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Hiroshima (Japan)

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City: Hiroshima / Country: Japan / World Region: Asia

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    6 Reviews
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      23.08.2010 05:30

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      A few months ago I went traveling around Japan. My final stop before returning to Tokyo was Hiroshima. Traveling outside Tokyo was a big culture shock. Everyone in Japan tends to move to the big cities such as Tokyo or Osaka to find work leaving the rural areas and small cities empty with nothing but farmers and retired people.

      Upon arriving in Hiroshima, my first impression was rather neutral. There's just nothing significantly interesting especially when compared to Tokyo. The town is relatively small, the city center is only 2 kilometers from the main train station. The city center was completely destroyed by the a-bomb so everything has been rebuilt. There's a tram to get you around the city center, however since it's so small one would be better off walking. There's also the genbaku dome and museum which is an interesting place to visit.

      Overall this town seems to be very haunted by it's past despite having occurred over 60 years ago. No one wants to seem to live here and there are constant reminders that this city suffered from an atomic bomb.

      Culturally and historically one should definitely visit Hiroshima however I don't recommend staying there for more than a few nights.

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      27.03.2010 15:24
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      If you can afford to visit the west of Japan, you must come here

      Most people know Hiroshima as the location of the terrible atomic bomb explosion in 1945. As you would expect, the history of the attack along with the consequences are well documented in this city, but far from being a depressing place to visit, it is quite the opposite. Hiroshima is now a modern, thriving city based across a beautiful river network and is well worth a visit if you can afford time to explore western Japan.

      As with most major Japanese cities, Hiroshima lies on the main railway network line and can be easily accessed from other major cities csuch a s Kyoto, Osaka or Kobe. For our visit, we opted for the tourist only Japan National Rail Pass and used the shinkansen (bullet train) for speedy comfortable travel. A tram network is run in the city itself and provides excellent, affordable travel to whatever part of the city you wish to visit. Personally, we got a tram to our hotel and were able to visit most places on foot.

      Most "sights" in Hiroshima revolve around the bomb blast. The A-bomb dome is certainly worth a visit as this is the remains of the building where the bomb exploded directly above. Whereas the rest of the city was virtually levelled, the dome remians as a harrowing reminder of events that fateful day.

      The Peace Memorial Park and Museum are also must see locations. The park contains memorials and a cenotaph with all the names of the known victims of the bomb. Also present are the Flames of Peace which burn until the final nuclear weapon has been destroyed. The museum itself shows the history before and after the bomb blast and can be a welcome air conditioned alternative on a hot day! As a warning, this is not for the faint hearted as some of the images inside are quite graphic. The exhibition certainyl doesn't pull any punches with what the consequences of war were.

      As a modern city, Hiroshima boasta a number of excellent hotels and eating options. Various river cruises can also be taken on the expansive network of waterways surrounding the city. Overall, I can strongly recommend Hiroshima as at least a one day visit.

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      24.11.2006 19:14
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      Take time out to reflect on the tragic aftermath of the A Bomb

      HIROSHIMA

      I am sure everyone has heard of Hiroshima as the place where the Atomic Bomb went off in August 1945, ending WW2.

      On a visit to Japan I felt I had to go and see for myself what Hiroshima is like. We travelled by ferry from Shikoku island but you can also travel by train from Tokyo or wherever you happen to be staying.

      Hiroshima is a modern city, its towering buildings are a delight to wander around. Sixteen storeys is nothing for a department store here! There are speciality shops, specialising in Japanese souvenirs and there are three major shopping centres so if you are a shopaholic you are sure to enjoy Hiroshima!

      Oysters are a speciality food of the city as the waters of the Inland sea are a good source for them, along with other kinds of fish.

      Hiroshima has rebuilt its industry, now highly valued, not only in Japan, but internationally. They produce cars, bridge constructions, containers and cranes to name but a few.

      Hiroshima is steeped in tradition and customs, and throughout the year there are various festivals. Perhaps the most moving of these takes place on 6th August every year when there is the Peace Memorial Ceremony at the Peace Park and paper lanterns are floated along the rivers.

      I will say more about the Peace Gardens later, but first of all want to give a mention to other tourist attractions in Hiroshima. There is a castle, called the “carp castle” which was reconstructed in 1958 after the original was burnt in the atomic bombing fires. This is now a museum of local history and is open daily, except in the New Year period. Do check opening times prior to visiting. The price when I was there several months ago was around 400 yen.

