would cost a lot more. Finally, we found what we wanted, but we did do our homework. What I find when I review what other people say is that if they are unhappy it is for one of three reasons. First, they didn?t do their homework and went somewhere that didn?t have what they were looking for. Second, they had a bad experience which colored the entire trip and they didn?t enjoy anything. Or third, their standards were not going to be met in Mexico (see my comment about the perfect resort). Some of the basics. In trave
          ling to Mexico you need a passport or a copy of your birth certificate. If you are a single parent or a grandparent taking kids to Mexico for vacation you will need a notarized letter granting you permission from the parents or the other parent to take the child to Mexico. Most all inclusive will give you a wrist band to identify you so you can get drinks, food, etc. They may have a towel card system to insure you return the towels you use on the beach. Others like the Sunscape Tulum didn?t have any of that. No wrist bands, no towel cards, etc. There were no other resorts close by, so this system was doable and worked great. There are a number of travel companies who have all inclusive offers for Mexican travel. These include Apple Vacations, Suntrips, and Funjet to name a few. I have never used Apple Vacations. I?ve used Suntrips twice and found them to be very good. But I particularly like Funjets website. It allows you to put in dates for travel and then offers you a list of the carriers who travel from your city to where you are going. So rather than being booked on Continental flight with a layover in Houston, I can pick a nonstop on Frontier to Cancun from Denver. On our last trip to Mexico, rather than buying a package from one company, we found a great deal on the hotel, found ground transportation to and from the Cancun airport and I arranged my own plane reservations. I would not recommend this to first time all inclusive travelers to Mexico. The travel companies have it down to a science and rather than have to worry about all the details, I would go with one of them. In addition, they will give you some great advice too. For instance, when you arrive in Cancun you will find just outside the immigration all kinds of nicely dress people with small booths offering to check your documents or give you information. Our flight crew told us to ignore them; they were trying to set you up for a timeshare pr
          esentation. I?m pretty sure if I hadn?t been given that advice, I would have ended up talking with them. You can look for special deals at the Travelzoo at http://dir.travelzoo.com/Vacations.asp?intCategory=55 and the Travelfleamarket at http://www.travelfleamarket.com/vacation-packages.php?category=6. In addition, Frommer?s keeps an eye out for travel deals and you can check the packages there at http://www.frommers.com/book_a_trip/deal_package/. All of these are taking the best deals being offered by a myriad of travel agencies across the country. When you review these specials many of them will seem too good to be true. And in fact many of them are. You need to do your homework. The first thing I do when I see a great offer to investigate the resort the offer is at. The best place on the web is Trip Advisor (http://www.tripadvisor.com) . Trip advisor has write ups on most of the all inclusives in Mexico as well as a huge number of hotels around the world. These write ups are by people who have stayed at the hotel and gives their opinion of the resort. If it is just Mexico or the Caribbean you are interested in, you can also find good write ups at Ron?s All Inclusive ratings http://www.ramproductions.com/survey/topres.asp?myfilt=&mode=ALL and Judy and Marie?s http://www.jmtravel.com/ . Evaluating a resort before you go Here is the way I go about evaluating a resort. I go to Trip Advisor first and scan the ratings. If they are almost all bad, I cross it off the list. You will find a number of the really good deals are for second or third rate resorts and end up not being good deals. But not all of them are. In fact, you will find some great deals on great resorts as well. If the ratings are almost all good, I specifically look at the really bad reviews to see what these people found so offensive. I believe we all have deal breakers. If we go to a resort that suffers from our deal b
          reaker, we will write a bad review. When I read these I want to see if their deal breaker is the same as mine. If not, then the resort with a lot of glowing reviews is likely to be one that I would be happy at. For instance, one of my deal breakers is loud (I mean really loud) music playing all day so you can?t enjoy the beach and the sound of the waves. If I find that in the unhappy reviews, I know I would be unhappy too at this resort. Tip #1. Find your deal breakers. You need to examine what you like and don?t like in a vacation. Think about what a perfect resort would be like. Then think of what makes it perfect. What would be the opposite of those qualities? Some of those are probably your deal breakers. Do you want to be where there is a lot of night life? Cancun is probably where you want to stay. Is a great beach really important to you? Then Playa del Carmen is a better choice than Cancun. Do you want to be relatively close to the attractions? Which attractions are you talking about? I saw a write up by someone who stayed at a resort we did in Tulum who complained it was so isolated (this is a good point for us). At the time we were at the Tulum ruins and met a man who was there with his son. He was staying in Cancun but felt it was so far from everything (he was going to Chichen Itza, Xe Hal, the Tulum ruins, etc). The Tulum resorts were not so remote for him. Food Since the resort is all inclusive, this means you will be able to eat all your meals there and I think you would want to know a little about the food service. Most all inclusives have a buffet and at least one ale carte restaurant. At some all inclusives you can eat at the ala cartes all you want. At others, you are allowed to eat at the ala cartes a limited number of times. The Riu Hotels we stayed in had two buffets (one general and one specific i.e. a steakhouse) and one or two ala carte restaurants. At the Riu Cancun