      There is also a museum of contemporary art, a zoological park, botanical gardens and a temple. However, I did not have time to visit these so will now move onto the Peace Park.

      The first thing I want to mention is the A Bomb Dome, this is all that remains of the devastating attack on the city and it is left as a reminder of the damage caused. Its skeletal remains look stark in comparison to the other modern buildings surrounding it, all that remains is a windowless concrete building that was once the workplace of many local people.

      As you walk through the Peace Park you see the eternal flame flickering in front of the Memorial Cenotaph, a solemn promise that it will never be extinguished until all nuclear weapons are abolished.

      The Memorial Cenotaph is an archway underneath which is a stone chest containing the names of all the victims of the A Bomb. Silhouetted through the arch is the Peace Dome and people come here to pray and lay flowers in memory of those who perished. The Cenotaph was dedicated on 6th August 1952.

      A stone hewn from Ben Nevis, has a place in the Peace Park and this was donated by the people of Scotland in 1972 as a symbol of the quest for world peace.

      In another section of the Peace Park is a huge bell, the Peace Bell. I stood underneath this with a Japanese man and together we struck the bell. A relative of mine was a POW in Japan and although he left a diary which revealed the hatred he had for the Japanese and the suffering he endured, I felt I should make an effort to help achieve better cultural understanding.

      A plaque by the bell reads “We dedicate this bell as a symbol of Hiroshima aspiration. Let all nuclear arms and wars be gone and the nations live in true peace. May it ring to all corners of the earth to meet the ear of every man.” The bell was put there in 1964.

      Another feature of the Peace Park are the almost bus shelter like structures which house paper cranes. The crane is a symbol of hope to the Japanese and a young girl, Sadako, who was a victim of the bombings thought if she could make 1,000 origmai paper cranes, this would make her well again. Sadly the little girl did not recover and only made about 700 cranes before she died from radiation poisoning. However, since then in her memory, and the memory of the other victims, schoolchildren and other groups make tiny paper cranes out of origami paper and string them together into a kind of garland and they are hung in the shelters at the Peace Park. On my first visit to Hiroshima several years ago the garlands were just laid on the walls, but I was told on my last visit that shelters had been erected to protect them as someone had set fire to them when they were on the walls. They are now displayed in the shelters in the daytime but locked away in the evenings. This struck me as particularly sad that someone could stoop to such vandalism in the Peace Park.

      I must point out here that a visit to the Peace Park was very emotional, it is very tranquil, hardly any noise, it has even been said that no birds fly over the park and I must admit I didn’t see any. The whole visit brought home to me the effects of the bombing and made me realise that even now, 60 years or so afterwards, people are still suffering from its effects.

      There are elderly people who are still suffering from the physical effects of the radiation and as I walked around the park I saw a group of American visitors being given a talk by someone. These were elderly men and women, all with tears in their eyes, as they listened to the interpreter relating the tragic story of the old Japanese lady sitting in her wheelchair.

      After the Peace Park we wandered into the Memorial Museum. Again, I found this very emotional. Remnants of children’s clothes and their school bags were on display, showing what remained of them as they made their way to school on that morning when the bomb was dropped at around 8 am. A doorstep shows the radiation burnt shadow of someone, there are fragments of buildings, household artefacts and many photographs of the damage.

      It was truly a very moving experience to go here. I would like to see all those people today who want to start wars being made to go and see this place, it just might make them think again about the horrific effects a war can have.

      Nevertheless, let me end of a less morbid note. Hiroshima is not just about the Peace Park and Memorial Museum, there is a lot more to see here. There are lots of good restaurants, including fast food places like MacDonalds, and I highly recommend you visit the Memorial Park first then spend some time browsing in the shops before having a relaxing meal. Otherwise, you just might find you feel depressed for the rest of your visit. Even writing this review has brought back to me the sadness I felt on my visit, imagine how bad it must be for those who lived through the bombing. They will never forget, neither should we.

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        20.05.2002 16:47
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        Hiroshima is the capital city of the Hiroshima Prefecture (Hiroshima-ken) which is in western Honshu. This Japanese city is famous for having suffered the first atomic bomb on 6 August 1945. Since then it has become a city devoted to peace and the eradication of all forms of mass destruction. More personally for me it is the city where my old housemate teaches English to Japanese school children. This year I visited Japan and stayed with my friend in Kure, a small town forty minutes by bus or train from Hiroshima. For me Hiroshima was my impression of Japan, so I will talk a little about Japan in general too. (So be warned, its quite a long one!) GETTING THERE I came into Narita airport which is about an hour by Express train from Tokyo. I then changed and got on the Shinkansen, or Bullet train, destined for Hakata. The Shinkansen is not cheap, but for me this was still going to work out cheaper than flying into Osaka airport. If you do fly in to Osaka you may well still choose to take the Shinkansen to Hiroshima. All the signs are clearly marked in both Japanese and English which makes it fairly easy to find which platform to go to. The one problem I did find is that the number of stops is listed on the departure boards along with the platform number. (In fact, for a little while I was standing on the wrong platform!) The information printed on your ticket is both useful and important to read. When you buy your ticket on the Shinkansen you reserve you seat, and it is very important that you sit in the seat allocated for you. (As in the UK there is a separate car and seat number.) The useful piece of information is the departure and arrival time. I find it very easy on long train journeys to forget when I am going to arrive. The Shinkansen was a welcome resting point after a long flight. Not only is the train non-smoking and mobile-free. (Well, they ask you to turn them to vibrate.) It is also very spacious and
        comfortable. I was able to rest my backpack against the seat in front whilst having room for my legs and was able to recline my seat. The map on the back of the seat also shows you where the toilets, vending machines, telephones and bins are located. If, like me, you have seen traditional pictures of Japan depicting mountains, that suddenly rise from expanses of flat ground, painted in bluish grey shades, and thought they were stylised depictions, then think again! The Shinkansen gave me a chance to quickly see the beauty and changeability of the Japanese countryside, and the truth in those beautiful pictures. PLACES TO VISIT The Peace Museum Cost: 50 Yen (I think?!) This Museum really brings home the atom bombs legacy to Hiroshima and raises a nasty question. If they did have to drop the atom bomb on Hiroshima (which is contentious in itself) then why did they wait only three days until they dropped the bomb on Nagasaki? Surely it would have made more sense to wait and see what kind of effect it had upon the Japanese Government and decide whether the second bomb was needed? The first part of the Museum is devoted to putting the bomb in context, and is mainly facts and figures. The Museum is careful to state that the Japanese were far from blameless in the war, and is simply trying to act as a reminder that this kind of destruction should never happen again. It is here that I discovered that every time a test of a weapon capable of mass destruction is made, the Mayor of Japan will write to that country asking it to stop testing. This section also includes two 3D maps, one showing Hiroshima before, and one showing Hiroshima afterwards - this will shock you, especially when you think of the people who would have been where the buildings stood. The second half of the museum is devoted to the effect on the individual people. Clothing worn by victims at the time of the blast, roof tiles, glass
        bottles melted by the heat of the blast, pieces of glass that were either removed or rejected by the body decades later are all accompanied by a few lines that sum up what happened to that person. It is incredible to be standing before a child's rusty tricycle trying to stop yourself from crying - I defy anyone not to be moved. The Peace Gardens After the Museum we were both quite shell shocked. We had decided that the best idea would be to lighten our mood by going around the beautiful Peace Gardens. Due to the fact that Japan is so over-populated there are very few parks, and this one contains many reminders that this should not happen again. - The Eternal Flame This burns as an everlasting reminder of the effects of the bomb. - The Peace Bell This bell is rung on the anniversary, the 6 August 1945 at 8.15 am, when the bomb exploded 580 meters above the city. - The Children's Memorial I found this to be one of the most memorable memorials that we visited in the Peace Gardens. In the Museum you will read about the story of a little girl who developed leukaemia years after the bomb was dropped. This little girl made more than a thousand origami cranes in order that she could get better. (It is believed that if you make a thousand cranes your wish will come true.) Unfortunately her wish did not come true and she died, but she became a symbol for the children of the bomb. Children from all over the world send cranes to Hiroshima to fill glass boxes surrounding a stone with a bronze crane sitting on it. The A-Bomb Dome In 1967, the old 'Hiroshima Prefectural Exhibition Hall' was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It is one of the few buildings which managed to withstand the blast to any degree. The building was set alight, killing thirty people inside, but the shell remains with twisted metal inside and the remnants of the dome. It is a testament to
        its architecture that so much of it survived. The Castle (Hiroshima-jo) Cost: 300 yen I have to admit to that I found this very difficult to find. You will first come upon a building with wooden floors where you have to take your shoes off, and put on slippers. This building has a wooden model of what the Castle once looked like and many beautiful pictures on the walls. Confused by the lack of English I almost walked away but an attendant asked me if I had seen the Castle. I had to carry on through a square and a car park, past a Buddhist Shrine with a shop, (inquiring en route) until finally I found the Castle - do not fear it is there! (Strangely enough, this is the only time I couldn't find enough signs!) This building was rebuilt in 1958 to look like part of the old Castle, and now houses a small museum. The first couple of floors are the most interesting, dealing with how the area came to become populated, and how the city came to play an important part in the Prefecture. I would definitely advise you to visit this museum before visiting Miyajima and the Itsukushima Sinto Shrine, as it helps to put them in context. Miyajima Island and the Itsukushima Sinto Shrine This island was once a cultural centre and houses many attractive shrines, the most famous of which is the Itsukushima Shrine which stands in the water at the edge of the island, at high tide it almost looks as if it is floating on the water. In order to get to the island you will need to take a train and a ferry. The ferry, conveniently comes in directly facing the shrine, and gives a nice opportunity to look at it from the water. Like any shrine in Japan, you should use the water and bowls provided to pour water over your hands before you enter the area. (It is better if you can get the person you are visiting with to do this for you, because in Japan you are meant to consider of other people and do things for them without being ask
        ed.) - The mountain (I'm sorry I can't remember the proper name.) Although there is a cable car that goes up this gorgeous mountain, I would suggest that you walk up the other side to reach the top. We originally intended to catch this, but by mistake walked all the way to the top, and the views we saw were well worth the two hour walk up, and forty-five minute walk down. Do be careful not to leave it too late though, because we had heard of some people who had difficulty picking their way down in the dark! Food Yaki okomomiyaki is a dish specific to Hiroshima, (around about 400 yen in price), which is made from noodles, egg, cabbage, pancake, bacon and a special sauce. You can buy this in the Shikenchi Plaza building, behind the Parco department store. Be careful though, this meal is very filling! Sushi - when in Japan this has to be tried, and I thoroughly enjoyed it (apart from two pieces). The best idea is to go for a set meal, these started at 1,000 yen where we ate, but we went for the 1,500 yen set meal. A small warning, in case you don't know - sushi contains a green paste which tastes like strong horseradish, so if you don't like horseradish ask for it to be removed. Don't bother buying Western food, it is expensive (3,400 yen in some places) and your in Japan for goodness sake! Hiroshima in General Hiroshima does have a couple of bars which are run by English speakers due to the number of English teachers, like my friend, and I would advise you to try out a Karaoke bar whilst you are there. (I'm afraid that I can only advise one which is in Kure which is called 'Memories' - if you do go in say 'Hi' to Kirsty!) Another warning though, drinking is also expensive in Japan! - Travel in Hiroshima I found all my travel to be nothing but efficient. Hiroshima is connected by trams, trains and buses. One small note for the buse
        s is that when you get on you must take a ticket (as you do on the tram) which has a number on it. On large boards at the front of the bus are numbers with prices under them. When you get off the bus you should pay the amount under the number on your ticket. Although there are change machines, I would advise you to take lots of change with you as the Japanese do expect you to be quick when paying. Japan in General Provided you nod (a greeting and sign of respect in Japan) to everyone, the people are infinitely helpful. There is a great urge to understand what is being said which is sorely lacking in the UK. Although I would suggest that you take a good phrase book with the phrases written in the Japanese script as well as written phonetically in English, these basic words might be quite useful: Arigato gozaimasu - thank you Sumimasen - excuse me Egoi - English Hai - yes As well as being very forgiving of the English not knowing their language, I found the Japanese to be incredibly helpful although you have to expect to be laughed at a little or questioned about England a great deal if they are English speaking. If they see you having problems they will volunteer help, but the laughter disguises their shyness along with showing their amusement at the silly foreigner - I would much rather be laughed at then have people scowl and dismiss me as a stupid foreigner as I think we are occasionally prone to do. As you can tell, I thoroughly enjoyed my visit to Japan, although it was far too short. I am intending on going back to visit my friend again, although it may be a few years before I can afford to go back again. Japan is expensive, but Hiroshima has made me want to see more - Tokyo next time maybe? I do hope that I might have convinced you that there is plenty to see in this historic city!

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          04.07.2001 21:23
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          Hiroshima is perhaps most famous because it was the first place that an Atomic Bomb was dropped on a civilian population ever. The bomb, sickly named Little Boy, was dropped on August 6th, 1945 at 8:45 in the morning, by the American Bomber, Enola Gay (Cue crap 80's pop song by OMD). This exploded 580 meters above the city and releasing the equivalent of 15,000 tones of TNT. This killed over 140,000 people, most instantly however other did die of cancers or radiation sickness within a year of the bomb exploding. I visited Hiroshima, as I wanted to find out the truth about what happened that day and also I wanted to see what the city was like today. (Its true what they say about the history books being written by the victors) Most foreign tourists visit Hiroshima to visit the Peace Memorial and the Peace Memorial Museum. Call it a sick, or perhaps a morbid fascination but we do want to see the devastation cause by such a powerful weapon. We’ll get back to this later. Hiroshima is to the south of the island of Honshu but not as far south as the island of Kyushu. To get to Hiroshima, from Osaka it’s a 75 minute train ride if you get the “Nizomi” (Super fast bullet train (300kph+) or 105 minutes if you take the “Hikari”. From Tokyo, it’s a 3 hour 55 minutes on the “Nozomi” and 4 hours 50 minutes and the “Hikari”. If you can get the Nizomi its well worth the extra money, but you might have to book in advance. If you wish to drive, its 882km from Tokyo, (Don’t bother in Japan). This would take a very long time believe me. Plus the motorways have tollgates. On arrival in Hiroshima, you don’t notice anything different about the city. It now looks like most other Japanese cities, Tall building dominate the skyline and there are buildings as far as the eye can see. We stayed in the Hotel Granvia Hiroshima, which is ideally suited a
          s its right next to the train station. Be warned though if you’re a smoker. The hotel is nearly all no smoking. Just one floor is smoking. If you buy the Japanese rail pass, before you go to Japan (More in my review of Japan in General). You can get discounts if you stay at Japanese Railways hotels sometimes as much as 40% off the normal price. The transportation in Hiroshima is superb. They have a extensive Street Car (tram) network which is both cheap and reliable however it can get busy at rush hours.. They also have a very good bus service as well. Coupled with the train system, which can get you to some parts of the city very quickly. Buses and trams are the cheapest transport, starting at 200 yen (£1.14) and trains and taxis being more expensive. As we only spent three days in Hiroshima I didn’t see a great deal in the city but what I did see was the following. Hiroshima Castle. Although the castle has been rebuilt after the A bomb of 1945 the building is almost identical to the original castle which was originally built in 1589. The castle is really a museum of the history of the City of Hiroshima and the history of the castle. The castle is a truly magnificent building and I could not but stand in awe of its size and the design of the building. Like most Japanese castles the main building is built on a large stone base, by large I mean around 30 feet high and then the castle itself is a wooden structure made of many layers. If you are going to visit, this or any other Japanese castle I might suggest you wear decent socks (Clean and without holes) as you will be asked to remove your footwear and put on a pair of special slippers to protect the wooden floor. The castle is fairly easy to get too, from Hiroshima station, Catch the no.1 or no.6 street car to Kamita-cho, then it’s about 10 minutes walk to the castle. It took my wife and I about 2 hours to walk round the castle, but we took lo
          ads of pictures and stopped to look at different things quite a few times. Miyajima Island http://www.hiroshima-cdas.or.jp/miyajima/english/top2.htm This is a small island about 30 minutes local train journey outside of Hiroshima. You will have to get the ferry across to the island; this takes about 15 minutes and passes the Otorii (Grand gate), which stands in the water on the sea front of the island. Upon arriving on the island you have to walk, there are few taxis and there expensive, or you can hire a bike. The main features of the island are the Itsukushima Shrine, which is a temple that has stood on Miyajima since 593 although its has been damaged by sea and fire many times. The temple stands directly on the sea front and at high tide the waters do actually lap around the many piers of the temple. The island is also home to Senjokaku (meaning “hall of a thousand mats”) (note: all room sizes are measured in tatami mats as these are a standard size of 3 x 6). This is a large wooden building with the shrine located in the middle of the hall. What I found especially wonderful was all the old, very old pictures, which hang from the ceiling. Some of these are so old they are barely visible. Next to the Senjokaku is a five story pagoda. This has to be one of the most beautiful pagodas I’ve seen in japan. There are lots of other temples on Miyajima, as well as Mount Misen, from which you can see the bay of Hiroshima, but its a trek to reach the summit though. There is also an Aquarium here. Okay back to Hiroshima itself and the Peace Memorial Park and Museum. Firstly If you are going to the Park and Museum, make sure you have a very open mind as there are something’s in the museum that aren’t for the faint hearted. Firstly, the Park. Located just south east of the main JR train station, the park is about 15 minutes tram ride (get a tram heading
          for Koi, Eba or Miyajima, and get off at the “Genbaku-Dome-Mae” (Meaning Atomic Bomb Dome). Getting the bus bound for Yoshijima will pass the Peace Museum; just get off at “Heiwa-Kinen-Koen” My recommendation is to get off at “Genbaku-Dome-mae” as this is where the old town hall still stands in the ruined state from the dropping of the A-Bomb. This is close to where the bomb was detonated, directly overhead. This prevented the building from being blown to pieces as the blast hit the building from directly above. The building is in almost the same condition as it was after the bomb, although minor structural pieces have been added to stop the building falling down. The dome has been designated as a World heritage site and therefore the city of Hiroshima are charged with making sure that the building stays standing forever, no matter what the cost. This has been done as a symbol of Atomic war and everlasting peace. The area around the Atomic Dome is very peaceful, there are gardens everywhere and only pedestrians are allowed, even cyclists get off and push their bikes through the park. At the other end of the park, just less than a mile away is the memorial museum. This is one of the most disturbing places I have ever visited as it tells the story of the bomb, the dropping of the bomb, the aftermath and the long-term effects on the city and the people of Hiroshima. What I was not ready for was as soon as you walk in you are presented with two large maps, a before and after the bomb to a scale of 2 kilometers. The before is littered with thousands of buildings and the after is just a black, charred mess with very few concrete buildings standing. Although it’s just a map if really gets the point across. The museum is on several levels and walking round will take a few hours. Be warned there are a few exhibits which will make you skin crawl and other stories of people who lived and d
          ied at the time of the bomb will bring tears to your eyes. This is well worth a visit, as you will not see things like this anywhere else, apart from Nagasaki (which is worse). Overall, I loved Hiroshima. It’s a new city with a long history with lots to see and do. The people can be a bit stand offish, and don’t be surprised if you get asked “American Jin?” (Are you American). Just say “iie, ingirisu jin desu” (Pronounced “e eh in gi ri su jin des), meaning No, I’m English. You’ll see any animosity disappear. There is still tension between the Japanese and Americans in some parts of Japan. http://www.tourism.city.hiroshima.jp/english/level2/h.html © copyright 2001, Mike Porter.

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            11.07.2000 19:21
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            I was stirred from sleep just after midnight to find a figure in a grey uniform standing over me. He apologized for disturbing me, but he had to lock up. A Japanese station was very unlike one in Germany, where authoritative little Fuhrers would kick a traveller to consciousness, demand a passport and maybe ask questions later. They would never apologize in a Bahnhoff. "Where are you going please?" I was asked politely. "Hiroshima in the morning," I answered, still coming to terms with the blue seats of my environment. "Shinkansen, seesh-a-cloch." I thanked him for the information, and bowed. Shinkansen travel was not like normal rail travel. There were no backpacks on my train, and short of a video screen and audio-channels in the arm-rest, we could have been airborne; the ride was so smooth and quite. I was waiting for the oxygen demonstration and felt like checking under my seat for the life jacket. Yellow and green patterned fields flashed by. Blue tiled roofs lasted a little longer on the retina, but the bent over field-hands were nothing more than a fleeting curiosity. The sky was was blue, with only a passing cloud or two. I would compose the frame, then black; another tunnel. The periods of dark through the volcanic masses were frequent, but we were never thrust in to the world of glowing red dots, that on an Italian carriage of smokers would seem like beacons; indicating a face a few feet away from you. On a Shinkansen, the lights stayed on. Hiroshima: It was clear day on 6th August, 1945, when three B29's approached Hiroshima at about 28,000 feet. The plane had made a 158 degree turn and was about 10 miles north of the target at the moment of impact. The effects of the blast on property and human live as portrayed in the exhibition at the Peace Memorial Museum serve as a reminder to the extreme horrors that should never
            be inflicted on a population again. It is estimated that the total deaths caused by the single A-bomb from 6th August to the end of December, 1945, amounted to approximately 140,000. The structure of the former Industrial Promotion Hall is the only ruined building allowed to stand; it's skeletal dome has become the symbol of the destruction. No one should visit Japan without taking a moment to quietly contemplate, in Hiroshima.

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            "The Japanese city of Hiroshima (広島市) is the capital of Hiroshima Prefecture, and the largest city in the Chūgoku region of western Honshū, the largest of Japan's islands. It is most known throughout the world as the first city in history subjected to nuclear warfare with the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in World War II."