          , the ala carte restaurant wasn?t really ala carte (it had a fixed menu), but it was a sit down and be served restaurant. At the Riu Playacar the ala carte restaurants were two side by side outside restaurants, one a steak house and the other a seafood restaurant. There was a selection of perhaps 5 entrees at each restaurant with a common appetizer, salad and dessert for all the meals. At the Rius you had to sign up to get a reservation in the morning if you wanted to eat at the ala cartes. Another factor we found odd at the Riu Playacar was that you had to sign up for an early or late seating at the buffet (either 6:30 PM or 8:30 PM). This took some of the flexibility out of the meals. However, the food was good at the Rius. At the Sunscape Tulum, there was a single buffet and four ala carte restaurants. There was no set time for eating at all of the restaurants. There were no reservations taken for the ala carte restaurants, so you would go over to them and either be seated or get on a waiting list if they were full. The food at the Sunscape was terrific and was reflected that way in most of the write ups. Also, the menus at the Sunscape were great. At the Italian Restaurant, there was a choice of 6 appetizers, two soups, 6 pasta dishes, 4 meat dishes or 4 seafood dishes as entrees and 4 different desserts. Again, you need to know your deal breakers. Some people don?t like having to ?get up at the crack of dawn in order to get a reservation? at an ala carte restaurant, while others wouldn?t like the Sunscape because they might have to wait in line in the evening to get a seat at the ala cartes. I liked the flexibility of deciding in the evening to select what kind of food I felt like eating. So to me, the Sunscape system was better (but neither was a deal breaker). Tip #2. Make sure that the all inclusive that you are looking at is compatible with you regarding its food. Do you hate buffets? As people descri
          be the buffet does it sound like you would like it? Do the other restaurants serve the kind of food you like? What about reservations? What do the people evaluating the food say? Do you want to have a set time you can go to eat or would you like the flexibility of deciding that evening where you want to eat? Liquor Most all inclusive include liquor as well as food. If you see the word domestic liquor this means Mexican liquor. Other resorts (the more swanky ones) will include top shelf liquor as well. But if you want the top shelf liquor even at the swankier places you need to specifically ask for it or they will use domestic. Wine is another animal. Most include a local house wine as part of the all inclusive but will have a wine list which will cost extra for better wines. The house wines at the Rius were pretty bad. The Sunscape?s house wine was not bad. Some all inclusives will have service at the pool and or on the beach. Others will not. Most people who use poolside service tend to find it takes around 15 minutes or more to get a drink. To some people that is too long. I also found that drinking to oblivion was much more prevalent in Cancun. We took the local bus one night and a group of people got on the bus with drinks in hand and they were three or more sheets to the wind. I also saw it around the pool in Cancun. Of course, you find a younger crowd in Cancun. Tip #3. Save yourself a lot of time and hassle. Get a large insulated mug for your drinks. You can buy them at WalMart for about $5 for a 20 ounce mug. It does a couple of things for you. The glasses they use at the resorts tend to be small. Your own mug will last you a lot longer than the small glasses. Secondly, you will be the only one drinking out of it. The bartenders will wash glasses as well as fill them up. If you watch them wash it, I think you?ll feel better knowing it?s your mug. Fac
          ility The next factor is the facility. There are a number of resorts in Mexico with a great wow factor for the facilities. The Riu Cancun had gorgeous common areas. The Riu Playacar?s wow factor was the beach. The Sunscape Tulum didn?t really have a wow factor on the facilities, but I found it charming. There are a number of resorts where the ground and the pool are take your breath away beautiful. Want a swim up bar? Check to see if they have one. Some resorts have posh rooms. Want a Jacuzzi in your room? See if it is offered. If any of these things are important to you check them out. Tip #4 Again at Trip Advisor there is a link at the top of the page to pictures of the hotel. It will give you some idea of the wow factors. Rooms The room is a factor you want to consider too. You will read a lot of people complain about how hard the beds are. We?ve been to three resorts and all of them had really hard beds. I believe that is just the kind of beds they have in Mexico. Check to see the facilities in the room. The Rius didn?t have any coffee making in the rooms, but they did have four bottles of hard liquor in a dispenser on the wall (I guess that?s if you need a drink before the bars open at 10 AM). All of the places we?ve stayed had safes in the room. The Rius had a key type safe while the Sunscape had a combination safe. Riu Cancun had a bathtub, Riu Playacar had a shower only, while the Sunscape had a shower only in the regular rooms and a bathtub in the junior suites (this was a deal breaker for someone at Tripadvisor who got a regular room, but wanted a bathtub). The Rius had no clock in the room. All the resorts we stayed at had cable TV with a good number of English language channels. Another complaint you will see is the smell. There is a musty smell in the tropics from the water and the drains in the rooms. We smelled it at all the resorts
          , but read a lot about it at the Playacar. In fact, when I got back from the Riu Playacar I had to not recommend it because of the very strong odor in the rooms there. Tip #5. If you keep reading about a problem mentioned by a lot of people, you may want to reconsider using that resort. We all have our sensitivities, but if it is mentioned by a lot of people, it is probably more than one or two people who are overly sensitive. Size The size of the resort is something that is a big factor for us. We don?t like huge resorts. They have more facilities, but more people competing for them. The Riu Playacar was a small facility but there were three sister resorts sharing the beach (a big wonderful beach, but crowded with about 2000 rooms in four resort). Sunscape Tulum was a small resort with only 278 rooms. We found it easier to meet people and you got to know more people at a smaller resort. So what size resort are you comfortable with? 200 rooms? 300 rooms? 500 rooms? More? Entertainment A big factor for many people is the animation staff and the activities at the hotel. Many all inclusives have activities by the pool all day. These may include water polo, trivia, exercise, Spanish lessons, dance lessons, etc. Some people want music and activities by the pool all day. Others (like myself) want any activities to be unobtrusive and to hear the ocean not the loud music. Another form of entertainment is nonmotorized sports equipment. See what they have. Many offer boogie boards, sail boards, kayaks, catamaran sail boats, paddleboats. Many resorts offer these at no expense. Some have a time limitation per day during which there is no charge to use the equipment. Most all inclusive also have a show at night. These vary in quality. Some can be very professional, while others tend to be more amateurish. Is this important to you? Large resorts tend to have better an
          imation shows at night. Topless Bathing You will find that most places on the Atlantic Coast in Mexico will have some topless sunbathers. It tends to be more prevalent in the Riviera Maya than Cancun, because there are more European guests. If you are taking kids, this is something to you will need to deal with. Children Being in my 50s I don?t have little children to worry about. There are adult only resorts as well as family resorts. There is even a couple of adult only rated X resorts in the Cancun area. If you have kids you want to find out about the children programs, any restaurant restrictions, etc. the resort you are looking at might have, etc. You will read about them at the resources I gave you earlier in this report. For instance, Sunscape Tulum was a family oriented resort but children under 12 weren?t allowed in the Italian restaurant. They had an all day daycare and children?s club, but there was an additional charge if you wanted a babysitter at night. I actually did read on one of the Mexico forums where some grandparents were looking to take their grandchild to Mexico. The advice from one person on the board was to take the child to Disneyland. But I see a lot of reports where the kids love the resort in Mexico. Day Trips There are numerous daytrips you can take from Cancun and the Riviera Maya. We went to Chichen Itza and Tulum. Both are Mayan ruins. Chichen Itza is a large city with some very interesting ruins. We climbed up the Pyramid there and saw an observatory that looked a lot like our observatories today. Tulum is an absolutely beautiful site. It is smaller and has a number of stone buildings spread out. But the site, by the sea is what really makes it memorable. It is very hot there and people recommend you wear bathing suits under your shorts so you can take a dip and cool off (not a bad idea). In addition there are a number of ecolog
          ical parks that are very nice for the family. Your tour agency who sold you the trip will also try to sell you some of these trips. In fact, Sun Trip had a representative at our hotel each day to do exactly that. I had gotten a Cancun Card http://www.cancuncare.com/2_for_1_cancun_discount_card.htm which got me some good prices on some of these trips so I didn?t use them. I have read that some people have gotten better prices from local tour groups than the one they came to Mexico with. You just need to decide if it is worth it to you to try to find a better deal, or just take the convenient way. You can go on line and simply type in day trips Cancun and get a list of companies that offer them. Here is a link to one, but it is no better or worse than many others. http://www.yucatanres.com/aCancunDayTrips.htm Final advice Mexico is a treasure. The beaches are beautiful and you get a lot for your money. The Mexican people are very hard working. All inclusives advertise they include all tips too. I think tipping is a great thing to do. I?ve found tipping about $15 days will help a lot of people. Does it affect the service you get? Probably yes. Not directly, that is they won?t ignore you if you don?t tip, but they do remember you if you do. For instance, the bartenders tend to remember what you are drinking and will ask if you want the usual. We had the same waiter at the Italian Restaurant at the Sunscape Tulum every night we went to the Italian restaurant. We were talking about getting after dinner coffee, but decided not to order any. Our waiter heard us discussing it and ended up bringing us on his own a pretty good coffee drink. Don?t forget the maids. Do go a visit some of the Mexican ruins. Would you go to Egypt and not visit the Pyramids? We have Pyramids in the Western Hemisphere and you don?t want to miss them. Bring an umbrella. During the rainy season it wil
          l come in handy and during the sunny season it will shade you from the sun on your trip to the Mexican ruins. Learn to bargain. At the various markets, the asking price is just that, the asking price. Bargaining is a time honored tradition in many societies. Learn a little Spanish. Gracias and a few other words will help you a great deal. Use the collectivos. Some of the people at the Sunscape said they felt isolated. For $2 per person they could get a ride in a collective to Playa del Carmen. Collectivos are white vans than go from Tulum to Playa del Carmen or Playa to Cancun about every 10 minutes. They are in good condition and have an air conditioning system that works well. It?s a good way to get around. Finally, you are on vacation so enjoy yourself. I?ve read reviews where something unfortunate happened to the person and it seemed to color their entire trip and took the joy out of it. Don?t let one bad thing ruin your trip.

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments